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International Chamber of Shipping

12 Carthusian Street London EC1M 6EZ Tel +44 20 7417 8844 Fax +44 20 7417 8877 ics@marisec.org www.marisec.org www.shippingfacts.com

29 April 2010
ThisCircularanditsattachments(ifany)areconfidentialtotheintendedrecipientandmaybe privileged.IfyouarenottheintendedrecipientyoushouldcontactICS/ISFandmustnotmake anyuseofit.

To:

CHEMICAL CARRIERS PANEL

CC(10)03

Copy:

All Full and Associate Members (for information) Marine Committee Oil Tanker Panel

GUIDELINES FOR TANK ENTRY PROCEDURES ON CHEMICAL TANKERS Action required: Members are invited to contribute to the further development of draft guidance developed by IPTA regarding tank entry procedures on chemical tankers with the aim of producing joint industry guidelines. The ICS report on FP 54 (MC(10)45 noted that: The Sub-Committee agreed that the issue of safe tank entry was linked to consideration of IG requirements and that the draft guideline submitted by IPTA (FP 54/17/1) was important and should be considered in the context of the revision of resolution A.864(20) on Recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ships, and recommended that the entire annex be referred to both the DSC and BLG Sub-committees for comments, taking into account its applicability to all tankers. It may be noted that within the IMO correspondence group (CG) on enclosed space entry, participants have differing positions regarding the inclusion of such ship specific guidance in the amended resolution. Following discussion with IPTA, it has consequently been agreed that irrespective of further consideration of the document within the Organisation, ICS and IPTA would together further consider the draft guidelines with the intention of developing an agreed guideline for circulation within the industry and possible inclusion in the next edition of the Tanker Safety Guide (Chemicals), a review of which was advised in CC(10)02.

International Chamber of Shipping Limited. Registered in England No. 2532887 at the above address

Members are invited to seek expert comment on the draft guidelines developed by IPTA and forward these to the undersigned. It is intended that further development of the document will produce guidelines that provide effective generic tank entry guidelines for chemical tankers. Further consideration of the draft guidelines within IMO and a decision regarding their possible inclusion in the resolution A.864(20) will guide how ICS/IPTA promulgate the outcome of this work, although a joint circular is in any case anticipated. Once circulated the guidelines would provide an effective basis for the development of individual company and ship specific guidelines based on a unified industry wide approach. The annex to FP 54/17/1 is also attached in MS Word format and members may find that comment can be made effectively using the track change facility. John Murray, Secretary to the Panel

-2 CC(10)03 - Guidelines for tank entry procedures on chemical tankers.doc

INTERNATIONAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION

E
FP 54/17/1 22 January 2010 Original: ENGLISH

SUB-COMMITTEE ON FIRE PROTECTION 54th session Agenda item 17

REVISION OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ENTERING ENCLOSED SPACES ABOARD SHIPS Draft guidance for tank entry on chemical tankers Submitted by the International Parcel Tankers Association (IPTA) SUMMARY Executive summary: Strategic direction: High-level action: Planned output: Action to be taken: Related documents: This document provides an example of tank entry procedures for chemical tankers 5.2 5.2.3 Paragraph 5 FP 54/17; DSC 14/INF.9, DSC 14/22; STW 41/WP.7; FP 53/23, FP 53/5/4, FP 53/5/5, FP 53/6; MSC 81/8/1 and MSC 81/INF.8

1 FP 53 agreed that the fitting of appropriate inert gas systems to new oil tankers of less than 20,000 tonnes deadweight and new chemical tankers carrying low-flash point cargoes would minimize the risk of fires and explosions. If the application of inert gas were to be mandated for chemical tankers, this would lead to a significant increase in the use of nitrogen and the associated risks in relation to cargo tank entry. 2 In document DSC 14/INF.9, MAIIF revealed that there have been at least 101 enclosed space incidents, resulting in 93 deaths and 96 injuries, since the adoption, in November 1997, of the Recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ships (resolution A.864(20)). 3 In view of the continued concern over enclosed space incidents, IPTA considers that if the application of inert gas were to be mandated for chemical tankers, the increased operational hazards associated with entry into cargo tanks previously inerted with nitrogen would justify the development of specific guidelines for tank entry on chemical tankers. 4 In annex 1, IPTA offers an example of chemical tanker tank entry procedures that might be used as a basis for the development of such guidelines.
For reasons of economy, this document is printed in a limited number. Delegates are kindly asked to bring their copies to meetings and not to request additional copies.

I:\FP\54\17-1.doc

FP 54/17/1 Action requested of the Sub-Committee

-2-

5 The Sub-Committee is invited to consider the above and the draft guidelines, as set out in the annex, and take action as appropriate. ***

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FP 54/17/1 ANNEX DRAFT GUIDELINES ON TANK ENTRY FOR CHEMICAL TANKERS 1 PURPOSE

The purpose of these Guidelines is to describe the procedures and minimum precautions, which are to be followed when personnel intend to enter a tank, in order to reduce the risk of poisoning by toxic gases or asphyxiation due to lack of oxygen, particularly after inerting of tanks by Nitrogen. 2 USE OF NITROGEN

2.1 Nitrogen is a colourless and odourless gas that can cause oxygen deficiency in confined spaces, and at exhaust openings on deck, during purging of tanks and void spaces. 2.2 Nitrogen (N2) is classified as a simple asphyxiate, meaning that it will displace oxygen in high concentrations and create an oxygen deficient (< 21%) atmosphere without any significant physiological effects. Breathing is stimulated and controlled by carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the lungs. As the CO2 level increases, the brain sends a message to increase respiration. When the CO2 level drops, the rate of respiration will also decrease in order to maintain the proper balance. 2.3 Everyone should understand that one deep breath of 100% N2 will be fatal. 100% N2 will displace CO2 and O2 completely and, in the absence of a CO2 signal to the brain, the stimulus to breathe no longer exists. 3 3.1 PRE-PLANNING Prior to entering a tank, all persons who are to be involved in the task should meet to: .1 .2 .3 .4 3.2 define the purpose of entering the tank; identify the steps to be taken to achieve the purpose; develop a plan of action; and assign responsibilities.

The meeting should address: .1 scheduling of manpower may include the following: .1 authorization: the master will be ultimately responsible for authorization for tank entry and should be kept informed. An officer should be designated as responsible person for ensuring that the correct procedures are observed; an Approved Tester is an officer who has been trained in the use of testing equipment and is thoroughly conversant with the Tank Entry Permit. The officer responsible for authorizing tank entry can also be the approved tester; Lookout a person trained to maintain contact with the person(s) inside the tank, to raise the alarm in case of emergency and to assist with the rescue operation; and tank rescue team any members of the crew trained in the use of rescue and resuscitation equipment;

.2

.3

.4
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FP 54/17/1 ANNEX Page 2 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 .8 .9 tank washing; gas freeing; testing of the tank atmosphere; identifying and minimising physical hazards; listing equipment needed, i.e. safety, fire fighting, communication, tools, escape and rescue; advising personnel who will enter the space of the hazards associated with the operation; maintaining safe conditions in the tank; and reviewing emergency procedures for rescue and fire fighting may include the following: .1 .2 .3 the person in charge of the rescue party should not enter the tank, but should coordinate the rescue operation from the tank access; in the event that a casualty must be removed from the tank, sufficient persons must be on deck and available to effect proper use of the rescue equipment; sufficient persons should be assigned to the rescue party. They are to be familiar with the tank construction and qualified in the use of the equipment and able to deliver first aid; and the decision to remove an injured person from the space must be based on the relative danger of his location and extent of his injuries, versus the danger of increasing his injuries by movement prior to effecting first aid.

.4

4 4.1

INITIAL PREPARATION Marking of cargo tanks

4.1.1 Tanks should be tagged to make it clear to all which are safe for entry and which must not be entered. Any tank where crew are working should be clearly marked as such. 4.1.2 Warning signs should also be posted when nitrogen is being produced on board or received from shore. 4.2 After a tank has been cleaned and ventilated, the following steps should be taken:

4.2.1 Ensure that the tank to be entered has been segregated from all other spaces which contain or may contain a non-gas free atmosphere. All common line valves should be lashed in the closed position and labelled. 4.2.2 Check that all cargo pipes in the tank being entered have been washed and drained.

4.2.3 In addition to the safety equipment used for tank entry, rescue and resuscitation and fire-fighting equipment should be available, inspected and in proper working order. This may include the following:

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FP 54/17/1 ANNEX Page 3 .1 equipment to be immediately available on deck: .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .2 rescue hoist equipment to enable an injured person to be removed from the tank; escape respirators; C.A.B.A. SETS; oxygen meter; gas meter; and toxic gas detector;

equipment to be carried on board and readily available: .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 stretchers; resuscitator; first-aid kit; fire hose with spray nozzle; and dry chemical and foam fire extinguishers;

.3 .4 .5

equipment to be carried by each member of the tank entry party: flashlight and protective clothing; equipment to be carried by at least one member of the tank entry team: intrinsically safe walkie-talkie; additional equipment to be immediately available on deck during hot work operations: fire hose with open spray nozzle rigged to spray water on the exit ladder when the hydrant valve is opened. This hose to be securely lashed; and equipment in each hot work area within the tank: fire hose with spray nozzle provided with Butterworth hose saddle at point of tank entry, and dry chemical fire extinguisher.

.6

4.2.4 Arrange for qualified person to stand by the tank entrance while people are in the tank. In addition, sufficient people to form a rescue team should be identified and readily available. 4.2.5 Establish a means of communication and emergency signals between the persons on deck and the persons in the tank. Ensure everybody understands these signals before tank entry and ensure that intrinsically safe walkie-talkies are available at the tank entrance. 5 TESTING THE ATMOSPHERE IN THE TANK

5.1 After a tank has been cleaned, ventilated and prepared for entry it should be tested for oxygen content, and finally, as appropriate, for toxic gases at various levels from top to bottom. 5.2 The atmosphere can only be accepted as suitable for entry when all the relevant hazards have been identified and removed.

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FP 54/17/1 ANNEX Page 4 5.3 Measurement of the tank atmosphere through the tank cleaning openings is not considered adequate where work is to be done in areas away from these openings. If work is to be carried out in an area of the tank where the atmosphere cannot be checked from outside the tank, then a responsible officer should first check the tank as far as possible, enter the tank with an air supplied escape respirator and check the areas using a suitable direct reading meter. 5.4 All ventilation must be stopped prior to and during the atmosphere tests and resumed prior to any person entering the tank. 5.5 5.5.1 Criteria for Tank Entry Oxygen

Tank entry is only allowed without the use of breathing apparatus if the oxygen content is at least 21%. 5.5.2 Hydrocarbon .1 .2 .3 1% LFL or less: entry permitted without respiratory protection; greater than 1% but less than 5% LFL: entry permitted only with a suitable air supplied respirator. Escape respirators are not to be used for this purpose; and greater than 5% LFL: entry permitted only in case of emergency and only with an air supplied respirator. For any reason other than an emergency the tank must be rewashed and/or ventilated to reduce the hydrocarbon level to less than 5%.

An officer should be designated as responsible for ensuring that all measuring instruments in use have been properly calibrated and are maintained in accordance with the respective manufacturers instructions. 6 IDENTIFYING PHYSICAL HAZARDS

6.1 The officer making this inspection should be familiar with the construction of the tank. Before the initial entry, lighting should be rigged as required inside the tank. 6.2 After the tank has been found safe for entry, an inspection should be made to identify any physical hazards and corrective actions should be considered. These might include: .1 handrails, ladders and walkways: .1 .2 .3 access ladders and surfaces in the space may become slippery and should be cleaned to prevent accidents; handrails and ladders should be checked to ensure that they are safe for use; and any unsafe areas should be roped off and warning signs rigged;

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FP 54/17/1 ANNEX Page 5 .2 structure and fittings: some parts of the structure may have suffered damage to the extent where a hazard may exist (e.g., thin plating, detached stiffeners or missing sections). Such areas must be identified and warning signs rigged; lightening holes: all lightening holes along the access route and in work areas must be roped off to prevent persons from falling through them; lighting: adequate lighting should be provided in the access and working areas; access: staging should be rigged as required to provide safe access to the work area; remotely controlled valves and equipment: remotely controlled valves and equipment which, if operated, could pose a hazard to persons in the tank must be secured and warning signs placed at all operating positions; and tools: .1 .2 .3 due to the hazards presented by falling tools, all tools must be carefully lowered into the space inside a bag or a bucket; when working at height, tools should be tied to the user with a lanyard to prevent them from being dropped; and before any hammering, chipping, welding, cutting or grit is undertaken, or any power tool is used outside the machinery space, the responsible officer is to ensure that the area is gas free and maintains that status throughout the period and that hot work procedures are being followed.

.3 .4 .5 .6

.7

FINAL PREPARATION [Review with the work group the final plan of action]

Ensure that all persons entering the tank have been given instructions. The Officer in charge should check that each person entering the space is correctly dressed in the proper protective clothing and provided with the correct safety equipment. 8 TANK ENTRY PERMIT

8.1 The relevant sections of the Tank Entry Permit should be filled in upon completion of preparations for tank entry. Entry permits may be made for multiple tank entries, however tanks which are not entered and worked within 4 h* of the initial test must be re-tested and a new permit issued. At no time should a permit be granted for entry into more than six tanks. 8.2 The validity of an entry permit should not exceed 8 h.

If cargo operations or inerting are being carried out anywhere on the vessel this should be reduced to 1 h.

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FP 54/17/1 ANNEX Page 6 9 TANK ENTRY

After the tank entry requirements have been met, the tank may be entered by the work group. While persons are working in the space, safe working conditions must be maintained. Particular attention should be given to the following: .1 the Officer in charge should ensure that the atmosphere is continuously monitored and order the evacuation of the space if the safe limits are exceeded or if there is any doubt about it at any stage of the operation; ventilation must be provided during the entire period of the operation. Where necessary, portable ducting must be provided to ensure a good supply of air to the actual working area inside the space; the Officer in charge should ensure that all safety hazard corrective measures are being enforced; the standby watch should be in continuous attendance at the entrance to the space; the officer in charge should be aware of the location of every man in the tank at all times. The entry team should stay together whenever possible; safety harness should be worn at all times when working in tanks; rescue equipment should be rigged and ready for use throughout the operation and persons assigned to the rescue detail are to be constantly in attendance; if pipes or fittings are to be opened, they should have been flushed with water prior to the entry of the work team. They should be monitored for gas during the work period; and access openings should be kept open and clear for emergency exit at all times.

.2

.3 .4 .5 .6 .7 .8

.9 10

LEAVING THE TANK

10.1 If the space is vacated for any reason, such as a meal break or other interruption, ventilation should continue during the break and if the break exceeds 4 h* all tests should be retaken prior to re-entry. 10.2 When finally leaving the tank, the officer in charge must ensure that all persons in the entry team are accounted for and that all tools, rags and equipment have been removed from the space. ____________

If cargo operations or inerting are being carried out anywhere on the vessel this should be reduced to 1 h.

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SUB-COMMITTEE ON FIRE PROTECTION 54th session Agenda item 17

FP 54/17/.. 19 January 2010 Original: ENGLISH

REVISION OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ENTERING ENCLOSED SPACES ABOARD SHIPS Draft guidance for tank entry on chemical tankers Submitted by the International Parcel Tankers Association (IPTA)

SUMMARY Executive summary: Strategic direction: High-level action: Planned output: Action to be taken: Related documents: IPTA provides an example of tank entry procedures for chemical tankers 5.2 5.2.3 5.2.3.4 Paragraph 5 FP 54/17; DSC 14/INF 9; DSC14/22; STW 41/WP 7; FP 53/23; FP 53/5/4; FP 53/5/5, FP 53/6; MSC 81/8/1, MSC 81/INF.8

1 FP 53 agreed that the fitting of appropriate inert gas systems to new oil tankers of less than 20,000 tonnes deadweight and new chemical tankers carrying low-flash point cargoes would minimize the risk of fires and explosions. If the application of inert gas were to be mandated for chemical tankers, this would lead to a significant increase in the use of nitrogen and the associated risks in relation to cargo tank entry. 2 In DSC 14/INF 9, MAIFF revealed that there have been at least 101 enclosed space incidents resulting in 93 deaths and 96 injuries, since the adoption November 1997of A.864(20), the Recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ship. 3 In view of the continued concern over enclosed space incidents IPTA considers that if the application of inert gas were to be mandated for chemical tankers the increased operational hazards associated with entry into cargo tanks previously inerted with nitrogen would justify the development of specific guidelines for tank entry on chemical tankers. 4 At Annex 1 IPTA offers an example of chemical tanker tank entry procedures that might be used as a basis for the development of such Guidelines. Action requested of the Sub-Committee 5 The Sub-Committee is invited to consider the above and the draft Guidelines at Annex and take action as appropriate.

ANNEX 1 DRAFT TANK ENTRY GUIDELINES FOR CHEMICAL TANKERS

1.

PURPOSE

The purpose of these Guidelines is to describe the procedure and minimum precautions which are to be followed when personnel intend to enter a tank, in order to reduce the risk of poisoning by toxic gases or asphyxiation due to lack of oxygen, particularly after inerting of tanks by Nitrogen. 2. USE OF NITROGEN

Nitrogen is a colourless and odourless gas that can cause oxygen deficiency in confined spaces and at exhaust openings on deck during purging of tanks and void spaces. Nitrogen (N2) is classified as a simple asphyxiate, meaning that it will displace oxygen in high concentrations and create an oxygen deficient (<21%) atmosphere without any significant physiological effects. Breathing is stimulated and controlled by carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the lungs. As the CO2 level increases, the brain sends a message to increase respiration. When the CO2 level drops, the rate of respiration will also decrease in order to maintain the proper balance. Everyone should understand that one deep breath of 100% N2 will be fatal. 100% N2 will displace CO2 and O2 completely and, in the absence of a CO2 signal to the brain, the stimulus to breathe no longer exists.

3.

PREPLANNING

Prior to entering a tank, all persons who are to be involved in the task should meet to: Define the purpose of entering the tank. Identify the steps to be taken to achieve the purpose. Develop a plan of action. Assign responsibilities The meeting should address: Scheduling of manpower may include the following: o Authorization: the Master will be ultimately responsible for authorization for tank entry and should be kept informed. An officer should be designated as responsible person for ensuring that the correct procedures are observed. o An Approved Tester is an officer who has been trained in the use of testing equipment and is thoroughly conversant with the Tank Entry Permit. The officer responsible for authorizing tank entry can also be the approved tester o Lookout a person trained to maintain contact with the person(s) inside the tank, to raise the alarm in case of emergency and to assist with the rescue operation o Tank rescue team any members of the crew trained in the use of rescue and resuscitation equipment Tank washing Gas freeing Testing of the tank atmosphere Identifying and minimising physical hazards Listing equipment needed. i.e. safety, fire fighting, communication, tools, escape and rescue. Advising personnel who will enter the space of the hazards associated with the operation Maintaining safe conditions in the tank Reviewing emergency procedures for rescue and fire fighting. May include the following: The person in charge of the rescue party should not enter the tank, but should co-ordinate the rescue operation from the tank access.

In the event that a casualty must be removed from the tank, sufficient persons must be on deck and available to effect proper use of the rescue equipment. Sufficient persons should be assigned to the rescue party. They are to be familiar with the tank construction and qualified in the use of the equipment and able to deliver first aid. The decision to remove an injured person from the space must be based on the relative danger of his location and extent of his injuries, versus the danger of increasing his injuries by movement prior to effecting first aid.

4.

INITIAL PREPARATION

Marking of Cargo Tanks Tanks should be tagged to make it clear to all which are safe for entry and which must not be entered. Any tank where crew are working should be clearly marked as such. Warning signs should also be posted when nitrogen is being produced onboard or received from shore. After a tank has been cleaned and ventilated, the following steps should be taken: Ensure that the tank to be entered has been segregated from all other spaces which contain or may contain a non-gas free atmosphere. All common line valves should be lashed in the closed position and labelled. Check that all cargo pipes in the tank being entered have been washed and drained. In addition to the safety equipment used for tank entry, rescue and resuscitation and fire fighting equipment should be available, inspected and in proper working order. This may include the following: Equipment to be immediately available on deck Rescue hoist equipment to enable an injured person to be removed from the tank Escape respirators C.A.B.A. SETS Oxygen meter Gas meter Toxic gas detector Equipment to be carried onboard and readily available: Stretchers Resuscitator First aid kit Fire hose with spray nozzle Dry chemical and foam fire extinguishers Equipment to be carried by each member of the tank entry party: Flashlight Protective clothing Equipment to be carried by at least one member of the tank entry team: Intrinsically safe walkie-talkie Additional equipment to be immediately available on deck during hot work operations: Fire hose with open spray nozzle rigged to spray water on the exit ladder when the hydrant valve is opened. This hose to be securely lashed. Equipment in each hot work area within the tank: Fire hose with spray nozzle - provided with Butterworth hose saddle at point of tank entry

Dry chemical fire extinguisher

Arrange for qualified person to stand by the tank entrance while people are in the tank. In addition, sufficient people to form a rescue team should be identified and readily available. Establish a means of communication and emergency signals between the persons on deck and the persons in the tank. Ensure everybody understands these signals before tank entry and ensure that intrinsically safe walkie-talkies are available at the tank entrance. 5. TESTING THE ATMOSPHERE IN THE TANK

After a tank has been cleaned, ventilated and prepared for entry it should be tested for oxygen content, and finally, as appropriate, for toxic gases at various levels from top to bottom. The atmosphere can only be accepted as suitable for entry when all the relevant hazards have been identified and removed. Measurement of the tank atmosphere through the tank cleaning openings is not considered adequate where work is to be done in areas away from these openings. If work is to be carried out in an area of the tank where the atmosphere cannot be checked from outside the tank, then a responsible officer should first check the tank as far as possible, enter the tank with an air supplied escape respirator and check the areas using a suitable direct reading meter. All ventilation must be stopped prior to and during the atmosphere tests and resumed prior to any person entering the tank. Criteria for Tank Entry Oxygen Tank entry is only allowed without the use of breathing apparatus if the oxygen content is at least 21%. Hydrocarbon 1% LFL or less: Entry permitted without respiratory protection. Greater than 1 % but less than 5% LFL: Entry permitted only with a suitable air supplied respirator. Escape respirators are not to be used for this purpose. Greater than 5% LFL: Entry permitted only in case of emergency and only with an air supplied respirator. For any reason other than an emergency the tank must be rewashed and/or ventilated to reduce the hydrocarbon level to less than 5%. An officer should be designated as responsible for ensuring that all measuring instruments in use have been properly calibrated and are maintained in accordance with the respective manufacturers instructions.

6.

IDENTIFYING PHYSICAL HAZARDS

The officer making this inspection should be familiar with the construction of the tank. Before the initial entry, lighting should be rigged as required inside the tank. After the tank has been found safe for entry, an inspection should be made to identify any physical hazards and corrective actions should be considered. These might include: Handrails, ladders and walkways Access ladders and surfaces in the space may become slippery and should be cleaned to prevent accidents

Handrails and ladders should be checked to ensure that they are safe for use Any unsafe areas should be roped off and warning signs rigged

Structure And Fittings Some parts of the structure may have suffered damage to the extent where a hazard may exist (e.g., thin plating, detached stiffeners or missing sections). Such areas must be identified and warning signs rigged. Lightening Holes All lightening holes along the access route and in work areas must be roped off to prevent persons from falling through them. Lighting Adequate lighting should be provided in the access and working areas. Access Staging should be rigged as required to provide safe access to the work area. Remotely Controlled Valves And Equipment Remotely controlled valves and equipment which, if operated could pose a hazard to persons in the tank must be secured and warning signs placed at all operating positions. Tools Due to the hazards presented by falling tools, all tools must be carefully lowered into the space inside a bag or a bucket. When working at height, tools should be tied to the user with a lanyard to prevent them from being dropped. Before any hammering, chipping, welding, cutting or grit is undertaken, or any power tool is used outside the machinery space, the responsible officer is to ensure that the area is gas free and maintains that status throughout the period and that hot work procedures are being followed.

7.

FINAL PREPARATION

Review with the work group the final plan of action. Ensure that all persons entering the tank have been given instructions. The Officer in Charge should check that each person entering the space is correctly dressed in the proper protective clothing and provided with the correct safety equipment.

8.

TANK ENTRY PERMIT

The relevant sections of the Tank Entry Permit should be filled in upon completion of preparations for tank entry. Entry permits may be made for multiple tank entries, however tanks which are not entered and worked within four hours* of the initial test must be re-tested and a new permit issued. At no time should a permit be granted for entry into more than six tanks. The validity of an entry permit should not exceed eight hours

9.

TANK ENTRY

After the tank entry requirements have been met, the tank may be entered by the work group. While persons are working in the space, safe working conditions must be maintained. Particular attention should be given to the following:

The Officer in charge should ensure that the atmosphere is continuously monitored and order the evacuation of the space if the safe limits are exceeded or if there is any doubt about it at any stage of the operation. Ventilation must be provided during the entire period of the operation. Where necessary, portable ducting must be provided to ensure a good supply of air to the actual working area inside the space. The Officer in charge should ensure that all safety hazard corrective measures are being enforced. The standby watch should be in continuous attendance at the entrance to the space. The officer in charge should be aware of the location of every man in the tank at all times. The entry team should stay together whenever possible. Safety harness should be worn at all times when working in tanks. Rescue equipment should be rigged and ready for use throughout the operation and persons assigned to the rescue detail are to be constantly in attendance. If pipes or fittings are to be opened, they should have been flushed with water prior to the entry of the work team. They should be monitored for gas during the work period. Access openings should be kept open and clear for emergency exit at all times.

10.

LEAVING THE TANK

If the space is vacated for any reason, such as a meal break or other interruption, ventilation should continue during the break and if the break exceeds four* hours all tests should be retaken prior to re-entry. When finally leaving the tank, the officer in charge must ensure that all persons in the entry team are accounted for and that all tools, rags and equipment have been removed from the space.

___________________________________

*If cargo operations or inerting are being carried out anywhere on the vessel this should be reduced to one hour