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A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr.

Shiva Aithal for the 34th 0


Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page No.

1. Formal itinerary 2

2. Objectives of tour 3

3. Methodology in Data Collection 3

4. Indian deep space network (IDSN) 5

5. Indian space science data center (ISSDC) 7

6. The 32 meter antenna 9

7. Control Room Beneath The Antenna 11

8. Concluding Remarks 13

LIST OF PICTURES
(Picture Data is collected form the Internet and suitable references are mentioned wherever necessary)

Picture 1. Doda Alada Mara or the Big Banyan Tree 4

Picture 2. Spacecraft Control Center (SCC) and the Giant Screens 5

Picture 3. Visit to Indian Space Science Data Center (ISSDC) 7

Picture 4. Visit to Storagetek Data Storage systems at ISSDC 8

Picture 5. The 32 m Antenna at the Indian Deep Space Network 10

Picture 6. The 18 m Antenna at the Indian Deep Space Network 10

Picture 7. Wheel-and-track design of 32 meter antenna 11

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 1
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
A Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN).

Formal itinerary went as follows

8.00 AM Assembly at the Academic Staff College.

8.30 AM Left for Byalalu.

9.00-9.30 Breakfast at Raghuveer Farm House.

10.30 Checkup an Entry inside The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN),

Byalalu.

10.45-11.30 Spacecraft Control Center (SCC) with Sr. Scientist H.

Veerbhadrappa.

11.30-11.40 Tea Break.

11.45-12.30 Space Science Data Center (ISSDC) with Sr. Scientist Mr. J.D. Rao.

12.45-1.45 Deep Space Tracking Antenna with Sr. Scientist Mr. Bangaruraju

1.45 – 2.15 Lunch by ISRO.

Part of the itinerary which could not be completed were as follows (See text for details)

3.00-4.30 pm Satellite Center Bangalore.

4.45-5.30 pm Visit to Shiva Temple.

6.00pm Return to ASC-BUB and End of Tour.

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 2
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
Objectives of tour:
 For evaluating, observation and interpretation skills of the participants of 34th orientation
programme.
 To have a understanding of Scientific and Mission objectives of Indian Space Research
Organization (ISRO) in promoting development and application of space science and
technology to assist in all-round development of the nation

Usefulness of tour:
 A study tour helps to observe the features and developments of the world in which we live.
We can watch and get great deal of information and gain knowledge of the vast and
unfathomable developments made by science and technology, indigenously by our dedicated
and committed scientists.
 First hand experiences gained during the tour remain as “teachers” for our lifetime and can
act as milestones to teach the generation which we will handle for years to come.
 Books give information too, but study tours afford first-hand knowledge and personal
experiences, which will last in one’s memory forever.
 One tour with multiple participants can generate multiple thoughts and ideas, some of which
may become determinant in decision-making.

Methodology (Data Collection and interpretation):


 Due to the strict security as only a pen and pad was allowed inside and the data collection
methodology was primarily primitive and latter on creamed by the information available on
the net, correlating the first hand experiences.
 Interpretation of data in this report is combination of two components, the first one being
the scientific knowledge gained through observation and learning and other one being
philosophical, based on thoughts, morals and ethical values gained during the study.
 Technical detailing of the instruments and technologies observed during the visit are
deliberately abstained and appropriate references, which provide exhaustive information of
the same that are available on the internet, are provided wherever necessary, and in this
report more emphasis is given on on-hand experience gained during the visit.
Conclusions from tour:
 Scientific and Philosophical conclusions are drawn from the experiences of this visit in a
view, which will remain as long-term lessons for a lifetime.

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 3
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
1.0 INTRODUCTION
We assembled at the Academic staff college at 8:00 AM sharp on 24th June 2009 and from there
took a KSRTC Bus, which was convened from “Majestic” by two of our members. One of our
members could not make it on time and we all were late by half an hour for the start. So we started
with a delay and left Academic Staff College, Bangalore (ASC-BUB) at 8.30 am. This was not a
good beginning, which was to result into a loss later on. Our programme coordinator Dr. A.S.
Vaidya sir had already appointed tentatively team leaders one male and one female, who maneuvered
the proceedings. All the time our coordinator remained passive and put most of the responsibilities
on the team leader. It was an intended circumvention to inculcate the leading and following abilities
in oneself and also to let ourselves know how responsible we could remain as a team. The initial idea
was to have a breakfast at a spot called “Allada Mara” which simply means Big Baniyan tree in
Kannada. Due to delay we had our breakfast in a farmhouse.

We moved on to the destined spot on the way we saw the unique Baniyan tree, through the running
bus. The Doda Aalada Mara (which is in kannada and literally translated to Big Banyan Tree, is a
giant Banyan tree located in the village of Ramohalli, near Kengeri approximately 28 kilometers west
of the city of Bangalore, Karnataka, India. This single plant covers 3 acres and this is the fourth
largest banyan tree in India. It is said to be at least 400 years old. A few years back, the main root of
the tree succumbed to natural disease, and thus the tree looks like many different trees now.

Picture 1. Doda Alada Mara or the Big Banyan Tree located in Ramohalli, near Kengeri

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 4
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
An hour's drive from the IT city, this nondescript tiny hamlet is on the Bangalore-Mysore highway.
Byalalu has rocketed to fame. It is here that the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has set
up Deep Space Network (DSN) center to track Chandrayaan I, which lifted off on 22 Oct 2008. The
Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) is located at Byalalu, a village about 40 km from Bangalore,
India. It was officially inaugurated on 17 October 2008 by ISRO chairman Mr. G. Madhavan Nair.
The antenna was designed and commissioned by Hyderabad based Electronics Corporation of India
Limited at a cost of Rs 62 crore to Rs 65 crore (about 130 million US dollars).

2.0 INDIAN DEEP SPACE NETWORK (IDSN)


When first rocket was launched in space in 1963 in Tumba village of Tiruvananthapuram, the
laboratory was a church and the workers included people like A.P.J. Abdul Kalam. The modes of
transport were cycles. The two-stage rocket, weighing 715 kg and powered by solid propellants,
climbed to an altitude of 208 km, releasing sodium vapors that lit up the sky (Source:
http://www.hinduonnet.com/fline/fl2101/stories/20040116004011600.htm)

November 21, 1963: The Nike Apache rocket being readied for launch and a rocket being carried
on a bicycle to the launch pad in the early days. (http://www.hinduonnet.com)

We reached the gates of Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) at 10.15am, which was followed by
a strict security check up, and warnings (no mobiles, laptops, cameras and pendrives). There was a
small misunderstanding as one of our members unknowingly possesed a “pendrive” which got
caught during the security scanner and after intervention of our coordinator the misunderstanding
was resolved and we were in. Somebody asked “How didi they detect it?”. On second thoughts
everyone realised it was a real understatement for the people who are scanning the moon. We had to
walk a few minutes to reach the Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC). Once inside the SCC, we were

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 5
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
made to comfortably sit on the chairs used by scientists, in an air-conditioned chamber at Space
Craft Control Center (SCC) by senior scientist Mr. H. Veerbhadrappa and Mr. Bagararaju who
humbly explained the missions and goals of ISRO and also introduced us to Chandrayaan with
display of video clippings of Chandrayan1 taking off to space, on a giant screen used to monitor
moon activities. A beautiful animated version of the whole process till its present activity made the
picture clear, for rest of our lives, about what is really happening in ISRO. Though we may not have
deserved it, but we enjoyed the feeling of sharing the chairs used by high-level scientists. We
nevertheless sensed that these materialistic things might have no values for those great scientists
who sweat out their blood for the country.

Picture 2. Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC) and the Giant Screens


(Pic. Source www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page11.htm)

On being asked why Byalalu of all the sites in Bangalore was chosen for this venture Sr. scientist
Bangarraju, an ISRO official, told us that the land for setting up the DSN, measuring 123 acres, was
selected after evaluating various other sites. "We used a lot of data transmitted by the Indian remote
sensing satellites during the site-selection process," he said, “One of the main advantages of selecting
Byalalu was its saucer-like shape that will help in blocking radio frequency disturbances”, he added.
The vital information obtained in this session provided combined by Mr. Veerbhadrappa and Mr.
Bangararaju is highlighted below.
 The prime objective of ISRO is to develop space technology and its application to various
national tasks.
 ISRO has established two major space systems, first one being INSAT for communication,
television broadcasting and meteorological services.
 Second one is Indian Remote Sensing Satellites (IRS) system for resources monitoring and
management.
 ISRO has developed two satellite launch vehicles, PSLV and GSLV, to place INSAT and
IRS satellites in the required orbits.

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 6
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
Functions of Indian Deep Space Network IDSN
As per information availed, Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft carrying 11 scientific instruments termed, as
"pay loads" weighed about 1380 kg at the time of its launch. Of them 5 are indigenous and of the
remaining six payloads, three are from the European Space Agency (ESA), one is from Bulgaria, and
two are from NASA. More details of these payloads can be had at: http://www.isro.org/pslv-
c11/brochure/page7a.htm

Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft was built at ISRO Satellite Center, Bangalore with contributions from
ISRO/Department of Space (DOS) establishments like Vikram Sarabhai Space Center (VSSC),
Liquid Propulsion Systems Center (LPSC) and ISRO Inertial Systems Unit (IISU) of
Tiruvananthapuram, Space Applications Center (SAC) and Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) of
Ahmedabad and Laboratory for Electro-optic Systems (LEOS) of Bangalore. The launch of
Chandrayaan-1 took place at 6:22 am Indian Standard Time (00:52 Universal Time UT) on October
22, 2008 from the Second Launch Pad at Satish Dhawan Space Center, SHAR, Sriharikota in the
Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh state. Sriharikota is situated at a distance of about 80 km to the
North of Chennai.

During the various phases of its flight, Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft sends detailed information about
its health to Earth through its transmitter. At the same time, the spacecraft receives radio commands
sent from Chandrayaan-1 Spacecraft Control Center instructing it to perform various tasks. Besides,
the spacecraft receives, modifies and retransmits the radio waves sent by ground antennas in a
precise way. This plays a crucial role in knowing its position and orbit at a particular instant of time.
The Ground Segment at Bayalalu of Chandrayaan-1 performs the crucial task of receiving the radio
signals sent by the spacecraft. It also transmits the radio commands to be sent to the spacecraft
during different phases of its mission. Besides, it processes and safe keeps the scientific information
sent by Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft.

ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) had a lead role in establishing the
Ground Segment facility of Chandrayaan-1 along with ISRO Satellite Center (ISAC) and Space
Applications Center (SAC). The Ground Segment of Chandrayaan-1 consists of:
1. Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)
2. Spacecraft Control Center (SCC)
3. Indian Space Science Data Center (ISSDC)
Source and more details at http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page11.htm

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 7
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
3.0 INDIAN SPACE SCIENCE DATA CENTRE (ISSDC)
The session went on for half an hour and then we were offered a tea break at 11.30 am. Tea was
courtesy of ISRO. From the impressive Spacecraft control center we moved on to Indian Space
Science Data Centre ISSDC at 11.45 am, which was located as a separate segment in the same
building.

Picture 3. A view of Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC)


(Pic. Courtesy http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page11.htm)

Shri Veerbhadrappa introduced and handed over our batch to Sr. Scientist Mr.J.D. Rao. Due to
the astronomical size of our batch we were split randomly (first come first serve) into batches of 25
each and escorted inside the ISSDC, where Mr. J. D. Rao meticulously explained us how the Payload
data from the satellites are received at the data reception stations and subsequently transferred to
ISSDC for further processing. The information Mr. J.D. Rao at ISSDC provided is as follows:
 Indian Space Science Data Center (ISSDC) is a facility established by ISRO, as the primary
data center for the payload data archives of Indian Space Science Missions.
 This data center is responsible for the ingestion, archive, and dissemination of the payload
data and related ancillary data for Space Science missions.
 The following picture shows data storage unit containing eight “Robots” holding 1500 media
storage cartridges at a time (each of 800 GB). The total volume, which can be stored, is 4.5
TB (4500 GB). Till now Chandrayan has delivered 4.5 TB of data from space as explained by
Mr.Rao.
 The capacity of ISSDC as per Mr. Rao is 140 TB.

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 8
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
Picture 4. Storagetek Data Storage systems at ISSDC
(Source: http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page11.htm)

 The principal investigators of the science payloads as well as scientists from other
institutions and general public will use this facility. The raw payload data received through
the data reception stations is further processed to generate Level-0 and Level-1 data
products that are stored in the ISSDC archives for subsequent dissemination.
 The data is generated from Chemical Mapping, Mineralogical Mapping, Topography
Mapping, Radiation Environment, Magnetic Field Mapping, Volatile Transport, Lunar
Atmospheric constituent
 Data processing is planned in three stages viz; Raw payload data / Level-0 data/ Level-1
data for each science payload is transferred to the respective Payload Operations Centers
(POC) for further processing, analysis and generation of higher level data products.
 The higher-level data products generated by the POC’s are subsequently transferred to
ISSDC archives for storage and dissemination.
 The data archives for Level-0 and higher products are organized following the Planetary
Data System (PDS) standards. The dissemination of data from ISSDC to the payload
operations centers/principal investigators, scientists and general public is supported through
private WAN connections and Internet.
 Software packages, specially high level of indigenous firewall software, developed by
software development teams in the different centers of ISRO, by the principal investigator’s
teams / payload development teams are deployed at ISSDC to support these functions.
(Supportive information source:
http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan/htmls/ground_segment_indianspacesciencedatacenter.htm)

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 9
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
4.0 THE 32-METER ANTENNA
We were handed with brochures of ISRO achievements and we came out of ISSDC at 12.20 am
and from there on Mr. Bangararaju escorted to the huge umbrella like antennas. We had to walk
along and the stroll was made more informative with both Mr. Bangarraju and Mr. Veerbhadrappa
giving imperative information about the huge antenna. The information about the giant 32-meter
antenna availed from them is as follows.
 The foundation stone for laying down this 32-metre antenna, a joint venture of the
Electronics Corporation of India (ECI) and the Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BAARC),
was put up in 3 December 2008 by the Chairman of ISRO Mr. G. Madhavan Nair.
 IDSN consists of two large parabolic antennas, one with 18 m and the other 32 m diameter
at Byalalu. Of these, the 32 m antenna with its 'seven mirror beam wave guide system' was
indigenously designed, developed, built, installed, tested and qualified. The 32m antenna can
support Chandrayaan-1 and any spacecraft mission further deep into space.
 A fibre optic link provides necessary communication link between the DSN Station and
Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC), Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC) and Network
Control Centre (NCC).
 The antenna antenna is a fully steerable 300-ton structure with a final weight of 480 ton.

Picture 5. The 32 m Antenna at the Indian Deep Space Network, Byalalu


 The antenna system consists of 32-metre diameter parabolic main reflector in "cassegrain
configuration". The paraboloid reflector is illuminated by a series of precision machined
mirrors arranged in beam waveguide configuration.

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 10
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
Picture 6. The 18 m Antenna at the Indian Deep Space Network, Byalalu
(Both Antenna Pic. Source: http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page11.htm)

 The 18-metre antenna has been imported from Germany and supports only Chandrayaan-1
mission.
 The 32-meter antenna turns on a track, called the azimuth rotation track. It can turn a full
270 degrees before it must turn back the other way to "unwrap" the cables below that carry
the information to the electronics in the antenna building. Mr. Veerbhadrappa informed us
that this rotation was inspired from the neck rotation of Owls.
 The 32-m antenna is of a wheel-and-track design. The station is also equipped to control
remotely from the ISTRAC Network Control Centre (NCC).

Picture 7. Wheel-and-track design of 32 meter antenna


(Source: http://www.vlba.nrao.edu/antennatour/azimuth.shtml)

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 11
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
5.0 CONTROL ROOM BENEATH THE ANTENNA
After observing the 32-meter antenna closely we were escorted to the control room beneath the
antenna. Mr. Veerbhadrappa provided us the following information.
 The whole room was continuously maintained at 18°C by cryo-cooling techniques
employing liquid helium, in order to reduce the instrumentation noise.
 A very interesting and important part of the instrument was the “active hydrogen
maser” employed for maintaining a precise Universal time (UT). It had the precision of
10-15 milliseconds. Mr. Veerbhadrappa explained that if time does not match then the
parties reject the data as they pay for their payload data (USA pays $3500 per minute for
the data availed).
 Hydrogen maser, also known as hydrogen frequency standard, is a specific type of maser
that uses the intrinsic properties of the hydrogen atom to serve as a precision frequency
reference. The active maser has better long-term frequency stability for maintaining the
Universal time (UT).

6.0 THE FINALE

From the control room, we headed for “Lunch” which was gentle gesture by ISRO. Without our
knowledge of time we were unknowingly getting late for our second part of the itinerary which
was the Satellite center in Bangalore. The split of our group into two at Indian Space Science
Data Center (ISSDC) earlier at 11:45am meant that – the deliberations of our ever inquisitive
academic groups were going to consume double the time viz; at the 32-meter antenna, control
room beneath it and of course lunch. Our coordinator wisely kept reminding us about time but
put no pressure as it was left to us to manage everything.

After concluding all these events were all gathered in the bus at 2:15 pm and were on track for
our way back to Bangalore at 2:25pm. This was like racing against time to reach ISRO Satellite
Center (ISAC), which is lead center of ISRO for satellite technology located at HAL Airport
Road Vimanpura Post, Bangalore. The distance between Bayalalu and ISAC was more than 40
kms and the appointment was at 3.00pm sharp. The ISRO follows a strict protocol of time and
any minute of delay meant cessation of part two. We were sure that we were losing the race, as
Bangalore, which has a population of 6.5 million, has more than three million vehicles, is
considered “notorious” for its traffic jams.
(Source: http://www.managementparadise.com/forums/articles/16409-mobile-tech-helping-
bangalore-beat-its-notorious-traffic-jams.html). Our coordinator left us in the middle, as he was

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 12
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
very much sure of the result of our adventure. The inevitable happened and the traffic got the
better of us. A “short cut” route, ventured as a last measure turned out to be of no use and we
arrived at 4:00pm. For obvious reasons we got rejected at the gates of ISRO. The only option
remaining was the “Shiva temple”. But with time and purpose lost, interest was also lost and we
dismally came to a point that retreat to base camp was the only best thing which could be done.
We returned to Academic Staff College at 5.30pm. Our co-coordinator smilingly received us at
the gates and his smile taught a thousand things.

6.0 CONCLUDING REMARKS

The following conclusions are drawn from the tour, and from a Microbiologists perspective
will remain imbibed in the intellect for lifetime. The conclusions drawn below reflect lore in
terms of things learnt from the tour. As “Orientation” is defined as is a function of the mind
involving awareness of three dimensions: time, place and person (Ref:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orientation_(mental), it is concluded that a perfect correlation in
management of all these is on of the vital things necessary for a successful teacher.

1. A variety of satellites designed, developed and built by The Indian Space Research Organization
(ISRO) and the successful launching of many of them into their intended orbits makes India
splendiferous. More importantly, the country has used its satellites for the rapid expansion of
its national infrastructure including telecommunications, TV broadcasting, weather monitoring,
education, public health, agriculture and rural development. More recently, India has provided
many space-based services including launch services to foreign customers on a competitive basis.
India is one of the very few countries that have significant achievements to their credit in the
arena of space.
2. Manage the time as not only it keeps one disciplined but also is the key to success of an
organization leading to the benefit of society. One of the most amazing things was “hydrogen
maser” in the control room beneath the 32m antenna. It was precise to 10-15 of a second in
maintaining the universal time (UT); if it failed to do so then the data is rejected. India looses
$3500 dollars per minute for one payload and other loses are beyond that. If we as a team started
on time we could have begun and ended as scheduled, with lot more information.
3. Plan and prepare for the future of the students, and have a vision. In Indian Space Science
Data Center (ISSDC), they are well prepared for situations like natural disasters to prevent loss
of data. The whole system is not only “fire walled” with indigenous softwares, but also made the

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 13
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
whole area “fire proof” which ensures that safety of complete data, at any levels of fire. Also the
storage capacities are well ahead to times.
4. Take small steps at a time, which will lead to higher altitudes with fewer failures. Nobody had
thought that in the first attempt itself in 1963 our rockets will be fired to the moon, but the will
and determination definitely existed and we have result after 48 years and the quest is still on.
5. Think big and bigger, while doing so small problems become smaller and certain needs will be
automatically be taken care of. The products in our everyday lives like refrigeration, Aluminum
and Hindalium from tankers, fire resistant suites, Computer aided tomography (CAT), Walking
aids and wide array of management techniques systems have been derived for the laymen from
ISRO technologies.
6. Experience is the best teacher. What is done is done. Nothing of the past can be changed.
The most we can do about anything that has already been done is to take counter measures to
prevent them from getting repeated. However, there is one more effective way to stop the
damage and that is to prevent it.
7. Technology is the need of the day. The technological advancements have made society take a
leap towards success. Every new invention in technology is a step towards progress of mankind.
Since ours are the times of technology, the technological reform must spread far and wide. We
as teachers should make the masses aware of the new technologies. As technology is bound to
rule our present and future, it must be introduced through education, which will bridge distance
between the present and the future.

Resources:
1. www.isro.org
2. www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page11.htm
3. http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan/htmls/ground_segment_indianspacesciencedatacenter.htm
4. http://www.managementparadise.com/forums/articles/16409-mobile-tech-helping-bangalore-
beat-its-notorious-traffic-jams.html

Acknowledgements:
We are thankful to Dr. M. S. Talwar, The Director, UGC-ASC-BUB and Dr. Arun S. Vaidya, The
Coordinator, UGC-ASC-BUB for their valuable support in organizing the study tour. We are also
grateful to the elite ISRO and their Team of scientists, who despite their busy schedule
thoroughly enlightened on areas, which could not be even dreamt of.

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 14
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009
Date: 30-06-2009

DECLARATION

For the submission of this report to The Director, Academic Staff College, Bangalore University,

Bangalore, I declare that that I was present to the tour conducted by UCG-ASC-BUB on 24th of

June 2009 and was present throughout the mentioned time, and the views expressed in this report

completely represent my ideas, based on the first hand experience gained during the tour and

resources from the internet as mentioned in the report.

(Dr. Shiva C. Aithal)

Department of Microbiology,

Dnyanopasak College,

Dist. PARBHANI (M.S.)-431401

Phone: 09421085167

Email: shiva.aithal@rediffmail.com

A tour report of “Visit To The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)” submitted by Dr. Shiva Aithal for the 34th 15
Orientation Programme conducted by ASC-BUB, 10th June – 7th July 2009