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Waterbury, Vermont

Site Feasibility Options


Prepared by

Wiemann Lamphere Architects October 16, 16, 2013

525 Hercules Drive I Suite Two I Colchester, VT 05446 I Phone: 802.655.5020 I Fax: 802.655.6567 I wiemannlamphere.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS
-SUMMARY

-SECTION 1: Site Site Analysis Process Site Summary Site Findings Table 1 Site Options Site Feasibility Options OPTIONS Option 1: 1 Library Site: Library, Historical Society, Municipal Offices, Community Room. NO Police Option 2: 2 Library Site: Library, Historical Society, Municipal Offices, Community Room. NO Police Option 3: 3 Library Site: Library, Historical Society, Municipal Offices, Community Room, Police. Option 4: 4 Armory Site: Police, Library, Municipal Offices, Community Room. NO Historical Society Option 5: 5 Armory Site: Police, Library, Municipal Offices, Community Room, Historical Society. Option 6: 6 Waterbury Complex: Police, Library, Municipal Offices, Community Room, Historical Society. Option 7: 7 Waterbury Complex: Police, Library, Municipal Offices, Community Room, Historical Society. Option 8: 8 Combined sites: Library Site + Waterbury Complex: Library Site: Library and Historical Society. Waterbury Complex: Municipal Offices, and Community Room, Police. -SECTION 2: Cost to build on sites Cost per Option 1-8 Relative Heat Comparison -SECTION 3: Consultants reports reports of existing existing building conditions: Janes Building Historical Preservation Recommendations by Liz Pritchett Associates. Structural report of existing building conditions by Hardy Structural Engineering. Mechanical System Assessment by Shaw Engineering, LLC. Armory Historical Preservation Recommendations by Liz Pritchett Associates. Structural report of existing building conditions by Hardy Structural Engineering.

SUMMARY
The purpose of this study is to assist the Town and Village of Waterbury with determining the viability of locating various municipal functions on available sites within Waterbury. Several additional sites have been reviewed by the Waterbury Municipal Building Committee. However, Wiemann Lamphere has been asked to provide site options and cost information related to three specific sites as others were determined to be not viable. This study takes a look at various building use combinations and provides some insight into the buildable capacity of the properties in question. For each site, we have prepared multiple options showing potential configuration at the preliminary stage. Each option includes an estimate of probable cost and we have included a summary of anticipated energy use to differentiate between building types. This study shows possible options for consideration and is not meant to be considered as showing the only options available.

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SECTION 1

Site

Site Analysis Process General


The initial review involved listing what we know and do not yet know about each of the properties the Town Building Committee asked us to include. Each site was analyzed in the following categories: Features - The physical and dimension information, size in acreage, Zoning District, and setbacks. Attributes - The positive potential of site including proximity and visibility to main thoroughfares, sun exposure, views, permitted or conditional uses, and ease in addressing flooding potential. - The potential locations suitable for building and parking. Limitations - Locations on a site unsuitable for building and parking due to existing grades. - Encumbrances including Right of Ways and Easements - Lot Coverage, Setbacks, and buildable acreage within the setbacks. - Accessibility, both visual barriers and physical access from main streets. - Potential challenges posed by flood mitigation measures required by site location. - Conditions of existing uses set on development of a site (existing buildings and associated parking requirements, for example). Unknowns - Actual soil types. - Archeological sites. - Environmental issues.

Library Site
Reviewing use of the Library Site included: - Visit Existing Library building and document existing building condition including: o Existing Structural conditions including: the roof framing, floor construction, framing sizes, girder sizes and locations, bearing wall locations and estimated capacities, girder post or column sizes, spacing, and footings, foundation walls, masonry. Structural analysis included a visual survey for softened, split, or broken wood framing, plaster cracks, cracked or spalled foundations. o Existing mechanical conditions including heating type(s), heating systems including boilers and piping, fuel sources. o Existing insulation (if visible), door and window conditions including weatherstripping and storm windows. o Historic details, intact elements, and modifications.

o Spaces and their current uses. o Potential uses and issues including handicap access, floor loading capacities, flood-proofing issues. o Potential presence of existing hazardous material such as lead paint or asbestos. Visit Existing Site directly behind Library building: o Existing grades. o Standing water. o Sun exposure. o Views, o Relationship to existing Library o Physical and Visual Access from Main St. Review existing documentation and utilize where possible in site analysis: o Historic information including the propertys past history and available photographs. o Previous project studies for this site done over the recent years. o Create approximate as-built drawings. o Obtain from the Town any existing site drawings including contours. Review Site Considerations with Town Planner: o Parking that should be planned for if Town Offices, Police and a Community Room are co-located on the site. o Confirming Zoning District and potential Conditions for use. o Determining the Setbacks that apply. o Determining the Easements and other Encumbrances on the Site.

Armory Site
The Armory Site was challenging to determine suitability for the building program given the limitations of steep slopes, narrow streets, and limited grades suited for locating a building. However, we were able to obtain enough information to proceed in a manner similar to the Library Site analysis. Reviewing potential use of the Armory Site included: - Visit To The Site: o Observe existing grades, potential site entrances, and approaches including neighborhood streets. o Physical and visual access from major Village streets. o Sun Exposure. o Direction of views. o Existing visible site improvements such as hydrants, stormwater controls, drainage swales, soil. o Proximity of neighboring homes and properties including Thatcher Brook School parking lots and playing fields. - Visit Existing Armory Building: o Determine structural condition including visual clues such as cracked masonry, roof frame condition, roofing, window and overhead doors, visible foundations and slabs.

o Determine history of building and historic significance if any. o Photograph existing building exterior and interior. Obtain existing documentation: o Existing site plot plan including set aside portions of property for conservation easement. o Site contour and grading plan that shows proposed new parking layout for Thatcher Brook School staff parking. o Preparing drawings based on printed information above. Review with Town Planner regarding Site: o Confirming Zoning District and potential Conditions for use. o Determining road rights of way and setbacks. o Determining that Armory Avenue is a Village street. o Determining what limitations are established by Conservation Easement. o Determining that agreement with school for parking means providing for this additional parking in project.

VSOC Lot 6 Site


Reviewing potential use of Lot 6 Site included: - Obtain Existing Documentation: o Previous reports regarding the Site o Previous structural report regarding issues for reuse of the existing Stanley and Wasson buildings. o Identifying Site issues particularly flood zone and mitigation. o Existing Site Drawings. o Previous project design proposals. o Current development proposals. o Limits established by the State for use of the property. - Visit Site: o View existing grades. o Observe conditions of the existing Stanley and Wasson buildings including a cursory physical condition and notable water stain lines from flood.

Site Summary
SITE PROPERTY SIZE 2.19 Acres (Combined) SETBACKS SITE COVERAGE

LIBRARY

40 Ft Front, 25 Ft Side, & 50 Ft Rear

Option 1: Building (Exist & New): 9,550 S.F. Paved: 32,000 S.F. Option 2: Building (Exist & New): 16,400 S.F. Paved: 33,190 S.F. Option 3: Building (Exist & New): 18,200 S.F. Paved: 36,000 S.F.

ARMORY

2.61 Acres (Lot A 40 Ft Front & 50 Only) Ft Rear. No Sideyards for this Site.

Option 4:

Building: 8.650 S.F. Paved: 36,000 S.F.

Option 5:

Building: 14,050 S.F. Paved: 40,400 S.F. Building: 9,100 S.F. Paved: 43,045 S.F.

STATE OF 2.30 Acres VT LOT 6

15 Ft Front, Side, & Rear

Option 6:

Option 7:

Building: 9,100 S.F. Paved: 40,140 S.F.

Site Findings Library Site


Functional Findings: The expanded Library Site is large enough to accommodate a new building and associated parking and drives. Site is served by existing municipal services including water and sewer. Site is easily accessible to Main Street. Intent of all Options shown assumes continued use of the Janes house in a fashion and in a manner that would be appropriate to its historical importance. Structural Findings: Structural analysis may be found in Hardy Structural Engineers report attached to this Report. Flood Mitigation: We anticipate that the existing first floor of any new construction will be located above the Flood Design Level. Mitigation will be required for basement of the Janes house including flood vents, removing mechanical heating equipment and fuel tanks from basement, installing new structural supports posts (in lieu of existing wood posts and steel pipe) that would be robust enough withstand effects of flood waters. Site mitigation may be required to protect utilities including electrical, water, sewer, and emergency power. Easements: No known easements exist on this site. Accessibility: Site is composed of gentle slopes where Options show new construction. On grade entrances should enable new facilities to be handicap accessible. Existing second floor of Janes house is not accessible currently and may be a challenge in any of the Options we considered. If program spaces for second floor warrant making second floor accessible, consideration may be required to add access by means of an elevator or from an addition. Parking: Parking for 70 vehicles is shown for all Options. Historical considerations: Historical analysis and recommendations for the Library building (Janes House) may be found in Liz Pritchett Associates report attached to this Report. In reference to a Memorandum of Agreement between the Town of Waterbury and Vermont Historic Preservation Office, dated November 8, 2011 the following are required: - An archeological study of this site. - Impact of a new facility on the historical character of the existing historical neighborhood. - Execution of mitigation plan with VHPO for any development proposed for the Site.

Site Work Required: Library site is quite suited to new building and associated site improvements. There appears to be no major site construction issues. Hazardous Materials: Library building may be considered to contain some lead or asbestos that will need to be abated or encapsulated depending on materials encountered. Caution will need to be exercised to avoid disturbing historically important architectural details or elements. Sewer and water: Services are available on Main Street. Zoning Requirements: Village Mixed Residential. Library is a permitted use and Municipal or government uses are Conditional Uses in this District. Housing Displacement: No housing would be displaced by any of the Options for this Site. Impact on Neighborhood: Landscape screening for a new building and parking should be provided along the south property lines adjacent to rear yards of adjoining homes on Winooski Street. Visibility: Janes house has an excellent presence on Main Street. Rear portion of the property, current location of the Community Garden, is less visible from Main Street.

Armory Site
Functional Findings: Site is challenging for a number of reasons. For example, gentle slopes best suited for construction of building and parking is limited to the northwest side of property along Armory Avenue. Steep slopes to southeast will require extensive re-grading and the need for retaining walls is likely. Structural Findings: Structural analysis of existing Armory Building may be found in Hardy Structural Engineers report attached to this Report. Flood Mitigation: There are no flood issues with this site because of its elevation. Easements: Thatcher Brook School has 99 year lease with Town for parking on Site. We estimate this requires 40 parking spaces be included in Options for this Site.

Accessibility: Steepness of the Site presents a challenge for handicapped access. Parking: Parking for 70 vehicles plus 40 for the School required. Historical considerations: Historical analysis of existing Armory Building may be found in Liz Pritchett Associates report attached to this Report. Site Work Required: Anticipated and estimated to be extensive. Hazardous Materials: Armory Building may contain some lead paint or asbestos that will need to be abated prior to demolition. No information is available regarding other hazards present on this Site. Sewer and water: Water is available on High Street. Pumping will be required to connect to existing sewer on Hill Crest Terrace above this site. Zoning Requirements: Village Mixed Residential. Library is a permitted use and Municipal or government uses are Conditional Uses in this District. Housing Displacement: No housing would be displaced by either of the Options for this Site. Impact on Neighborhood: Landscape screening for a facility and parking should be provided along the street sides of this site. Visibility: None. Site is located behind Thatcher Brook School and not visible from Main Street or downtown.

VSOC Lot 6 Site


Functional Findings: The Site is located in an existing parking lot adjacent to the Vermont State Office Complex (VSOC, formerly the Vermont State Hospital). The Lot is substantially flat. The Site is located between Park Street and VSOC loop road and one block off of Main Street behind a line of existing residences. The Stanley and Wasson buildings have been analyzed in previous studies and determined to be inadequate for use as part of a new Town facility due to costly physical reconstruction or rehabilitation. No major physical obstacles to constructing a new building in the existing parking lot.

Structural Findings: A Structural Analysis of the Stanley and Wasson buildings was done previously by DeWolfe Engineering Associates. Flood Mitigation: The Site is located in the 100 year flood zone. Both Options for this Site provide for elevated first floor above the Flood Design Level. The Project must not create obstacles to flow of floodwaters. The building ground level and foundations will need to be robust enough to withstand floodwaters. Building services including electrical, water, sewer, fuel tanks, and emergency power will need to be protected to withstand impact from floodwaters. Easements: It is unknown what the impact redevelopment of the Stanley or Wasson buildings will have regarding on- site parking. Both Options provide for a number of spaces above the 70 required to support a new combined Town building. Accessibility: Elevating first floor will require elevator(s). Parking: Parking for 70 vehicles plus at least 44 to 67 additional are shown in Options 7 & 6 respectively. Historical considerations: Historical Analysis of the Stanley and Wasson buildings was done previously by Liz Pritchett Associates. Site Work Required: Site work is anticipated to be minimal Hazardous Materials: The Stanley and Wasson buildings may contain some lead or asbestos requiring abatement. No information is available regarding other hazards that may be present on this site. Sewer and water: Water and sewer are available on site. Zoning Requirements: The Site is located in the Village Mixed Residential & Complex Overlay District. Library is a permitted use and Municipal or government uses are Conditional Uses in this District. Site setbacks are reduced in the Overlay District to 15 feet for any new building. Housing Displacement: No housing would be displaced by either of the Options for this Site.

Impact on Neighborhood: Landscape screening for a new facility and parking should be provided along the northeast side of the Site facing existing homes. Visibility: Visibility of a new facility would be fair to poor with Option 6. A new facility, as shown in Option 7, would be more visible from Main Street by way of the VSOC entrance road.

OPTIONS

Option 1
Library Site Estimated cost: $4,610,150.
The site is the current location of the Public Library and Historical Society. It has a good visibility and downtown presence. The southwest portion of the newly annexed property includes Community Garden plots. The site is mostly level except for the steep bank to the recreation fields located north of the property. The site has good southern exposure and is above the 100 year flood level. Per Zoning District Use Regulation Chart: (VMR) Library is permitted use and Government is conditional use. Option 1 is a plan to locate the Library, Municipal Offices, and Community Room in a twostory building connected to the existing Library (Historic Janes House). This plan recalls the original barn attached to the house. Advantages: Provides room for outdoor space and the smallest building footprint. Ground floor is located above flood level. Existing Library building remains the primary public face of the property. Community Garden space to remain although relocated. Two-way entrance drive wraps around with one-way exit on south side. Two story addition provides easier ADA access to existing 2nd floor Disadvantages: Parking is limited adjacent to facility and extends considerable distance from building entries. Existing building basement will require flood-proofing. Use of historic building will have higher maintenance & heating costs

Option 2
Library Site Estimated cost: $4,625,717
The site is the current location of the Public Library and Historical Society. It has a good visibility and downtown presence. The west portion of the newly annexed property includes Community Garden plots. The site is mostly level except for a steep bank to the recreation fields located North of the property. The site has good southern exposure and is above the 100 year flood level. Per Zoning District Use Regulation Chart: (VMR) Library is permitted use and Government is conditional use. Option 2 is a plan to locate the Library, Municipal Offices and Community Room in a one-story building connected to the existing Library and Historical Society (Historic Janes House). The library wraps around the existing building. The Town Offices and Community Room facilities extend further West. Advantages: Ground floor is located above flood level. Existing Library building remains the primary public face of the property. Community Garden space to remain although relocated. Separate entrance drive & parking for Library or Historical Society. Single story structure will not require stairs or elevator. Disadvantages: Long narrow building lot limits single story configuration options. Existing building basement will require flood-proofing. Use of historic building will have higher maintenance & heating costs Substantial portion of site required for building and parking.

Option 3
Library Site Estimated cost: $5,384,000
The site is the current location of the Public Library and Historical Society. The west portion of the property includes Community Garden plots. Option 3 is a plan to locate a one-story building Library connected to the existing Library building (Historic Janes house). Municipal Offices, Community Room, and the Police Facility would be housed in a separate one-story building to the West. An alternate option would be to exchange the functions: Municipal Offices, Community Room, & Police located in a one-story building adjacent to the Janes House and the Library located in the separate building. Advantages: Ground floor is located above flood level. Existing Library building remains the primary public face of the property. Community Garden space to be relocated to west end of lot. Separate entrance drive & parking for Historical Society. Single story structures do not require stairs or elevator. Disadvantages: Visibility of new buildings from Main Street is limited. Separate site infrastructures will add cost to site work. Existing building basement will require flood-proofing. Substantial portion of site required for building and parking. Common areas and building services cannot fully be shared.

Option 4
Armory Site Estimated cost: $7,446,754
The site is the current location of the Armory Building. It has unimproved residential streets on three sides, and is across Armory Ave from the Thatcher Brook School. The school uses an existing gravel parking lot on the property. The site is long and narrow with gentle slopes along Armory Avenue but rises steeply to the southeast property line. The southeast side of the site abuts new conservation land. The Site is well above the 500 year flood level with pleasant views to West and North. Per Zoning District Use Regulation Chart: (VR) a Library Use and a Government Use are Conditional. Option 4 is a plan to locate the Municipal Offices, Community Room, and Police Facility on the first floor of a two story building just east of the existing building footprint. The existing Armory building would be demolished. A large parking lot is provided on the West side of the new building. The Library would be located on the second floor with an entrance from an upper parking lot. Advantages: Separate drives & parking for each floor. Provides parking for both Town and School. Maintains a municipal use for an underutilized Site. Sharing of common spaces and building services. Disadvantages: Remote location from Main St/ Downtown: No visibility. Steep slopes requiring substantial site work and site infrastructure will add cost to Option. Parking on site must be provided for School. Building demolition is required. Abatement may be likely.

Option 5
Armory Site Estimated cost: $7,699,080
The site is the current location of the Armory Building. It has unimproved residential streets on three sides, and is across Armory Ave from the Thatcher Brook School. The school uses an existing gravel parking lot on the property. The site is long and narrow with gentle slopes along Armory Avenue but rises steeply to the southeast property line. The southeast end of the site abuts new conservation land. Site is well above the 500 year flood level with pleasant views to West and North. Per Zoning District Use Regulation Chart: (VR) a Library Use and a Government Use are Conditional. Option 5 is a two-building scheme. The East building would locate Police and Community Room on first floor of a two story building. Town Offices are on second floor with an entrance from an upper parking lot. A single story Library is shown on the West end of the site with a large parking lot located between buildings. The existing Armory building would be demolished. Advantages: Separate entrance drive & parking for each floor of Town Office facility. Library and most of the parking can be located on gentle slopes although Library will require retaining wall behind. Disadvantages: Remote location from Main St/ Downtown: No visibility. Steep slopes requiring substantial site work and site infrastructure will add cost to Option. Parking on site must be provided for School. Scheme has fewer spaces. Building demolition is required. Abatement may be likely. Common areas and building services cannot be shared.

Option 6
State of Vermont Site Lot 6 Estimated cost: $6,367,308
The site is an existing parking lot adjacent to the Stanley and Wasson buildings on the grounds of the Vermont State Office Complex. Site has access to Park Street North of the site. The site is large and rectangular, relatively flat with minimal slopes. The site is located in the 100 year Flood Zone. Future of existing buildings is unknown to date. Per Zoning District Use Regulation Chart: (VR) Library and Government are conditional use. Site is within the Campus Overlay District. Option 6 is a plan to locate an elevated two story building on the North end of the site. Ground level would include building entrance and exits with covered parking. First occupied level above grade includes Town Offices, Police Facility, and Community Room. The Library would be located on the top floor. Most of the existing paved lot would be repaved. Selected areas are removed for building and new parking islands. Reuse of or addition to Stanley & Wasson buildings for Town use is not considered viable. Advantages: Elevated floor scheme places facility above 500-year Flood Level. Additional parking located at grade is provided below building. Site infrastructure is available and will not add cost to site work. Disadvantages: Building will require substantially robust structure and finishes to withstand flooding. Flood conditions will require evacuation and render building inaccessible. Not highly visibility from Main Street / Downtown. Parking must be provided for Stanley / Wasson. (unknown quantity)

Option 7
State of Vermont Site Lot 6 Estimated cost: $6,482,970
The site is an existing parking lot adjacent to the Stanley and Wasson buildings on the grounds of the Vermont State Office Complex. Site has access to Park Street North of the site. The site is large and rectangular, relatively flat with minimal slopes, and is located in the 100 year Flood Zone. The future of existing buildings is unknown. Per Zoning District Use Regulation Chart: (VR) Library and Government are conditional use. Site is within the Campus Overlay District. Option 7 is a plan to locate an elevated two story building as close as possible to the South property line of the site. Ground level would include building entrance and exits with covered parking. First occupied level above grade includes Town Offices, Police Facility, Historical Society and Community Room. The Library would be located on the top floor. Most of the existing paved lot would be repaved. Selected paved areas are removed for building and new parking islands. Reuse of or addition to the Stanley & Wasson building for Town use is not considered viable. Advantages: Elevated floor scheme places facility above the 500-year Flood Level. Additional parking located at grade is provided below building. Availability of existing site infrastructure will not add cost to site work. Improved visibility from Main Street. Disadvantages: The Building will require substantially robust structure and finishes to withstand flooding. Flood conditions will require evacuation and render the building inaccessible. Parking must be provided for Stanley / Wasson. (unknown quantity)

Option 8
Library & State of Vermont Site Lot 6 Estimated cost: $6,974,123
For this option, we are utilizing two building sites to accomplish the required programming. The Public Library & Historical Society would remain on the current site and would be improved with additions and renovations. The existing parking lot adjacent to the Stanley & Wasson buildings on the grounds of the Vermont State Office Complex would accommodate the remaining uses of Municipal Offices, Community Rooms, and Police. The building would be a single floor above a parking level on grade. Per Zoning District Use Reg. Chart & Bylaws: The existing library site (VMR) Library is permitted use. Lot 6 (VR, COD) Government is conditional use. The Library site will include a total of 30 parking spaces and associated drives. The Lot 6 site parking will be determined by the needs of the existing Stanley and Wasson buildings. Advantages: Elevated floor scheme places facility above the 500-year Flood Level. Availability of existing site infrastructure keeps site work cost reasonable Existing Library building remains the primary public face of the property. Community Garden space to remain although relocated. Disadvantages: The Building will require substantially robust structure and finishes to withstand flooding. Flood conditions will require evacuation and render the building inaccessible. Parking must be provided for Stanley / Wasson. Separate site infrastructures will add cost to site work. Added maintenance costs and utility costs for separate locations.

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SECTION 2:

Costs

Option 1
Library Site Estimated cost: $4,610,150
Total Building Area: New building*: Existing Building: 19,100 Square Feet 13,700 SF 5,400 SF (* Police not included)

Costs: Site (Including Selected Demolition): o $ 608,474. Building: o $3,259,910. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $3,868,384. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 464,206. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 58,026. Project Cost: o $4,390,620. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 219,531. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $4,610,150.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800). Police (Min. $230/ Sq Ft)

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any). Historic Impact Mitigation

Option 2
Library Site Estimated cost: $4,625,717
Total Building Area: New building*: Existing Building: 19,100 Square Feet 13,700 SF 5,400 SF (*Police not included)

Costs: Site (Including Selected Demolition): o $ 621,734. Building: o $3,259,710. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $3,881,449. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 465,774. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 58,222. Project Cost: o $4,405,445. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 220,272. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $4,625,717.00

Not Included: Police (Min. $230/ Sq Ft) Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any). Historic Impact Mitigation.

Option 3
Library Site Estimated cost: $5,384,000
Total Building Area: New building: Existing Building: 20,900 Square Feet 15,500 SF 5,400 SF

Costs: Site (Including Selected Demolition): o $ 672,081. Building: o $3,845,650. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $4,517,730. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 542,128. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 67,766. Project Cost: o $5,127,620. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 256,381. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $5,384,000.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any). Historic Impact Mitigation.

Option 4
Armory Site Estimated cost: $7,446,754
Total Building Area: 17,300 Square Feet Costs: Site (Including Demolition): o $2,218,183. Building: o $4,030,404. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $6,248,587. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 749,830. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 93,729. Project Cost: o $7,092,146. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 354,607. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $7,446,754.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any). Off-Site Storage Building.

Option 5
Armory Site Estimated cost: $7,699,080
Total Building Area: 18,650 Square Feet Costs: Site (Including Demolition): o $1,958,330. Building: o $4,501,990. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $6,460,317. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 775,238. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 96,905. Project Cost: o $7,332,460. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 366,623. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $7,699,080.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800 + $40,000 to elevate).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any). Off-Site Storage Building.

Option 6
State of Vermont Lot 6 Site Estimated cost: $6,367,308
Total Building Area: 18,200 Square Feet Costs: Site: o $ 499,715. Building: o $4,843,107. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $5,342,822. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 641,139. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 80,142. Project Cost: o $6,064,103. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 303,205. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $6,367,308.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800 + $40,000 to elevate).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any).

Option 7
State of Vermont Lot 6 Site Estimated cost: $6,482,970.
Total Building Area: 18,200 Square Feet Costs: Site: o $ 567,536. Building: o $4,872,338. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $5,342,822. A & E Fees (12%): o $ 652,785. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 81,598. Project Cost: o $6,174,257. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 308,713. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $6,482,970.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800 + $40,000 to elevate).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any).

Option 8
Library & State of Vermont Lot 6 Site Estimated cost: $6,974,123.
Total Building Area: New building: Existing Building: 20,900 Square Feet 15,500 SF 5,400 SF

Costs: Site: (Including Selected Demolition) o $ 801,445. Building: o $5,050,557. Total Building Cost (Including Builders Fees & Contingency): o $5,852,002 A & E Fees (12%): o $ 702,240. Permitting (1.5%): o $ 87,780. Project Cost: o $6,642,022. Owner Project Contingency (5%) o $ 332,101. TOTAL PROJECT COST: o $6,974,123.00

Not Included: Office furniture. Library furniture and shelving. Town Safe ($64,800 + $40,000 to elevate).

Site Acquisition Costs. Abatement Costs (If Any). Historic Impact Mitigation.

Relative Heating Comparison


Proposed Waterbury Municipal Building (New Construction only) Note: Estimated yearly therms are for comparison only and not representative of exact heating energy used. Scheme Descrption Option 1: One Building, 2 Floors Option 2: One Building, 1 Floor Option 3: Two Buildings, 1 Floor Each Option 4: One Building, 2 Floors Option 5: Two Buildings, One with 1 Floor, One with @ Floors Options 6 & 7: One Building, 2 Floors with parking garage under Estimated Yearly Therms 862 * 911 * 1116 * 1021 1301 1463

13,650 sq ft 13,700 sq ft 15,500 sq ft 17,300 sq ft 18,650 sq ft 18,200 sq ft

* Does not include existing Library building in this estimate.

SECTION 3: Consultants Reports of Existing Building Conditions

October 9, 2013

Bill Shepeluk, Municipal Manager Town of Waterbury Municipal Office 51 South Main Street Waterbury, VT 05676 Re: Site Feasibility Study of the Waterbury Library Historic Preservation Recommendations for Future Use

Dear Mr. Shepeluk; Introduction At the request of Wiemann Lamphere Architects, I am submitting this letter report that provides information on the architectural and historic significance of the Waterbury Library at 28 North Main Street. I have also provided options for future uses of the building that in my professional opinion are appropriate for the age, character, and significance of this historic structure. Wiemann Lamphere Architects in collaboration with Waterburys Site Study Citizen Group is completing a site analysis of potential sites for housing the functions (municipal offices, library, police, and historical society) in the Village of Waterbury. This report comprises a brief assessment of The Waterbury Library with an inventory of significant architectural features that should be retained in order to allow the building to either remain in its current use or be adapted to a new use in a manner that would preserve the distinctive character of the building. Historic and Architectural Significance The Waterbury Library is a highly significant Queen Anne style building that was constructed c. 1890 as part of the estate of Dr. Henry Janes, a highly-regarded Waterbury doctor and descendant of early prominent citizens of the village. Janes gained national distinction for his work on the battlefields during the Civil War. Upon Janes death in 1915, the house was bequeathed to the town for use as a public library. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing resource (site #4) in the Waterbury Village Historic District (entered in the National Register on August 24, 1978). While the National Register nomination lists the construction date as c. 1890, features of the building such as split lath, up-and-down saw marks on boards and timbers, and hand wrought door hardware point to a construction date before the 1850s. It is likely that Dr. Janes updated an early house in the 1890s in the then fashionable Queen Anne style. A large dairy barn was formerly attached to the rear wing (see

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historic photograph), and the flat roof addition off the north elevation was added c. 1916 to increase shelving for the book stacks. The building remains in generally good condition and continues to convey its prominent visual role along the streetscape as an important building in Waterbury village. Distinctive Features The myriad character defining features of the Waterbury Library worthy of preservation are listed below. Exterior: Asymmetrical massing and complex roofline typical of the Queen Anne style created by dormers and bay windows in the front block, The connected 2-part, gable roof rear wing is representative of continuous architecture common in the mid-to late 19th century in New England, Queen Anne style features include multiple building materials such as brick on the first story of the front block and clapboards and wood shingles on the upper stories, elongated one-over-one windows with multiple panes surrounding the central pane in the second floor upper sash, decorative wood trim including horizontal banding around the elevations of the front block and applied woodwork in the front and north gable peaks, and molded cornice trim over some windows, The c. 1916 addition built when the home was adapted for use as a library, Slate roofing, Brick wall chimney, Eastlake style front porch with pierced and applied wood trim details, and exposed rafter tails.

Interior: Open floorplan of the library in the front block defined by natural finish posts, Other natural finish woodwork around windows, doors, and for fireplace mantels and the front stairs, The pressed metal ceiling in the front block, The large collections room on the second floor, Historic natural finish Queen Anne style doors in the front block, and earlier painted, panel doors in the wings, Hardwood flooring on the second floor of the front block, Secondary spaces in the wing, such as smaller rooms including bathroom could be modified to accommodate a somewhat different floorplan for a new use.

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Summary and Recommendations for Future Use The Waterbury Library is a highly significant historic building in Waterbury due to its architectural and historic merit. The distinctive structure, located at the northern boundary of the historic district, serves as a very visible gateway to the historic district and village. The building continues to function in its intended use when Dr. Janes bequeathed the resource to the town for use as a library after his death in 1915. It would be appropriate to continue this use; however, the town could also chose to adapt the building for a new municipal use that would be appropriate and worthy of the historic character of this important community resource. When planning for the future of this significant building, due to its distinctive Queen Anne style character and its wealth of significant architectural features, retaining the features that reflect this style is highly recommended. This would include all features noted above on the exterior, and the front block interior features. The interior features of the rear wing are less unusual and thereby the floorplan could be modified for a new use. Any features of the wing, both in massing or interior elements that are less than 50 years old would be considered non-historic and could be removed or modified in a manner that complies with The Secretary of the Interiors Standards (see attached), so that footprint changes or other alterations would not have an adverse impact on the character of the existing building overall. New, traditional size, vertical window openings, could be added at the rear wing if determined necessary. A new addition off the west end of the existing building, or a separate structure set back at the rear of the property, would also be possible, as long as the new construction complies with The Secretarys Standards (see Standards 9 & 10). The new addition could reflect the size and massing of the former barn that originally was attached to the west end of the rear wing. Please contact the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation prior to construction regarding the potential for impacts to archeological resources. Sincerely yours,

Liz Pritchett Historic Preservation Consultant cc: Wiemann Lamphere Architects

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CURRENT PHOTOGRAPHS WATERBURY LIBRARY

1. View looking northwest from Main Street. The barn formerly extended westerly from the rear wing.

2. View looking northwest of front block and rear wing.

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3. View of the Eastlake style front entrance porch.

4. View looking southwest from Main Street. Note 1916 addition on right.

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5. View looking northeast of the 2-part, gable roof rear wing and Queen Anne style front block.

6. Interior view of entrance hall looking south to entrance. Note historic stairs on left.

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7. Interior view of front block, first floor, which retains its historic metal ceiling, natural finish woodwork including fireplace mantels and shelving.

8. Historical Society collections on second floor of main block; note historic wood flooring.

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9. Painted panel doors and flat trim in rear wing likely date from the early to mid-19th century.

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HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH

6. Historic Photograph of the Janes house including the barn that was formerly attached to the west end of the rear wing of the house. Courtesy Waterbury Historical Society.

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Standards for Rehabilitation .


The Secretary of the Interiors Standards for Rehabilitation are ten basic principles created to help preserve the distinctive character of a historic building and its site, while allowing for reasonable change to meet new needs. The Standards (36 CFR Part 67) apply to historic buildings of all periods, styles, types, materials, and sizes. They apply to both the exterior and in the interior of historic buildings. The Standards also encompass related landscape features and the buildings site and environment as well as attached, adjacent, or related new construction. The Standards are applied to projects in a reasonable manner, taking into consideration economic and technical feasibility. 1. A property shall be used for its historic purpose or be placed in a new use that requires minimal change to the defining characteristics of the building and its site and environment. The historic character of a property shall be retained and preserved. The removal of historic materials or alteration of features and spaces that characterize a property shall be avoided. Each property shall be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or architectural elements from other buildings, shall not be undertaken. Most properties change over time; those changes that have acquired historic significance in their own right shall be retained and preserved. Distinctive features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property shall be preserved. Deteriorated historic features shall be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature shall match the old in design, color, texture, and other visual qualities and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features shall be substantiated by documentary, physical, or pictorial evidence. Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblasting, that cause damage to historic materials, shall not be used. The surface cleaning of structures, if appropriate, shall be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Significant archeological resources affected by a project shall be protected and preserved. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures shall be undertaken. New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction shall not destroy historic materials that characterize the property. The new work shall be compatible with the massing, size, scale, and architectural features to protect the historic integrity of the property and its environment. New additions and adjacent or related new construction shall be undertaken in such a manner that if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.

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Waterbury Library Mechanical Systems Assessment: Shaw Engineering, LLC The heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems at the Janes House were reviewed during a site survey on September 23, 2013. Existing conditions and recommended upgrades with opinion of probable cost for each upgrade are listed below. Heating: Heat is provided to the first and second floors through steam radiators positioned throughout each floor. A single thermostat located on the first floor controls the heat for the entire building. Steam is provided by an oil fired boiler in the basement. The boiler is a Peerless SC-SCT-05 W/S with heating capacity of 343,000 btu/hr. The boiler has a Beckett burner and enisys burner control. A 275 gallon oil storage tank is located in the basement. The boiler appears to be fairly new, and in good shape. The existing heating system is a one pipe steam system. There is a single pipe that runs in a circuit around the basement, with takeoffs to the various radiators on the first and second floors. Both steam from the boiler and condensate returning to the boiler run in the single pipe. The centrally located first floor thermostat controls the temperature of the whole building by turning the boiler on and off as needed. A one pipe steam system is a very simple system, but can have several drawbacks:
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As the boiler comes on and steam is sent out into the system, air must be forced from the pipe. To allow this, each radiator has an air vent. Over time, these air vents can become stuck open, allowing steam to escape from the system and enter the room, or stick shut, not allowing any steam (or heat) into the radiator. Radiators near the boiler will tend to get steam first, and can become hot enough to satisfy the thermostat and turn off the boiler before all areas of the building are heated. There can be no space by space control of the system. The steam and the condensate enter and leave the radiator by the manual valve at the bottom of the radiator. The valve must be fully open to operate. If some control is attempted by partially closing the valve, the condensate wont be able to flow out, and will accumulate, causing water hammer as the steam bubbles through it.

These drawbacks make it hard to have any control or uniform heating throughout the building. The recommended upgrade to this system would be to remove the steam radiators and piping, and install a modern hot water system with fin tube radiation or cabinet heaters as appropriate, and zone circulators to allow separate control in the various areas of the building. The existing boiler can be converted to hot water and reused. Depending on the frequency of fill ups for the oil tank, a second storage tank might be appropriate. A combustion air system should be added to be sure the boiler can get the required combustion air to operate efficiently. This would be particularly important if the building was weatherproofed and sealed against infiltration. With a hot water heating system, the boiler would maintain water temperature at all times, and when an area thermostat called for heat, the circulator for that area would start, causing water to flow from the boiler and provide heat to that area. In this way,

heat can be provided only where it is needed at the moment, and not overheating areas that dont need heat. The temperature of the water from the boiler can be reset based on the outside air temperature. During spring and fall, when there is not as much heat required, the water temperature can be kept low (around 140 deg). As it gets colder outside, the water temperature is reset up(around 180 deg), to provide the required heat to the fin tube radiation. This upgrade would mostly provide better comfort, but the fact that areas could be zoned off and maintained at different temperatures, and the boiler water temperature can be reset would also add to the efficiency of the system. The probable cost of this upgrade, including circulators, piping, insulation, fin tube radiation, expansion tank, combustion air system, controls, re-using existing boiler and adding a second 275 gallon storage tank would be in the range of $58,120.00 Cooling: Cooling is currently provided by three small window air conditioners on the first floor, and one small window air conditioner on the second floor. (Approximate total capacity installed: 2 tons). Although cooling isnt always as important as heating, it can help to make the building more comfortable during the warmer months. Based on the square footage of the building, it is estimated that 4 to 5 tons of cooling would be required to provide full air conditioning. The recommended upgrade to the cooling system would be to replace the window A/C units with ductless split systems and increase the total capacity to 5 tons. The probable cost of this upgrade would be in the range of $7275.00 Ventilation: The library has operable windows, which allow for natural ventilation. However, when it is too cold to have the windows open, the amount of ventilation available is greatly reduced. There are two toilet rooms, one on each floor. The first floor has an exhaust fan, but the second floor does not. The recommended upgrade to the ventilation system would be to add energy recovery units to each floor to provide exhaust for toilet rooms and fresh air to the general areas. Fresh Air being brought into the building would recover the heat in the air that is being exhausted from the building. The probable cost of this upgrade would be in the range of $3800.00 End of Mechanical System Assessment

October 14, 2013

Bill Shepeluk, Municipal Manager Town of Waterbury Municipal Office 51 South Main Street Waterbury, VT 05676 Re: Site Feasibility Study of the Old Waterbury Armory, Armory Avenue, Waterbury, VT Historic Preservation Recommendations for Future Use

Dear Mr. Shepeluk; Introduction At the request of Wiemann Lamphere Architects, I am submitting this letter report that provides information on the architectural and historic significance of the Armory Building, located on Armory Avenue behind Thatcher Brook School. I have also included recommendations for the future use of the building that in my professional opinion are appropriate for the age, character, significance, and condition of the structure. Wiemann Lamphere Architects in collaboration with Waterburys Site Study Citizen Group is completing a site analysis of potential sites for housing the functions (municipal offices, library, police, and historical society) in the Village of Waterbury. This report comprises a brief assessment of the historic building with an inventory of significant architectural features that should be retained in order to allow the building to either remain in its current use or be adapted to a new use in a manner that would preserve the character of the building. Historic and Architectural Significance The building called the old Armory in Waterbury was built c. 1950. According to Linda Kaiser, Archivist of the Waterbury Historical Society, the old Armory functioned as a vehicle storage and maintenance facility for the Vermont National Guard. The members of the National Guard had an office nearby in the basement of the elementary grades section of the Waterbury School (now Thatcher Brook School). The new National Guard Armory, designed in the International Style by Vermont architect, Marcel Beaudin, was built in 1956 on Armory Drive off Route 100. The Vermont National Guard Armory has been determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places as a good example of the International Style due to its low, flat, roof, simple geometric massing, clerestory ribbon windows, smooth brick wall surfaces, and lack of ornamentation, and for its historical association with a military service in the context of peace

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and protection. (Survey of International Style Buildings in Vermont, c. 1937 c. 1975, Liz Pritchett, 2003) The old Armory, now serves as a vehicle storage and maintenance building for the Town of Waterbury. The condition of the building is fair to poor, primarily due to severe structural cracks in many areas of the masonry walls. Based on information in the Historic Resource Identification and Vermont Historic Sites and Structures Survey Report for 1950s -1960 Vermont Military Department Resources at Camp Johnson and Vermont Army National Guard Armory Complexes prepared by Historic Preservation Consultant Paula Sagerman in 2010, the old Waterbury Armory appears eligible for the State and National Registers as a good example of a motor vehicle storage building associated with Vermonts Cold War era military resources. Ms. Sagermans report documents twelve historic armories, eight armory auxiliary buildings, plus two historic rocket storage buildings at Camp Johnson, the Vermont Army National Guards headquarters in Colchester. The armories, motor vehicle storage buildings, and rocket storage buildings help depict the history of the Vermont Army National Guard, as well as Vermonts Cold War history, a significant time period of this countrys history, when the United States military was reorganized due to the perception of an imminent attack by the U.S.S.R. Because armories and their associated structures, such and vehicle storage buildings, are so rare at both the state and national levels, even a fragment of one of these resources might still qualify for designation in the National Register of Historic Places. Distinctive Features According to Ms. Sagermans report, the severe modern appearance of the armories depicts the typical architecture of the mid-twentieth century, and the design is typical of 1950s armories not just in Vermont, but around the United States. The motor vehicle storage buildings were the first military structures built in Vermont after World War II. These less architecturally detailed structures, are utilitarian in form and feature, and unlike the armories of the 1950s to 1960, are not representative of a particular architectural style, yet are still highly significant due to their historic associations. Ms Sagermans report identifies two identical, large motor vehicle storage buildings in Ludlow and St. Albans that were designed by the Army Corps of Engineers and constructed in 1949. The first, or old, Waterbury armory that was built to house and service military vehicles appears nearly identical to the St. Albans and Ludlow buildings, but it is not identified in the inventory in Ms. Sagermans report. Both the Ludlow and St. Albans Vehicle Storage buildings were determined eligible for the State and National Historic Registers. Therefore, because the Waterbury building is nearly identical to these other two, it appears the Waterbury old Armory is likely eligible for listing in the State and National Registers.

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Distinctive features found on the old Waterbury Armory (and also found on the Ludlow and St. Albans Vehicle Storage buildings) are listed below. Exterior: Long, rectangular, gable roof, one-story massing, Tall, wide, garage bays with overhead doors on each gable end, Small, 12-pane, steel frame windows at the top of the side elevations and in the gable peaks, Structural concrete block and brick masonry walls. Interior: Open interior with exposed steel framing members.

Summary and Recommendations for Future Use The c. 1950, old Waterbury Armory appears to retain sufficient architectural and historic significance to qualify for listing in the Vermont and National Registers. The simple, utilitarian form and features of the building are nearly identical to similar buildings in St. Albans and Ludlow that were built at the same time and for the same purpose as storage and maintenance buildings for the Vermont National Guard. The old Waterbury Armory, despite its simple form and lack of detail or other ornamental features, is considered a good example of a rare building type, and due to its overall integrity, having been little changed since construction, and its historic associations with the Vermont National Guard during the Cold War era, the building retains sufficient integrity to qualify for the State and National Registers. However, while integrity of design remains intact overall, integrity of materials at the old Armory is poor. The major concern is the structural brick and concrete block masonry, which exhibits large diagonal cracking in many areas, especially at the corners of the building. An engineering analysis should be conducted to more fully determine the condition of the structure, and if the building is a reasonable candidate for rehabilitation. It may be likely that the cost of rehabilitation is not a reasonable option for the future of this resource. Future uses of the building appear limited, if indeed it is determined sufficiently sound to rehabilitate. The open floorplan would adapt well to new interior walls or office partitions, but the lack of windows makes the space unappealing as office space. The structure could continue to function as a storage facility, but it appears likely that primarily due to its poor condition the structure has outlived its useful life and is not a good candidate for adaptive reuse. Removal of the building from the site would result in an adverse effect to the historic resource due to its significance; however, demolition may possibly be justified in this particular situation based on the condition as outlined in an engineers report and the high cost of rehabilitation. If the town determines that taking down the old Armory building is justified, then the building

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should be documented with photographs and a brief narrative that records the architectural and historic significance of this resource in Waterbury, on both the State and National levels. Please contact the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation prior to construction or demolition regarding the potential for impacts to archeological resources. Sincerely yours,

Liz Pritchett Historic Preservation Consultant cc: Wiemann Lamphere Architects

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CURRENT PHOTOGRAPHS OLD WATERBURY ARMORY

1. View of west end of Old Armory looking southeast.

2. Detail of large structural crack in the north elevation near the northwest corner.

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3. View of east end of Old Armory looking northwest.

4. View looking west along the south elevation. Note cracks in brick at east elevation.

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5. Detail of photo above, showing two large, diagonal cracks in the east elevation.

6. Close up of one crack in the east end of the building.

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7. View of typical steel frame window on south elevation.

8. Interior view of north wall structural masonry.

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Standards for Rehabilitation .


The Secretary of the Interiors Standards for Rehabilitation are ten basic principles created to help preserve the distinctive character of a historic building and its site, while allowing for reasonable change to meet new needs. The Standards (36 CFR Part 67) apply to historic buildings of all periods, styles, types, materials, and sizes. They apply to both the exterior and in the interior of historic buildings. The Standards also encompass related landscape features and the buildings site and environment as well as attached, adjacent, or related new construction. The Standards are applied to projects in a reasonable manner, taking into consideration economic and technical feasibility. 1. A property shall be used for its historic purpose or be placed in a new use that requires minimal change to the defining characteristics of the building and its site and environment. The historic character of a property shall be retained and preserved. The removal of historic materials or alteration of features and spaces that characterize a property shall be avoided. Each property shall be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or architectural elements from other buildings, shall not be undertaken. Most properties change over time; those changes that have acquired historic significance in their own right shall be retained and preserved. Distinctive features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property shall be preserved. Deteriorated historic features shall be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature shall match the old in design, color, texture, and other visual qualities and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features shall be substantiated by documentary, physical, or pictorial evidence. Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblasting, that cause damage to historic materials, shall not be used. The surface cleaning of structures, if appropriate, shall be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Significant archeological resources affected by a project shall be protected and preserved. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures shall be undertaken. New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction shall not destroy historic materials that characterize the property. The new work shall be compatible with the massing, size, scale, and architectural features to protect the historic integrity of the property and its environment. New additions and adjacent or related new construction shall be undertaken in such a manner that if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.

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\ St. Albans Motor Vehicle Storage Building, Field Maintenance Shop, and Flammable Material Storage Building, 1949, Franklin County, Vermont. April 2009 Photograph, Courtesy Paula Sagerman.