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LOCAL WOMEN SHARE THEIR STORIES IN HOPES OF HELPING OTHERS

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS


It was really nice to see everyone was so forthcoming with the yes you can do it ... the support was really good.

Cathy Sullivan
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Towns go pink
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ALSO INSIDE:

`` How to Support a Breast Cancer Patient `` The Best Prevention Foods `` Advances in Breast Reconstruction and Technology

Life moves on with new normals, new goals, new outlooks.

The Salem News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

This Breast Cancer Initiative is brought to you by

and these local partners:

BEVERLY M. SHAFER, M.D. FACS

PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY


900 CUMMINGS CENTER, SUITE 112 W, BEVERLY 978-927-8844

District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett

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John Keenan State Rep. - Salem

BREAST CANCER

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Tinti, Quinn, Grover & Frey, P.C. Attorneys At Law

Mayor Kim Driscoll

ve spent a lot of time talking about breast cancer awareness during the past several weeks. The great news is that community support of this Salem News special project has been overwhelming. The bad news is that just about everyone Ive spoken to has a personal connection to the disease. And some of the stories do not have happy endings. Wives. Mothers. Sisters. Best friends. Everyone knows a woman, or a man, affected by breast cancer. Through the efforts of the Salem News and the generosity of 57 business leaders on the North Shore, we are hopeful that the number of those stories will diminish, and that far more will have happy endings. I am very proud of this effort to put breast cancer awareness front and center. This special edition offers much more than pink ink and pink ribbons. On these pages you will find the inspirational story of Cathy Sullivan of Beverly, who bravely shares her experience battling breast cancer; words from retired Marine Peter Devereaux, one of the thousands of men diagnosed each year; news of the 5K walk/run in Karen Andreas memory of Danvers beloved Lynda Talbot, who died in 2010 at age 61. A special thank you to the leaders here on the North Shore who helped make this effort possible through their sponsorships. You will see their messages of hope and support throughout this special edition, as well as on our website and regular Salem News pages. The National Breast Cancer Foundation tells us that when breast cancer is detected early, at the so-called localized stage, the five-year survival rate is 98 percent. That means prevention is key. Monthly selfexams and mammograms are a must. Still, other facts are alarming: 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. And more than 232,000 women and 2,200 men are expected to be diagnosed in 2013 alone. The fight is on. And your Salem News, and your local leaders, stand ready for action.

The fight continues

KAREN ANDREAS Publisher The Salem News and North of Boston Media Group

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Elaine Ham Glass, left, and Elaine Seifert attach pink bows to the pillars at the Peabody Institute Library as part of their campaign to pink up Danvers for breast cancer awareness.

KEN YUSZKUS/Staff photo

Women deck Danvers in pink to raise awareness of breast cancer

BY ETHAN FORMAN
STAFF WRITER

DANVERS Some North Shore women have decked the town in pink as a way to raise awareness about breast cancer and cancer in general. Ham Glass, Ruth DeSoto and Elaine Seifert have put up pink ribbons and bows around town to mark October as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Seifert, 62, is a retired nurse and a nineyear survivor of breast cancer, after a nine-month battle with the disease in 2004. Definitely, the town of Danvers has been aware of this situation (the prevalence of breast cancer) because we are just surrounded by hospitals. You name it, theyre there, said Glass, a former longtime Marblehead resident. The woman recently approached selectmen and the town manager for guidance about putting up pink ribbons on lamp posts and various fixtures around town. Pink it up, Selectwoman Diane Langlais told the women. It was really nice to see everyone was so forthcoming with the yes you can do it, the support was really good, said Seifert, a resident of West Peabody. DeSoto, who works at Hospice of the North Shore and Greater Boston, also lives in West Peabody.

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Cities and towns all over the country are putting up pink ribbons to make people more aware of breast cancer, which one in eight women will be diagnosed with in their lifetime
The women even suggested Danvers firefighters wear pink T-shirts, but fire Chief Kevin Farrell said the departments uniform policy does not allow it. Instead, this month, firefighters are wearing pink ribbons on their uniforms, and the department has installed pink ribbon decals on the cabin windows of fire trucks. The whole push at the Fire Department is to make people aware of cancer in general, Farrell said. One of the departments former firefighters, Matthew Smith, 45, died in March 2012 after a two-year battle with melanoma. Firefighters face an increased cancer risk because of the toxins they are exposed to when they battle a blaze, Farrell said. The idea of the cancer awareness is to make sure people get their annual checkups because early detection can make a difference. Glass said cities and towns all over the country are putting up pink ribbons to make people more aware of breast cancer, which one in eight women will be diagnosed with in their lifetime, according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation Inc. The women have been raising money for breast cancer since 2005, walking with a team in Susan G. Komen for the Cure walks. The team has raised $2 million over the years. For the past year, the women having been raising money for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, holding a recent peach festival at Connors Farm on Valley Street for the cause. Glass said the pink ribbon

From left, Capt. Ken Reardon, Paul Lapointe, Steve Deroche, Pete Carter, Brandon Lamson, Jim Ciman and Nancy Libby, all of the Danvers Fire Department, stand in front of one of their engines displaying a pink ribbon for breast cancer awareness. The firefighters will also wear pink ribbons on their uniforms throughout the month of October.
awareness campaign is not meant as a fundraiser. We are not asking for money this year, but people are walking up and saying, can I give you money? Glass said. On a recent morning, the women decorated the headquarters of Hospice on Sylvan Street, the Holten Richmond Middle School on Conant Street, and they are eyeing some private historic homes as well. They have pinked up Danvers High, Danvers Town Hall, Danvers Square and the Peoples United Bank. The pink ribbons were donated by Currans Brothers Florists and Greenhouses on Park Street in Danvers, Nunans Florist and Greenhouses in Georgetown, The Leonhards Florist in Beverly and Flores Mantilla in

DAVID LE/Staff photo

Marblehead, Glass said. Staff writer Ethan Forman can be reached at 978-3382673, by email at eforman@ salemnews.com or on Twitter at @DanverSalemNews.

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

182 North Street

THE BUTCHERY
The Difference is Delicious!

DANVERS
978-777-3000
Open 9AM-7PM 7 days a week

2 Morgan Avenue

NEWBURY
978-463-3001
Open 9AM-7PM 7 days a week

Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month

k n i Th k n Pi
Directions to the Danvers Store: Take Route 1 North Danvers To Traffic Lights, Turn Right Directions to the Newbury Store: Take Route One North to Rotary. Take 1st Exit onto Parker Street. Proceed across 1A to Morgan Ave. (next to Town Hall)

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IMPROVING THE ODDS:

It takes a team
Andrea McKee, MD, and Kim Willis, NP-C, MSN CBPN-IC

intraoperative radiation Breast cancer affects therapy (IORT) coming to more than 200,000 women Today, specialists address all aspects of a womans care Lahey Hospital and Medievery year; however, death cal Center this fall mean not just the treatment itself, but its effects on her life, rates are falling, and the that we can provide the odds are shifting in favor her family and those closest to her. We work to provide level-of-care treatment that of patients. Today, more best meets the patients women are surviving a patients with the education, resources and support they needs. For example, IORT breast cancer diagnosis, reduce typical radiathanks to greater puband their families need to help manage the unique physical can tion treatment therapy lic awareness about the from daily for six weeks to importance of annual and emotional challenges that diagnosis brings. one dose delivered in the mammograms, extraordioperating room. Imagine nary advances in diagnoshow this will significantly tics and treatment, and a emotional challenges that diagnosis brings. improve the quality of life for patients. more personalized approach to care. Lahey Health member hospitals are privA significant development in recent years When breast cancer is detected, patient is the addition of the patient nurse naviga- ileged to treat and truly care for women support is vital to treatment success. In a study published this month in the Journal tor who guides women through the process during this challenging time in their lives. We take pride in our work to not only proof Clinical Oncology, Harvard researchers of care every step of the way, helping to vide patients with the latest clinical care, confirmed what weve always seen: Support reduce stress and anxiety. Patient navigabut also the most thoughtful and conscientors are integral members of the team, from spouses, family and friends signifiworking closely with our breast surgeons, tious care for their emotional well-being, cantly improves chances of survival. and that of their families. At Lahey Health member hospitals, care oncologists and social workers to explain Our commitment to patients does not end clinical information, coordinate appointis provided by dedicated teams breast when treatment does. As health care proments, and locate resources within the surgeons, medical and radiation oncoloviders, we continue to offer each woman hospital and the community for patients gists, social workers and patient navigathe support and resources she needs to that enhance care and provide emotional tors who work together to educate and maintain breast health, remain cancer-free support for women and her loved ones. engage women about their treatment and live the best life she can. Also important for patients is access to options. Discussions go beyond the parsupport groups. Support groups, a number ticulars of her breast cancer such as of which are offered through our hospitals, the tumors type, size and location, and Andrea McKee, MD, is chairman of the provide vital connections for women who whether lymph nodes are involved to Department of Radiation Oncology at the are experiencing the same challenges; and Sophia Gordon Cancer Center, Lahey Hosinclude her emotional health, values, suphelp arm newly diagnosed patients with port system and quality-of-life needs. pital and Medical Center. knowledge about breast cancer, provide Today, specialists address all aspects of Kim Willis, NP-C, MSN CBPN-IC, is a cerinsights into their own personal strengths tified breast imaging/cancer care navigator a womans care not just the treatment and often lead to lasting friendships. itself, but its effects on her life, her family at Lahey Outpatient Center, Danvers an Advances in treatment options, such as and those closest to her. We work to prooutpatient center of Beverly Hospital. vide patients with the education, resources targeted drug therapies, breast conservLaheys member hospitals include Addiing surgery and accelerated partial breast and support they and their families need son Gilbert Hospital in Gloucester and Bevirradiation (APBI) including advanced to help manage the unique physical and erly Hospital.

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Retired Marine stays active despite stage 4 breast cancer


By Katherine Stephens
GORDON COLLEGE NEWS SERVICE

PEABODY When retired Marine and North Andover resident Peter Devereaux, 51, bumped his hand into his chest one morning and felt a lump, he thought it was a cyst or fatty tissue. Disbelief and shock overwhelmed him when the doctor called back with the results: breast cancer. I had no idea men could have breast cancer. I repeated my name on the phone because I wanted to make sure he was looking at my records, said Devereaux, who was diagnosed with stage 3B invasive ductal carcinoma in January of 2008. I can remember the day: It was a Wednesday night, my wife was working late and my daughter, Jackie, was watching Sponge Bob in the other room, he said. She was 10 years old at the time. Devereaux enlisted in the Marines after graduating from Peabody High School in 1980, and is one of 82 men diagnosed with breast cancer from a speculated water contamination at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. Devereaux, who was at the base from 1980 to 1982, did not know this was a possible cause until he was already six months into treatment. After 14 months of aggressive radiation, a mastectomy and the removal of 22 lymph nodes, Devereaux was exhausted and knew there was a high probability of the

cancer returning. The body gets beat up. Even now, Im 51, but I feel like Im 80, said Devereaux. In 2009, Devereaux, a former boxer and ultramarathon runner, learned that the cancer had spread to his spine and ribs, reaching stage 4, metastatic breast cancer. Just this year, Devereaux was told that the cancer had spread again to his lung and liver. Despite repeatedly disappointing news, Devereaux took action early on and remains hopeful, working hard to live an active, healthy and positive life. If you do just conventional treatment, you wont live. Thats the fact, said Devereaux. You have to be proactive and do alternative stuff, everything from juicing, to changing your diet, to exercise, to acupuncture, massages and mediation. Anything to help all of the poison being put in you. Anne Kelly, 60, a nurse practitioner with Bostons Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in the Susan F. Smith Center for Breast Cancer, has known Devereaux since he was diagnosed. We try to encourage people to stay active, like Peter has done, and we try to make sure their treatment will allow them to be active, because maintaining a healthy mind-and-body connection is the best way to handle treatment, said Kelly. You also need to have family support. As one of seven siblings and a husband and father, Devereaux surrounds

You have to be proactive and do alternative stuff, everything from juicing, to changing your diet, to exercise, to acupuncture ...
worth something. I have to be involved in the change and finding a cure, said Devereaux. It cant be for nothing. I have cancer, but it doesnt have me. In 2011, some of his biggest supporters, a group of men he played basketball with, approached Devereux about starting a four-onfour basketball tournament to raise money for breast cancer awareness. What has now become the Turkey Shoot Out fundraiser is an action-packed event that takes place after Thanksgiving at the World Gym in Danvers. This years event is Saturday, Nov. 30, and costs $25 per person and $100 a team. The proceeds KATHERINE STEPHENS/Gordon College News Service go to the Hope and FriendPeter Devereaux, a retired Marine, works to raise awareness of the fact that men can also be ship Metastatic Breast Cancer group. struck with breast cancer. You have to do things you love, surround yourself awareness. He has had an himself with the people he Breast Cancer Coalition on with the right people and loves, and remains active in effect locally and nationally, breast cancer awareness, train all of your friends and and as long as hes feeling raising awareness for men and to MD Anderson Cancer family on how you want to good, hell do whatever he and breast cancer. be treated, said Devereaux. Center in Houston, Texas, The advocacy work keeps can. They know its never going for a conference. He has Devereaux has parhim going sometimes. He also traveled to Washington, to be a pity party around ticipated in events with Art D.C., eight times to create loves sharing his story, me. I want positive energy. beCAUSE, a breast cancer said Fiona Maguire, 48, I have a great life, and Im awareness. foundation. He has travDevereauxs wife. I can one of the richest guys I I ask a lot why was I see the difference he has given this disease, but since know, besides having stage 4 eled to San Diego to take a made in male breast cancer class hosted by the National I have it, Ive got to make it breast cancer.

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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National cancer survivor group has success at North Shore YMCA


By Dave Hicks
GORDON COLLEGE NEWS SERVICE

MARBLEHEAD Six years ago, Sheila Vitale of Marblehead beat breast cancer. Even as she battled the disease, she continued playing the violin for the Boston Ballet. Now shes meeting with local survivors to continue recovering an active lifestyle. Vitale is one of eight cancer survivors who are participating in a new pilot program at the Lynch/van Otterloo YMCA on Leggs Hill Road. On Sept. 23, the organization partnered with the LIVESTRONG Foundation to offer a new 12-week fitness program for cancer survivors. Although the program has been underway at YMCAs across the nation more than 22 are in Massachusetts Lynch/van Otterloo is the first to offer it on the North Shore. It really was very emotional for me to meet with the group and to say again that I am a cancer survivor, said Vitale, 70. Even though we are different ages and at different stages of treatment, the fact that we all have cancer in common gives us space to talk about things that worry us. The new group was launched because everyone knows someone who has been affected by cancer, Lynch/van OtterlooHealth and Wellness Director

they can feel better and move forward in their lives. Potvin said one participant had to walk with a cane and was unable to take the stairs when he began the program. Now, he walks without the cane and tackles the stairs to class. You cant attribute (that progress) to exercise quite yet, Potvin said. But it is a sign that confidence is being built. Andrea Klein, 63, who completed her treatment for breast cancer this past August, said the program has already helped her feel better. I already feel such a difference, mentally and physically, she said. The radiation and surgery took more out of me than I thought. I was feeling weak, but now my strength is really coming back. When the class concludes the YMCA plans to begin a second session for a new group of survivors in January. This will be an ongoing program, Bloch said. We will keep offering (the program) for as long as there is a demand. And despite being a quarter of the way through her Courtesy photo time with the program, Vitale said she had no regrets. YMCA fitness instructors who run LIVESTRONG programs are trained in the elements of cancer, post-rehab exercise and I get the feeling that even supportive cancer care, according to the programs Web page. though we will be finished, which they exercise under women and one man. Each open to any cancer surviJaime Bloch said. that wont be the end of our the guidance of three certi- group, she said. We are vors from the North Shore. participant went through Our question was: what Participants are given a free an assessment process that fied personal trainers. can we do? she said. We getting a great chance to We want to help them included gaining permisdecided this was a great way YMCA membership with know and encourage each build a community, said sion from their physician to support survivors in our access to any of the North other. As more and more and articulating their goals. Martha Potvin, 43, trainer Shore YMCAs. community, so we moved people begin to join in, I They meet twice a week for and program coordinator. The programs inauguforward with it. really think were just going To provide a setting where to grow. 90-minute sessions, during ral group includes seven The program is free and

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More options for women who choose

BREAST RECONSTRUCTION
By Cheryl Lecesse
STAFF WRITER

BEVERLY New trends and technological advances give women faced with a lumpectomy or mastectomy more options for breast reconstruction. Dr. Beverly Shafer, a plastic surgeon with an office in the Cummings Center, said the number of mastectomies, or removal of a breast, is decreasing in relation to the number of lumpectomies. A lot of that is because of earlier detection, Shafer said.
For a patient who is undergoing a lumpectomy followed by radiation, Shafer recommends undergoing breast reconstruction surgery before beginning radiation. I can do a plastic surgical procedure that can give the breasts a new shape, she explained.You want to have all the surgery before radiation starts. The breast tends to shrink a little during radiation, making it difficult to reconstruct an even shape across both breasts for some patients, reconstruction may involve a breast reduction in the healthy breast. Shafer said theres a three- to four-week golden window between surgery and treatment in which she likes to see patients.She stressed, however, that reconstruction after radiation is not impossible, and patients shouldnt be deterred from consulting a plastic surgeon. Plastic surgeons are beginning to use a patients own fat to fill any divots or hollows during reconstruction. The process is similar to skin grafting, in which surgeons take skin from one part of the body and transplant it to another. The fat that we graft contains some stem cells, Shafer said, allowing the fat to adapt easily to its new location. While surgeons cant completely reconstruct a persons breast with fat, Shafer said this form of grafting can take care of any indentations. An injection of a patients own fat can also help alleviate pain in a part of the breast where the skin may tighten during treatment, she said. For women who undergo a mastectomy, Shafer said surgeons have developed a

Plastic surgeons are beginning to use a patients own fat to fill any divots or hollows during reconstruction. The process is similar to skin grafting, in which surgeons take skin from one part of the body and transplant it to another.
breast cancer or ovarian cancer, they really should be seen by a geneticist, Shafer said. First, a computer program can help determine a persons risk for the disease. From there, the person can decide whether to undergo testing for the BRCAgene mutations. A person who tests positive can greatly reduce her chances of developing breast cancer by undergoing a bilateral mastectomy. Angelina Jolie made headlines earlier this year when she made the same choice. Shafer said women have been making the same decision for some time now, but there was a flurry of women seeking reconstruction after a bilateral mastectomy after Jolies announcement. Its helped to have somebody as prominent and visible as Angelina Jolie to help people face it positively and bravely, Shafer said. Finally, Shafer reminds women that, under the Breast Reconstruction Act, anyone who has any type of breast cancer surgery is covered under insurance for their reconstruction procedures.

Dr. Beverly Shafer


nipple-sparing technique. The result looks more like a breast augmentation than a reconstruction. Certain areas are doing it more than others, but its certainly moving towards the North Shore, she said. In terms of prevention, genetic testing can give women the upper hand in the fight against breast cancer.According to Shafer, research has shown that the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations can be passed down from both the paternal and maternal sides of a persons family. If a person does have a family history of

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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Mammography makes the difference. Get screened.


Todays amazing technology provides women with the breast health knowledge they need to be and stay healthy.
Complete breast health means providing care that is more about you. Our diverse resources for highly specialized needs include:
The Aurora Breast MRI, the only FDA-cleared, magnetic resonance i maging (MRI) system specically designed for 3-D bilateral breast imaging 3-D Mammography Breast Ultrasound
Comprehensive Breast Health Centers offered at:

Lahey Medical Center, Peabody 978.538.4250 Lahey Outpatient Center, Danvers An outpatient facility of Beverly Hospital

978.304.8101 Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, Burlington - 781.744.8834

This fall, Lahey Medical Center, Peabody will become the rst medical center in Massachusetts Breast to offer Breast Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT), tive Intraopera y p a advanced one-dose radiation treatment for Radiother ) early-stage breast cancer. (IORT
is Coming th fall

Learn more breast health tips with Kim Willis, NP-C, Certied Breast Patient Navigator, Lahey Outpatient Center, Danvers at YouTube.com/BeverlyHospital

SM

Lahey Health mammography facilities possess a valid license and certicate of inspection by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

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Stephanie Rooney and Cheri Johnson, both of Danvers, cross the finish line at last years run/walk.

Courtesy photo

Memorial run/walk has become a Danvers tradition


By Cheryl Lecesse
STAFF WRITER

DANVERS Last year, more than 500 people came to the Danvers YMCA to walk or run in honor of Lynda Talbot. Were just overwhelmed with the amount of support we get from the local people, said Stacy Bazylinski, one of Talbots daughters. Talbot, a lifelong Danvers

resident, fought breast cancer for more than two decades before succumbing to the disease in 2010 at the age of 61. My mother was an amazing person, she had the biggest heart, said Talbots daughter Julie Donnelly. She would do anything for anyone, so generous and thoughtful. Donnelly, Bazylinski and their family and friends are

Last years run/walk raised money for Art beCAUSE, which funds research on the environmental causes of breast cancer, and the Beth Israel Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Fund.
organizing the third annual Lynda J. Talbot Memorial 5K Run/Walk, set for Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Danvers YMCA. Proceeds from the $30 registration fee go toward the Lynda J. Talbot Memorial Scholarship and to benefit breast cancer research.

Last years run/walk raised money for Art beCAUSE, which funds research on the environmental causes of breast cancer, and the Beth Israel Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Fund. Talbot underwent her treatment at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.It wasnt until after her fourth breast cancer diagnosis that Talbot was tested

for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, which are known to cause breast cancer. She tested positive for BRCA2. Four days after Talbots death, Donnelly tested positive for the same gene mutation. Donnelly also went to Beth Israel, where she underwent a bilateral mastectomy. She also had breast reconstruction.

Talbot, Page S16

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TALBOT: Memorial run/walk has become a Danvers tradition


Continued from Page S15 North Shore, she said. A committee of about 15 people, made up of family I was able to make the decision to have the surgery and friends, start planning with the support of my hus- the race in the spring. A lot of them are working band, family and friends, moms and me, my sister and Donnelly said. my family are very grateful Last years event also for their time, Bazylinski raised money for the said. Danvers YMCA and two The 5-kilometer course scholarships for Danvers (3.1 miles) starts and finHigh graduates. My parents were gradu- ishes at the Danvers YMCA ates of Danvers High, said on Pickering Street, and travels by both the Talbots Bazylinski, as are most of home and the cemetery the run/walks committee where Talbot is buried. members. The race is a lot of work The Talbots had strong but its so worthwhile once ties to Danvers, andBazylits done, saidBazylinski. inski said many of the run/ Although Talbot kept her walk participants are local battle with breast cancer people. I think its one of the big- private, the annual run/walk ger road races in town as far has brought the community together in her memory. as the local runners on the This [the run/walk] is definitely not something she would be comfortable with, but definitely something she would have been proud of, said Bazylinski. It is a great way for our family, friends and the community to remember my mother and also raise money for a great cause, said Donnelly.

The Lynda J. Talbot Memorial Run/Walk takes place Saturday, Oct. 19, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with same-day registration starting at 8:30 a.m. The event takes place at the Danvers YMCA, 34 Pickering St. The fee is $30 for the 5K run, $20 for children under 18. Go to www.racewire.com/talbot to sign up.

Committee members at the Lynda J. Talbot Fundraiser Night at Mattys Food and Spirits in Danvers. In top row from left, Keri Smith Demers and Jani Haibon Wilichoski. In second row from left, Dani Gianino Baldassare, Kristen Haibon Clark, Kristen Cullen, Natasha Romsavich Coyne, Dena DeLuca Chase, Jennifer Mahoney Chase and Lauren Jalbert Burke. In bottom row from left, Brooke Bazylinski, Stacy (Talbot) Bazylinski, Kathy Gardner, Julie (Talbot) Donnelly and Michelle Frasier Dustin. Missing from photo is Allison Jansky Eaton.

GROWING STRONGER TOGETHER


The YMCA of the North Shore joins the fight against cancer with LIVESTRONG at the YMCA, a program that helps survivors move beyond cancerbody, mind and spirit. Together, with the strength of the North Shore community, were helping you to say good-bye to being a patient and hello to a healthy, whole you!
For more information, contact the Lynch/van Otterloo YMCA at 781.631.1819 ext. 2401 or email livestrong@northshoreymca.org. www.northshoreymca.org

S17 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Stronger Bonds, Better Life

211 Boston Street, Middleton, MA 01949 1-800-7/BOSTIK

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

No one food or diet plan has been proven to keep cancer at bay. But research shows that a healthy, primarily plant-based diet will provide your body with the nutrients it needs to stay healthy and keep your weight in check, too, which will further reduce your risk of breast cancer. Eat these nine nutrition superstars on a regular basis:
1. Oatmeal. Oatmeal is high in fiber, which helps soak up excess estrogen circulating in the blood stream. Plus, oatmeal is a good source of antioxidants called phenols, which may help repair cell damage that contributes to cancer growth, says Franella Smith Obi, a registered dietitian/nutritionist at Greenville Health System Cancer Institute in Greenville, S.C. 2. Broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage. These cruciferous vegetables are rich in sulforaphane, phytochemicals that have anti-cancer properties, Obi says. 3. Beans. In addition to being high in fiber, theyre an excellent source of protein making them a good swap for red meat and other animal protein, which can be high in saturated fat and has been linked to a higher risk of breast cancer, says Sally Scroggs, clinical program manager of integrative health in cancer prevention at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. 4. Kale, collards and spinach. All three have super-high levels of carotenoids, a type of antioxidant that protects against free radical damage that contributes to cancer development. 5. Citrus fruit. A recent Korean study found that women who regularly consumed oranges, grapefruit and other citrus had a 10 percent reduction in their breast cancer risk. 6. Berries. Strawberries and raspberries, in particular, are a potent source of ellagic acid, a phytochemical that has been shown to prevent cancers of the breast, skin and lung in lab studies, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. 7. Fatty fish. Lab studies suggest that the ultra-healthy omega-3 fatty acids in fish like salmon and mackerel may slow the growth of breast cancer cells. 8. Lentils. Lentils are one of the best sources of folate and research suggests that women who have high levels of folate are up to 44 percent less likely to develop breast cancer. 9. Spices. University of Michigan researchers found that piperine (a compound found in black pepper) and curcurmin (the main ingredient in turmeric) reduced the growth of breast cancer-initiating team cells in lab studies. Other research has shown that pepper and turmeric have anti-inflammatory benefits and theyre a smart way to add flavor to food without adding fat or calories, too.

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BEST FOODS FOR

BREAST CANCER PREVENTION


By Camille Noe Pagan

S19 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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What you should know about breast cancer


A woman living in the United States has a

12.3%, OR A 1 IN 8, LIFETIME RISK of being diagnosed with breast cancer. An estimated 232,340 NEW CASES OF INVASIVE BREAST CANCER will be diagnosed among women in the United States this year. Approximately 39,620 WOMEN ARE EXPECTED TO DIE FROM BREAST CANCER this year. Only lung cancer accounts for more cancer deaths in women. About 2,240 MEN WILL BE DIAGNOSED with breast cancer and 410 men will die from the disease this year. Excluding cancers of the skin, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, accounting for 29% OF NEWLY DIAGNOSED CANCERS.

Men are generally at low risk for developing

breast cancer; however, they should REPORT ANY CHANGE IN THEIR BREASTS to a physician. 79% of new cases and 88% of breast cancer deaths occurred in WOMEN 50 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER. Breast cancer INCIDENCE RATES ARE HIGHER IN NON-HISPANIC WHITE WOMEN than African American women for most age groups. An estimated 5% to 10% of breast cancer cases result from INHERITED MUTATIONS, including those in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2.
Source: American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org)

BREAST

States.

CANCER IN MEN accounts for one percent of all breast cancers in the United
Source: Susan G. Komen for the Cure (www.Komen.org)

Breast cancer is the

LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH among women aged 35-54. MAMMOGRAPHY DETECTS APPROXIMATELY 2 TO 3 TIMES AS MANY early breast cancers as physical examination. 85% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have NO PRIOR FAMILY HISTORY. A woman is diagnosed with breast cancer EVERY 3 MINUTES. A WOMAN DIES from breast cancer every 11 minutes.

Source: Men Against Breast Cancer (www.menagainstbreastcancer.org)

The Kelly Automotive Group Supports the Fight Against Breast Cancer. Brian K elly
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North Shore radiologist to present on breast imaging


By Cheryl Lecesse
STAFF WRITER

DANVERS When people think of preventative measures against breast cancer, early detection in the form of self-exams and annual mammograms are among the first thoughts that comes to mind. These days, health care centers on the North Shore have technology available allowing physicians to determine quickly and more assuredly whether a patient has breast cancer. Next week, Dr. Mansi Saksena, a radiologist at Mass General/North Shore Center for Outpatient Care in Danvers, will give a free presentation on breast cancer and the latest innovations in breast cancer imaging at Hathorne Hill rehab and care center. Saksenas presentation is part of an annual breast cancer program that has taken place over the last four years, first at Cedar Glen Nursing Home and now at Hathorne Hill, which replaced Cedar Glen in February. Christine Baldini, administrator at Hathorne Hill and previously at Cedar Glen, said past activities included a pink blanket campaign, in which residents created hand-tied pink blankets for donation, product reviews and presentations on the environmental factors of the disease. Obviously breast cancer is something that affects almost everyone, said Baldini. That statement was true at Cedar Glen and now at Hathorne Hill, as several employees either had family members diagnosed with breast cancer or battled the disease themselves. Saksena has been with Massachusetts General Hospital since 2011 and is also an instructor at Harvard Medical School. She said her presentation will include an overview of breast imaging. One of the technological innovations she will discuss is

Tomosynthesis has helped doctors both increase their cancer detection rate and decrease their patient callback rate. Were calling fewer patients back who have nothing wrong with them and calling more patients back who have something wrong, Saksena said.
Mass General/North Shore Center for Outpatient Care for a mammogram will get tomosynthesis, unless theres a special reason against its use. For example, Saksena said a patient who Dr. Mansi Saksena cannot hold still would not be a good candidate for tomosynthesis. Preparation for a three-dimensional tomosynthesis, or three-dimensional mammogram is exactly the same, she mammography. This type of breast said. imaging is entering its third year of Doctors also use magnetic resouse in the field and has been at Mass Generals Danvers facility for the past nance imaging, more widely known as MRI, to screen a patients breasts year and a half. and helps to detect tumors. The machine is exactly the same Were kind of sitting on the cutting as a mammography machine, Saksena explained. The only differ- edge here, said Michael Auerbach, ence is the X-ray cube moves. It basi- senior manager of public affairs cally provides multiple images of the and communication at North Shore same breast and from multiple spots. Medical Center. Its certainly a great benefit to people in this area. . .they Tomosynthesis takes longer than dont have to go a distance to get the a regular, two-dimensional mammogram does about 15 seconds longer treatment they need. Saksena will also talk about the but provides doctors with a much Breast Health Program at Mass more detailed image of the breast, General/North Shore Center for Outallowing physicians to get a clearer patient Care which includes many look at any abnormalities. aspects of care, including diagnostic Saksena said the process has testing, surgery and reconstruction, helped doctors both increase their and support. cancer detection rate and decrease Im really looking forward to actutheir patient callback rate. Were calling fewer patients back ally meeting members of the community that we have started to practice who have nothing wrong with them in, and looking forward to presenting and calling more patients back who all the services we offer here on the have something wrong, she said. North Shore, she said. Today, everyone who comes to

IF YOU GO
What:Innovations in Breast Imaging, presented by Mansi Saksena, MD, Mass General/ North Shore Center for Outpatient Care When:Wednesday, Oct. 23; tours begin at 5 p.m.; hors doeuvres and light refreshments at 5:30 p.m.; dinner and presentation from 6 to 7 p.m. Where:Hathorne Hill,15 Kirkbride Drive,Danvers Cost:Free; open to the public RSVP: By Friday, Oct. 18, to Pam Wall at 978-551-3656or pamela.wall@genesishcc.com

Other breast cancer programs


The Mass General/North Shore Center for Outpatient Care has other programs planned in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month. On Thursday, Oct. 17, join Mass General/North Shore Breast Health Center specialists Drs. Phoebe Freer, Erica Linden and Jeanne Yu for a free presentation calledFrom Screening to Treatment: How innovations in technology are improving breast health care,from 6 to 8 p.m. in the first floor lobby atMass General/ North Shore Center for Outpatient Care, located at 102 Endicott St. in Danvers.Learn about the latest advances in screening exams, breast surgery, breast reconstruction and breast cancer treatment options.To register or for more information, call 800-897-8213 or visit MassGeneralNorthShoreSeminars.org. On the first Tuesday of the month, the Mass General/North Shore Cancer Center offers an ongoing Breast Cancer Support Group for women in all stages of breast cancer that meets from 6 to 7 p.m., also at 102 Endicott St., in Danvers. Asupport group for newly diagnosed patients is also available. For details or to register for either group, contact Mary Anne Macaulay at mmacaulay@partners.org.

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FDA approves first pre-surgical breast cancer drug


treating most forms of cancer. Perjeta is the first drug to be approved as a presurgical step. WASHINGTON A Doctors hope that using biotech drug from Roche cancer drugs earlier could has become the first medicine approved to treat help shrink tumors, making them easier to remove. breastcancer before surIn some cases, that could gery, offering an earlier allow women to keep their approach against one of breasts, rather than having the deadliest forms of the a full mastectomy. Doctors disease. also say that treating the The Food and Drug disease at its earliest stages Administration approved could prevent tumors from Perjeta for women with returning later, though studa form of early-stage ies have not yet established breastcancer who face a that benefit. high risk of having their By making effective cancer spread to other parts therapies available to highof the body. Surgery to remove tumors risk patients in the earliest disease setting, we may is usually the first step in MATTHEW PERRONE AP Health Writer delay or prevent cancer recurrences, said FDAs Dr. Richard Pazdur, who directs the agencys office of cancer products. Cancer specialists already use several chemotherapy drugs as initial treatments for cancer, but they are not formally approved for the use. The FDA originally approved Perjeta to treat breastcancer that has spread to other parts of the body after surgery. The FDA granted the drug accelerated approval for its new use based on a study showing women who received the drug as an initial treatment were more likely to be cancer-free 12 weeks later than women who received older drug combinations. Accelerated approval is reserved for drugs that show groundbreaking results for treating life-threatening diseases in early studies. As a condition of approval, Roches Genentech unit must conduct a larger follow-up study showing the drugs long-term benefits for patients. Generally that means showing that patients lived longer or had a higher quality of life due to taking the drug. Genentech, based in South San Francisco, Calif., has already enrolled about 4,800 patients in the follow-up study, with results expected in 2016. Dr. Paula Klein, a breastcancer specialist, said she will start prescribing the drug for early-stage patients immediately, but stressed the importance of follow-up data on patient survival. This does not yet prove to us that using the antibody in this setting will result in more cures. That is still a hypothesis, said Klein, who directs the breastcancer program at Continuum Cancer Centers of New York. The FDA said the approval, which came on Sept. 30, was based on a 417-woman study comparing Perjeta in different combinations against older breastcancer treatments. When Perjeta was combined with Herceptin, another Genentech drug, and standard chemotherapy, 39 percent of women saw their cancer reach undetectable levels. Only 21 percent of women experienced the same results from taking Herceptin and chemotherapy alone. After drug treatment all the women received standard breast surgery to remove any cancerous tumors. Genentech says this surgery allowed researchers to confirm the presence or absence of cancer.

www.thewomensfundec.org

THINK PINK!

onth M s s e Supporting n Breast Cancer Aware


EmpowEring womEn & girls

The Womens Fund is a community of women, families, and businesses dedicated to creating social change for women and girls. Our vision is to empower all women and girls to reach their full potential. We raise funds and make grants to non-profit programs in Essex County that are changing the lives of women and girls in significant and sustainable ways.

The Womens Fund Essex County Community Foundation 175 Andover Street Suite 101 Danvers 978-777-8876

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Salem woman puts spotlight on metastatic breast cancer


arah Merchant is a Salem resident and founder of Insert Boobs Here, a blog of her experiences as a young woman battling metastatic breast cancer. She is also president of Beyond Stage 4, a nonprofit created to educate, support and ultimately cure metastatic breast cancer, with a focus on supporting young women diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer. Its a prevalent disease and its not just pink ribbons, said Merchant. We really need to put the dollars into metastatic cancer research. As a metastatic breast cancer survivor, Merchant urges other women facing a cancer diagnosis to be advocates for themselves throughout the treatment and recovery process. I was able to convince my doctors to do a more strenuous treatment program, she said, encouraging women in similar positions to ask questions. They [doctors] know when they sit down with me that Ill have questions. This is Sarah Merchants story:

Sarah Merchant

To the Courageous
During the month of October, this special time dedicated to breast cancer awareness, I pause to praise the many brave men and women who confront such challenges in their lives as breast cancer. It touches so many of us so profoundly, so your courage and tenacity is truly inspirational to so many. I have the privilege of knowing you during these times and am consistently amazed by your strength to battle against breast cancer. I also say thank you to the incredibly talented researchers who continue the fight for innovation and excellence, allowing the medical community to have the important advancements necessary to treat our patients treatments not available even ten years ago. My deepest gratitude, patients and researchers. I applaud you.

Beverly M. Shafer, M.D.

Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

900 Cummings Center, Suite 112W

Beverly MA

978.927.8844

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I was metastatic, and at some point I was going to die of breast cancer. My plan for surgery was changed to chemotherapy first, then possibly surgery, radiation, and more chemotherapy. I was going to be on some sort of chemotherapy for the rest of my life. My doctors never gave me a timeline, yet I knew that living another five years would be a dream.
I was 28 years old, only a few years after I graduated from college. I had a beautiful son and a great career. It was then that I noticed a ping pong sized lump in my left breast. I waited a week before I went to the doctors, thinking I had just banged into something and that it would heal on its own. When I did go to the doctors they said I was much too young for breast cancer and that it was most likely a cyst, but they sent me to the breast clinic to be examined anyway. After many biopsies, mammograms, and a breast MRI, I was told that I had breast cancer. At the time the breast cancer only seemed to be in my breast, so we started to schedule a mastectomy for the following week. Before my surgery I was going to have to meet with an oncologist to discuss chemo after surgery, have a CAT scan, brain MRI, bone scan, and PET scan just to be sure everything was contained to the breast. Two days before my scheduled surgery I found out that the cancer had spread to my liver and sacral spine. I underwent a liver biopsy, however it was clear at that point that everything had changed. My surgery was cancelled and I was no longer cureable. I was metastatic, and at some point I was going to die of breast cancer. My plan for surgery was changed to chemotherapy first, then possibly surgery, radiation, and more chemotherapy. I was going to be on some sort of chemotherapy for the rest of my life. My doctors never gave me a timeline, yet I knew that living another five years would be a dream. I am now 32, and my son is 12. Thankfully the drug regimens I have been on have kept the cancer at bay and I am currently considered No Evidence of Disease, which means the cancer is too small to be detected on scans. I am almost four years out, and I have no plans on going anywhere anytime soon. Thanks to medical research for metastatic breast cancer I am still here, and my son still has his mother.

For more about Merchant, her experiences and Beyond Stage 4, visit www.insertboobshere.com or www.beyondstage4.org.

We stand in strong support with those fighting for a cure.

With hope, Fred and Gayle Berry

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Show of support
Throughout October, firefighters at the Beverly Fire Department are wearing pink t-shirts in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. From left, standing in front of the ladder truck at the BFDs Hale Street headquarters, are firefighters from Group 1, Dean Julien, Chris Halloran, Brad Saunders, Chad McCormack, Dave Genest, Scott Steeves, AJ Petronzio, Bob Bergeron, Mike Zarbano, Pat Brady, and Sean Murray.

Footprint power
Be Aware and beat breast cancer

Footprint Power supports our friends, family, and neighbors in our community in the fight against breast cancer. Schedule your screening today and take a step toward beating breast cancer.

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Advances in breast cancer treatment: Less is more


result, women who previously might have had chemotherapy are finding that they would not benefit from this form of treatment and can avoid many of the dreaded side effects like nausea, a weakened immune system and temporary hair loss. Doctors have also uncovered new ways to successfully lessen the impact and dosage of radiation that they administer to breast cancer patients. For more than 30 years, standard practice was to administer a high dose of radiation to the whole breast, daily, for at least As we observe Breast Cancer Awareness month, a six weeks, which includes look back at advancements a boost dose concentrated over the site where the in treatment over the past tumor was removed. 40 years shows us how far Today, with a treatment weve come. New techniques called partial breast irraand advanced technolodiation, we treat just the gies have offered a variety cancerous site, plus a rim of of new options that have surrounding normal breast changed care for women tissue. This technique for the better. The most reduces the conventional noteworthy change is the philosophy behind our care treatment time frame from six weeks to just a few days today: Less is more. or even to one dose delivThe move to minimize ered in the operating room. treatment started when researchers concluded that This single dose treatment is called intraoperative radiextensive surgery did not ation therapy, and it is the improve survival over less most promising advanceaggressive surgery. Trials conducted in the 1970s and ment we have seen. This 1980s clearly demonstrated method provides the most targeted treatment because that surgery to remove the whole breast was not more the tissue is treated directly. We are installing this treatsuccessful than surgery ment method now at Lahey that conserved part of the Hospital & Medical Center breast. While only a small and are excited for the posfraction of women in the 1980s received this surgery, sibilities it will bring to the today, most eligible women patients we treat. Breast cancer care is are able to conserve part of evolving toward the likelitheir breast with this new hood that many surgeries technique. Thanks to advancements will no longer be necessary. The research community in research, we now have is currently focused on the ability to learn more about each womans tumor profiling, more specifically, individual breast cancers. and determine more tarThis will allow physicians geted, personalized and to better tailor treatment so effective treatment. As a

Dr. Rebecca Yang

Dr. Andrea McKee, left, and Dr. Rebecca Yang look over a patients test results.
of care based on all of the unique characteristics of her cancer. For example, a woman who comes to a Lahey Health affiliate for treatment is seen by a coordinated group of skilled cancer specialists, from surgeons and radiologists to social workers and nurse navigators, who are on hand to walk the patient and her family through every step in the process. Breast cancer is scary for many women. As anyone who has been diagnosed or who has had a friend or family member receive a diagnosis knows, there are many variables and unknowns that can be frightening. But through medical advancements, and changes in the way we deliver care, we hope to make the process easier for women and their families and ultimately advance treatment techniques to decrease patient suffering and increase survival.

The move to minimize treatment started when researchers concluded that extensive surgery did not improve survival over less aggressive surgery.
women arent subjected to as much radiation or chemotherapy, and their chances of survival are higher. Our hope for the future is that, rather than a host of invasive surgeries and chemotherapy and radiation, an affected woman (or man) will need only a small sample of their cancer to provide all of the necessary information to guide successful treatment. With enhanced coordination of care among the breast cancer disciplines, we are excited about these new treatment options. Today, a woman who has been diagnosed with breast cancer has a team of specialists who work together to develop the best plan

Rebecca C. Yang, MD, is a board-certified surgeon by American Board of Surgery and the medical director of the Lahey Hospital & Medical Center Comprehensive Breast Health Center.

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Breast Friends walk continues to honor Marblehead womans memory


MARBLEHEAD Despite a dreary forecast and a rainy morning, the annual Breast Friends Walk sold more T-shirts Oct. 6 than it did during last years sunny event. Its a great day no matter the weather, said Carol Smith, who helps her son Adam organize the walk. Adam Smith and Sara Bryant Smith started the Breast Friends Foundation in 2006, two years after Sara had been diagnosed with breast cancer. A walk around the Neck, Sara thought, would be a simple way for people to get involved and contribute to the fight against breast cancer. Today, the walk continues in Saras memory and to help others battle the disease. The money raised goes to the patient navigator program at Massachusetts Courtesy photos General Hospitals Chelsea HealthCare Center, helpA clothesline of T-shirts from previous Breast Friends walks ing hundreds of patients get the care and screenings hangs in the pavilion during this years event. they need.

Ned and Brooks Williams with Adam Smith, center.

From left, Adam Smith, Matt Dolan, Carol Smith, Rick Cuzner and Tim Twombly.

Tracy and Adam Smith (left and center) with the Edwards family.

Registration at the pavilion at Devereux Beach.

From left, Rae Weed, Laura Best and Donna Goodwin

Jim Nye and Penny Wigglesworth

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A group of students from The Village School in Marblehead made and sold bracelets at the walk.

Courtesy photos

Adam Smith, bottom center, with the group from the Massachusetts General Hospital outreach program in Chelsea, the beneficiary of the Breast Friends Walk.

North Shore Bank is proud to promote Breast Cancer Awareness.

For the love of a Mother, For the love of a Sister, For the love of a Grandmother, For the love of an Aunt, For the love of a Friend, For love, schedule your screening today!

877-712-7000 l www.northshore-bank.com Beverly l Danvers l Middleton l Peabody l Salem l West Peabody l Vinnin Square
Member FDIC l Member SIF

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Stress, diet, smoking, exercise for the average breast cancer patient, bad habits are now fair game for public discussion. Changing everything overnight is impossible heres how to set yourself up for success, and a healthier life.

PLAN IT, CHANGE IT, SURVIVE IT


By Darci Swisher

Dealing with breast cancer and treatment is physically and emotionally stressful, but experts say that lifestyle changes can slow the disease, reduce the risk of recurrence and give much-needed energy, as well as peace of mind. While making too many changes at once is undeniably daunting, many patients, and survivors, can make and build on small modifications to their diet, body and mind. Although stress has not been shown to impact the effectiveness of cancer treatment, finding ways to manage life during cancer treatment can go a long way to making this time more tolerable, says Dr. Ruth Steinman, a Philadelphia-area psychiatrist who has been working with cancer patients for more than 20 years. Stress is hard to avoid when undergoing breast cancer treatment and it helps to understand that, she says.Our lives are complicated and busy, and for many not that manageable on a good day.
Mindfulness meditation, which involves visualization and progressive muscle relaxation, can be helpful especially at night when ruminative worry often takes hold.Many of my patients listen to a relaxation CD with guided imagery before going to bed, she says. Steinman points out that sometimes people who think they are stressed may be clinically depressed, which can lead to suicide and actually be more life-threatening than breast cancer. People with depression should always seek help from a mental health professional.

She is also quick to denounce the once-held belief that stress and a negative outlook can promote recurrence

of breast cancer.It is very important to understand this, that no matter how much you are a glass half empty kind of person, you are not going to negatively impact your chances of survival, Steinman says.Many others in your life will spend a lot of effort getting you to think otherwise, which can cause even more stress and demoralization. However, stress and feeling overwhelmed can interfere with behaviors that have been found to help keep recurrence at bay, she adds, such as diet, maintaining a healthy weight and exercise. Registered dietician Cynthia

Thomson tells patients to focus on the broader health benefits of a healthier diet. While most women are not going to die of breast cancer, treatments and other risk factors may contribute to the onset of other diseases, she says. We survive breast cancer, but are we going to be dealing with heart disease at an earlier age? asks Thomson, director of the University of Arizona Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention & Health Promotion. She points out that a couple of diet changes are more important than others. The main one she emphasizes is increasing the amount of vegetables in

ones diet. Her tips: Begin grocery shopping in the produce department, filling the cart with a variety of colors and choosing one new vegetable each week. It makes it fun and not so prescriptive, she says. Then, she stresses, eat the vegetables. You really do have to plan to eat them, says Thomson, who recommends searching for recipes online, especially when trying new foods. Fruit is also important but, in general, people are more likely to eat their daily servings, since fruit is an easy snack, she says. Moderating alcohol is also an

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How to tell advice givers to

BACK OFF

Just about all breast cancer patients and survivors experience a common side effect: unsolicited advice. Cancer support groups spend a lot of time on this topic because it is so ubiquitous and can be maddening, says Dr. Ruth Steinman, a Philadelphia-area psychiatrist who has been working with cancer patients for more than 20 years. I think it can be helpful to say something like, I know your heart is in the right place and that your intentions are to help me, but it doesnt help me to talk about this. Can we talk about something else? Of course, finding someone to talk to is essential, whether it be for informational, emotional or practical support. According to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the benefits of solid support include reduced anxiety, psychological distress and depression, and improved mood, self image and feelings of control. A support group comprised of other patients and survivors may be the key. A number of studies have found that support groups helped increase the quality of life for women dealing with breast cancer, although they did not extend their lives.

important diet change, since alcohol intake has long been associated with breast cancer risk and recurrence, Thomson says. In addition, alcohol can exacerbate depression, which breast cancer patients and survivors can suffer from for an extended period of time. Diet and exercise always go hand-in-hand, but a recent study by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that only 34 percent of women met the U.S. physical activity guidelines two years after treatment, 39.5 percent at five years and only 21.4 percent after 10 years. But exercising during or after breast cancer treatments has many benefits, lymphedema, says Andrea Leonard, such as improving tolerance to treat- president of the Cancer Exercise ments, increasing energy, reducing Training Institute in Portland, Ore., pain and preventing and managing

and author of Essential Exercises for Breast Cancer Survivors (Harvard Common Press, 2001). Anything they do to move is going to be a benefit, she says. Walking included. Walking is great, she adds, as is stretching, yoga and even breast cancer specific DVD workouts. But for more complex exercise routines, Leonard advises working with a trainer who is certified to work with cancer patients and can take into account variables like surgeries, reconstruction and treatments. Its not a cookie cutter workout, she says. Its pretty complex.

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

NEWS AND EVENTS AROUND THE NORTH SHORE


American Cancer Societys Look Good ... Feel Better program for women undergoing cancer treatment meets today from 10 a.m. to noon, and again on Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Addison Gilbert Hospital. Guided by volunteer cosmetologist, female cancer patients who participate in this class will learn how to use make-up and skin care techniques to overcome the appearancerelated effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Women also learn ways to disguise hair loss with wigs, scarves and other accessories. Following the program, participants will receive a complimentary make-up kit. To register for the free program, call Community Relations at 978-283-4000, ext. 585. The third annual Lynda J. Talbot Memorial 5K Run/Walk is set for Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Danvers YMCA, 34 Pickering St. Registration and packet pickup begins at 8:30 a.m., followed by the start of the run/walk at 11 a.m. Registration costs $30 per person. Proceeds support The Lynda J. Talbot Memorial Scholarship and breast cancer research. Sign up at www.racewire.com/ talbot or contact Julie Donnelly at jltlbt@yahoo.com for more information. The second annual Relay for Life of Danvers season will kick off with a Fall Festival on Tuesday, Oct. 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Danvers High School, located at 60 Cabot Road.The eventincludes performances by high school groups, a costume contest, trick-or-treating, face painting, mummy wrapping, relay races, and an opportunity to learn more about the Relay For Life event, including how to get involved and how the event assists the American Center Societys mission to eliminate cancer as a major health threat. Admission is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Shannon Archer at 781-314-2678 or shannon. archer@cancer.org. The fourth annual Fed Up With Cancer fundraiser is set for Wednesday, Oct. 23, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at the Danversport Yacht Club, located at 161 Elliott St. The fundraisers theme is Oktoberfest and features German-inspired food and beer, an oompah band, and a live and silent auction. Local restaurants will also offer food samples. Billy Costa will serve as emcee and auctioneer. Tickets cost $35 in advance, or $40 at the door. Tickets and details are available at www.fedupwithcancer.org, or contact Denise at 978-998-6896, ext. 3598, for more information. Reach For Recovery, a free seminar with exercises and education for maximizing upper extremity mobility and function post mastectomy, will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 29, at 6:30 p.m. at Orthopaedics Plus, located at 100 Cummings Center, Suite 121Q, Beverly. Physical therapists who have been trained in a comprehensive post-op rehabilitation protocol will provide information and treatment ideas, sensitive to both physical and psycho-social aspects of breast cancer, to facilitate a faster recovery after surgery. Reserve a spot by Friday, Oct. 25, by calling 978-927-0907, or emailing orthoplusactivities@gmail. com. Beverly Hospital at Danvers Breast Health Center offers a free, eight-sessionNewly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Support Group, aneducational/support program for individuals who have been newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program meets on the second and fourth Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in LMI Conference Room B at 480 Maple St. in Danvers. For more information, call978-304-8105. located inside the hospitals entrance at 298 Washington St. in Gloucester.Also, a Breast Cancer Support Group at The Herrick House meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month on the upper campus of Beverly Hospital, located at 89 Herrick St. in Beverly. No fee or pre-registration required for either group.For more information or to register, call978-2834001, ext. 585.

AGeneral Cancer Support Group meets from 4:30 to 6 p.m.on the fourth Tuesday of each monthin the Longan Room at Addison Gilbert Hospital, located at 298 Washington St. in A Breast Cancer Support Group Gloucester.There is no at Addison Gilbert Hospital fee or pre-registration meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on required.For more informathe third Tuesday of each tion or to register, call978month in the Longan Room 283-4001, ext. 585.

WORKING TOGETHER TO FIGHT BREAST CANCER


Detecting and treating breast cancer takes a team of experts working together to keep you h ealthy. The Mass General/North Shore Breast Health Center in Danvers, MA provides the highest caliber of care in a supportive, convenient and patient-focused manner.
3-D Mammography at the Mass General/North Shore Breast Heatlh Center

BREAST TOMOSYNTHESIS NOW AVAILABLE AT THREE NORTH SHORE LOCATIONS


Breast tomosynthesis, also called 3-D mammography, provides a clearer, more accurate view of the breast, enabling doctors to pinpoint the size, shape and location of any abnormalities. Tomosynthesis can result in better detection and greater peace of mind. Appointments are available at: Mass General/North Shore Breast Health Center, Danvers NSMC Womens Center, Danvers NSMC Salem Hospital

For more information call 978-573-4455, or visit MassGeneralNorthShore.org/Breast

All Mass General and North Shore Medical Center mammography facilities are licensed and accredited by the ACR, FDA and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Radiation Control Program.

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I wanted to be around people who understood what I was going through


By Cheryl Lecesse
STAFF WRITER

BEVERLY Cathy Sullivan has always been an active person. She swims, bikes and eats right. She even works with athletes in her profession, helping them determine their weaknesses and develop exercises and strategies to increase their performance. So when she was diagnosed in midNovember 2012 with stage 2B breast cancer, she was caught by complete surprise. At that time I thought they must be making a mistake, said Sullivan, 56, of Beverly. Doctors found a tumor during a routine mammogram at the Breast Health Center at Lahey Outpatient Center in Danvers. The tumor was deep inside, behind the nipple, and I didnt feel it, she said. When they told me I had a sizable tumor I was shocked. Sullivan went back for an MRI, and other tests followed. I was there at 7:45 in the morning and I didnt go home until 2, she said, adding that her husband was with her at the hospitals suggestion that she not come alone. They just kept running tests on me. The day gave her insight into how the health center operated and connected her with the medical team she would be working with throughout her treatment. I felt secure right from the onset from what I knew was going to be a changing event in my life, she said. After the diagnosis, she met with anoncologist, surgeon and radiation oncologist to discuss next steps. Sullivan had strong hopes that radiation would be all she would need, but doctors recommended surgery. For my type of cancer, (radiation) really wouldnt have been effective, Sullivan said. She initially pushed harder for radiation. Her doctors listened to her concerns and provided statistics that led her to the conclusion that the surgery, along with four rounds of chemotherapy and seven rounds of radiation, was her best option. Looking back on that now, I am so glad I did that, she said. As for surgical options, they discussed

Shes pushed through it all, even going back to work for a few days in between rounds. She had a lot of support from family, friends and work colleagues.She also sought out a support group for cancer patients.
support from family, friends and work colleagues.She also sought out a support group for cancer patients. I wanted to be around people who understood what I was going through, Sullivan said. I had never known anybody who had cancer at my age. The group she attends, at Addison Gilbert Hospital in Gloucester, is no pity party. Patients share with and learn from one another, helping everyone to grow. Experts frequently come to talk about topics specific to health and recovery. Next month, for example, the group will hear from a nutritionist. I think Ill probably always go to them, Sullivan said. You learn so much from the Courtesy photos American Cancer Society, from the nurses Cathy Sullivan in February during her third 1/2 months after her final who are running it ... Im not a support Cathy Sullivan, 2 chemotherapy session what she described group type of girl, but Ive found these so radiation treatment, at the top of Mt. as the worst session ever. beneficial I dont think Ill ever stop. Monadnock in New Hampshire. My goal was Today, Sullivan is doing well. Shes back to climb, swim a mile, and ride 25 miles. All both full and partial mastectomies. to work four days a week and shes staying completed this summer. Life moves on with Together, Sullivan and her team decided on new normals, new goals, new outlooks. Thank active. Over the summer, four months after a quadrantectomy, or partial mastectomy, her last treatment, she took part in a local you, Lahey team. in which part of the breast is removed. Swim Across America event, swimming I did want to try to conserve some mus- get out in the fresh air. to raise money and awareness for cancer Her chemotherapy didnt go without cle, she said of her decision to keep part of research. her breast. I wanted to go back to my way challenges, however. She developed an Im very fortunate because I have been allergic reaction to the chemo during her of life. able to go back to all the things that I love, third round and at one point went intoana- she said. Sullivan had surgery and radiation at phylactic shock. There was a 10-day period Beverly Hospital and went through cheSullivan hopes her story encourages during the treatment in which she was motherapy at Lahey Hospital and Mediwomen to go for regular checkups, no matincredibly sick. And then theres chemo cal Center.She did her best to stay active ter how healthy they feel or active they are, brain, which she still experiences Its throughout her treatment and recovery. and, if faced with a diagnosis, to remember almost like your engine in your car slips Each day, she promised herself she would theyre not alone. down in second gear; you can still drive have an empowering conversation with Cancer is not easy, its never easy. But I someone and that she would go for a walk, the car, but it just goes a little slower, she think the support is out there for those who described. no matter how long or short. want to take advantage of it, she said. Shes pushed through it all, though, Sometimes that was just to the end even going back to work for a few days of the driveway, and that was called the Cheryl Lecesse can be reached at 978-338chemo shuffle, she said. I felt so happy to in between rounds. She had a lot of 2664 or clecesse@salemnews.com.

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S33 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

November 2013

Culinary Centre

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thur

Fri
1 Flavors of Italy Rome 7-10

Sat
2 Autumn Dinner Party 6-9 9 Tuscany Food and Wine 6-9 16 French Country 6-9

Book your Corporate Its not too early to event with us! Team plan your holiday Building, Employee party at Eurostoves Dinners, Office Party, Retirement event. 3 Flavors of Italy Florence 3-6 10 Healthy Kitchens 3-6 4

Celebration, whatever Visit us on the web the occasion Eurosat eurostoves.com toves is the place to or on facebook be! 978-232-0007 5 6 Knife Skills 6:30-9 7 Girls Night Out New Orleans 6:30-9:30 14 Puff Pastry 6:30-9:30

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11 12 Gluten Free Baking Hearty Breads 6:30-9:30 6:30-9:30

13

17 Autumn Dinner Party 3-6 24 Thanksgiving Tips 3-6

18

19

20 Fall Harvest Soups 6:30-9:30 28

21 Autumn Dinner Party 6:30-9:30 28 Thanksgiving Day!

21 Bangkok Nights 7-10 29 The Dinner Party 7-10

23 Thanksgiving Cake Boss 10-1 Flavors of Italy Rome 6-9 30 Parent-Child Cupcake Crazy 10-1 Winter Warming 6 p

25 Hors douevres Made Easy 6:30-9:30

26 Pies and Tarts 6:30-9:30

December 2013 Euro Stoves The Culinary Center www.eurostoves.com 978-232-0007


Sun
1 2

Mon
3

Tue

Wed
4 Hors doeuvres Made Easy 6:30-9:30

Thur
5 Private Event

Fri
6 Winter Warming 7-10

Sat
7 Italian Christmas 6-9

The human spirit is stronger than anything that can happen to it.
~ C.C. Scott

8 Eurostoves Party

9 Pressure Cooking 6:30-9:30

10 11 International Stews 6:30-9:30

12 Girls Night Out Italian Christmas 6:30-9:30 19 Hawaiian Christmas 6:30-9:30 26

13 Foods from the Greek Isles 7-10 20 Cajun Christmas 7-10

14 Kids: Cookies and Candies 10-1 21 Christmas in Provence 6-9 28 Tuscan Food and Wine 6-9

15 White Christmas 3-6

16

17 Hors doeuvres For Entertaining 6:30-9:30 24

18 Super Sides for the Holidays 6:30-9:30 25

Eurostoves stands with those who have been affected by cancer and supports the crucial effort to raise awareness and improve treatments.

23 22 Christmas Candies Buche de Noel 10-1 3-6 29 Tapas, Paella and Sangria 3-6 30

27 Cupcake Wars 10-1 Winter Warming 7-10

31

For information on our cooking class schedule or on any other special events, please call or visit our website. 978.232.0007 | www.eurostoves.com

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

S32

Culinary Centre

The human spirit is stronger than anything that can happen to it.
~ C.C. Scott

Eurostoves stands with those who have been affected by cancer and supports the crucial effort to raise awareness and improve treatments.

45 Enon Street | Rte. 1A | Commodore Plaza | North Beverly

S33 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

November 2013
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thur Fri
1 Flavors of Italy Rome 7-10 7 Girls Night Out New Orleans 6:30-9:30 14 Puff Pastry 6:30-9:30 8 Couples Cooking Food and Wine 7-10 15 Spanish Tapas 7-10

Sat
2 Autumn Dinner Party 6-9 9 Tuscany Food and Wine 6-9 16 French Country 6-9

Book your Corporate Its not too early to event with us! Team plan your holiday Building, Employee party at Eurostoves Dinners, Office Party, Retirement event. 3 Flavors of Italy Florence 3-6 10 Healthy Kitchens 3-6 4

Celebration, whatever Visit us on the web the occasion Eurosat eurostoves.com toves is the place to or on facebook be! 978-232-0007 5 6 Knife Skills 6:30-9

11 12 Gluten Free Baking Hearty Breads 6:30-9:30 6:30-9:30

13

17 Autumn Dinner Party 3-6 24 Thanksgiving Tips 3-6

18

19

20 Fall Harvest Soups 6:30-9:30 28

21 Autumn Dinner Party 6:30-9:30 28 Thanksgiving Day!

21 Bangkok Nights 7-10 29 The Dinner Party 7-10

23 Thanksgiving Cake Boss 10-1 Flavors of Italy Rome 6-9 30 Parent-Child Cupcake Crazy 10-1 Winter Warming 6 p

25 Hors douevres Made Easy 6:30-9:30

26 Pies and Tarts 6:30-9:30

December 2013 Euro Stoves The Culinary Center www.eurostoves.com 978-232-0007


Sun
1 2

Mon
3

Tue

Wed
4 Hors doeuvres Made Easy 6:30-9:30

Thur
5 Private Event

Fri
6 Winter Warming 7-10

Sat
7 Italian Christmas 6-9

8 Eurostoves Party

9 Pressure Cooking 6:30-9:30

10 11 International Stews 6:30-9:30

12 Girls Night Out Italian Christmas 6:30-9:30 19 Hawaiian Christmas 6:30-9:30 26

13 Foods from the Greek Isles 7-10 20 Cajun Christmas 7-10

14 Kids: Cookies and Candies 10-1 21 Christmas in Provence 6-9 28 Tuscan Food and Wine 6-9

15 White Christmas 3-6

16

17 Hors doeuvres For Entertaining 6:30-9:30 24

18 Super Sides for the Holidays 6:30-9:30 25

23 22 Christmas Candies Buche de Noel 10-1 3-6 29 Tapas, Paella and Sangria 3-6 30

27 Cupcake Wars 10-1 Winter Warming 7-10

31

For information on our cooking class schedule or on any other special events, please call or visit our website. 978.232.0007 | www.eurostoves.com

S34

BREAST CANCER

AWARENESS ASK THE EXPERT

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Thank you for being a friend


By Rachel Graf

Letty Cottin Pogrebin, author of How to Be a Friend to a Friend Whos Sick, shares advice on helping a friend through an illness

For one reason or another, sickness tends to render people awkward and uncomfortable. Even with longtime friends, visitors might be unsure how to treat them in light of their sickness. It might be difficult to find a balance between the desire to be considerate and sympathetic and the desire to pretend nothing has changed. Visiting a friend in the hospital can be hard. How should we approach the situaThe disconnect between how tion so it isnt uncomfortable? patients want to be treated and how they are treated prompted Letty CotWhen talking to a friend who is tin Pogrebin to write her book How going through treatments, establish to Be a Friend to a Friend Whos absolute honesty the minute you hear toward her. Sick (PublicAffairs, 2013). Pogrebin was the diagnosis. If you establish honesty from I wanted to say, Stop treating me like recently treated for breast cancer and says the beginning, you dont have to worry about she was often shocked by how friends acted cancer girl, Pogrebin says. Treat me like a whether youre being intrusive or offensive

normal friend who happens to be going through something hard. In her book, Pogrebin offers proper etiquette advice for treating someone when theyre sick. She covers topics such as what to say, how to act and what types of gifts to bring. If you have a friend or loved one who is sick, you might be asking yourself the very same questions that Pogrebin answered for us.

With ConfidenCe
12 Page Street Danvers, MA 978.774-0296 Daniel.C.Bennett@verizon.net www.DanBennettRealEstate.com

BuY and SeLL

SuPPorter
of the fight againSt

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S35 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

BREAST CANCER

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Friends should be alert to a patients body language, facial expressions and the type of response they give to your questions. If they try to slough off your question with a short, nondescriptive answer, thats your signal to back off. Not everyone wants to be interviewed about their illness, treatment or Should you ever try to relate to the condition. They may consider patient through experiences of your your questions to be intrusive or they may simply be tired of When is offering to help helpful and own or of someone you know? when is it degrading? talking about their problem. No Some people immediately one wants to become their illrespond by citing their own Offering help is never degradness in the eyes of their friends. experience with illness, or theyll ing but it may be infantilizing. start recommending treatments, People dont want to be treated vitamins and so on. None of this is Whats the best way to end your as helpless. I recommend that visit or talk? you should ask directly how you helpful to a patient. Your story is can help. You should add that you your story; your illness and your This goes back to what I was response to it are unique to you. genuinely mean it. Otherwise, saying earlier about honesty. Ask Try not to be self-referential in people will assume youre just your friend to tell you when to your remarks to any patient unless leave. You need to tune into the saying it to be polite. she specifically asks for your expe- cues of the patient. If I had to give an answer for how long to stay, I What are the best ways to comfort rience with the same disease. a friend? would say long enough to show that you care, but not as long as Bringing gifts can be comfortHow do you know when to step back? you think. ing to patients, but be sure the

because youve established a policy. In terms of how to behave, kindness equals empathy plus action. You have to be able to listen to their needs, as well as actually help with those needs. If youre unsure how to help, tell your friend that you want to be helpful but really dont know how to be.

gifts are thoughtful. Chances are, shes not going to eat all that fruit, but she may be really excited if you give her a certificate for a manicure or pedicure. Take time to think about what you will bring, and ensure that whatever you choose will really help her feel good.

How to say what you want to say in the most tactful way
Everyone should be especially thoughtful of what phrases they choose when speaking with a sick friend, Pogrebin says. Old greetings that have become second nature might suddenly have a different connotation for someone whos sick. I resented being asked how are you? all the time, Pogrebin says. That simple line becomes a problematic line for someone with breast cancer because it means we have to calibrate how much that we want to tell our friends. She suggests instead that you should establish honesty from the start so you know what conversations are on or off-limits. Also, dont be afraid to talk about daily activities not just the illness. In her book How to Be a Friend to a Friend Whos Sick, Pogrebin offers seven examples of phrases that sick people typically want to hear: 1. Im so sorry this happened to you 2. Tell me how I can help 3. Im here if you want to talk 4. Just give me my marching orders 5. That sounds awful; I cant even imagine the pain 6. Im bringing dinner 7. You must be desperate for some quiet time. Ill take your kids on Saturday.

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We are proud to support the fight against Breast Cancer

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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MIND?
Memory loss is a common complaint of breast cancer patients
BY RACHEL GRAF

WHERE IS MY

Misplaced car keys, difficulty with multitasking and the need to write down everyday tasks are all symptoms of chemo brain, a form of cognitive decline that affects many women after chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer. Post-treatment breast cancer patients report higher complaints about their memory and their higher-level cognition than do women who have not undergone treatment, according to a recent study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study is one of the first to demonstrate that patients self-reported memory complaints are backed by objective test results. In the past, many researchers said that we cant rely on patients self-reported complaints or that they are just depressed, because previous studies could not find this association between neuropsychological testing and cognitive complaints, says Patricia Ganz, director of cancer prevention and control research at UCLAs Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this study, we were able to look at specific components of the cognitive complaints and found they were associated with relevant neuropsychological function test abnormalities. The researchers subjects were 189 breast cancer patients with an average age of 52. The patients had completed the initial cancer treatments but had not yet undergone hormonereplacement therapy. These patients completed a self-report questionnaire about cognitive abilities. Generally, women with breast cancer

S37 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

BREAST CANCER

AWARENESS

reported higher complaints regarding memory than the control group of healthy women about the same age who do not have breast cancer. About 23 percent of the women with breast cancer reported greater complaints about memory, and about 19 percent of those women reported greater complaints about higher-level cognition and problem-solving ability. Women who had undergone both chemotherapy and radiation were especially likely to report memory problems compared to women who had undergone only chemotherapy or only radiation. Typically, cognitive decline affects patients anywhere from two months to three years, says Dr. Virginia Kaklamani, an oncologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and associate professor of hematologyoncology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Neuropsychological testing that was also conducted during the study supports the results of these self-report questionnaires. Patients who reported even subtle memory changes showed significant differences in neuropsychological testing. The women who were tested completed about two hours of standardized tests that included many questionnaires. For example, the women may have been asked to read a story without any further initial instruction. About 15 minutes later, the testers would ask these women what details they could recall from the story. Women who had undergone therapy performed worse than those who had not. Although a link between chemotherapy and cognitive decline has been proven, doctors do not yet know its cause. A couple of leading hypotheses are that its due to a lack of oxygen to the brain or an early onset of menopause due to chemotherapy. Because there are confounding factors present during breast cancer treatments, such as a spike in estrogen levels, it is difficult for doctors to know what effects

are due to chemotherapy and what effects are due to a change in estrogen levels that accelerate menopause. Women experiencing menopause often experience cognitive decline, as well. Partly because of the uncertainty regarding its cause, doctors have not determined a cure for chemo brain. Research is being conducted about how to minimize or mitigate these effects, but nothing definitive has been determined. Angie Plagman, 39, of Casey, Iowa, completed treatment for breast cancer nearly a year ago and is still suffering from symptoms of cognitive decline. Plagman says she has difficulty remembering everyday tasks at work and at home, so she now takes notes about everything. Doctors rarely alert breast cancer patients about the possibility of mental decline, although the majority of patients complain about it, Kaklamani says. This is largely because there is very little that doctors can do to prevent the memory loss or loss of focus. Honestly, at the time, you have so many things that theyre telling you will happen to you, even if they wouldve told me, that was probably the least of my worries, Plagman says. Kaklamani says that doctors instead focus on post-treatment therapy that these women can complete after chemotherapy. Exercises to combat the effects of chemotherapy include sudokus, memory games and similar brain-focused exercises. Most women eventually do recover from the effects of chemo brain. In the meantime, experts urge patients to encourage family and friends to be understanding. These women should acknowledge that theres a problem and not be afraid to ask for help, says Jamie Myers, adjunct assistant professor at the University of Kansas school of nursing. Give yourself permission not to be perfect, Myers says. You dont have to be superwoman.

Give yourself permission not to be perfect. YOU DONT HAVE TO BE SUPERWOMAN.

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

S38

Caring for Women Since 1964


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S39 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

BREAST CANCER

AWARENESS

Q & A with Dr. Ann Partridge

Young women and breast cancer


Ann Partridge, MD, MPH, is the founder and director of the Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer in the Susan F. Smith Center for Womens Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is also the director of the Adult Survivorship Program at Dana-Farber. started the program to address these issues and to support young women more fully through and beyond breast cancer, and to help them to address their unique challenges.

Q: Why did you found the Program forYoung Women with Breast Cancerat Dana-Farber?
A: Early in my career, when I first started caring for patients in the breast oncology center, I recognized the unique concerns that young women with breast cancer face and how

Q: What are some of the unique challenges for young women with breast cancer?
A: Young women are more likely than older women to be diagnosed at a time in their lives when they are going through school, startAnn Partridge, MD ing a career, raising young families, trying to get pregyoung women often struggle nant or trying to get a date. They tend to be much less with the diagnosis, treatestablished in their social ment decisions, as well as and work lives, and breast survivorship issues. We

cancer and its treatment can threaten or interrupt many important experiences and goals for young women. Young women are also more likely to have more advanced and more aggressive disease at diagnosis, often requiring more aggressive treatment. Further, young women are more likely to harbor a genetic predisposition for the disease and this has implications for their treatment as well as for their families. All of these things together lead to the fact that young women often have a more difficult time emotionally after a diagnosis of breast cancer.

To date, it is not clear if young women develop different disease or if they are just more likely to develop more aggressive subtypes of the disease than older women. Researchers are working hard to understand this issue.
Q: Is breast cancer different in younger women? Q: Are treatment options different for younger women?

A: To date, it is not clear if young women develop different disease or if they are just more likely to develop more aggressive subtypes of the disease than older women. Researchers are working hard to understand this issue.

A: Treatment options vary for young women predominantly surrounding hormonal therapy issues, given that young women are most often pre-menopausal and thus manipulation of their ovarian function is an option for treatment and other

Partridge, Page S40

Think Pink in October


is a proud supporter of
The North Shore Chamber of Commerce supports the second annual Salem News Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign. Live with Courage

Senator Joan Lovely

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

www.northshorechamber.org

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

PARTRIDGE: Answering questions on young women and breast cancer


Continued from Page S39 treatment may be necessary. For women who are interested in future fertility, hormonal treatments that we have a fertility referral have been proven to work in older women, such as the service and work closely with our colleagues in the aromatase inhibitors, have much less of a track record reproductive endocrine group at the Brigham and in younger women. Womens Hospital to make sure that young women Q: How does the Program forYoung Women with Breast receive the information and Cancerhelp women cope with are counseled about fertilfertility issues? ity preservation strategies, A: Fertility is an issue that and support them to pursue is of paramount importance such options if appropriate and desired. We also edufor some young women cate, counsel and support with breast cancer. Early women surrounding fertility in the course of a womans concerns in the survivorship care, we introduce this as phase of their care, after an issue, evaluate their they have been through desire for future fertility their early treatment, as difand support them to make ficult decisions and realities their treatment decisions can arise in this setting as in consideration of fertilwell. ity concerns recognizing that fertility-impairing Some women in these high risk families will choose to undergo bilateral mastectomy (a la Angelina Jolie) When: Friday, Oct. 18, from 8 to 4 p.m. and/or salpingo-oophoWhere: Lucca Back Bay Restaurant, Boston rectomy (removal of tubes What:The Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer at DanaFarber Cancer Institutes Susan F. Smith Center for Womens Cancers and and ovaries), both of which prevent breast cancer in the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Womens Cancer Center are sponsoring this setting. However, most aforum for patients and survivors to share their experiences and hear young women with breast breast cancer specialists speak on the latest information about treatments, psycho-social, nutrition, exercise, and post-treatment issues cancer do not have a clear unique to young women who have or had breast cancer. hereditary predisposition Admission: $10 registration fee; advance registration required by to the disease and there are Thursday, Oct. 17 otherwise no good ways to For more information or to register: call617-632-1924 or visit www. determine which women DFBWCC.org/BreastCancerForum will be at high risk and thus may benefit from such aggressive prevention strategies. While not specific for cancer in this population Q: Want can (young) women do to help prevent breast remains elusive. Family his- prevention of breast cancer cancer? tory is one of the strongest in young women, observarisk factors for early onset tional studies suggest that A: At the present time, the reason a young woman breast cancer, particularly women who maintain an ideal body mass after the in families who harbor a develops breast cancer age of 18, exercise, and/or known mutation in the is usually not clear, and do not drink alcohol beyond thus how to prevent breast BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 genes.

IF YOU GO:

moderation (6 to 12 ounces of wine or the equivalent, or less per day on average) are less likely to develop breast cancer over their lifetimes. Further, there are other health benefits from these general recommendations, and thus most experts agree that it is prudent for women to follow them.

The Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institutes Susan F. Smith Center for Womens Cancers and the Dana-Farber/ Brigham and Womens Cancer Center are sponsoring a forum for patients and survivors to share their experiences and hear experts speak about breast cancer in younger women.

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S41 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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ATHLETES THINK PINK

The Danvers High School girls soccer team wore special shirts to support Breast Cancer Awareness month as well as pink socks and pink ribbons in their hair for their game against Salem on Wednesday evening.

DAVID LE/Staff photo

Jack Lambert of St. Johns Prep drives his legs through an attempted tackle by a Malden Catholic defender on Oct. 5. Prep players, including Lambert, were decked in pink for the game.

ROSE RAYMOND/Photo

In Loving Memory of
a dedicated employee for 20 years we love and miss you

Lynda J. Talbot

Lynda J. Talbot Memorial 5K Run/Walk


Race Date: Saturday, October 19, 2013
Proceeds will go towards The Lynda J. Talbot Memorial Scholarship Fund, and to benefit Breast Cancer Research. Lynda was a Danvers local for over 60 years. She passed away in August of 2010 after a 23 year courageous battle with breast cancer. Her family and friends have created this race in her memory and hope that you will join them in the fight against breast cancer. Please visit www.racewire.com/talbot for more information.

978.887.1188 * CPBerryHomes.com

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Zumbathons help raise awareness


taking part in the fitness companys Party in Pink campaign, designed to raise money for breast cancer For Zumba instructors Betsy Buccafusca and Kym research through 90-minute to two-hour classes of Nugent, their first Party in Pink on Oct. 26 will be more Zumba, a fitness program inspired by Latin and interthan a Zumbathon. national dance moves. Both Buccafusca and All the money raised Nugent have been personally touched by breast can- through the Party in Pink cer Buccafuscas mother campaign will go toward the Zumba Global Research is a 10-year survivor, while Grant for Breast Cancer Nugents husbands sister succumbed to the disease in Prevention, a new grant managed by Susan G. 1993; she was 30. Komen that will ensure that This is definitely some75 percent of Party in Pink thing thats near and dear ticket fees go toward breast to both of our hearts, said cancer research. Buccafusca. Buccafusca, of Topsfield, Throughout the month of October, Zumba instructors and Nugent, of Boxford, will hold their Party in across the country will be
STAFF WRITER

Cheryl Lecesse

Pink at Precision Pilates new Danvers location, at Timothys on Route 1 north. The owner, Nancy Higgins, is battling breast cancer herself. The duo is planning an hour-and-45-minute set, split into two classes to give people a break. Our goal is to start small this year and see how we do, said Buccafusca. Danvers will be the site of a second Party in Pink, by Kerri Kelley on Oct. 27 at Boston North Fitness. This will be Kelleys fourth event. People bring their friends, their relatives, their neighbors, said Kelley, who is expecting a large turnout. Shes also done Zumbathons for Operation Troop

Support and ALS. Everyone no matter what skill or experience level is invited and encouraged to take part. Zumbas just fun, exciting, Kelley said. Its a party. Theres no limits or restrictions. Thats what makes these kinds of events successful I think, because anybody can do it. With raffles of movie passes, salon products and wine baskets, and vendor tables including breast cancer T-shirts and Mary Kay, Kelleys Party in Pink is a draw for people who dont want to take the class but still would like to donate to the cause.

Danielle Roberts hopes her Party in Pink fundraiser this year Zumba, Page S46 raises more than the $1,500 the Zumbathon raised last year.

Courtesy photo

HILL
BRAD STATE REPRESENTATIVE
October is

Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Join the fight.

S43 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month


Join us this month in our effort to raise awareness.

Education
prEvEntion
is thE bEst form of

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month


Join us this month in our effort to raise awareness.

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Cranney Home Services is proud to support the fight for cancer awareness. Also, we support those who fight the battle every day.
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978-750-6900

District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett is proud to support breast cancer awareness month.

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

YWCA program gives survivor her life back


By Lynne Hendricks

NEWBURYPORT Margot Labadini is a three-time cancer survivor whos battled breast cancer twice and lived to tell about it. But its been a long road back to recovery from a surgery and treatment plan that left her broken, in pain and fearful about her future. For at least two years, Labadini, an Amesbury resident, was in such physical and emotional pain she could scarcely get up off the couch. It was a YWCA-branded program in Newburyport called Encore that ultimately coaxed her up off the couch and restored her faith that life would once again be good even great. Its a very special place for me, said Labadini of the group of women and instructors that make up the Encore and After Encore programs at the YWCA. I didnt know what I was walking into, because my world had become so narrow and small, sitting on that couch. I had forgotten that there was a whole beautiful world out there and thought this was going to be my life and nothing was going to help or work. Margot Labadini with her Newfoundland puppy.
Labadini was first diagnosed with cancer in 1986 and fought it successfully into remission. But two years later, in 1988, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She thought her second successful fight was the end of it and enjoyed 16 years in remission before the cancer came back, in a different form in the same breast. Labadini recalls that she was only six months into her new job as a nurse at a state-run hospital at the time of her diagnosis and money was tight so tight that she rushed to return to work after surgery and treatment, even though she was suffering from a chemotherapy-induced nerve condition that attacked her nerve endings. The condition left her in horrible pain and with compromised brain function. I tried to go back to work, and I went back too soon because we were losing our house, she said. They basically had to tell me I couldnt do my job because I was so focused on trying to work for money. They were very gracious, and being a state facility, they embraced me and did everything they could for me to make sure

Courtesy photo

I got benefits. I shouldnt have been there. I couldnt even write. Labadini was suffering from a condition known in the industry as chemo brain, which attacks the memory centers of the

S45 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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ABOUT ENCORE
Encore is a YWCA-branded program, according to Grady, thats completely free to participants and was designed especially for the breast cancer survivor. All instructors are trained as facilitators through the YWCA Training Network, Grady said. Were the only ones who offer this on the North Shore. For Grady, her work as an instructor and trainer in the program, a task she shares with instructor Gayle Calistro, is deeply personal. Grady lost her sister Pammy to breast cancer and looked on helplessly while another sister battled the disease. She lost her father to cancer, as well, so her annual mammograms and MRIs are fraught with an intensity that helps her relate to those who come through the door of the YWCA. I couldnt help Pammy, but I can help these women, and I can give back, and theres nothing that gives me greater joy than giving back to these women that sense of confidence that they can resume a normal active life, which is critical in reducing the rate of recurrence. It doesnt have to be that you were like that forever. You just have to start doing it. We also offer After Encore that many women stay on and

amount of confidence to go to those classes. Ilene and Gayle are magnificent. What they do and the way they care their knowledge, their sharing and listening ear, is incredible. I feel like Im back. I can lift and go and move and do whatever I want, be it lifting grocery bags or doing stuff for my children. It really brought me back from a very dark place. Mogavero was fortunate to discover her cancer at an early stage and underwent a lumpectomy and reconstruction but was able to forgo chemotherapy and radiation. Still, she experienced after her surgery an all-too-common ailment for women who go through breast cancer, one seldom spoken aloud by survivors. When you have a breast issue and a reconstruction like that, as a woman youre different, she said. You have to learn who you are again and to be comfortable in your own skin again. Thats something Mogavero has learned to do through Encore. I was nervous about a group expeBRYAN EATON/Staff photo rience, sharing in a group, being in a Participants in the Encore program, a fitness program especially designed for breast cancer group, she said. I didnt know other patients at the YWCA in Newburyport. people were going through what I was going through, but they were, and continue to exercise here on an ongoing the way it healed, I hadnt used my worse. Some were recovering better upper body in months. Encore really basis. taught me how to move again and gave than me, some recovering worse than Gloria Mogavero of Georgetown is me, and yet, we bonded and were able one of those women who continued on. me my life back. to share, and that sharing led me to Mogaveros surgery left her with an She was diagnosed in winter 2012 with overwhelming fear fear of hurting the a new doctor and really is probably breast cancer. going to affect my health for the rest of surgical site, fear of everything. My surgery was in November 2012, my life. Im really not kidding. I cant I had fear of that whole area, she and I just had no range of motion from say enough about this program. It was said. It gave me just an incredible the surgery. The pain and healing and life-changing.

brain in a small percentage of patients and leaves them with pins and needles in their extremities and unable to organize themselves, remember words or recall important details and events essential to living an independent life. Following her leave of work, weeks and months went by, and Labadini became increasingly depressed and despondent. She noticed articles in the local newspaper about YWCA Encore, a group that meets weekly to restore physical and emotional strength in breast cancer

survivors, but money was so tight that she figured she could never afford the program. Finally, I ran into someone at the Newburyport Yoga Center, which does a once-a-month class for cancer survivors. Thats how I found out about Encore, that the first 10 weeks are free. Thats how I got there, never knowing I was going to end up with a scholarship and that it was going to completely change my life. Encore Program Director Ilene Grady, who has overseen 10 sessions of

the program in the past three years, said Labadinis story is one that shes seen replayed many times for the women who walk through the YWCAs doors after months sometimes years of silent suffering. They come in a little fearful because theyre post-surgery and theyre worried about pain, said Grady. Some of them have had several bouts of cancer and havent been active, so they dont really know what their ability is. Through a lot of discussion, we help them push through and find

the confidence to really try. They leave us so much more empowered and strong that they can, in fact, be healthy and active individuals. I saw change and saw that I was achieving change and my body was improving, said Labadini, who found the warm-water pool at the YWCA the ideal environment to mount a physical comeback. I couldnt even do the exercises when I first got there. Labadini has come so far from those dark days of being housebound that she has taken on a role in

her church and welcomed a new puppy into her life that shes now able to walk and care for. Shes even come to the revelation that cancer may just be the best thing to have ever happened to her. I was a drunk, and I did drugs marijuana and all that social stuff and that was my life, because I had no self esteem, Labadini said. It wasnt me. The first time I had cancer, I was able to give up that lifestyle, so for the first time in my life, I had hope. Two years later, I had breast cancer, and thats

when I got into the 12-step program. Rather than circling the drain and ending up in the gutter where I thought I belonged, its just been this uphill climb where I was able to just blossom. Now Im working on becoming my authentic self. Im finding out who I really am, and my relationships have changed so much. I had a really lousy past, so Im giving up the past, and my depression is lifting. Im in the moment, and Im able to give to other people. I feel Im a role model for other people with cancer.

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

ZUMBA: Local events help raise breast cancer awareness


classes and a few gift baskets. A two-hour Zumba class Breast cancer it may seem intimidating, but affects everybody, she Roberts said the energy said. You dont have to be level carries the particia woman to be affected by pants through it. breast cancer. Ive never seen a After her first Party in fundraiser like this that Pink was success, Danielle has not had a high energy Roberts of Salem will do it level, she said. Its an again on Oct. 27. event. Its not just a class This year I have 13 anymore. It makes them instructors including myself feel like theyre going to the to donate their time, said club. Roberts, who has also Nugent said she and expanded her Zumbathon to Zumba partner Buccafusca two hours. know of at least a couple of Last years Party in Pink breast cancer survivors who saw about 70 people raise will be at Precision Pilates $1,500 for Susan G. Komen, Courtesy photo for their Party in Pink. and Roberts hopes donaDanielle Roberts teaching at her first Party in Pink Zumbathon last year. Its more than just comtions and ticket fees exceed ing to dance, said Nugent. that amount this year. Its a great place to Its fun to see your people who arent interalso the charity, she said. includes raffles for area connect. friends, and you meet new ested in Zumba alone but Roberts Zumbathon also restaurants, free Zumba Continued from Page S42

LOCAL PARTY IN PINK ZUMBATHONS


Saturday, Oct. 26, 3 to 5 p.m., Precision Pilates (at Timothys), 227 Newbury St. (Route 1 north), Danvers. Tickets are $10 in advance, $20 at the door. For more information, email Betsy Buccafusca at b.buccafusca@gmail.com Sunday, Oct. 27, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Boston North Fitness Center, 30 Prince St., Danvers. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door. For more information, email Kerri Kelley at zumbamom3@gmail.com, visit KKFitForLife.com or search for KK Fit For Life on Facebook. Sunday, Oct. 27, 2 to 4 p.m., Corinthian Hall, 523 Franklin St., Melrose (by Salem resident Danielle Roberts). Tickets are $20. For more information, email Danielle Roberts at danielle@danielledroberts.com or visit www.danielledroberts.com.

Board Certified Physicians


Available 7 Days A Week

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ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


Womens Health & Medical Arts Building 83 Herrick Street, Suite 1003 Beverly, Massachusetts 01915

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Wishing Wellness in the Battle Against Breast Cancer


From The Staff at Garden City Pediatrics
Erica N Goldstein, MD Suzanne F Graves, MD Paula Heimberg, MD Elizabeth H. Humphreys, MD Jacob S Kriteman, MD Sheryl R Silva, MD Ian F Sklaver, MD Eric Sleeper, MD Heather Archibald, NP Lauren Parker, NP

www.gardencitypediatrics.com

S47 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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Chemotherapy: From the mouths of survivors


By Dawn Klingensmith Two-time cancer survivor Ted Griggs describes himself as a guys guy. He was big and muscular at his healthiest, tipping the scales at 219 pounds. An assistant vice president at JPMorgan Chase by day, he does security on occasion for the Dallas Cowboys. Yet chemotherapy brought him to his knees in pain and in prayer. In fact, despite having pancreatic cancer one of the deadliest he opted out of his last round of chemo against his doctors advice. I felt like my body just couldnt take it anymore, says Griggs, who dwindled to 164 pounds in treatment and describes it as the worst hangover combined with the worst flu, with food poisoning thrown in on top of that, times a hundred. Having passed the critical five-year remission mark, Griggs decision seemingly did no harm. But looking back, he says skipping his final course of chemo is not something he would do again. He would draw on his previous experience and find new ways to endure. Heres how Griggs and five others got through chemotherapy. I got strength from God and my family. Were a tight little group. I didnt want to leave them early. My strongest advice is to get right with God and get a support system family, friends, a church group, a cancer support group. The love of friends and family taught breast cancer survivor Pam Haschke of Arlington Heights, Ill., that my husband was there to talk to. You can also pray or ponder some deeper questions about what you want to accomplish as your legacy. I wanted to help other women going through cancer and wrote four books, which was part of my healing process. While Betsy Butterworth of Oak Park, Ill., welcomed help and support from family and friends, when it comes to chemo, she says its OK to the mentors who told me to exercise to help with insomnia caused by steroids in the chemo drugs I was so Learn from others jittery I couldnt sleep. You experiences. pick up all sorts of tips like that. I had one rule. I would Chemotherapy patients ask people, Does this have tend to have a depth of empathy that others lack, so a happy ending? when they the information they share is started to talk about their delivered gently, says Kana- moms aunts friends expevos, adding that she needed rience. If not, dont tell me. more information than doc- Its important to keep your tors were giving. I became spirits up. It was through research an e-patient. I did research and networking that Helen and connected with people Szablya of Baltimore online who were going learned that through the same thing. Alternative therapy may help CancerConnect.com was a good source of peer support, with side effects. and I got a cancer mentor The fatigue, for me, was through the R.A. Bloch Can- absolutely horrible. I would cer Foundation. It was one of get up and slump on the divides her time between Massachusetts and California, says theyre a good way to couch and at some point it would occur to me that I was hungry and should probably eat, says Szablya, a peritoneal cancer survivor. But then I would think about the effort it would take for me to stand up, walk to the fridge, open it, take something out and make something. I would imagine this scenario 30 or 40 times before I would get up and do it. Dealing with the fatigue, acupuncture was very helpful. As for the pain, I smoked medical marijuana and it absolutely went away. Id always thought medical marijuana just made people not care, but it took the pain away with no side effects.

Creature comforts can be curative.

They tell you youre going to lose your hair. They prepare you for that. But in my particular case, when it started to fall out of the follicles, it was like thousands of pin pricks across my scalp. I wasnt prepared for it, Haschke says. When friends and family found out I was having chemotherapy, they knitted or crocheted caps for me, for the hair loss. These brought comfort and relief from the pain. I dont think theres any science behind it, but when someone is thinking of you and your recovery and offers you a handmade gift like that, I think theres a psychological benefit. After my experience I started Halos of Hope, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization that distributes free handmade caps to chemotherapy patients. Count your blessings. New York-based psychologist Paulette Kouffman I dont want to sound corny, but I was grateful if Sherman, a breast cancer survivor, also relied on the someone in my family had support of loved ones and to get cancer, I was glad it says treatments go faster if was me, says Griggs, of Bedford, Texas. I am a man you Bring a chemo buddy. of faith. I never said, Why me? I never questioned Chemotherapy can be an my faith. My wife and two all-day thing. Its important daughters, three brothers, to occupy your mind in a my parents and nieces and good way, says Sherman, nephews were all looking who recommends bringing to me to see how I would a laptop, DVDs and readhandle going through some- ing material as well. I had thing as painful as this was. books and meditations, and

Take a solo journey.

The first time I had chemotherapy, they wanted me to bring somebody. After that, I realized I preferred to be alone. I found the process to be very personal, Butterworth explains. Chemotherapy is hard, and I had to get ready for it mentally. It was a 40-minute drive and on the way I listened to Led Zeppelins Kashmir and Ramble On because both songs are about journeys, and I considered chemotherapy a journey inward. My friends and family really wanted to be there for me, but I was really honest with them. I told them I appreciated their support but I felt like I needed to do it alone. Its almost a spiritual moment, when you need to focus on getting cured. Id also advise people to stay away from online message boards because they can end up scaring you more than they help. Some people totally isolate themselves and stop working, which I dont recommend. I think its important to keep up your normal routine as much as youre able and to live your life. While Butterworth found message boards upsetting, Kathy Kanavos, a breast cancer survivor who

Think Pink in October.


Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

TED & JUNE SPELIOTIS


State House - Room 20 Boston, MA 02133 617-722-2410 Theodore.Speliotis@mahouse.gov

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Pink comic hero joins band to fight breast cancer


By Angie Sykeny
GORDON COLLEGE NEWS SERVICE

Pink Deadpool
Photo courtesy of Ross Liberti

Know-how is supporting the


Peoples United Bank is a proud supporter of the

communities where we live and work.

Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign

Wenham Museum Join Us in the Fight Against Breast Cancer


Wenham Museum is collecting donations for the American Cancer Society, during the month of October.

800-772-1090

peoples.com

132 Main St. Wenham, MA 978-468-2377 www.wenhammuseum.org

2013 Peoples United Bank | Member FDIC |

Equal Housing Lender

S49 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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ALEM Bostons Marvel comic book character Deadpool has traded in his red suit for a pink one in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. James Jwanowski, 26, of Peabody, is a local cosplayer, or a person who dresses up as a fictional character from a comic book, video game or film and attends conventions known as Comic Cons. Jwanowski has taken his passion beyond the Comic Con events to become what he calls a cause-player and has been dressing up in his original pink Deadpool suit at various breast cancer charity events since October of last year.
Jwanowski since preschool. Last summer, Liberti stumbled across a Facebook video of Jwanowski in the pink Deadpool outfit, speaking at a Comic Con event. Then, he had an idea. It seemed natural, given our ties to Salem, the spirit of Halloween, said Liberti, and the fact that Sylvana Joyce & The Moment makes it a point to get involved with charities and benefits, to merge our plans for a Salem Halloween show with Jamess cause (breast cancer awareness). Liberti said Jwanowski was on board from the get-go. The show is free to attend, and donations will go to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the largest breast cancer organization in the nation. Individually and as a band, we feel very strongly that we would like to see cancer become a preventable and curable condition in our lifetime, said the bands front woman Sylvana Joyce, 28, of Jersey City, N.J. Anything we can do to help that become a reality would be a great honor for us. In the past, Sylvana Joyce & The Moment have played for Project Animal Worldwide, Sing for Hope, Women of Song and various fundraisers for cancer research. They also advocate for the awareness of Parkinsons disease and Crohns disease. Liberti and Joyce said these causes are personal for them. Joyces mother was diagnosed with Parkinsons 18 years ago, and a good friend of Libertis has been battling Crohns for most of his life. They and Jwanowski have also lost friends and family members to cancer. According to Joyce, the band is entirely grass-roots and selfmanaging. They handle their own publicity, book their own shows, design posters and flyers and call friends in the area to get the word out. Because Jwanowski has been working toward cancer research funding for a year now, Joyce said his experience is invaluable for fundraising at the Gulu Gulu Caf show. Jwanowski is also taking donations for Komen on his FirstGiving.com fundraiser page. He has already raised $390, with $1,000 as his goal. To me, music is not just about expression, said Joyce. Its about sharing a sense of unity and passion with each other, taking care of each other emotionally, connecting and using our music as a force for the greater good. And in this case, its also about working with a pink superhero to fight breast cancer.

I want to actually be a superhero for people, Jwanowski writes on his FirstGiving.com fundraiser page. Since I cant fly, jump over buildings or stop a speeding bullet, I figured I could always dress up for charities for kids, the less fortunate, the sick or whoever wants a great costumed hero at their event. His next destination? The Gulu Gulu Caf in Salem, Saturday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m. alongside Sylvana Joyce & The Moment, a gypsy/ blues rock band out of Astoria, N.Y. The bands drummer, Ross Liberti, 26, of Jersey City, N.J., grew up in Peabody and has known

Proud Supporter
October 2013
Kevin & Jill Michaud Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Rte. 114 Danvers 978-774-4040 michaudmitsubishi.com

Tinti, Quinn, Grover & Fr ey, P.C.


27 Congress Street, Suite 414 Salem, Massachusetts 01970

The Law Offices of:

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Lucy, a regular at Anna Jaques Hospital, visits the Oncology Department every Tuesday.

Pet therapy dog provides cancer patients with much-needed comfort


Karen Hartmann

LUCY WILL SEE YOU NOW

Pet therapy is a medically recognized treatment that employs a variety of animals to help boost patients emotional and physical well-being. Lucy, a 3-year-old black Labrador, is that source of comfort for many patients at Anna Jaques Hospital. Lucy has been a pet therapy dog for two years. After passing a series of tests to prove that she had the temperament and skills, she was certified and earned a red vest (and hospital ID card) identifying her as a therapy dog. Her certification as a qualified pettherapy animal required Lucy to prove that she wasnt easily startled and not aggressive toward humans and other animals, to help ensure she would be a calming force for the patients that she visits. Lucy, now a regular at the hospital, visits the Oncology Department every Tuesday, as well as other areas of the hospital, providing comfort and a much-needed break to patients.Once, during a procedure with

Lucy, a therapy dog, waits patiently at Anna Jaques Hospital.


a nervous patient, Lucy walked to the hospital bed and gently put her head on the womans shoulder. As their heads came together, the woman relaxed and her procedure went smoothly.With her gentle touch, placing her head onto laps and shoulders, looking at people with calm and soulful eyes, Lucy makes a real difference to patients and their families. Her 5- to 15-minute sessions allow patients to escape from the often stressful emotions that surround their diagnosis and treatment. Lucy is a wonderful pet, but she also has a special job to do.Her presence at the hospital has had a positive impact on patients, their immediate families and even the staff, providing a ray of sunshine and putting smiles on the faces of all she meets. Karen Hartmann is a practice manager at the Gerrish Breast Care Center at Anna Jaques Hospital.

S51 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

OCTOBER is Breast Cancer AWARENESS MONTH

In every company there are compelling reasons to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month. At Moynihan Lumber these are our reasons:

Vikki Rundlett, wife of Webb Rundlett, breast cancer victim - 2003 Sandra Moynihan, wife of Gerard Moynihan, breast cancer victim - 2005 Lisa Bernstein, breast cancer survivor Carol Karsadi, breast cancer survivor Eileen McNeil, breast cancer survivor Rita Mullin, breast cancer survivor Barbara Surdam, breast cancer survivor

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So, how do you know if a preventive mastectomy is right for you?

Angelina Jolies double mastectomy made headlines, as did the swell of support and criticism of her choice.

To prevent or not to prevent


By Jessica Royer Ocken

It certainly was Angelina Jolies revelation of her preventive double mastectomy in the May 14, 2013, New York Times that got the general public talking about preventative mastectomies. However, since genetic testing has become more widely available in the last 10 to 15 years, more and more women are being tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, the presence of which significantly raises a womans risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, explains Dr. Lisa Kay Jacobs of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center in Maryland. Increased genetic awareness has likely led to the steady rise in mastectomies performed in the last 10 years (including those in women who have not been diagnosed with cancer), as has the growing number of women who want to be proactive and avoid dealing with cancer, she notes. However, a mastectomy, or a double mastectomy in the case of preventive procedures, is an involved surgery and not a choice to be made lightly. Its a personal decision even with the highest risk, because it is prevention, Jacobs says. When you talk about prevention, you want to compare the risk of the procedure to the benefit to be gained. So, the place to begin is with an accurate assessment of a womans risk for breast cancer. The higher her risk, the greater potential benefit from a preventive mastectomy.

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Genetic mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for only about 5 percent of breast cancers, but among those who have them, the risk of developing cancer can be as high as 85 to 87 percent.

PREVENTIVE MASTECTOMY
A true story
By Jessica Royer Ocken
CTW FEATURES

The general populations risk of developing breast cancer over a lifetime is 12 percent, Jacobs says. Factors raising a womans risk include a family history (particularly among immediate female relatives) of breast and/or ovarian cancer before menopause and any male family members with breast cancer. Family histories dont often take the fathers side into account, but breast and ovarian cancers among female relatives on the fathers side can indicate the presence of a genetic mutation, which is another risk factor. Genetic mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for only about 5 percent of breast cancers, but among those who have them, the risk of developing cancer can be as high as 85 to 87 percent, reports Dr. Marisa Weiss, founder and president of breastcancer.org. A strong family history without a BRCA mutation may yield a risk of 30 to 40 percent, Jacobs notes. So if you have an elevated risk and want to lower it, explore all your options, Weiss urges. Lifestyle adjustments like getting to a healthy weight, exercising, quitting smoking, limiting alcohol consumption and avoiding unnecessary radiation might reduce your risk by 40 percent, she says. And anti-estrogen medicines like Tamoxifen can reduce risk 40 to 50 percent. However, if your risk is 85 percent, even if you reduce it by 40 percent, its still significant. Prophylactic mastectomy can lower risk by 90 or 95 percent. That sounds pretty damn good when youre looking at a situation of high risk and you feel unsafe, Weiss says.

Whos a candidate?

The fact that a preventive mastectomy can eliminate a significant portion of the risk of breast cancer is its greatest benefit. Its a huge peace of mind thing, says Dr. Deborah M. Capko, surgical oncologist and member of the Breast Surgical Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital in New York and New Jersey. Women who have their breasts removed (Well, 97 to 99 percent of their breasts its virtually impossible to get all the tissue, Capko notes) can also reduce the amount of screening and testing mammograms, ultrasounds, MRIs, biopsies they do each year to detect cancer. These tests can cause anxiety, as each one has the potential to find something, and theyre also not much fun. For some women, preventive mastectomy is a better alternative than taking Tamoxifen, which can have menopauselike side effects and is not recommended for women who may become pregnant, Capko adds. And, in 10 to 15 percent of prophylactic mastectomy procedures, biopsy reveals that cancer was present in the breasts, even if it hadnt been detected previously, Weiss says. The biggest drawback to preventive mastectomy is the fact that its a major surgical procedure. The risks of the surgery vary depending on the technique employed and the type of reconstruction chosen, but theres a risk of bleeding and infection with any surgery, note

Cons of the procedure

Pros of the procedure

Prevent, Page S55

When Stephanie Spences older sister, Crystal Hildreth, called a little over a year ago to say shed found a lump in her breast, Spence, then 41 and a mother of three living with her family outside Atlanta, Ga., sprang into action to reassure her. Id found cystic lumps before, so I was already having annual checks and mammograms, she says. They were all just cysts, and my mom had cysts, so I was sure my sisters was just a cyst too. But her sisters was not a cyst. It was cancer. And her sister had tested positive for the BRCA2 gene mutation. The morning Spence got that phone call, she flashed back to her dads sister, whod had breast cancer and passed away from ovarian cancer in her 30s. Then she remembered a story a friend at work had told her: his wife lost her sister to breast cancer in her 20s, so she elected to have a double mastectomy rather than experience that herself. That was the first moment I thought about treatment for myself, Spence says. Her sister said there was a 50-percent chance Spence had the gene too, so she called immediately to schedule genetic testing at a nearby hospital. The test itself was so simple, she recalls just a quick swish of mouthwash and analysis of the sample but

Stephanie Spence
the results were much more complicated. She returned from vacation in April 2012 and sat in her doctors office, waiting for the news. It didnt really hit me until she opened the folder and said I had [a mutation], she says. Then it was a blur for the next 24 hours. I had up to an 87-percent risk of developing breast cancer, and up to a 44-percent risk of ovarian cancer. Spence describes herself as a woman of action, not one to sit and ponder, so she wanted to make a decision right away. I didnt have cancer, but I did not want to get it, she says. My kids are my everything, and Id breastfed all three, so my reaction was Thank God we found out. Take it all away! But she was concerned about what her husband might think. This, our life, doesnt work without you, he told her. This is easy. Were going to get it done. She was so thankful for his

support and says the process of going through all of this has brought them closer, but even with the initial decision made, she remained concerned about how her breasts would look and feel post-surgery. Then she remembered a Facebook post shed seen from a fellow mom a year or so before. Hell yeah, theyre fake! the woman had written. My real ones almost killed me. Though she didnt know her all that well, Spence immediately reached out and asked if they could have lunch. The next day, they swapped stories. Spence is BRCA2 positive, and her friend was positive for BRCA1. She shared her experience with preventive mastectomy and helped Spence get in touch with the doctors she ultimately decided to use. On our second date she showed me her breasts, Spence says with a laugh. Now were super close friends. Now I knew the results didnt have to be scary, she continues. Id seen someone who went through this and the results were beautiful. This was very helpful, she remembers, because the journey was about to get a lot harder. She cried through her first appointment with the plastic surgeon, but he put her in touch with several of his other patients who could talk with her about their reconstructions and what

Spence, Page S54

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She didnt want them for a moment to be worried or afraid. But in her closet, packing Continued from Page S53 to go to the hospital with her husband, Spence melted to expect from the surgery into a puddle. She still hadnt breast friends, Spence decided on her final reconnow calls them. She had a struction options, and it just terrible time deciding what sort of reconstruction to do. seemed all too much. Have the eye of the tiger, her husIf you keep your nipple, you band told her. Your scars have to leave a little tissue will be a badge of courage. with it, and some doctors think this is a risk for BRCA And that got her to the place where she could do it, she patients, she explains. And says. her sisters doctor (they Just hours before her compared information and surgery in June 2012, when treatment options all along the way) thought Spence was the doctor drew on me with a Sharpie, she says, thats too young to even consider when I finally decided to a procedure involving her latissimus muscle to support keep my nipples. Spence had a double mastectomy implants. with immediate reconstrucShe did a lot of crying tion using implants and her and struggling, but it was latissimus muscle, which mostly with strangers, she surgeons pulled forward says. At home, I was very positive. I told the kids I was from its natural position having surgery over dinner. in her back to support the implants. This made her We made it seem small.

AWARENESS
come see her until day two or three, and before they arrived despite the fact that she could barely lift her arms she put on makeup and twisted her hair into its usual bun. I was so determined for them not to see me as anything but tired, she explains. I didnt want to scare them because theres a solid chance my daughter [who is currently 6] will go through this too. Their visit lasted just long enough for them to collect the goodie bags shed prepared for them and see that she was OK. However, once she got home, she couldnt hide. My mom is just the opposite of me, she says with a laugh. If one of her children appeared while her mom was changing her drains, she treated them like little nurses. She had them wash their hands and help, which made them feel empowered. The drains came out after a few weeks, and Spence has had two more (much simpler) procedures to get her new breasts just right. The third surgery was the charm, she reports, and now a year later my results, according to my husband and all the girlfriends Ive forced to look at them, are very beautiful. However, this summer is the first time shes really felt like her breasts are part of her, like she can wear a bathing suit and be comfortable. It was a long road to get used to her body again, and her back was swollen for months. Ive never regretted my decision for a second, but some moments were harder than others, she says. To further reduce her risk of cancer Spence had a hysterectomy in May, and she says she finally feels ready to get back to her life. Im ready to start walking, to start hot yoga, and just get back to normal. Shes reduced her risk of breast cancer from 87 percent to less than 5 percent and says she feels very lucky to have had a choice in her treatment. My aunt didnt have a choice, and thankfully my sister caught it in time, she says. I think my sister got cancer first so I wouldnt die from it, she adds. And shes thanked Hildreth for that. It made [my sister] feel better because she knew shed been the alarm system for me, Spence says. Hildreth is now in remission and has had a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery as well. Spence is now looking for ways she can be an alarm for others her nieces, her daughter someday, even her Facebook friends. [This experience has] brought our family closer together, she says. It gives you clarity on whats important.

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

SPENCE

surgery more complex, and more painful, but ultimately yielded very natural results. She recalls waking up in recovery, shocked that the procedure was over and feeling like an elephant sat on her chest. The plastic surgeon had put just enough fluid in her expander implants to give her a little cleavage, like shed had before. She also had four surgical drains, two in front and two on her back. She was in Atlantas Piedmont Hospital for four days, on a lot of pain medication, and the first night, in particular, was miserable, she recalls. Her husband stayed home to keep things normal for their children, so her mom stayed with her, rubbing her arm all night long and calling the nurse for more medication whenever possible. She didnt have her kids

PREVENT: How do you know if a preventive mastectomy is right for you?


Continued from Page S53 Jacobs and Capko. And theres also some post-operative pain to manage and temporarily reduced range of motion in the upper extremities, they report. Its not a cosmetic procedure like an augmentation, Capko says. Youre not just getting a new pair. Post-surgical drains are in place for two or three weeks, and most women spend a few days recovering in the hospital, followed by a few weeks at home. And there are emotional and physical considerations. Mastectomy is a loss, a change in your body, Weiss says. Youre sacrificing your breasts to be in healthier place, no longer at high risk. You lose sexual function of the nipples even if you choose to retain them with a nipple-sparing mastectomy, she notes, and Jacobs adds that sensation across the chest is likely to be altered by the procedure because the skin is lifted. Finally, if the breast tissue is removed, breastfeeding will no longer be possible, Capko says. Breast reconstruction may use tissue from your body, silicone implants or some combination of the two, but regardless of what you and your surgical team determine to be the best approach, the majority of these surgeries are not one shot in the operating room and done, Capko says. There will be additional reconstructive procedures needed. Some people want it all done in the summer and to never have to think of it again. Thats not going to happen, she says. You wont be happy [with the results] if you go in with that attitude.

S55 The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

A persons overall health should also be a factor in decision making, because women who smoke, are diabetic or have had radiation to their chest for treatment of Hodgkins disease have additional risk factors that may complicate the mastectomy and reconstruction surgeries.
reconstruction using body tissue. And its safe to estimate a week of recovery time for every hour of surgery, Weiss says. At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital, patients can expect a 23-hour, overnight stay after this procedure, and at Johns Hopkins, patients may stay three days after an involved reconstruction. After that they recover at home. These experts say that at least one follow-up surgery (a much simpler procedure) will likely be required to replace the temporary tissue-expander implant with the larger final one, and additional adjustment procedures may be required to get the look and feel the patient desires for her new breasts. Long term, these women will still need annual breast exams to monitor the remaining tissue, and those with silicone implants will need to have them replaced after 10 or 20 years. If surgery is not the right choice, the alternative is vigilant screening for those at increased risk for breast cancer: a breast exam conducted by a physician every six months, a yearly mammogram and perhaps even an annual MRI, Jacobs says. And again, taking Tamoxifen as a preventive measure is an option for women done with with a preventive mastectomy, a great deal childbearing, she notes. Capko adds that ultrasounds may be useof planning begins. The breast cancer surgical team and plastic surgery reconstruc- ful for screening as well, and she suggests that younger women begin mammograms tion team must coordinate on a time, and the surgery is usually scheduled at least a when they are 10 years younger than the youngest cancer diagnosis in their family. couple of months in advance. In addition to the screening benefits, In the meantime, the patient will likely annual testing provides a good opportuhave breast imaging done, and shell meet nity for patient follow-up and assessment, with both surgeons to discuss procedures Capko says. We can evaluate how theyre and make decisions about the type of feeling about surgery. Are you still happy reconstruction shed like, says Capko. with this [course of action]? Has anything Smokers must stop smoking, says Weiss, changed? and some patients may do a little physical Whatever decision a woman makes, therapy to prepare their abdomens if theyll its important that she do so with all be using tissue from that area to reconthe information she needs and after struct their breasts, Jacobs adds. Theyll appropriate counseling, these experts also have additional counseling to make say. I dont think its good to do surgery sure they understand the procedure and based on fear, Capko says. But if you what to expect. do it based on knowledge and informed The surgery itself can range from three consent, it becomes a powerful tool for to four hours if implants will be used for women. reconstruction to six to eight hours with

A lot of patients select themselves, Capko says. For women who are gene positive and have seen other family members go through cancer, its often a relatively easy decision, she says. That person is a lot more proactive. However, she adds, not every woman who is gene positive needs to have a bilateral mastectomy. The only real time you need to do that is if you have cancers in both breasts that are beyond the capability of breast-conservation surgery. So its important to weigh your options carefully and keep things in perspective. Even those at highest risk dont know if or when theyll get breast cancer, and if a cancer does develop, it can be treated when found early with screening tests, Capko explains. Jacobs always talks to her patients about medications before they discuss preventive mastectomy. Tamoxifen can reduce risk by half, and thats a tablet once a day for five years, she notes. For some thats a better option. A persons overall health should also be a factor in decision making, because women who smoke, are diabetic or have What to expect if you do it had radiation to their chest for treatment of When a woman decides to move forward

How to make a decision

Hodgkins disease have additional risk factors that may complicate the mastectomy and reconstruction surgeries, these experts note. They also recommend that a woman considering preventive mastectomy meet with a plastic surgeon so she can understand her best options and likely outcome for reconstructive surgery, which are impacted by her anatomy and the shape and size of her body. We spend a lot of time talking about the patients expectations, Capko says. The patient needs to understand the procedure because if we cant fulfill her expectations, she will always be disappointed. A final decision-making factor is timing, these experts note. This is not a decision that should be made urgently. Because of increased genetic screening, many women are learning theyre BRCA mutation-positive quite early in their lives. But you dont need to remove your breasts at 20, Jacobs says. Someone whos at high risk needs to be vigilant 10 years before the age of the earliest diagnosis in her family. If breast cancer runs in a womans family, but her relatives have been diagnosed in their 40s or 50s and shes 25, she might decide to wait, Weiss notes. Some younger women elect to have children before considering bilateral mastectomy, Capko adds. And those who are gene positive may elect to remove their ovaries before their breasts. [Preventive mastectomy] is always an option thats a great way of looking at it, Capko says. Once you find out youre at high risk, you dont have to decide today. You should feel youre ready to make the decision because its right for you at that time.

What to expect if you dont

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Breast cancer in 1945


expression on her face, Connie Brown said. The elder Browns friend asked what was wrong, and AnastaMANCHESTER Connie Brown, cia responded that she had felt 91, remembers the day in 1945 that something very small when she her mother, Anastacia, was diagstretched her arm. nosed with breast cancer. According to Connie Brown, the Anastacia Brown was having a friend, before leaving that day, went coffee break with a friend in the across the street to where Connies kitchen of the Browns home when father ran a store and told him to she reached up into a cabinet. get his wife to a doctor immediately. She was just reaching up for He took Anastacia to New Enga cup or saucer, and had a sharp land Deaconess Hospital the next
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ANASTACIAS STORY
day, Connie said, and she ended up having a mastectomy. At that time they didnt use the word cancer, Connie said. My mother lived a wonderful life but she was cut very, very deeply. Soon after the surgery, a customer at the store inquired about Anastacias health and offered an invaluable piece of advice. According to Connie, the customer said Anastacia should keep the surgical area of her chest especially covered and protected because it could still

By Cheryl Lecesse

attract infection. Thats what happened to the customers mother, who had also undergone a mastectomy but died of illness afterward. She stressed that you have to keep warm, Connie said. She really, truly saved my mothers life. Anastacia went on to live until she was 82 years old. She was a survivor and it never came back, said Connie. They havent really solved it [breast cancer] but theyve come a long way.

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The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

What to expect when youre ingesting


How to cope with side effects of common types of breast cancer medicines
By Bev Bennett Regaining your health is paramount when youre being treated for breast cancer. And if side effects result from your prescribed drug protocol, well, youll grit your teeth and deal with them. Different treatments may be associated with certain side effects. However, the likelihood, type and severity vary greatly with each patient, according to healthcare experts. By being informed, you can talk to your physician about managing any challenges that arise. Tools for relief include other medications, vitamins and stress-alleviating techniques, along with exercise the remedy for many ills. Although its helpful to know you could have side effects, its not beneficial to focus on potential issues, especially before you take a medication, according to Dr. Tara Sanft, assistant professor of medicine (medical oncology) at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. Most people deal with side effects pretty well. I tell patients they dont know whether theyll suffer a side effect until they take the medication, Sanft says. Your drug treatment may fall into one of three categories: hormone-blocking therapy, chemotherapy or targeted drugs. Hormone-blocking therapy may be used to treat breast cancers that are sensitive to hormones. Younger women who are treated with these drugs go into menopause. Theres no therapy to prevent that, says Janelle therapy classes for mind stimulation may help, according to Mann. Fatigue may be harder to deal with. Fatigue is common, and women may underestimate it. Women think the Potential side effects are part of the conversation treatment is over and they when you discuss breast cancer drug treatments with a should feel normal. It can physician. take months, up to a year How will it make me feel, is the question Dr. Ethan for women to resume their Basch most often hears. Patients want to know how people like them did with a energy levels, Sanft says. Counter-intuitive as prescribed drug, he says. it seems, exercise is an In return, Basch wants to give patients an honest appraisal of the benefits and risks of drugs so they can antidote. decide based on their own values and situation. Exercise can actually Unfortunately, cancer drug labels dont provide improve fatigue and may adequate information for those decisions, according to speed up recovery, Sanft Basch, director of the Cancer Outcomes Research Prosays. gram at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Physical activity is also He is calling on companies to do a better job of colbeing studied for its role in lecting and sharing information on how their drugs will helping while chemotherapy affect patients symptoms and quality of life. is still going on, according to Without that knowledge, treatment may be more difJanelsins. ficult for patients, according to the oncologist, author Theres some evidence it of a recent perspective piece on patient-centered drug may help patients handle a development in oncology, published in the New England higher level of treatment, Journal of Medicine. she says. Patients want to know whether all the side effects are Again, as with vitamin D, worth it. People want to know how people like them did the key is finding the optiwith the drug, Basch says. The cancer specialist is also working with the National mal amount of exercise for each patient. Cancer Institute to develop a system for patients to Targeted drug treatment, report their own side effects. which works against speIts interesting that skeptics of collecting information cific cancer cell abnormalifrom patients think patients dont want to be bothered. Sanft, who is also medical ties, is an interesting and Mann, a board-certified [But] theyre pleased to answer questions about how director of adult survivorgrowing area, according to oncology pharmacist and theyre feeling, he says. Mann. assistant professor of phar- ship for the Yale Cancer Center Survivorship Clinic. Symptoms vary, but the macy practice at St. Louis joint pain and to promote Finding medications to College of Pharmacy in St. Chemotherapy uses drugs more common complaints bone health, according to relieve the pain is difficult; include diarrhea, headaches Louis, Mo. to destroy cancer cells. Michelle C. Janelsins, assistolerating pain is the goal, and heart muscle changes, Anti-depressant drugs Hair loss may be your tant professor at University worry if youre undergoing she says. she says. can be prescribed for hot of Rochester Medical Center chemotherapy. Massage therapy and Mann recommends overflashes that may accompany in Rochester, N.Y. exercise are possibilities. the-counter medications to menopause. The good news is that The key question is Along with joint pain, combat diarrhea. The drugs may not your hair does grow back, how much to take, says decreasing bone density is But be prudent using an eliminate the hot flashes though the texture, and Janelsins, who researches associated with aromatase OTC headache remedy. It but make them more maneven color, may be differways to alleviate symptoms ent after treatment is coninhibitors. could mask a fever thats ageable, according to the related to breast cancer We can treat women if pharmacist. cluded, according to Mann. part of an infection, accordtreatments. they get into a dangerous Breast cancer patients Many women report they ing to Mann. Its really important for zone. Weight-bearing exerChanges to heart muscle who are past menopause experience chemo brain, may be treated with aroma- cise staves off bone loss and women to have their vitamin the perception of not being cells may require regular D checked. We know that a as sharp as before, accordhelps improve quality of consultations with a carditase inhibitors. lot of breast cancer survilife, Sanft says. ologist. Prescription medicaJoint pain can be very ing to Sanft. vors have suboptimal levels Vitamin D may have the tions are available to help common in women on aroLearning techniques for of vitamin D, she says. potential to both reduce with this, Mann says. matase inhibitors, says focusing and taking art

Quantifying the side effects

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Ask the Expert: Eva Andersson-Dubin

Eva Andersson-Dubin, founder of The Dubin Breast Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York.

STEFAN ANDERSSON/Courtesy

The Dubin family, from left, Jordon, Celina, Maya, Glenn and Eva.

Courtesy photo

Doctor fights to treat others the way she wanted to be treated


about to face the fight of her life, and she knew that she deserved better. It was 2002 and AnderHer doctor simply told sson-Dubin, who had just her, You have breast canhad her third child, had not cer, and I think you need a had a mammogram in more mastectomy and hung up. than a year. Once I had it, Eva Andersson-Dubin, they told me it was fine but once a model with an called me up an hour later illustrious career, a Miss Universe finalist and now a because they saw something physician at Mt. Sinai Medi- but werent sure it was cal Center in New York City, important or just deodorant on the film, says the now knew that wasnt the way 52-year-old. to treat a patient. She was By Lisa Iannucci Her risk factors for breast cancer were minimal. She was 34 when she had her first child, but no one in her family had ever had any form of cancer, so the odds were in her favor. That is, until the doctor called with the diagnosis no woman wants to hear. It was shocking, she says. I had just helped one of my closest friends go through the exact same cancer diagnosis. I was super busy with a 7-, 5- and 1-year-old, and this was out of nowhere. One call changed her life forever. I was scared I would have an advanced stage of breast cancer, I wouldnt see my children grow up, and Id be dead in a year or two, she says. As a physician, she knew too much about cancer and test results. I knew exactly what needed to be confirmed. I also remember grabbing on to any cancer survivor who survived for more than two years and hoped I would become one of them. I loved talking to them because it was very encouraging, and I tried focusing on the positive. She consulted with multiple doctors who could coordinate her care. She was diagnosed with an early stage of breast cancer, but it was decided that a mastectomy was what she needed to do. I didnt need chemo, but I knew I didnt want radiation, she says. Andersson-Dubin has lived a wonderful life, traveling the world as an international model, but medicine was her calling. Years earlier, she made a conscious decision to complete her pre-medicine program in Sweden. When I was younger, I was fascinated by hospitals, she says. I loved the smells and

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All in the family


Eva Andersson-Dubins daughter, 18-year-old Celina, wants to become a breast surgeon. She started at Harvard University this fall and is taking pre-med classes to become a doctor. She says her inspiration is Dr. Elisa Port, the director of the Dubin Breast Center.

When did you decide you wanted to become a breast surgeon and did your mothers diagnosis play a factor in that?
Ive always been interested in science and biology. During the last couple years, Ive been shadowing a lot of surgeons and specifically have become interested in breast surgery after spending some time with Dr. Elisa Port, chief breast surgeon at Mount Sinai, who is very inspiring. This, more than my mothers diagnosis, has led me to be interested in breast surgery. My mothers diagnosis probably has strengthened my interest in medicine.

Your mother had breast cancer. Talk about how you feel about your risk increasing?
I know by being a daughter of a breast cancer survivor, Im at an increased risk of breast cancer myself. However, I am lucky that my mother does not carry the mutation called the BRCA gene. As a result of my mothers diagnosis, I am definitely more aware of early screening and will be followed in a center that specializes in breast cancer.

I see myself living in New York City, hopefully having completed medical school at a great institution and working as a surgeon, specializing in breast surgery.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Eva Andersson-Dubin with her daughter, Celina, 18.

the sounds, and I could see myself taking care of people. When I got older, I knew I needed to go into the field so I could learn more. It was always fascinating to read about your body, and it was interesting being a mix of a detective and a scientist. It was a right fit for me. But she was also drawn to the life of a model. I wanted to see the world and make money, so I figured I would take off one year, but one turned into four, she says. It was very hard to stop. I was having a good time traveling, but an opportunity came up to go back to school and I took it. Today, Andersson-Dubin is a board-certified internist at Mount Sinai Medical Center. After her experiences with breast cancer, she decided that it was time to give back. My husband, Glenn, and I looked into doing something for the hospital, and we suggested creating a breast cancer center, she says. The couple donated $16 million to create The Dubin Breast Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center. I had no intention to enter into the breast cancer field, she says. But its very unusual to have the experience of being philanthropist, patient and physician. It makes me very invested in the place because it carries our name. The Dubin Breast Center is a multidisciplinary facility that includes oncofertility, nutrition and mental health counseling in addition to massage therapy, acupuncture and other complementary services, all under one roof. Mount Sinai offers 3D mammography and new procedures like seed localization, which allows surgeons to better target and remove breast tumors. Our goal for the Dubin Breast Center is to provide patients with seamless care, she says. From breast cancer screening to diagnosis to treatment

and survivorship, patients receive personalized, comprehensive care in a welcoming, private and reassuring setting. She says that she is obsessed with keeping the place clean. We dont use wall-to-wall rugs, and I almost want to ask patients to take their shoes off, she laughs. But I want it to be clean, and the quality of care inside the center is the most important thing. All of our doctors are handpicked and the best of the best. Im most proud of the personnel we have hired. She meets with every employee to ask them how they are doing and how they can make the center better. I meet with patients too, she says. They have a different experience than I had and I want to hear what their ideas are. To those women who are going through treatment or were just diagnosed, Andersson-Dubin says, Breast cancer today has a very good prognosis. We find breast cancer earlier, we have very high survival rates. Dont panic, and go to someone who specializes in breast cancer. Its a journey that, at the end of the day, will make you a stronger, better person. Andersson-Dubin says it changed her life for the better. All of a sudden, I was faced with the fact that something was affecting my life, and I started appreciating my life, friends and family on a level I wasnt aware of before. Im humble and thankful for every day. Today, Andersson-Dubin is healthy and makes sure to get checked every six months. I get nervous, though, but Im not walking around looking for lumps and bumps. For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/ patient-care/service-areas/ cancer/cancer-services/ dubin-breast-center.

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THE PREVENT DEFENSE

ways to reduce your risk of breast cancer

ust 10 percent of breast cancers are due to genetic factors. The rest? Theyre related, directly or indirectly, to lifestyle, says Dr. Marisa Weiss, president and founder of BreastCancer.org, who is a breast cancer survivor herself. While that may sound like cause for concern, Weiss says its actually empowering: Whether youve never been diagnosed or youve had the disease in the past, theres plenty you can do to reduce your risk. Here are six positive steps to take today:

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You can reduce the likelihood of getting the disease with these methods 1. Get moving
Numerous studies have shown that women who exercise reduce their likelihood of being diagnosed, or re-diagnosed, with breast cancer. Among the evidence, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill researchers found that two hours of daily physical activity (from working out, as well as activities like household chores), reduced womens odds of breast cancer by a notable 30 percent. New research from the University of Minnesota suggests that exercise helps by allowing the body to break down estrogen, the hormone that plays a major role in the diseases development. Tight on time? Every little bit makes a difference, says Dr. Kathy J. Helzlsouer, director of prevention and research at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. I tell all of my patients to look for free moments; for example, I always take the stairs instead of the elevator. It adds up throughout the day. shows that using smoking cessation aids such as counseling, nicotine patches, gum and/or medication more than triples your chances of success. Visit SmokeFree.gov for free resources.

5. Consider the benefits of motherhood and nursing

Women who have at least one child in their 20s are less likely to develop breast cancer than those who give birth later; those who breastfeed for two years of their lives, total, are also less likely to have breast cancer for similar reasons. Researchers arent sure why, but it may be related to a reduction in overall estrogen exposure.

2. Go easy on alcohol

Alcohol consumption increases risk of breast cancer and the more women drink, the higher their odds, studies show. Thats not to say you should never have a cocktail again, but keeping your intake to no more than three to five drinks a week is a good idea, both for breast cancer and overall health, says Weiss. (One drink is the equivalent of 11/2 ounces of liquor, 5 ounces of wine or 12 ounces of beer).

6. Stay in close contact with your doctor

When it comes to prevention, One size does not fit all, says Dr. Nancy Klauber-DeMore, a surgical oncologist and professor of surgery at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Women should talk to their physicians about their health history, family history and lifestyle to figure out their Fat tissue increases the production of estrogen. individual risk, then Researchers believe that may be why women who tailor their approach are overweight or obese are at a higher risk for accordingly. If you have a breast cancer. Fortunately, losing just 5 percent of first-degree relative whos body weight if you weigh 170, thats 81/2 pounds had breast cancer, or a genetic lowers postmenopausal womens blood levels of risk factor such as the BRCA1 or estrogen and reduces breast cancer risk by 22 perBRCA2 gene, your doctor may cent, according a study from the Fred Hutchinson recommend extra steps, such as Cancer Research Center in Seattle. biannual screenings (including The closer you can get to a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or lower, the better, Helzlsouer says. Go physical exams, mammograms and/or MRIs), or preventive to CDC.gov for a free BMI calculator. medication like Tamoxifen. If youve had breast cancer in the past, perhaps the most important thing you can do is Smoking gets a bad rap because of lung cancer, to stay the course with your but its a major breast cancer risk, too, stresses treatment, Helzlsouer says. Dr. Maurie Markman, national director of mediNo ones better equipped cal oncology at the Cancer Treatment Centers of to help you with that than America. Even secondhand smoke is dangerous, your physician. Markman says. Smoke is a carcinogen that damages tissue and triggers cell abnormality. If you need to kick the habit, dont go cold turkey; research

3. Mind the scale

4. Kick butts

S64

The Salem News BREAST CANCER AWARENESS Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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