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CUSTOMS CLEARANCE IN EXPORTS CLEARANCE OF GOODS BY CUSTOMS AUTHORITIES

Generally the central excise duties are payable on manufactured goods at the time of their removal from the factory premises. However goods exported are exempted from paying central excise duties. The following are two ways in which goods meant for export can be cleared.

1.Pay and Refund Method


Under this method, the exporter pays the excise duty at the time removal of goods from the factor and when the goods are exported, claims of the same when excise duty is paid the exporter sends the central excise authorities five copies of AR4 form, three copies of the gate pass, 1 (GP1) form Excise Inspection then visit the factory and insect the goods on the basis of the AR4 and GP1 form. If the inspectors are satisfied, AR4 and GP1 form and the first and second of the AR4 form are returned to the exporter.

2.Clearance Under Bond


Under this method, the exporter enters into a bond with the collector of central excise. The bond is executed for a sum equal to the amount of duty that would have been payable on the goods.

Organisation structure

Manager Manager
Operating stock Operating stock Finance Manager Finance Manager Assistant Assistant Operational Manager Manager Executive A/Cs A/Cs Operating Assistant Executive of A/Cs Sales Manager Deputy Manager Document Executive Assistant Manager

Regional

DEPARTMENTS OPERATING UNDER MSA


1) Sales: Under this department the sales activities are

carried on and this department mainly deals with leasing of containers to various parties who needs it. 2) Marketing: All the marketing activities are controlled under the guidance of this department. 3) Accounts: All the MSAs accounting works are being carried on by this department.

4) Administration: The administration and over all control of various department is being done through this department. The main decision making activities is also done by administrative department. 5) Document stock operation: This department under MSA looks after all the documentation work needed at the time of exports and imports. Handling of Export Document The following are the main export documents handled by the company. a) Letter of Credit : Letter of credit is a document issued by the importers bank in favour of the exporter giving him the authority to draw bills up to a particular amount covering a specified shipment of goods and assuring him of payment against the delivery of shipping documents. This is a written document under taken issued by buyers bank agreeing to pay a sum of money within a specified period. b) Export order : An order is a commercial transaction which is not only important to the exporter respective countries, since it affects the balance of payment position of both the countries. It is, therefore, not just a matter of product, manufacturing,

packaging, shipment and payment but also one of the concerns to licensing authorities, exchange control authorities and banks dealing in export trade.

c) Bill of Lading : Bill of lading is a document issued by the Shipping Company or its agent acknowledging the receipt of goods mentioned in the bill for shipment on board the vessel, and undertaking to deliver the goods in the like order and condition as received to the consignee or his order of assignee, provided the freight and other charges as specified in the Bill of Lading have been duly paid. There are two types. A straight B/L is nonnegotiable. A negotiable or shippers order B/L can be bought, sold on traded while goods for L/C transactions. d) Certificate Of Origin : This certificate is issued by the chamber of commerce stating the goods being exporter are of Indian origin. Certain nations require a signed statement as to the origin of the export item. e) Shipping Bill : Shipping Bill is an important document required by the customs authorities for allowing shipment. It is prepared by the

exporter and it contains the name of vessel, master or agents, flag, port at which goods are to be discharged, country of final destination, exporter name and address, details about packages, number and description of goods, marks and numbers, quality, details of each case, FOB price, real value as defined in the Sea customs Act, whether Indian or Foreign merchandise to be reexported, total number of packages with total weight and value and the name and address of the importer.

f)

Order of Acceptance : The Order Acceptance is prepared by the exporter

confirming the acceptance of order placed by the importer. Under this document he commits the shipment of goods covered at the agreed price during a specified time. Sometimes the exporter needs a copy of his order of acceptance signed by the importer. The order acceptance normally covers the name and address of the indenter, name and address of the consignee, port of shipment, country of final destination, the description of goods, quantity, price each and total amount of the order, terms of delivery, details of freight and insurance, mode of transport, packing and marking details, terms of payment etc. g) Insurance certificate :

In the international trade, which the goods are in transit, they are exposed to marine perils, Marine Insurance is intended to protect the insured against the risk of loss or damage to goods in transit due to marine perils. Marine Insurance Policy is a contract where by the insurer in consideration of a payment on premium by the insured agrees to indemnify the latter against loss incurred by him in respect of goods exposed to perils of the sea. If the seller provides insurance, the insurance certificate states the types and amount of coverage. The instrument is negotiable

Handling of import documents The following are the main import documents handled by the company. a) Import Order An order is a commercial transaction which is not only important to the importer. But is also of concern to their respective countries, since it affects the balance of payment

position of both the countries. Exchange control authorities and banks dealing in import trade. b) Commercial Invoice : An invoice is a document which contains the detailed description of goods consigned, the consignors name, consignees name, name of the steamer, number and date of bill of lading, date of sailing, order of acceptance or contract number and date, country of origin, marks and number of packages, special markings, if any, quantity shipped, selling price to the buyer for each unit and total price, terms of payment, terms of sale amount of freight and insurance. Commercial invoice is a prima facie evidence of the contract of sale and purchase. The invoice should be strictly in accordance with the contract of sale and should be on the paper of seller and must be signed by the exporter or by the person acting on his behalf.

c) Bill of Exchange / Draft : Bill of Exchange is also known as Draft. A bill of exchange is an instrument in writing containing an unconditional order, signed by the maker directing a certain person to pay a certain

sum of money only to or to the of a person or to the bearer of the instrument. d) Packing List : A packing list contains the date of packing, connection invoice number, order number details of shipping such as the name of streamer, bill of lading number and date of sailing, case number to which the list / note relates, the details of goods such as quantity, weight etc.

Importing Countries
CHINA JAPAN SOUTH AFRICA U.S.A UAE OMAN QATAR

Exporting Countries
CHINA U.K

U.S.A FRANCE

SINGAPORE OMAN UAE QATAR

Major Exporting Goods


The major exporting goods are GARMENTS MACHINERIES HANDICRAFTS SPICES FOOD STUFFS

Major Importing Goods


The major importing goods are ELECTRONIC ITEMS HOME APPLIANCES

MACHINERIES HARD WARES SCRAPS

Mode of payments
The most commonly known trade terms are INCOterms, which are published by the International Chamber of Commerce. These are often identical in form to domestic terms.

FOB
A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods on board a vessel designated by the buyer. The seller fulfills its obligations to deliver when the goods have passed over the ship's rail. "Free on Board" means that the seller delivers when the goods pass the ship's rail at the named port of shipment. This means that the buyer has to bear all costs and risks of loss of or damage to the goods from that point. The FOB term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. This term can be used only for sea or inland waterway transport. If the parties do not intend to deliver the goods across the ships rail, the FCA term should be used. When used in trade terms, the word "free" means the seller has an obligation to deliver goods to a named place for transfer to a carrier. Contracts involving international

transportation often contain abbreviated trade terms that describe matters such as the time and place of delivery and payment, when the risk of loss shifts from the seller to the buyer, as well as who pays the costs of freight and insurance.

CIF
A trade term requiring the seller to arrange for the carriage of goods by sea to a port of destination, and provide the buyer with the documents necessary to obtain the goods from the carrier. Cost, Insurance and Freight means that the seller delivers when the goods pass the ships rail in the port of shipment.

The seller must pay the costs and freight necessary to bring the goods to the named port of destination BUT the risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after the time of delivery, are transferred from the seller to the buyer. However, in CIF the seller also has to procure marine insurance against the buyers risk of loss of or damage to the goods during the carriage. Consequently, the seller contracts for insurance and pays the insurance premium. The buyer should note that under the CIF term the seller is required to obtain insurance only on minimum cover. Should the buyer wish to have the protection of

greater cover, he would either need to agree as much expressly with the seller or to make his own extra insurance arrangements. The CIF term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. This term can be used only for sea and inland waterway transport. If the parties do not intend to deliver the goods across the ships rail, the CIP term should be used.

C&F
Cost and Freight means that the seller delivers when the goods pass the ships rail in the port of shipment. The seller must pay the costs and freight necessary to bring the goods to the named port of destination BUT the risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after the time of delivery, are transferred from the seller to the buyer.