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November 2013

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NOVEMBER 2013

Lots to fall into this time of year


blinked ... the weather got cooler and the trees in the foothills are magically painting our streets with the color of fall. I love this time of year, the comfort of traditions and enjoying the many festivities with family and friends. This edition of The

MJ Heltsley Sales Director

Arts
Seventy-five Placer County artists, including Terri Goodman, above, are creating new work and readying their studios for the Autumn Art Studios Tour 17

Foothills Entertainer will focus on topics of traditional food and drink, festivals, local performances, concerts and classic films. We are excited to weave the richness of the arts with the warmth of the many social activities that provide the foothills with so much holiday

spirit. We invite you to tour the pages on this issue and mark your calendars for some amazing activities. The family of The Entertainer raises our glasses to all of our neighbors as we showcase the highlights of our foothill communities. Enjoy your feast of Thanksgiving and all that our foothills have to offer. Cheers!

Food & Wine


Farm to Fork movement gains foothold in Placer, Nevada counties. Plus ... Wine & Beer Fest, Michael Pollan and Thanksgiving recipes and wine

4-13

Theater
Six actors take on Closer Than Ever, one man tackles Mercy Killers and a childrens troupe touches down in Oz.

14-16

Events
Cowboy poets in Loomis, bead and jewelry crafters in Grass Valley and the Mandarin Festival is back in Auburn

18-21

NOVEMBER 2013 Volume 1 Number 2


1030 High Street, Auburn www.auburnjournal.com
General Info: (530) 885-5656 or (800) 927-7355 General Manager: Jim Easterly, (530) 852-0224, jime@goldcountrymedia.com Publisher: Todd Frantz (530) 852-0200, toddf@goldcountrymedia.com Editor: Dennis Noone, (530) 852-0231, dennisn@goldcountrymedia.com Features Editor: Paul Cambra, (530) 852-0230, paulc@goldcountrymedia.com

Movies
Silver Screen Classics ready to show its 200th film. Plus ...The Birds touch down in Auburn.

22

Music
Pianist Sean Chen, cellist Rufus Cappadocia and slack key guitarist Makana. Plus ... Graham Nash, Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt ON THE COVER:
Mike Scagliotti, left, from Dingus McGees and Ike Frazee from Ikes Quarter Caf appreciate the bounty that Placer and Nevada counties have to offer.
COVER PHOTO BY KIM PALAFERRI FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

23-26

Advertising Director: MJ Heltsley, (530) 852-0225, mjh@goldcountrymedia.com Production supervisor: Sue Morin, susanm@goldcountrymedia.com Got some news for the Foothills Entertainer? Email it to: foothillsentertainer@goldcountrymedia.com
Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The publisher shall not be responsible for any liabilities arising from the publication of copy provided by any advertiser for the Foothills Entertainer. Further, it shall not be liable for any act of omission on the part of the advertiser pertaining to their published advertisement in the Foothills Entertainer. A publication of Gold Country Media.

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FOOD WINE
Paul Glowaski, co-owner of Dinner Bell Farms in Chicago Park, tends to his New Hampshire and naked neck chickens.
KIM PALAFERRI FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Yeah, we do that
P
I kind of laugh about it now and say Okay, cool. Do it, Selaya said. I was doing it when there were virtually no big farms in Nevada City. At one point I was buying lettuce from monks in Marin County. My belief has always been we have to support farmers. Without the farmer we are nothing.

Wealth of local agriculture makes Placer and Nevada counties natural players in the Farm to Fork movement
BY PAUL CAMBRA
FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

lease excuse Peter Selaya for being amused. The chef and owner of the New Moon Caf in Nevada City has been doing Farm to Fork for 25 years, long before the state capital took hold of the harvester and well before the term locavore was coined.
then that chef leaves and a new person comes in and asks, why does your chicken cost so much? Glowaski said. Its almost like you are starting from square one. They dont know you from Joe. You almost have to re-sell yourself. Its not insurmountable but it is a challenge. As if the farming life is not challenging enough especially for the small ones its tough to compete with the power of corporate agribusiness and the convenience of the global food market. Its not like we are raking it in, Glowaski said. Its much more a love of the game thing; we believe we can make a living, but you have to find people willing to pay a premium. One San Francisco restaurant invested in a breeding program for pigs. They loaned Dinner Bell Farms the money to make it a permanent part of their operation. In the fall, they get paid back with pigs. In the long term it made

THE FARMS
Paul Glowaski is not against going to the back door of a restaurant and handing the chef a chicken. Not just any chicken, but an organically-fed free ranger from Dinner Bell Farms in Chicago Park. One of the tough things is, its been amazing with a restaurant,

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

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One of Paul Glowaskis daily tasks on his Dinner Bell Farm is making sure his Magalitsa pigs are fed an organic corn-based grain supplement.
sense for them, Glowaski said. They are first in line forever for our pigs. There are a lot of ways restaurants and farms can work together beyond selling and buying. Bay Area restaurants make up a large part of Dinner Bell Farms business, with about 15 percent of their crop going to local restaurants. Glowaski has found that a lot of farming is about establishing relationships. Often times, its us approaching a chef and asking them what do you want? he said. Chefs really value that, they really value flexibility. If they order 10 pounds of salad mix, I go out and harvest it for them. They get produce delivered directly to them that was harvested for them. Folks are willing to pay a premium for that. He said their pastureraised heritage chickens are the farms bread and butter, but they also grow specialty vegetables, salad mix, baby cutting greens, arugula and a unique variety of peppers. You want to be super diverse and have everything, but you need to

If they order 10 pounds of salad mix, I go out and harvest it for them. They get produce delivered directly to them that was harvested for them. Folks are willing to pay a premium for that.
Paul Glowaski, co-owner, Dinner Bell Farms

focus on quality and efficiency, he said. All of the things we sell, the only way we make it is if our stuff is the best. We talk about quality all the time when we are harvesting, thats the only way we survive for the long term. Thats the challenge of any small farm. And then theres the whole organic thing. Farmers can grow things organically to their hearts content, but they cant label it as such unless they have been certified. Organic is the single most regulated word in agriculture, said Josh Huntsinger, Placer Countys agricultural commis-

sioner. There is a high standard; the consumer must have confidence in what they are buying. Theres a high bar they must meet. It is quite a process. Huntsingers office is a regulatory agency, and one of the things they regulate is organic farming. He said its a major commitment and the land has to be farmed for three years before they can call it organic. Farming is a business and it comes down to economics, he said. For many, it means your production is lower, but you may make it up from the premium price you can charge. But if farmers can get a good price without going through certification, they must make that decision. He said one of the nice things about buying local is, even if its not organic, is you interact with the farmer and ask them what their practices are. You may still be comfortable with their farming practices, he said. Deena Miller, co-owner of Sweet Roots Farm in Grass Valley, said they decided to go the organic
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ROASTED WINTER SQUASH

FARM
continued from page 5 route, getting their certification earlier this year. Before, at farmers markets, people wouldnt even talk to us, Miller said. Its interesting to see that perception change. We didnt do anything different. Miller said it was always part of the goal of Sweet Roots Farm and she feels proud to be certified organic. For her, it starts from the ground up; healthy soil and good compost. Eating food from a healthy soil with healthy microbes begat a healthy planet beneficial to your overall system, she said. I have been so much healthier since I have been farming, just eating a huge percentage of our food. Minutes before we eat it, it was in our ground. Their three-acre farm is located in a low, cool spot, which makes it hard to grow year-round. She said a handful of growers have recently stopped offering community supported agriculture (CSA) boxes, changing their model around to grow more efficiently but with less diversity. One she knows of goes year-round

FROM IKE FRAZEE, IKES QUARTER CAF, NEVADA CITY ne of my all-time favorite fall harvests is the winter squash, sweet and rich, full of caramel flavor and autumn color. So many varieties and ways to use in recipes. Here I will share a simple way to prepare squashes with maximum flavor for use in any recipe, no matter what squash is called for or you are using. Whether you are making a batch of morning muffins, winter soup, an elegant tart, classic pie or a special appetizer for a holiday feast, this method brings out the most flavor from the squash you decide to use. You will need: A squash of your choice A sheet pan to bake on Some oil of your choice A heavy knife (not flimsy or bendable) A heavy spoon to scoop the seeds out An oven set at 375-400 degrees Directions: Preheat oven, cut squash in half and scoop out seeds with spoon. Oil the baking pan lightly, if using an aluminum pan, be sure to place parchment paper down first. Place squash cut side down on to oiled pan. Lightly oil the top of the squash to help cook evenly. Roast for at least one hour or more, until a knife easily goes into the squash. Remove from oven and let cool. Using a heavy spoon scoop out all the inside meat and set aside. You now have perfectly roasted squash meat that can be used un any recipe. Make a soup with savory items such as sauted onions, garlic, celery and spices. For the liquid you can use stock or milk of any type. Use a blender to make a smooth creamy soup. Add to a muffin or make a pie. Try a cookie recipe, I recently did a cooking demonstration for third-graders and we made acorn squash chocolate chip cookies. Yum! Get creative and enjoy ... Bon Appetite!

Moon Caf but it takes time and effort to place multiple orders and its more expensive. But the quality and flavors are superior.

THE FORKS
When Ike Frazee first opened Ikes Quarter Caf in Nevada City, he felt like an outcast. We were the black sheep to some extent, labeled as a hippie restaurant, Frazee said. But its really come around, people are more aware. They know all of the different factors that keep the food clean. The menu is decidedly Louisiana Cajun, but the ingredients are as local as Ike can find. Bread baked in house with flours from Grass Valley Grains, lamb from James Ranch in Penn Valley, potatoes from Super Tuber, produce from Wild Blackberry Springs Ranch and, of course, chicken from Dinner Bell Farms. Its always been our main focus, to use the local farms and highlight the things in season and make them available for people to have a great meal, Frazee said. Since day one when we opened in 2001, all of the veggies we use were in season. He adapts his menu to
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In addition to freshness of flavor, seasonal produce have a higher antioxidant content than nonseasonal foods. They also offer higher nutritional content and support the bodys natural cleansing and healing abilities.
by coordinating with farms at lower elevations. I think the county offers a pretty wide selection, Huntsinger said. The thing people have to keep in mind is that produce is seasonal. You lose perspective on seasonality when you shop at supermarkets. Its a global food market they are buying from. Sometimes the variety available is limited if you are shopping local. Thats not a bad thing. You get exposed to new produce you are not familiar with. At the same time, you wont have fresh peaches in December. Miller estimates onethird of Sweet Roots Farms produce is sold to wholesale; to the local coop and natural food stores; a little more than one-third goes into CSA boxes and the rest is sold through farmers markets. Our business plan is very diversified, but it doesnt include consistent sales to restaurants, Miller said. What I have found is that unless the chef or restaurant is really committed to local food it just doesnt work. There are some that do a great job Ikes and New
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High Hand Conservatory chef Katherine Wilson shreds zucchini for a lunchtime special. Wilson has 30 years of experience in the culinary world.
KIM PALAFERRI FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

POTATO HERB GNOCCHI


PETER SELAYA, NEW MOON CAF, NEVADA CITY Ingredients: 2 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into same size 1 cup plus all-purpose flour 1 cup parmesan cheese, grated 2 small eggs Salt and white pepper Mixed herbs (chopped parsley, thyme, rosemary and sage) Butter White wine Garlic Shallot Directions: In a large pot of boiling water, boil potatoes until cooked (do not overcook so potatoes are water-logged.) Drain well. Place in mixing bowl with flour, parmesan, eggs, salt and white pepper. Mix until incorporated into nice dough. Roll out on floured surface and cut into small pieces, about inch thick. When all are rolled out and cut, boil in large pot of water, in batches, then cool in ice bath. When all are poached and cool, drain and set aside. Now you are ready to saut: Place butter in large saut pan, let brown a little. Add some gnocchi to pan and brown (dont overcrowd, or they will steam and not brown.) Add a little garlic and shallot, salt and white pepper to taste. Add a little wine and herbs, then place on platter and serve. For a large amount you can broil them: Place gnocchi in single layer on large pan, drizzle a little melted butter over them, sprinkle some grated cheese over and brown under broiler. Sprinkle herbs over and serve!

QUEENSLAND BLUE SQUASH TORT


MIKE SCAGLIOTTI, DINGUS MCGEES IN AUBURN Ingredients: 1 each Queensland Blue squash cup chopped garlic cup chopped shallots 1 bunch chopped basil 1 bunch chopped rosemary cup vegetable oil Salt to taste Pepper to taste 2 sheets puff pastry 3 large whole eggs Directions: Peel skin from squash and remove seeds. Medium dice the squash and mix together with garlic, shallots, basil, rosemary, oil, salt and pepper. Pan bake squash mixture for 12 minutes at 350 degrees. Remove squash and allow to cool completely. Cut each sheet of puff pastry into six equal sized squares; roll each square just slightly. Divide squash evenly between all 12 squares. Starting with one corner of the dough folding just slightly towards the center, continue every inch slightly overlapping the previous fold leaving the center open. Whip eggs and brush the dough liberally. Bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes or until crust is a golden brown. Makes 12 torts.

reflect whats available locally. In addition to the superior freshness and flavor, he also notes the health advantages of eating seasonal foods, which have a higher antioxidant content than non-seasonal foods. They also offer higher nutritional content and support the bodys natural cleansing and healing abilities. Eating food in season helps you fight regular allergies by stocking us with the right vitamins for that season, he said. Squash, beets and root vegetables all help us keep warm in the winter. Did he say squash? Squash is something I really love, Frazee said. People dont eat enough of it. There are so many delicious squashes out there. It can be a soup or a muf-

fin or a cookie. Theres so much deliciousness about that. Mike Scagliotti, chef at Dingus McGees in Auburn, would whole heartedly agree (See their recipes on pages 6 and 7). We just picked up a Guatemalan blue and a Tahitian melon squash, Scagliotti said. You get so much yield out of them. Peel it and straight up roast it. Grown from the seed, the flavor is phenomenal. With a garden on the grounds, Scagliotti does not have to go far for tomatoes, squash, zucchini, cucumbers and melons during the summer months. During the other seasons, he buys from all over the area, going as far as Del Rio Botanicals in West Sacramento and Riverdog Farm in the Capay Valley.

My produce driver knows what I want and what I like, he said. He gets my list and he does the pick. One week Ill have great peaches from Machados. Another week they might have sold out or have a gap, hell pick me up something from Newcastle. All of the components in Dingus McGees Mediterranean grilled vegetable plate and grilled vegetable Napoleon come from local farms. Organic grains from Grass Valley for the polenta, eggplants from Loomis and goat cheese from Sierra Nevada Creamery. Both chefs agree that dairy is a little hard to find in Pacer and Nevada counties. There are a couple cheeses somewhat close, Frazee said.
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he can. They know when they want to have fish, they come here, he said. Right now I have the last of the California salmon. Selaya said he gets just about everything he needs close to home, though he will go to Vacaville for quail eggs. Its pretty darn good around here through summer, he said. During the winter I get all my herbs and potatoes and grains. I joke with my grower, Oh and I need a case of pineapples and a mango, and they just start cracking up. He said he uses about seven or eight sources and loyalty plays a part. If hes been getting one thing from one source for years, hell stick with them. There are so many different farms around here, you can spread it pretty thin, he said. Some I dont deal with because I would be cutting back from others. My partner, who writes the checks, will say, Another farm? When it comes to choosing between local or organic,

FORK
continued from page 7 Clover in Sonoma County, a few from the Chico area, but thats one thats kind of rough on a regular basis. And eggs, weve used several farms but they dont keep up with it. I can imagine farming being a lot like running a restaurant. Huntsinger attributed the lack of dairy production in Placer County to economics, saying the dairy industry as a whole has gone to a more consolidated, larger operation. But, he said, Placer County used to have a lot of small dairies. But being more than 100 miles inland, theyve never had access to fresh fish, at least not of the ocean variety. But every chef has found a way to work around it. Dingus McGees has a deal with Skuna Bay in Vancouver, Canada. Raised in glacier-fed waters, the fish are touched by two people the fisherman and the chef. A lot of people ask where the

KIM PALAFERRI FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

New Moon Caf chef Peter Selaya uses a local wine as he creates a ricotta provolone and Romano with tomato and black olive ravioli dressed with an arugula pesto.
fish is from, Scagliotti said. Our fish guy is phenomenal. He picks it off the boat as I need it. Scagliotti also has the luxury of an on-site crawfish pond, licensed and oversaw by Crawfish International. Handy, since there are many Cajun dishes on Dingus McGees menu and the whole crawfish is used as garnish in quite a few of them. For Katherine Wilson, chef at the Conservatory in the High Hand Nursery, you cant beat Alaskan salmon. Caught on Thursday, flown in on Friday, she said. At the New Moon Caf, Selaya uses as much West Coast, wild, line-caught fish as

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FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

BLACK PEPPER TURKEY BREAST (OR BIRD)

his recipe is adapted from one shared with me by Ron Peterson of Seattle. It is a must make addition to his familys Thanksgiving celebration. Ron serves it as an hors doeurve right from the grill. His family pulls off tidbits and eats them with their fingers while enjoying before dinner libations. I tried several variations on Rons recipe and with a bow to him, I think I produced a more complex treat. You will need: 1 cup kosher salt cup low sodium soy sauce cup dark brown sugar cup salad oil 12 to 14 lbs. of bone-in turkey: (whole, two smaller breasts or breast halves) Defrost in the refrigerator. Allow 3 days for a hard frozen 14 lb. turkey. If smaller amounts are preferred visit butter-

ball.com and check the thawing table and cooking tables for correct times. Note: if you use self-basting turkey skip the directions for brining. The result will be slightly different but still delicious. cup uniodized regular salt tsp. of poultry seasoning tsp. ground chipotle pepper cup pepper (the finer the grind the better) 1 cup cider vinegar Brine: Dissolve the kosher salt, soy sauce and dark brown sugar in 2 gallons of water and submerge the turkey, holding down with a heavy pan or clean bricks wrapped in aluminum foil. Refrigerate for 24 hours. Remove bird (discard brining liquid) and rinse, patting dry inside and out. Place on cutting board. Mix the salad oil and cup salt and cup pepper into a paste. Gently slide your hands between meat and skin and loosen it all the way to the

back of the bird (breast). For a whole bird. loosen the skin over the thighs, too. Rub about half of the paste mixture into the meat under the skin, in the cavities and all around the outside. To the remaining paste add poultry seasoning, chipotle pepper, cup pepper and 1 cup cider vinegar. Brush a little over the breast leaving enough for 4 more bastings during the cook time. Trussing: If you like to truss the bird, now is the time. Remember a trussed bird will cook more slowly between thigh and body. About halfway through expected cooking time you can cut the skin between thigh and body of a whole bird to get better heat circulation and assure this area is fully cooked. For the charcoal barbecue: Follow manufacturers directions for indirect cooking. Cook the bird on

its back shielding the thinner ends of breast pieces or drumsticks of whole bird as needed to prevent burning. Add some water to the drip pan to help keep the turkey moist. If you are not a fan of the water method dont despair Ive done it both ways and it is fine. For the gas grill: Follow manufacturers directions for indirect cooking. If your grill has a temperature control keep it set to 325 degrees or use an oven thermometer set next to the bird. Cook the bird on its back shielding the thinner ends of breast pieces or drumsticks of whole bird as needed to prevent burning. Use an instant read cooking thermometer in the thickest part of the thigh between the leg and thigh without touching bone. Cook to 165 degrees, remove from grill and let rest 10 minutes before carving. Turkeys 10 to 12 lbs., thawed, will take 2 1/2 to 3 hours.

To serve: Once cooked you will find many uses for this succulent turkey. Here are some starters: Carved and served as an entre garnished with whipped yams and mashed potatoes Breasts carved into thin slices for a buffet served alongside warm fresh rolls for making yummy sandwiches with cream cheese and cranberry jelly. Breast carved into slices and served as an entre accompanied by fresh orange/cranberry sauce and maple baked yams Cold, this turkey makes delicious sandwiches, a variety of canaps, and goes well with creamy cheeses on a snack board. Note: This turkey doesnt freeze well beyond about 30 days. Use leftovers right away if possible. For a carcass keep in mind the saltiness of the brining and taste before adding any salt. ~ Judy Cook

Selaya said, for him, they go hand in hand. We try to support as much local, local, local as we can, he said. And organic is really important to me. All of the farms I buy from are organic. I feel we are only on this planet for, like, a minute and a half. We should all have the best. Scott Paris, owner of the High Hand Nursery, has the best of both worlds. His restaurant, The Conservatory, does not have to go far for

fresh fruit and vegetables. For us it comes down to this, he said. I am in the nursery business. Growing vegetables is a lot different than growing flowers. But its a natural thing for us. And a good thing if you are working in his kitchen. We have our own farm, Maple Rock on 193, said Wilson. They grow all our produce, to the season. We incorporate our menu to what is grown. Theres a farm

hand that brings it in the morning, we prepare it and put it on your plate. The menu is tailored to accommodate what they are growing and changes with the season. An herb garden grows behind the kitchen. Its real simple, Paris said. We grow it, we harvest it, we prepare it, we cook it, we serve it. All in the same day. Everything we can grow goes into the kitchen. We grow for a purpose. And it seems people

are eating for a purpose more and more these days. Scagliotti notes the trends he has seen since hes been in the business. From comfort food to the slow food movement to the turn-away from fried foods, all the way to the current trend. Nowadays, food in the raw is very big, he said. The less you can do to a product the better. Keep it fresh, keep it alive, absorb all the nutrients it has to offer, what you put in is what you get out.

And for the most part that works. But when it comes to that after-meal treat, well, just ask Wilson how fast the fat-free, gluten-free, low-carb commitment is forgotten. People are eating healthier, but they sure dont mind eating dessert, she said. Im kind of old fashioned that way. A dessert is meant to be an extravagance. It needs to be decadent. If you dont want it, dont eat it.

THE FUTURE
So what does it all mean for the future of farming and local? Its definitely a good time to be involved in agriculture, Glowaski said. The Farm to Fork movement has brought the issue to the forefront and that bodes well for the future of small- and medium-size agriculture. Nevada County Grown, a nonprofit organization created to promote local
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NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

FUTURE
continued from page 9 farmers and ranchers, is only six years old but picking up young farmers all the time. The University of California Cooperative Extension held a dinner that not only highlighted the local ingredients from local sources, but had a farmer at each table interacting with the community. It was amazing the conversations we had, said Miller, who is a member of Nevada County Grown. It comes back to there are people who are going to make the effort and put the time into the way they eat and where the food comes from. CSAs were hard to sell

For people in Roseville, Rocklin and Lincoln, its right in their backyard. Its a five-minute drive away. We want people looking up the hill rather than down.
Josh Huntsinger, Placer County agricultural commissioner

but people are talking about it. The conversation is happening with people who werent talking about it before. Other dinners are taking place from Auburn to Tahoe City, where consumers get to meet the growers. Huntsinger, who because of his post gets invited to some of them, said they are only one piece of the overall promotional puzzle. We just came off a real successful harvest festival and farm and barn tour, and that reflects positively on the interest people have in local agricul-

ture, he said. Carol Arnold, executive director of the Foothills Farmers Market and PlacerGROWN, said they recently held a blogger luncheon at Sinclair Family Farms in Penryn. They ate a local lunch, drank local wine and took a tour of the farms. Ten bloggers were entered in a contest to promote South Placer County and get them talking about us in Sacramento, Arnold said. Its an opportunity to spread the word through publicity and outreach.

Frazee even looks beyond the food for local sources. You can use a corporate linen service or the local laundry, he said. We really try and keep it local with small, familyrun businesses. When you do that, those people want to support you. Its a huge circle that goes around and builds a strong community. For Paris, he wants the High Hand Nursery to be a vital part of the community and to give back however it can, maybe by inspiring people to grow food at home.

With all thats going on in the world today, isnt it getting more important to know where your food comes from? he said. With the abundance of local produce being harvested and the network of advocates out there rallying for the cause, the Farm to Fork movement is not going away anytime soon. But while those in the valley are getting all the attention, the folks in the foothills know where the bounty lies. For people in Roseville, Rocklin and Lincoln, its right in their backyard. Its a fiveminute drive away, Huntsinger said. We want people looking up the hill rather than down.

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NOVEMBER 2013

11

FRUITS OF THEIR LABOR


LOCAL WINE PRODUCERS RECOMMEND BOTTLES FOR YOUR THANKSGIVING TABLE Stewart Perry, Fawnridge Winery
5560 Fawnridge Road, Auburn, (530) 887-9522, fawnridgewine.com

Mike Naggiar, Naggiar Vineyards and Winery


18125 Rosemary Lane, Grass Valley, (530) 268-9059, naggiarvineyards. com

and it adds a lot of richness to turkey, the sweetness brings out the subtle flavors. Brenda Taylor, Sierra Knolls Foothills Winery
10024 Linnet Lane, Auburn, (530) 269-2327, sierraknollswinery.com

Traditionally youd go with a white, but were not locked in to the old historic approach. Sauvignon Blanc, its a wine that has a nice balance and goes along with poultry. We produce ours in French Oak for a short period to soften some of the crispness. Ours is a little softer style, a little acidity to go along. If you are a red wine drinker, you probably have a favorite. We have a Foothill Cabernet that goes well with poultry, its light and fruity. Ryan Taylor, Mt. Vernon Winery
10850 Mt. Vernon Road, Auburn, (530) 823-1111, mtvernonwinery. com

I tell people the best wine you can get is a Grenache. Its a medium intensity red wine with great aromas, because ham is a medium intensity food and turkey is a white meat. Also, Viognier tends to go well with Thanksgiving fare. Mark Foster, Nevada City Winery
321 Spring St., Nevada City, (530) 265-9463, ncwinery.com

Cabernet Franc. The brand new American oak that gives it an oaky, spicy characteristic that really comes across when served with a roasted or smoked turkey. The flavors blend well.

Sangiovese is really great with a turkey thats barbecued or smoked or deep fried. The crisp skin and what not gives you that smoky character. Its a light red that goes really nice with a delicate turkey. Gewurztraminer is slightly sweet

Primativo, a lighter red wine; a genetic ancestor of Zinfandel. A little spice in the finish but a nice texture. Goes really well with just about anything served at a traditional Thanksgiving dinner. Pinot Gris, another dry wine, has big fruit, with no residual sugar, a lot of flavor, fruit flavor and body for a white wine. Phil Starr, Sierra Starr Winery
124 West Main St., Grass Valley, (530) 477-8282, sierrastarrwine.com

Zinfandel is known to be really good with turkey. We now have three zinfandels available (the 2009 Phils Selection

Zinfandel was a gold medal winner at the California State Fair). Chardonnay goes very well also, we have two different chardonnays. 2012 Celestial Chardonnay and 2011 Cosmic Reserve Chardonnay.

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12

FOOD

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Its that guy who said Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants
Ominvores Dilemma author comes to town
AN EVENING WITH MICHAEL POLLAN
What: Onstage conversation and interview, audience questions and a book signing. When: 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 Where: Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 255 South Auburn St., Grass Valley Tickets: $45-$60. Info: (530) 274-8384 ext. 14, (530) 272-5333, thecenterforthearts.org.

What would you like to ask Michael Pollan?

The Center for the Arts in Grass Valley presents an evening with bestselling author Michael Pollan at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 8 at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Grass Valley. Capital Public Radios Beth Ruyak will lead a conversation and interview with Pollan, followed by an audience question and answer and book signing. Pollan was named to the 2010 TIME 100, the magazines annual list of the worlds 100 most influential people and in 2009 Newsweek named Pollan one of the top 10

Why did it take him so long to start cooking? Hes written all these knowledgeable books about what were doing to our planet and hes just finally started cooking. Good for him.
Peter Selaya, owner and chef, New Moon Caf

New Thought Leaders. Pollan is the author of four New York Times bestsellers: Food Rules: An Eaters Manual (2010); In Defense of Food: An Eaters Manifesto (2008); The Omnivores Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006) and The Botany of Desire: A Plants-Eye View of the World (2001).

In his newest book, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, released last spring, Pollan explores his own kitchen by casting an eye on the missing middle link of the food chain: how we transform plants and animals into meals and, ultimately, why cooking matters.
~ Staff report

What is the most effective way to get people to start cooking again?
Carol Arnold, executive director of Foothill Farmers Market and PlacerGROWN

Id want to commend him for such wonderful work and thank him for all the time hes put into the real art of eating and eating right.
Ike Frazee, owner and chef, Ikes Quarter Caf

We have been invited to a dinner with Michael Pollan while he is here. I am interested in the current research on bacteria hes been doing. Id like him to elaborate on this and what hes learned in his research on bacteria in our bodies.
Deena Miller, co-owner, Sweet Roots Farm, Nevada County Grown board member

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

13

Wine & Brew Fest returns to Auburn


BY ANDREW CARLIN

FOOTHILL ENTERTAINER

ith fall in fullswing, and the Autumn colors of orange, brown and red making their yearly debut one is filled with feelings of the holidays, and subsequently spending time getting together with family and friends. The nights come much sooner, the leaves fall, and weekly NFL gridiron battles keep us yelling at our television sets and deeply regretting our fantasy football drafts picks. And of course, fall colors, friends, family and football coincide with the colors and social flavor of a good, stout ale. Placer County beer and wine lovers are in luck as the 18th annual Auburn Fall Wine & Brew Fest is swiftly approaching hosted by the charitable group Seniors First at the Ridge Golf Course on Saturday, Nov. 2. Several breweries and pubs will be showcasing their signature brews for any and all attendees over 21 years old to enjoy, including World Pub, Lost Coast Brewery, Nor Cal Beverage, Lagunitas Brewing, Ninkasi Brewing, Sierra Nevada and Anderson Valley Brewing. Additionally, several wineries will be in attendance, proving festivalgoers with a platter of fine-wine choices. Scheduled to attend are Sierra Knolls Winery, Bonitata Boutique Wine, Gallo Barefoot Wines, Secret Ravine Winery and Gold Country Getaways. Though enjoying a great brew, or intoxicatingly robust wine is enough reason to journey out to the Ridge with friends and relatives that is not the only thing

FALL WINE AND BREW FEST


When: 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 Where: The Ridge Golf Club, 2020 Golf Course Road. Auburn Cost: $40 in advance. $45 at the door. $25 designated driver tickets. $300 for a 10-ticket group rate. Available at Seniors First and Cherry Records in Auburn. Info: www.fallwineand brewfest.com

youre in store for at the Fall Wine & Brew Fest. There are many other fun and exciting attractions such as local cuisine, chocolates and desserts, live music by the band Fox Trot Mary, free massages, a silent auction (which features over 70 business-donated packages) and a raffle. Additionally, a unique and fun event entitled Bubbles and Bling, which is donated by Classic Wines of California, costs $25 to enter. All entries receive a flute of sparkling bubbly, and are guaranteed to win one of the following prizes: A genuine gemstone item, valued between $100 and $500, a pair of silpada earrings, valued at $20, and a bottle of Allure Sparkling Wine. Attendees are guaranteed a fun night of great wines and microbrews in addition to some fantastic food. Some of the local eateries providing some

of the tastiest foods Auburn has to offer include Old Town Pizza, Bootleggers Old Town Tavern and Grill and The Ridges own bar and grill, to name a few. Over a dozen business will set up shop and provide allyou-can-eat-and-drink services for lucky festival attendees. Seniors First will be the program that benefits from the Fall Wine & Brew Fest. The main mission of the Seniors First program is to help enable seniors to remain as independent as possible, for as long as possible, by helping with daily activities, insuring they are safe and residing in their own homes. With a radius that stretches from Colfax to Roseville, Seniors First relies on community and volunteer support to make it all happen. Volunteers are helping seniors in need by providing things such as meals, transportation, home repairs and friendly social interaction. Additionally, Seniors First has many useful resources that they utilize, such as their interactive hotline, Senior Link, and a unique senior nutrition program that focuses on nutritionally satisfying meals and social interaction with seniors. Tickets are $40 if ordered on their website or picked up at Seniors First or Cherry Records in Auburn. Tickets are $45 if purchased at the door. A fun-filled night with good food, brews and vibes, where the profits go toward a charitable organization that helps enrich the lives of seniors in need? Sounds like a night that is worth the trip for several great reasons.

14

THEATER

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Writers get Closer Than Ever


BY JUDY COOK

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

CLOSER THAN EVER

COURTESY PHOTOS

From left, Kate Haight, Kim Wellman and Nancy Haffey rehearse for Sierra Stages production of Closer Than Ever.

f youve never heard of Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire its time to take a listen. The writing duo, Maltby on lyrics Shire on music, is responsible for some very popular songs and musicals. Think Streisand. Then think Autumn, recorded in 1964 on the People Album. Think Starting here, Starting Now and No More Songs for Me and then move to musical theater and think Baby. Now that thats clear, its time to get excited because Closer Than Ever a seldom performed Maltby Jr./Shire musical/revue is about to hit the boards at the Off Center Stage in Grass Valley courtesy of

When: 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 and Saturday, Nov. 2; 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3 Where: Off Center Stage, 315 Richardson St., Grass Valley Cost: $15-$35 Info: sierrastages.org , (530) 346-3210

Sierra Stages. This nonprofit community theater group is a great regional resource for theater buffs and those who are just beginning to dabble. There couldnt be a better, more accessible place to indulge the needs for theater and live music than Closer Than Ever. As a musical revue it is somewhat unique in that it calls for singers who are

actors to a greater degree than most revues. The themes range from teenaged angst to dating, to marriage and kids, to parenting, starting overand thats just Act I. There is something here that everyone can relate to in their everyday lives. Maltby Jr. wrote songs with biting, frank lyrics that say the things we sometimes think but dare not say ourselves. The music is difficult, said musical director Ken Getz. Theres a huge amount of work by the cast both in rehearsal and at home to memorize and master the music. For instance in the song The Bear, the Tiger, the Hamster and the Mole there are long lists of animal names to memorize and sing clearly.

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The music moves quickly from one stage of life to another. Getz has worked with Director Peter Mason to help the singer/actors meld the music to the ever-changing characters they portray. The original show was written for two females and two males. This production takes advantage of six actor/singers who were invited to participate. The music consists of only piano and bass so lyrics can shine. The cast for Closer Than Ever consists of Danny McCammon, Isa Isa Acosta, JR Lewis, Kate Haight, Kim Wellman and Nancy Haffey. Their job is to pay attention to the lyrics said Haffey. The entire cast agrees that Closer Than Ever is a tough show with an opportunity for acting

NOVEMBER 2013

THEATER

15

Danny McCammon and Kate Haight rehearse a scene from Closer Than Ever.
opportunity to see something fresh that offers a great evenings entertainment for adults. Closer Than Ever is a show that promises to touch hearts and make heads nod in agreement: Yes. That is how it has been in my life. Tickets to Closer Than Ever produced by Sierra Stages can be obtained as both general admission with tickets priced from $15 to $25 and reserved seating with all tickets priced at $35. Tickets are available online at www.sierra stages.org , Briar Patch Co-op in Grass Valley or by telephone at (530) 346-3210.

MERCY KILLERS
A PLAY BY MICHAEL MILLIGAN What: This one-man theater by Broadway actor Michael Milligan gives an insight into the destructive personal impact of the American health care system as the character Joes story unfolds. The play humanizes the American health care system. Come and experience this moving and thought-provoking piece of theater. Experience the laughter, tears and anger of this performance that earned the 2013 Winner Fringe First Award. Broadway Baby called, one man theater at its very best. Post-performance question and answer session with the author. When: 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 Where: Del Oro High School Auditorium, 3301 Taylor Road, Loomis Cost: $10 Info: williamreed@yahoo.com, (916) 396-6601

while performing demanding music. Not often staged, the show enjoyed success off-Broadway and sever-

al revivals in summer stock. The latest version closed off-Broadway in November, 2012. Now the region has the

16

THEATER
BY JUDY COOK

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Kids hit the boards for an upbeat Oz-inspired musical


ime was that there was a production of a simple play as part of every primary school or middle school experience. These days with pressure put on schools from every corner there are fewer and fewer extras and gone are many opportunities for youngsters to get a chance to show the world their talents. By kids and for kids and their parents, the latest production of the Nevada County Performing Arts Guild is Lost Princess of Oz. Its a full-scale theater production that is the culmination of the eight weeks of training received in singing, dancing and acting. Derived from the popular OZ series and written for the stage by artistic director Mila

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Johansen with an original score by Daryl Stines, the show has all the costumes, lighting and music that will hold kids in their seats and make parents glad they decided to spend the afternoon doing something a little out of the ordinary. The beloved characters of the Tinman, Scarecrow and Lion join Tip as they seek to regain control of the Emerald City, but are not successful and must flee for their lives. Eventually they make their way to enlist the support of Glinda the Good. Glinda succeeds in capturing Mombi and erasing her magical powers. However, in quashing the rebellion she restores the throne not to the Scarecrow, but to the rightful heir, a young girl named Ozma. The story concludes as the mystery of the lost princess is finally solved.

THE LOST PRINCESS OF OZ


When: 7 p.m. Fridays and 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays Nov. 8 through Nov. 15. Special $5 preview performance at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7. Where: Center for the Arts, 314 W Main St., Grass Valley Cost: $10 advance, $12 at the door. Children 12 and under $4 advance, $5 at the door. Info: (530) 274-8384, (530) 272-6333, (530) 272-2131

Dedicated to educating the public and especially children, in the performing arts, the Nevada County Performing Arts Guild produces full-scale theater productions with all-child casts. The goal is installing an appreciation for the performing

arts in kids. A double payoff is that involvement in a production helps improve key skills for childrens success in life: publicspeaking, reading and memorization and self-confidence. Each PAG production involves six to eight weeks of acting, singing and dance training, two

full weekends of performances, award-winning costumes and opportunities to participate in radio interviews, set building, parades and many more activities. The cast and crew members receive all these benefits in a fun, supportive, safe and drugfree environment, according to a PAG spokesperson. This is PAGs 27th year serving Nevada County and the region. The statistics are impressive with over 97 productions that have involved over 3,000 kids. This is a tuition-based program with as many as one-third of the children attending on scholarships. There are seven performances of each production for the general public and two to five special performances for schools and other organizations. Each production reaches an audience of approximately 2,000 people.

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NOVEMBER 2013

17

E EATR H T C FILM MUSISOON! NG COMI


COURTESY

TICKETS 530.885-0156

Artists on display
BY JUDY COOK

Lynda Pike is hard at work in her Rocklin studio in anticipation of welcoming guests during the Autumn Art Studios Tour taking place Friday, Nov. 8 through Sunday Nov. 10.

NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER DONT MISS THESE EVENTS AT THE STATE THEATRE 985 Lincoln Way Auburn

Auburn Placer Performing Arts Center at the State Theatre Presents:


A Songwriting Workshop with Larry Diehl Songwriting From the Heart to the Soul

7 Tuesday Night Sessions November 5 December 17, 2013


Culminating in a performance on December 17 Workshop Cost is $175 For registration contact appac@att.net or call (530) 885-0156. Class size is limited! For more information, go to www. livefromauburn.com or larrydiehlmusic.com

or 20 years PlacerArts has presented the annual Autumn Art Studios Tour a threeday self-guided driving tour of Placer County artists showing and demonstrating their art in their studios. Its the publics chance to get an up close and personal view of the regions working artists in media from blown glass to pit-fired clay, painted silk to calligraphy. This year the show runs from Friday Nov. 8 through Sunday, Nov. 10. A good place to begin your tour is at www.plac erarts.org . Youll find a wealth of information as well as a link to a tour planning page. The tour is three days, has 75 participating artists located in 49 studios all over the

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

county. Youll find a little advance planning will help make it a great experience and ensure that you are seeing the art in which you are most interested. Another way to get into the swing of things is to begin your tour at the Preview Show at The Arts Building Gallery, 808 Lincoln Way. The show includes works from this years tour artists and it is a good place to get specific advice about what to see. This is a great first stop for planning your tour weekend. If you cant make it a stop on your tour, be sure to stop by as the show runs Nov. 16. While it would seem that this is an adult-oriented tour, the truth is that older children who have shown an interest in art may find a visit to the studios a rewarding

experience. Seeing how a professional artists work can encourage a talented youngster to pursue what could be a lifelong hobby or career. For the first time this year your purchase of a three-day Passport to the Autumn Art Studios Tour for $10 per adult enters you to win $100 in Art Bucks, which are redeemable with any of the participating 2013 artists. Have your Passport validated by at least 10 artists during the tour weekend and you will be entered in daily drawings Nov. 8, 9 and 10. Sixteen prizes of $100 will be awarded. See website for the rules. Purchase your tickets online at www.placer arts.org or from one of the 11 businesses selling tickets both before and during the tour.

Third Thursday in November Cinema at the State Theatre Presents:


Classic Suspense Film: Alfred Hitchcocks The Birds

November 21, 2013 2:00 PM and 7:00 PM


The Birds, a 1963 suspense/horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, depicts Bodega Bay, California, during which a wealthy San Francisco socialite pursues a potential boyfriend to Bodega Bay where birds of all kinds suddenly and for unexplained reasons begin to attack in increasing numbers and with increasing viciousness, leading to a series of widespread and violent bird attacks over the course of a few days.

Its a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play December 13 15, 2013


Its a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play is a stage play adaptation of Frank Capras film classic. Adapted and performed live in front of an audience. Im an angel second class; I dont have my wings yet. says Clarence, the angel sent to Bedford Falls to save George Bailey in the family Christmas classic Its a Wonderful Life. Director Glenda Gonzales and a delightful, talented cast return to the State Theatre stage with this enchanting rendition presented as an old fashioned live radio play for a one weekend run. Tickets are on sale now for the 3 show run Dec. 13 8:00 PM, Dec. 14 8:00 PM, Dec. 15 2:00 PM

Visit www.livefromauburn.com
or call The State Theater at 885-0156

18

POETRY

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Round up in Loomis for Cowpoke Fall Gathering


Western singer and songwriter Belinda Gail performs at the Saturday matinee of the 39th Annual Cowpoke Fall Gathering on Nov. 8-9.
COURTESY PHOTOS

Shows are Nov. 8-10 at Blue Goose Event Center


BY KATHY SPOTO
FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

ndian summer days give way to long fall evenings, when the cowboy poets ride into Loomis to share their poems, songs and heart-warming tales. Wanting to serve a slice of Americana to locals, Bert and Carol Braun, former owners of the Cowpoke feed store, cooked up the Cowpoke Fall Gathering, a modern-day, western variety show with equal parts storytelling, poetry and singing. This years

Mostly, I just like to make sure people have a nice time and have a story or two in my songs that they can relate to.
J. Parson, cattle rancher and singer

star-studded performances on Nov. 8-10 benefit local charities. Some of the countrys best yarn-spinners share their ranching way of life with a humbleness that makes audience members lean in a

little closer at their performances. Saturdays 1 p.m. matinee features cowboy poets Waddie Mitchell and Chris Isaacs and singers Belinda Gail and J. Parson. The handlebar mustaches, weather-crinkled smiles and western drawls are the real deal. Mitchell, from Jiggs, Nev., organized the original cowboy poetry festival in Elko, Nev., which in turn sprouted hundreds of cowboy poetry events across the country. Mitchell, who calls Loomis charming said, I suppose Ive been writing what people call cowboy poetry since we

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started calling it that. I refused to call it poetry when I started writing it, said Mitchell, whose rugged looks contrast with his ability to convey lifes sweetness, heartache and awe. We were fairly remote, said Mitchell of the ranch where he was born and raised. We were 62 miles from town 32 of those on a dirt road and 14 miles from the nearest neighbor. We didnt have power, said Mitchell, who was dubbed Waddie by the cowboys on his fathers ranch. It was a great way to grow up. My whole world was around the ranch and the horses and the cowboys and I was immersed in the whole thing. Isaacs is a mule packer from Eagar, Ariz., who turns 70 on his next birthday. He calls cowboy poetry an oral tradition that goes as far back as there were cowboys. Isaacs rejects Hollywoods portrayal of cowboys as gun-slinging rabble-rousers. The cowboys Ive been around are honest, hardworking, patriotic and love their families, he said. Parson, from Bakersfield, said, My songs are life experiences things Ive done and stories other people have told me. Real life, current day stuff presented in an old time way. Parson, who recently performed with Chris Isaacs at Silver Dollar City, Mo., was discovered and brought to the Loomis Cowpoke Fall Gathering by Bert Braun. I was on a trail ride out of Santa Ynez and I was playing some songs standing in the back of a wagon and this guy rode over and introduced himself and said he wanted

NOVEMBER 2013

19

Waddie Mitchell, who felt taken away to far off places by the cowboy stories and songs he heard growing up on a ranch in Jiggs, Nev., looks forward to sharing this oral tradition at the Cowpoke Fall Gathering.

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DECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS

KICKOFF GALA
What: Dinner, reception and entertainment sneak peak When: 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 7 Where: Red Horse Barn at Newcastle Wedding Gardens Tickets: $50 online or (866) 967-8167

COWPOKE FALL GATHERING


What: Live cowboy poetry, music and stories When: 6:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 8; and 1 and 6:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 9 Free performances: Loomis students recite cowboy poetry 10 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 9; and cowboy church at 9 a.m., Sunday, Nov. 10 Tickets: $35 and $45, online or (866) 967-8167 Where: Blue Goose Event Center, 3550 Taylor Road, Loomis Info: www.cowpokefallgathering.com or (916) 652-6290

It was a great way to grow up. My whole world was around the ranch and the horses and the cowboys and I was immersed in the whole thing.
Waddie Mitchell, participant at the Cowpoke Fall Gathering

me to play music at his festival and it was Bert, said Parson. Mostly, I just like to make sure people have a nice time and have a story or two in my songs that they can relate to. I like to entertain people and make them glad to be there, he said.

To get the annual event underway, a country-elegant Kick Off Gala dinner will be held on Thursday, Nov. 7 at the Red Horse Barn, in Newcastle, featuring the food of Jackson Catering and Events. On Saturday, at 10 a.m., a free, one-hour cowboy poetry performance, by $1,000 scholarship winner Meghan Baird from Del Oro High School and 12 students from Penryn, Loomis and H. Clark Powers elementary schools, takes place at the Blue Goose Event Center. Proceeds from the event benefit Jump In, South Placer Heritage Foundation, Ride to Walk and Sutter Roseville Breast Cancer Navigator Program.

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EVENTS
FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Handcrafted beads, jewelry await at The Whole Bead Show


ftentimes, some of our most treasured possessions are the small tokens that are powerfully unique to us and more specifically, what they can represent. Just like a wedding rings monumental statement of love, commitment and its ability to contain all the memories of your spouse, uniquely handcrafted, customizable jewelry plays a more important role than we may realize. Mothers pass down necklaces, earrings and rings to their children. Boyfriends, fiancs and husbands present their spouses with accessories

BY ANDREW CARLIN

that are sometimes worn a lifetime and evolve a new and powerful meanings as life ages. Some jewelry can contain unique tales, and can hold treasured memories. Dramatics aside jewelry is sometimes more than just beads and nylon. What started out 20 years ago, as the resilient Ava Motherwell touring the United States, selling her beads and jewelry alone, and subsequently evolved into the many multi-merchant shows she organizes today is coming to Grass Valley. Having organized bead shows all over the U.S, Motherwell expressed her enthusiasm for bring-

THE WHOLE BEAD SHOW


When: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov.3 Where: Nevada County Fairgrounds,11228 McCourtney Road, Grass Valley Cost: Free Info: wholebead.com

ing the show home to Grass Valley. We are super excited to bring our bead show to our local community. We hope this is the first of many years to come, she said. In addition to beads, and bead-themed jewel-

ry and accessories, the Whole Bead Show offers an extensive variety of handcrafted jewelry made from different base materials, such as glass, pearl and metal. The Whole Bead Show also offers other creative services, such as bead

catalogs and classes for those who are curious enough to want to make their very own personally customized jewelry. Many bead merchants are scheduled to exhibit their crafted wares at the show, including some local talent, such as Mana Beads and Wild Thing Beads. Additionally, the twoday Grass Valley Whole Bead Show will feature a contest entitled, Beads in the City, in which your homemade works can be entered to win one of three prizes. You can enter your own wearable piece that is inspired by your favorite Whole Bead Show city, by printing out a registration form at www.whole-

bead.com and fill it out before the deadline of Nov. 2 at noon. The winners will be announced at 2 p.m. Saturday. Winners will receive the following prizes: 1st place $200 cash; 2nd place $100 gift certificate from Permelias Beads; 3rd place $50 gift certificate from Blue Heron Bead Company. Whether you are on a quest for the most unique fashionable accessory you can find, or want to get into making your own customized pieces, all fans of handcrafted jewelry cannot afford to miss this rare opportunity to soak in the beads with dozens of like-minded merchants and sellers.

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FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

EVENTS
Mandarin madness

21

A Night in Havana
Guests will be transported back in time to Cuba in the 1950s, when Havana was the city of rum and rumba during A Night in Havana at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Miners Foundry, 325 Spring St., Nevada City. Wine tasting and cocktail hour, gourmet Cuban inspired dinner, dessert and coffee bar, dancing to the George Souza Band, silent auction. Cost: $150. Cocktail attire. Info: (530) 477-9700, support sierranevada.org.

focus on the Nisenan of the Nevada City Rancheria. Academic and professional speakers, descendants will talk about their history and stories of survival, traditional dancers, master basket weavers, jewelry, and art for show and sale. Info: nevadacityrancheria.org.

Readers Theatre
Stories by E.B. White, Katherine Anne Porter, Harold Brodkey, Grace Stone Coates and Slawomir Mrozek will be read by local performers beginning at 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov.17 at the Miners Foundry, 325 Spring St., Nevada City. Volunteer readers include Bruce Kelly, Drue Mathies, Dave Iorns, Renee Sprattling, Gaylie Bell-Stewart, and Carolyn Winters. Proceeds from this event will benefit the Miners Foundry. Tickets are $12 and are available at miners foundry.org, at the Miners Foundry or the Briar Patch CoOp, or at the door.

Rekindling the Spirit


Nisenan Heritage Day takes place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 in the Sierra College Nevada County Campus multipurpose Center, Building N12, 250 Sierra College Drive, Grass Valley. Free admission, suitable for all ages. California indigenous culture and education with special

The 20th annual Mandarin Festival will be held Nov. 22, 23 and 24 at the Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn. The event will feature a mandarin recipe contest, chef demonstrations, food, crafts, activities, music, entertainment and of course, plenty of mandarins. $7 general admission, $5 seniors, children 12 and under free. The Friday preview event is $3. For more information, call (916) 663-1918 or visit man darinfestival.com.

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MOVIES

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Lets go to a picture show!


Looking for something more than the megaplex?
BY ANDREW CARLIN

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

othing says American pastime quite like going to the movies. Your friends, your family, your date, a new and exciting film on the big screen is a welcome destination after work, school, or to kick off a promising weekend. The smell of the butter as it maneuvers its way over the freshly popped popcorn fills your nostrils as you peruse all the coming attractions. The ticket-takers bid you a pleasant film experience, and before you know it, you are seeing and hearing the deafening THX logo as it fills the theatre. More than likely, you may recall many occasions where both your friends and yourself were at a loss as to what to do for fun one evening. Fortunately, there is the always faithful silver screen providing a

option for a night on the town with friends, an ideal place for an awkward date and an impromptu visit to any number of quickstop shops in an attempt to line your pockets with discounted, outside candy. Theres nothing quite like the complete experience of seeing our favorite films come to life on the big screen. Though many corporate theaters play all the newest and latest flicks, there are several hometown movie-houses that

are gearing up for November screenings of both cinema classics, as well as documentaries that otherwise would not be distributed to a wider audience. Whether you have seen these classic films or not, nothing beats a timetraveling trip to decades past, and being able to experience these films at the movies like the generations before us did.
KIM PALAFERRI FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

The Birds
The Auburn State Theatre brings us the rare opportunity to see a true classic on the big screen as part of their Cinema at the State Third Thursday Film Series. Their Nov. 21 installment, the Alfred Hitchcock classic, The Birds. Staring Tippi Hendren, Robert Taylor, Suzanne Pleshette and Jessica Tandy, The Birds is one of Hitchcoks most recognizable works. His mastery of suspense and terror just may cause you to shy away from phone booths, or large groups of ravens perched on telephone lines. Whether you caught this timeless classic in theaters in 1963, when it debuted, or this is your first time seeing the film,

Susan Rushton looks over the schedule for Silver Screen Classics, which will celebrate showing its 200th movie this month at the Auburn Library.
nothing tops being able to witness the paralyzing horror of rogue birds pack-like ferocity on the big screen! Where: The Auburn State Theatre, 985 Lincoln Way, Auburn When: 2 and 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21. Admission: $8
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Casablanca
The Auburn Library gears up to show the 200th in their Silver Screen Classics series, with the iconic 1942 film Casablanca. Winning three Academy Awards and staring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Hen-

ried, Casablanca is widely considered to be one of the greatest films of all time, often featured at the top of AFIs lists. From its memorable dialogue, musical score and characters, this is a classic film not to miss. Auburn, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship. Where: The Auburn Library, Beecher Room, 350 Nevada St., Auburn When: 1, 4 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2. Admission: Free.
Information:

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Divorce Through Kids Eyes


Nevada Citys Magic Theater brings us a real-

life issue documentary by Ellen Bruno, entitled Divorce Through Kids Eyes. In Brunos 30-minute film, with the help of educated panelists including Gayle Peterson, PhD., Avia Rotlevy, MTF and Michael Axelman, PhD., Divorce Through Kids Eyes, explores the saddening reality of divorce through the perspective of the children involved in them. Where: The Magic Theatre, 107 Argall Way, Nevada City. When: 1 and 2;30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2. Admission: $5 suggested donation. Info: (530) 265-8262, themagictheatre.com.

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

NOVEMBER 2013

MUSIC

23

Miners Foundry hosts Greatest living slack key guitarist


The Miners Foundry presents Makana in concert at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6. With five albums to his credit, Makana has taken the centuries old slack-key tradition and blasted it into the 21st century, fusing it with influences from Bob Marley to the Smashing Pumpkins. His performance is an exhilarating ride through the breadth of slack key, folk, rock, bluegrass, ethnic and jazz, all infused with the spirit of Hawaii. $18 advance, $24 at the door; available at (530) 2655040, at Miners Foundry or Briar Patch Co-Op.
Hearst and Hands 20th Anniversary Celebrations Benefit Dance Concert featuring Lorraine Gervais at 7 p.m. Friday, House of Vibe All Stars

Nov. 15. Benefits Child Advocates of Nevada County. $75. Reservations available at (530) 265-9550 ext. 225, or at Briar Patch Co-Op.

play at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22. Hear a dynamic mix of performers, including local talent Augustus thElefant, Auburn Hip Hop Congress and DJ Vision. 18 and older. $20, available at Briar Patch Co-Op, The Ridge Cafe or Dimple Records.

The Alumni Series continues with pianist Katarzyna Musial at 8 p.m. Sat-

Let freedom ring through the mountains


Music in the Mountains presents a special concert celebrating the 150th anniversary of Lincolns Gettysburg Address at 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11 at the Grass Valley Veterans Hall, 255 South Auburn St., Grass Valley. Featuring the Camerata California Chamber Choir and the VITA Chamber Orchestra, directed by Peter Nowlen. Tickets $12.50 to $25. Uniformed Active Military and Youth Under 18 free. Info: (530) 265-6124, info@musicinthemoun tains.org

urday, Nov. 23. Includes works by Messiaen, Chopin, Turina, Vance, Ginastera and Gorecki. $30, includes after concert reception. Available at the Miners Foundry and Briar Patch Co-Op.

THIS MONTH AT THE AUBURN EVENT CENTER


LONESOME LOCOMOTIVE AND JERRY DUTY When: 6:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Nov. 2 Cost: $5 advance, $10 at the door. All ages, ID required for the bar. Jerry Garcia helped influence this show, as Lonesome Locomotive has taken their energy and sound from music we have all come to love so much, and taken it their own direction. OLD & IN THE WAY WITH POOR MANS WHISKEY Poor Mans Whiskey took on Pink Floyds Dark Side of the Moon and blew us all away. This time around Old and In The Way will be the

Album Djour and what a show this will be. When: 6:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Nov. 16 Cost: $18 advance, $20 day of show. All ages, ID required for the bar. LITTLE FEATS PAUL & FRED When: 7-11 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29 Cost: $20 advance, $25 at the door. All ages, ID required for the bar. Little Feat fun in Auburn for a very special Thanksgiving Weekend Show! Where: 145 Elm Ave., Auburn Info: (530) 823-8310, keepsmilingpromotions.com

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MUSIC

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Sean Chen to serenade Nevada County


BY ANDREW CARLIN
COURTESY

Rufus Cappadocia brings his cello to Nevada City for a Nov. 16 concert.

Experimental cellist influenced by Sufi melodies, Jimi Hendrix


Brooklyn-based cellist Rufus Cappadocia has been blazing his own trail on this classical instrument. He plays a modified cello with an additional fifth string and electric pick-ups. Cappadocia has performed worldwide, but will be making his first appearance in Nevada County on Sunday, Nov. 16 at the North Columbia Schoolhouse Cultural Center.

RUFUS CAPPADOCIA
When: 8 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 16 Where: The North Columbia Schoolhouse Cultural Center, 17894 Tyler Foote Road, Nevada City Cost: $24 members, seniors, students. $27 advance. $30 door. $12 kids 12 & under. Info: rufusmusic.com.

rom Mozart to modern pop, music is intricately interwoven into the seams of our daily lives. Whether we listen to the artists topping the charts on the radio, or traverse the seas of the Internet looking for the newest underground sensation we simply crave music. It helps us think, pass the time, relax, vent, feel, and put into words even our most tangled emotions. Though we may disagree on preference between genres of music, if auto-tune is a crime or not, or even what can be considered music, it is truly a mesmerizingly transcendent moment watching an artist perform who possesses an unprecedented mastery of their instrument. Grass Valley, and InConcert Sierra, has the rare opportunity and privilege to host a truly talented, world-class and utterly spellbinding pianist for their Nov. 17 concert: Sean Chen. With a trail of trophies and critical praise and acclaim, Chen is nothing
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KNOW AND GO
When: 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17. 1:15 p.m. pre-concert forum with Dr. Aileen James Where: Seventh-Day Adventist Church 12889 Osborne Hill Road, Grass Valley Admission: $28. Ages 5 to 17 are free if accompanied by an adult. Info: (530) 273-3990, inconcertsierra.org

COURTESY

Pianist Sean Chen will be performing a concert in Grass Valley on Sunday, Nov. 17.
short of a master behind the piano keys. Recently winning the 2013 American Pianists Association DeHann Classical Fellowship, and in recent years placing in the top three at both the 2013 Morocco Philharmony International Piano Competition and the 2011 Seoul International Music Competition, Chen has the credentials to ensure a performance of sheer technical brilliance you wont want to miss. Born in Margate, Fla., Chens blossoming intelligence, talent and aptitude did not go unnoticed. Before attending college, Chen won several awards and scholarships as a youth that included the Glenn Miller Scholarship, the Evelyn Vonar Storrs Scholarship, an NFAA ARTSweek award and placing at the California International Young Artist Competition. Upon offers of acceptance to Harvard, Juilliard and MIT, Chen attended the Juilliard school of music, where he earned both his bachelors degree and masters degree respectively. While studying, Chen went on to win several concert and piano competitions, and attained some highlysought scholarships for his performances. Chen has also performed with the Juilliard Orchestra. He is currently studying at the Yale School of Music, in pursuit of an artist diploma after receiving a George

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W. Miles Fellowship. Chen also has many high-profile solo recitals under his belt, including the Ventura Music Festival, Mexico Symphony Orchestra, National Chopin Foundation and for the McGraw-Hill Company - to name a few. However, his most astounding accomplishment is that Chen is 24 years old. Having such a young, accomplished musical prodigy performing locally is not something that happens on a daily basis, as Chens arrival and scheduled concert in Grass Valley has already created quite a buzz. Attendees are in for a classically delectable treat, as Chen will be performing Valse in A-flat Major by Alexander Scriabin; Impromptus by Frederic Chopin; La Valse by Maurice Ravel and Sonata No. 8 by Sergei Prokofiev. Classical music fans and admirers of masterful musical talent and brilliance alike, will not want to miss this rare opportunity to witness what will undoubtedly be a performance like none other Grass Valley has ever heard.

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26

MUSIC

NOVEMBER 2013

FOOTHILLS ENTERTAINER

Graham Nash without the others; Lovett and Hiatt together


Singer/songwriter Graham Nash returns to Grass Valley on Saturday, Nov. 9. This time, the two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee (Hollies; Crosby, Stills & Nash) will performing as a trio, accompanied by James Raymond (keyboards) and Shane Fontayne (guitar), part of Crosby, Stills and Nashs touring band. Saturday, Nov. 16 will be an intimate acoustic evening with two of the all-time greatest American singer/songwriters Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt. Four-time Grammy Award-winner Lyle Lovett is equally comfortable in pop, rock, blues and country. Eleven-time Grammy nominee John

AN EVENING WITH GRAHAM NASH


When: 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9 Where: Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 255 South Auburn St., Grass Valley Cost: $48-$58 Info: (530) 274-8384 ext. 14, (530) 272-5333, thecenterforthearts.org AN ACOUSTIC EVENING WITH LYLE LOVETT AND JOHN HIATT When: 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 Where: Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 255 South Auburn St., Grass Valley Cost: $58-$85 Info: (530) 274-8384 ext. 14, (530) 272-5333, thecenterforthearts.org

COURTESY

Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, Graham Nash, will make a stop in Grass Valley on Saturday, Nov. 9.
Hiatt melds rock, acoustic, folk, new wave and Mississippi Delta blues into songs recorded by some three dozen artists over the last three decades from Three Dog Night to Eric Clapton.

COURTESY

Singer/songwriters John Hiatt, above, and Lyle Lovett, right, bring their two-man act to Grass Valley on Saturday, Nov. 16.

The Missing Simple Sister:

Creators of Riveting Entertainment presents:

Sherlock Holmes
When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.

Adventure

November 14 16 20 21 22 23

Tickets $5 Students $10 Adults

7:00 pm 2:00 pm matinees on Nov. 16 and 23


Written, Produced and Directed by John Deaderick Colfax Performing Arts Center 24995 Ben Taylor Road, Colfax, CA 95713 (530) 346.2284 EXT. 2142 colfaxpac.org

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