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HISTORY ASSIGNMENT

QUESTION: THE ATTITUDE OF THE BRITISH TO INDIA ART AND ARCHITECTURAL TRADITION WAS INFLUENCE BY THEIR OWN CONVICTION OF THE SUPERIORITY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION. JUSTIFY THROUGH WORKS OF ENGLISH PAINTERS, WRITERS AND ARCHITECTS WORKING IN INDIA.

SUBMITTED BY: ROOPAK WADHWA ROLL NO. : 11025006003

ANSWER:
Colonialism is the policy or practice of acquiring full or partial political control over another country, occupying it with settlers, and exploiting it economically. architecture

Britain viewed the people of India as second-class citizens in their own country, working to build an infrastructure that fed India's natural resources to England while depriving the indigenous population opportunities to enjoy the fruits of their labor. 4 The Hindustan, under the sway of the British Empire, was despotism complete deprivation of freedom. Though, the 1850s witnessed the introduction of the three "engines of social improvement" that heightened the British illusion of permanence in India. They were the railroads, the telegraph, and the Uniform postal service, but it was primarily to serve the British and not for the development of the natives.
The infrastructure in India without the giving of the industrial revolution was negligible for the British, as mentioned above; the developments were for the colonizers and not for the ruled, the architectural manifestations also had a colonial aim of representation. Representation of power, supremacy and yet somewhere, even in their own dilemma, a way to connect to the masses of the colonized Indians and symbolize their blatancy of rule. The architectural undertakings in the colonial empire also just like in their own nation, politically driven, had different needs to subside to. For instance, the colonial and India office buildings in white hall, in fact, themselves indicated something of the distinctive character of empire. Both structures, designed by Scott and aligned with the Foreign Office, were classical in their architectural form. British architects who worked in the empire, regardless of their choice, shared a set of attitudes very different from their colleagues home. Their views together formed the colonial style, which more or less were inflicted with a concern of making visible Britains imperial position as ruler. Since, the British thought process was based on the allegory that, to know was, in some measure, already to rule, hence the imperial architecture was architecture both of knowledge and of power.
Architecture during British Rule Architecture during early British rule in India comprised colossal stone and wood structures, erected during the 17th century. In the emerging stages, British viceroy-generals like Robert Clive managed huge efforts to build such architectural wonders in the essential port cities of India. Early British architectural design composed of charts and

outlined plans already erected successfully back in England. This period witnessed the shipping of skilled British architects and young men, equipped with clever motives to make Indian artistic design much like western modes. Indian educated class or the comparatively poorer class did not possess the amount of talent that their English masters were looking for. As such, architectures were planned by the already utilised British structural wonders.

Paintings