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2013 83
Yarzheit 50
NOVEMBER 15, 2013
VOL. LXXXIII NO. 10 $1.00
page 26
Looking back at the
death of John F. Kennedy
HONORING BERNIE KOSTER page 6
SCREENING DOC POMUS page 8
THE MITZVAH BEAUTIFIER page 12
RACHEL BANAIS NEW EXHIBIT page 16
2 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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Page 3
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 3
JS-3*
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NOSHES ...................................................5
OPINION ............................................... 22
COVER STORY .................................... 26
HEALTHY LIVING &
ADULT LIFESTYLES .......................... 47
GALLERY .............................................. 56
TORAH COMMENTARY ................... 57
CROSSWORD PUZZLE .................... 58
ARTS AND CULTURE........................ 59
CALENDAR ..........................................60
OBITUARIES ........................................ 65
CLASSIFIEDS ...................................... 66
REAL ESTATE ...................................... 69
For convenient home delivery,
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CONTENTS
LETTERS
It is almost impossible today to purchase red
meat that is not glatt.
JEFF BERNSTEIN, NEW MILFORD
F.Y.I.
Typhoons wake hits Rockleigh
lThe typhoon that hit the Philippines
on Friday was a horror on a scale that
even those of us who were affected by
Hurricane Sandy can barely imagine.
The Jewish Home Family which in-
cludes the Jewish Home at Rockleigh,
Jewish Home Assisted Living, Jewish
Home at Home, and the Jewish Home
Foundation employs 92 Filipinos.
Thats a significant proportion of our
staff, the Jewish Home at Rockleighs
executive vice president, Sunni Her-
man, said.
It has been extraordinarily hard for
those staff members, many of whom
do not know how their family mem-
bers are faring.
These are our people, and that is
their homeland, she said.
When something happens in Israel,
it touches us. This is the same thing.
We asked the staff what we could
do for them, and they said Pray, Ms.
Herman said.
So they did.
On Tuesday, the Jewish Home Fam-
ily organized a program, held in the
chapel in Rockleigh, led by its chap-
lain, Rabbi Simon Feld.
We asked the staff if theyd like
to bring in a priest, and they said no.
They said that the rabbi is our rabbi.
It was a program that combined
religious prayers, recitations from
Psalms, and speakers, Rabbi Feld
said; the Filipinos recited a prayer in
Tagalog, and they sang their national
anthem. The Jewish Homes residents
donated money to the relief effort,
presenting a check.
It was important to the staff and to
the board of directors that we show
our concern, Mr. Berkowitz said.
We give care and comfort to peo-
ple, and we also give care and com-
fort to our staff, Ms. Herman said. It
doesnt matter what religion they are.
We are a family here.
She urges that anyone who possibly
can donate to the typhoon relief ef-
fort. The Jewish Federation of North-
ern New Jersey is collecting money,
which it sends to the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee; the JDC
has the experience necessary to know
how to spend those funds.
To donate, go to the federations
website, www.jfnnj.org. The link for do-
nation is at the top of the page.
JOANNE PALMER
Candlelighting: Friday, November 15, 4:20 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, November 16, 5:21 p.m.
We have some winners for Israels
Wikimedia Commons World Heri-
tage Site photo contest.
And by we I mean all of us. The point
of the contest is to solicit photos of
important places. Those images can be
reused by anyone who attributes them
properly.
This year, 7,000 photos were
submitted; the top winners received
cash prizes, and the top ten are being
entered in the global contest, which
drew entries from 51 countries and
Antarctica. LARRY YUDELSON
Winning photos for the global kibbutz
Staff members,
residents, family
members, and friends
from the Jewish Home
Family joined in a
program at the Jewish
Home at Rockleigh to
provide comfort and
hope to the 92 Filipinos
on staff.
COURTESY JEWISH HOME FAMILY
Pini Berman took first prize of NIS 5000 for his photo Jaffa at Night View
from the Sea
Amos Gal took the photo of an old bus stop in the Beit Shean Valley.
Yossi Steibel took this photo of the Casino at the Bat Galim promenade in Haifa.
4 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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Local
6 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-6*
A man for all reasons
Whatever the need, its a safe bet Bernie Koster will help meet it
JOANNE PALMER
T
he Great Depression marked
the children born during its ter-
rible hold on the United States
economy in different ways.
Some grew up to be hoarders, holding
onto pieces of refolded aluminum foil and
bits of bakery-box string.
Some became cheap, and others
spendthrift.
And then there are those people, like
Bernie Koster of Tenafly, who never have
forgotten the lessons about tzedakah,
about looking out for the less fortunate,
about mending and sharing and helping
and fixing.
Thats why Mr. Koster is being honored
by the Jewish Family Service of Bergen and
North Hudson on Sunday.
Although he sits on the JFSs board and
is active as a volunteer there, the organi-
zation is one of many to which he devotes
time, energy, care, and love. The kind of
personal and organizational care he lav-
ishes on a wide range of organizations is
his birthright.
Mr. Koster was born in East New York,
Brooklyn, in 1938. His parents, both of
whom had emigrated from Poland, owned
a kosher butcher shop, and at an early
age I learned what it meant to help people
in need, he said. I would listen to Mama.
If a customer didnt have money to pay for
meat, she would say Take it. When you
have money youll pay me, but the kinder-
lach they have to eat.
I heard that as part of my growing up,
and it has stayed with me until today.
Another experience that pushed him
toward a life of tzedakah came from
school. I went to the Yeshiva Toras Chaim
in East New York, he said; he stayed there
through ninth grade and then graduated
from Thomas Jefferson High School. They
gave us the blue and white JNF boxes, and
so I would go into the subway station and
stand there and have people donate to the
box.
There were one or two incidents where
kids wanted to take it away from me, but I
resisted. I protected that box with my life.
Those two sets of memories his moth-
ers kindness and the tzedakah boxes
provided him with the impetus to live his
life as he has done, supporting all sorts of
causes, religious and secular, Jewish and
general, including science, medicine, and
the arts. Its always been part of my DNA,
he said.
Mr. Koster knew from childhood that
he was not particularly good at the tasks
a butcher must master. Mama and Papa
worked side by side, he said. And I used
to pluck chickens. Id pull the feathers out.
Youd pretty much pull them out one at a
time use hot water to help get them out
but I would end up tearing the skin I
really wasnt very good at it and people
would want to pay me not to pluck their
chickens.
That career did not last long.
Mr. Koster was the third of four children,
and the only one to go to college. That was
Brooklyn College, where he majored in
accounting. After graduation, he worked
as an accountant while he put himself
through Brooklyn Law School at night. He
practiced law until 1980, when he let his
entrepreneurial side take over; he began
to work in real estate.
When he was married the first time, he
lived in Syosset, on Long Island, where he
was active in the Midway Jewish Center.
And I chaired the March of Dimes cam-
paign, I was on the board of the federa-
tion, and president of the Nassau County
Solomon Schechter school, he said. After
his divorce, he moved to Manhattan; 29
years ago, he moved to Bergen County,
where he now lives with his wife, jewelry
designer Norma Wellington. They have
been married for 27 years.
When I got divorced, I said never again
will I ever live in suburbia, he recalled.
When Norma and I got serious, I said that
we had to work something out, because I
was not going to commute. Then we got
married, and I am happy to say that now
you cant take Bergen County out of me.
I just love this community, and I feel
a part of it. I know that I made two right
decisions to marry Norma, and to go to
a community that I could become part of.
Its a live Jewish community, he said.
Its growing, with all the denominations,
all the way from Reform to Chabad. We get
a lot done here.
I have three lives my family, my
charities, and my profession, Mr. Koster
continued. I am still involved with a con-
struction company. The word retirement
is not in my vocabulary. He now works
for McGowan Builders in East Rutherford
from his home office.
Usually I start my day with breakfast
meetings mainly charity meetings, so I
get a good start to the day. I do that at least
two or three times a week.
I am there to help people I meet with
people who have lost their jobs, to see if
I can help them. I do what I can to make
peoples lives better.
The always exquisitely dressed Mr.
Koster, who invariably sports a perfectly
folded handkerchief in his jackets breast
pocket, now is active in a range of orga-
nizations; among the non-Jewish groups
are Englewood Hospital and Medical
Center, the Adler Aphasia Center in May-
wood, Youth Consultant Services, and
bergenPAC.
His Jewish commitments include board
seats at JFS, the Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey, Temple Emanu-El,
the Jewish Home at Rockleigh, the Jewish
Home Foundation, the regional council of
Israel Bonds, the Bergen County region
of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and
the Anti-Defamation League. He also has
been on the boards of Gildas Club and the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly.
He has chaired 45 journals for nine orga-
nizations, and he has raised more than $19
million.
Mr. Koster also takes pleasure in match-
ing out-of-work people with jobs. Its
within the mission of the JFS to strengthen
and preserve the well-being of individuals
and families, he said. I try to adhere to
that.
He sees some of those groups as playing
an important role in building community.
bergenPAC, for example, teaches kids
dance, music, and the arts. There is a need
for that to improve the community, and to
improve what it is that the community can
offer to its young people. With an organi-
zation like bergenPAC, or YCS, I know that
if we dont help them they are never going
to be able to grow up to be able to have
good life.
I want to do my share to help them.
Mr. Kosters desire to help, and his abil-
ity to spend the time that it takes to do so,
led to his close friendship with Sid Schon-
feld. Until Mr. Schonfeld died three years
ago at 87, the two men were nearly insep-
arable. Mr. Schonfeld, a successful food
importer and the inventor of tuna packed
in water, grew weak toward the end of his
life, so I made it my business to see Sid
every day, because when I was there he
smiled, Mr. Koster said. And I benefited
from it. It was a pleasure to be with him.
He is also active in his shul, Temple
Emanu-El of Closter, where he is a gabbai,
greeting everyone who enters the sanctu-
ary just about every Shabbat.
Bernie Koster, at left, and his wife, jewelry designer Norma Wellington, ank
his good friend Sid Schonfeld. Mr. Koster and the late Mr. Schonfeld were virtu-
ally inseparable friends.
Usually I start
my day with
breakfast
meetings
mainly charity
meetings, so I
get a good start
to the day.
BERNIE KOSTER
SEE KOSTER PAGE 21
Local
JS-7*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 7
Beyond BINGO!
Intellectually stimulating activities are what every senior looks
for in an assisted living community. This is the atmosphere
that we cultivate at JHAL in River Vale. We oer a unique and
sophisticated activities calendar that suits the intellectual,
cultural and active minds of our residents because weve
had their input.
At JHAL, our residents can visit the Internet Caf, bake challah
with our remarkable volunteers, or try Zumba all before
lunch! They might enjoy our televised 92nd St. Y series,
participate in a professionally-led book club discussion, take
continuing education classes through Montclair State
University, or go on a local cultural excursion.
With so much to oer, the only thing that cant be found here
is a dull moment.
Call John Albanese, Director of Marketing at
201-666-2370 for a tour today!
A Member of The Jewish Home Family
201.666.2370 www.jhalnj.org
685 Westwood Avenue, River Vale, NJ 07675
Lauren Levant, Executive Director, Jewish Home Assisted Living
Finding unity
at the GA
Local leaders reflect
on the Jerusalem
conference
PHIL JACOBS
F
or Rochelle Shoretz, this
years Jewish Federations
of North Americas General
Assembly in Jerusalem was a
chance to meet with Jews from all over
the world as an expression of unity.
As the executive di rector of
Sharsheret, a New Jersey-based national
organization addressing breast cancer
and ovarian cancer in our community,
Ive already connected with many fed-
eration executives who want to bring
Sharsheret programming to their com-
munity, she said. My ah-ha moment
today was that together we could bring
best practices in Jewish health to our
brothers and sisters in Israel.
Ms. Shoretz said that she was feeling
the sense of unity that the GA brings to
the Jewish world. It makes it even bet-
ter when the GA convenes in Jerusalem,
she added.
I always feel a sense of unity with
Jews from different denominations and
backgrounds, Ms. Shoretz said. All of
Sharsherets programs reach women
and families from all walks of Jewish life.
It is a core component of all we do.
Jason Shames, executive vice presi-
dent and CEO of the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey, agreed with Ms.
Shoretz as he noted a strong sense of
unity among the GA attendees.
The Pew report i s a common
thread, he said on Monday. The com-
mon practice is that reports such as the
Pew report help motivate people.
Mr. Shames found that the chance
to listen to Israeli Prime Minister Ben-
jamin Netanyahu was a highlight, as it
has been at earlier GAs. He spoke to us
about what Iran was up to, and he talked
about the Palestinian issue, he said.
The federations president, Dr. Zvi
Marans, also noted the energy of having
Jews from all over the world together in
Jerusalem for this years GA.
The Pew report, he said should help
world Jewry in the future. We want a
Jewish future that is vibrant and thriv-
ing, he said.
The meetings and messages he had
heard so far connected directly to Isra-
els national security, juxtaposed with
the ever-present Iranian nuclear threat
and the issue of a two-state solution.
Dr. Marans said that Prime Minister
Netanyahu wants that two-state solu-
tion, but Israels security must be a real-
ity, not just a talking point.
On the subject of Jewish identity, Dr.
Marans talked about the overall concern
on how to connect with detached or dis-
interested Jews.
The Pew study emphasized that, he
said.
Ms. Shoretz added that northern New
Jersey had a strong showing of lay and
professional leaders in attendance.
Our commitment to Israel extends
far beyond words alone, she said.
We are supporting communities
abroad, shaping educational program-
ming about the issues facing Israel back
home, and collaborating with nonprofit
organizations, like Sharsheret, that are
national and international role models
of Jewish engagement.
The GA ended on Tuesday, November
12. Next years GA will be held from
November 9 to November 11 i n
Washington, D.C.
Rochelle Shoretz Zvi Marans
I always feel a
sense of
unity with Jews
from different
denominations
and backgrounds.
ROCHELLE SHORETZ

8 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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From Williamsburg to the King
If you love music but never heard of Doc Pomus, this is a film you must see
JOANNE PALMER
O
ne of lifes sad but incontro-
vertible truths is that there
never has been much in the
way of career opportunity for
a polio-disabled overweight white Jewish
guy who wants to sing the blues.
In black clubs.
In the 1940s.
Most people on crutches looking at the
stairs leading up to the elevated train, way
out in Brooklyn, knowing that the only
way out was to climb them somehow
would have given up.
Not Jerome Felder.
Or maybe its more accurate to say not
Doc Pomus.
The name? He made it up.
The life? As Peter Miller, who made
a documentary about Doc AKA Doc
Pomus and will screen and talk about it
at the Glen Rock Jewish Center on Sunday,
put it, you couldnt possible make it up. If
it were fiction, no one would believe you.
Jerry Felder was born in Williamsburg,
Brooklyn, which is hipster central now,
but in 1925 was another slum neighbor-
hood. His parents, British-born Jewish
immigrants, were striving but very much
lower middle class, Mr. Miller said. His
father trained as a veterinarian and then as
a lawyer, his mother ran a nursing home,
eventually his father ran unsuccessfully for
local office. His parents were brilliant, Mr.
Miller said, and they tried hard, but they
never quite made it. It was a hardscrabble
life, he said.
Their life became even harder when
Jerry, at 6 still an only child, fell ill with
polio. He was in an iron lung for a year; the
machine saved his life, but only after mak-
ing it hell. The force of will that allowed
him and so many other polio victims to
withstand both the disease and the cure
gave him, as it gave so many others, a
fierce desire to succeed.
His only brother was born when Jerry
was 9. His name was Raoul, and yes, he
is the famous divorce lawyer. Its ironic,
Mr. Miller said. Here is Doc, who wrote
some of the greatest love songs, and here
is Raoul, who presides over everybody-
whos-anybodys divorce.
Doc Pomuss story really begins when
Jerry Felder puts on the radio, and he
hears the blues. Big Joe Turner. And a light
bulb goes off over his head. This disabled
Jewish kid decides that hes going to be a
blues singer.
The audacity of it!
Beginning in his late teens, He goes up
the stairs to the El, goes to the Village, to
Harlem, to Bed Stuy. He succeeded. He
sang in nightclubs for about a decade, Mr.
Miller said, and he recorded more than 50
record sides; he wrote some of his own
songs.
Jerry Felder (rather not Doc Pomus, it
seems) graduated from Bushwick High
School and then went to Brooklyn Col-
lege. He studied music, learned to play
piano and saxophone, Mr. Miller said.
His parents said, What are you going to
do with yourself? You should get a job as
an accountant!
But his heart was set on being a blues
singer.
That was not a typical choice, Mr.
Miller understated.
It was around that time that Jerry Felder
became Doc Pomus. He hoped that the
name which he decided sounded as if
it belonged to a blues singer also would
keep his mother from knowing what he
was doing. That was an unlikely hope,
given that he was still living at home and
would come back in the early morning,
stinking of smoke. You can only imagine,
Mr. Miller said.
Doc was very good at writing music,
and that part of his career flourished. His
performing career did not. At one point,
RCA bought Heartless, a song he wrote;
when they learned that he was a 31-year-
old disabled, heavyset Jewish guy, who
did not look like a pop star, they killed the
record, Mr. Miller said. It was clear that
Doc Pomus was not going to make it as a
performer.
Instead, he became increasingly suc-
cessful as a writer. Atlantic Records, the
great rock and blues label, signed him;
working both solo and with other writers,
he wrote hit after hit.
Then the nature of the music business
changed. In the early days of rock and
roll, there was a whole industry of people
who are writing songs for these white rock
and roll singers like Dion and the Belmonts
and Fabian. They needed material.
So there was this amazing place in
Manhattan called the Brill Building
1619 Broadway a glorious little jewel of
a building packed with songwriters and
music publishing companies, Mr. Miller
said.
Doc would knock on the door and
try to sell songs. He did that so well that
eventually he was put on staff with a com-
pany that happened to work with a young
singer named Elvis Presley.
Needless to say, Doc Pomus flourished.
In one year, he had 13 songs at the top of
the charts, Mr. Miller said.
In many of his songs there is a bio-
graphical element.
He was writing a happy song about
how good it is to be a teenager in love, and
then he looked back at his own experi-
ence, and remembered how awful it was.
The result of that soul-searching was the
immortal Teenager in Love. (Well if you
want to make me cry, / That wont be so
hard to do. / If you should say goodbye,
/ Id still go on loving you. / Each night I
ask the stars up above, / Why must I be a
teenager in love?)
In a way, his approach was rooted in
SEE DOC PAGE 10
Doc Pomus, AKA Jerome Felder.
Filmmaker Peter Miller.
JS-9
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 9
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10 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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Local
10 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
the blues, Mr. Miller said. Its rooted in
an understanding that through melan-
choly, through challenges, through the
bad stuff that happens, you can find tran-
scendence and beauty.
On the surface Teenager in Love
might look like a pop hit, but actually it is
very deep.
Save the Last Dance for Me is even
more steeped in irony and paradox. Doc
Pomus married a gorgeous gentile aspir-
ing actress, a nice Catholic girl from the
Midwest, Willi Burke, and they had chil-
dren and moved to the suburbs, Mr.
Miller said. She went on to star in the musi-
cal Fiorello, and the marriage didnt last,
but something happened at the wedding
that enriched all the rest of us.
Doc noticed at their wedding that she
could be dancing, Mr. Miller said. He
couldnt dance with her he couldnt
dance at all, he never did have the chance
to dance so he encouraged her to dance
with everyone else. He knew that at the
end of the evening, she would go home
with him.
Much later, he scribbled down the lyr-
ics on a scrap of paper oddly enough the
scrap was a leftover wedding invitation if
you made stuff like this up people would
make fun of you and it was Save the Last
Dance for Me.
His career, always a roller coaster,
headed down again, as the Beatles, Bob
Dylan, and all the other singer-songwriters
made just-plain-songwriters temporarily
obsolete.
Doc realized that he couldnt make a liv-
ing in the songwriting business any more,
so he turned to gambling, Mr. Miller said.
He became a professional poker player.
Because Doc was a man of extraordi-
nary intelligence, with a fantastic mem-
ory, not only did he excel at poker, but he
also held the games in his apartment, on
West 72nd Street in Manhattan. That way,
he got to keep not only his winnings, but
also the house cut.
It was a Damon Runyon-like life, except
the gamblers werent lovable con men, but
genuine Mafia gangsters, Mr. Miller said.
Theyd come back to his apartment and
see all the gold records that lined his walls,
and theyd say, Who is this guy?
Doc hated it. He hated it very much.
And then Elvis died. His music became
enormously popular again, as people
remembered him as a young sexy singer
instead of a bloated old-man caricature of
himself in skintight gold, and Doc Pomus
became rich again as the royalties rolled in.
Once again, he wrote songs; he devel-
oped deep friendships with such other
musicians as Dr. John and Lou Reed, who
died late last month. And he starts to
give back, Mr. Miller said. He befriends
younger songwriters, including Bob Dylan,
who comes to him for advice when it
comes to lyrics.
So does John Lennon, who also lives
on 72nd Street. (Lennon, of course, lived
in the Dakota.) John is in love with Docs
music. Always has been. They hang out
in coffee shops. John always has to wear
disguises.
By the time he was 65, Docs hard living
particularly his heavy smoking got to
him. He died of lung cancer in 1991.
His was an extraordinary life, and in
many ways, Peter Miller said, it was a
deeply Jewish one. He was not a syna-
gogue-going Jew, but I dont think that Doc
Pomus could have been Doc Pomus or
Jerry Felder without being Jewish.
Being Jewish in America shaped his
outlook. He was on the outside looking in
as a disabled person, and also as a Jew.
America was not always the most wel-
coming place for him, and yet, like so
many Jewish creative people poets,
musicians, writers, artists, performers
he tapped into something in American
culture, and created the absolutely best
musical culture that has ever been made
in this country.
He was not alone in this. Jewish artists
really understood the pulse of what was
going on in America.
Doc
FROM PAGE 8
Who: Film director Peter Miller,
director of Jews and Baseball: An
American Love Story
What: Will screen and talk about his
new film, AKA Doc Pomus
Where: Glen Rock Jewish Center,
682 Harristown Road
When: Sunday, Nov. 17, at 4 p.m.
Why: Doc Pomus was influential,
brilliantly gifted, and Jewish. His
story is extraordinary.
How much: $10 per person; includes
popcorn, snacks, soft drinks, coffee
and tea. $8 for seniors 65 and older.
Or buy tickets on line in advance
go to the shuls website, www.grjc.
org, scroll down on the homepage,
and click on the film link there.
Doc in late middle age.
At left, songwriting
partners Mort Shuman,
left, and Doc Pomus.
Below, Doc and his wife,
actress Willi Burke.
Doc was a mentor to the young
Bob Dylan.
He began his career singing
in nightclubs.
He often
worked with
another young
protege,
Dr. John.
JS-11
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 11
Visit www.acmemarkets.com or call 1-877-932-7948 PRICES EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 15 THRU NOVEMBER 21, 2013
Rain Check: We strive to have on hand sufficient stock of advertised merchandise. If for any reason we are out of stock, a Rain Check will be issued enabling you to buy the item at the advertised price as soon as it becomes available,
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NJ JEWISH STANDARD 11/15/13
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Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-12*
Getting dirty
doing good
NCSY volunteers help clean up
from the storm damage in Colorado
JUNE GLAZER
I
n mid-September, torrential rains
caused such severe flooding in
parts of Colorado that it prompted
federal emergency declarations in
15 counties throughout the state.
Hardest hit was Boulder County, where
homes were destroyed, roads washed
away and vital infrastructure damaged.
Residents there were told they would be
displaced for up to six months.
Recently, members of the Bergen
County chapter of National Council of
Synagogue Youth returned from a mis-
sion to Boulder County, where they
assisted flood survivors with storm-
debris cleanup and mucking out dam-
aged homes. The mission, the 22nd in
five years undertaken by NCSY chapters
in New Jersey for disaster relief, took
14 youths to Lyons, Colo., for four days
last month. There they partnered with
Nechama, the Jewish response volunteer
organization, and got dirty doing good,
according to Rabbi Ethan Katz, New Jer-
sey NCSYs regional director.
People ask me why disaster relief.
There are two main reasons, said Rabbi
Katz, who conceived of the missions pro-
gram after Hurricane Katrina and has
sent more than 300 teens from five state
chapters to help in communities in Loui-
siana, Alabama, Texas, Minnesota, New
York, and parts of New Jersey.
We view ourselves as ambassadors of
the Jewish people, here to help regard-
less of whether it is Jews or non Jews who
need it, he said.
Second, most of our teens live insu-
lar lives, and have never seen poverty
or devastation. They have never gotten
down and dirty to help out. So, when
kids go on these trips and a homeowner
tells them how much he or she appreci-
ates their help, they walk away know-
ing they made a real difference in some-
bodys life. Its a life-changing experience
for them.
NCSY students got their hands dirty in Colorado. Here, in the doorway, Michael
Feuerstein-Rudin and Matthew Wexler; in the middle, Judah Stiefel, Yosef Naor,
and Rami Levine, all from Teaneck; and, kneeling, Phillip Seidman of Marlboro
and Yoni Schwartz of Teaneck take a work break in front of a house they are
helping to repair. SEE GETTING DIRTY PAGE 64
Art and soul
Artist David Moss
teaches at Teanecks Beth Sholom
LARRY YUDELSON
D
avid Moss calls himself a mitz-
vah beautifier.
Its a variation on the
Hebrew phrase hidur mitz-
vah beautifying a commandment
used to describe the Jewish value of mak-
ing art out of a ritual object, like a menorah
or an etrog case.
But in Mr. Mosss cases, thats rather an
understatement. Over the years, he has
put his eyes and hands to work beautify-
ing mitzvot to amazing effect.
In the late 1960s, he revived the practice
of hand-drawn ketubot Jewish marriage
contracts with calligraphic art that in
effect create a whole old/new genre of Jew-
ish art.
In the 1980s, he tackled the Haggadah.
His version of the Passover story took
three years to complete. Much of that time
was spent on research: The Moss Hagga-
dah alluded to centuries of artistic hagga-
dah illustrations, even as it incorporated
a wide range of Jewish texts into the art.
To cite one sample: On the title page,
he includes the entire text of the Hagga-
dah in micrographic writing as a border
because the beginning contains the whole.
Or another: For the passage of the Hag-
gadah that says In every generation one
must see himself as having come from
Egypt, Mr. Moss drew profiles of many
figures. Each wears the dress of a different
Jewish community across the centuries.
Interspersed among the profiles, reflective
paper shows the viewers own reflection.
Davids work is about both text and
Jewish values and integrating the arts into
Jewish learning in all ways, said Elaine
Cohen, explaining why Congregation
What: From Word to Image
a presentation by David Moss,
sharing his artistic process and
evolution as a Jewish artist.
When: Sunday, November 17,
7 p.m.
Where: Congregation Beth
Sholom, Teaneck
David Moss in his Jerusalem studio. DAVID LONNER / SHMA.COM
SEE MOSS PAGE 64
Local
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J Street leader
to speak in Tenafly
LARRY YUDELSON
J Street is coming to town.
A senior official of the Pro-Israel,
Pro-Peace organization will be speak-
ing Sunday at Temple Sinai in Tenafly.
Alan Elsner, J Streets vice president
of communications, said he plans on
di scussi ng the state
of the U.S.-sponsored
Israeli-Palestinian per-
manent status peace
negotiations and Secre-
tary of State John Ker-
rys recent trip to Israel.
And I will be outlin-
ing what J Street is doing
in our Two Campaign,
which aims to educate
people about Kerrys
initiative and get people
to support it, he said.
In asking Jewish Americans to sup-
port the American officials diplomatic
efforts, J Street is finding itself opposing
the government of Israeli Prime Minis-
ter Benjamin Netanyahu, which twice
has in the past week found itself at odds
with the United States. First came a dis-
pute over whether Israeli announce-
ments about new apartments in the
west bank were a stumbling block in
the negotiations. Then came Netanya-
hus harsh, if premature, condemna-
tion of a reported agreement between
Iran and the United States (and five
other countries) over Irans nuclear
efforts. (In the end, no agreement was
reached.)
Mr. Elsners presentation is part of
a series of speakers on American Jews
and Zionism organized by the syna-
gogues brotherhood, according to
its president, David Klein. Were try-
ing to get differing views presented to
our congregation, Mr. Klein said. My
understanding is that J Street is the
potentially more liberal view; we might
have somebody from AIPAC present a
more conservative view.
The congregations Rabbi Jordan
Millstein said that the program is part
of what were trying to do to build a
deeper relationship with Israel among
our members.
The issue for us in the American
Jewish community is that there is fortu-
nately a very broad support for Israel,
but at the same time there are many
people who dont agree of course,
were Jews, were not going to agree
with policies that are taken by a given
Israeli government, Rabbi Millstein
said. Debate is important. People in
our community have to recognize that
diverse views are held and that those
views as long as they are in support
of Israel are legitimate.
Mr. Elsner came to J
Street a year ago from
the Israel Project, a pro-
Israel advocacy group;
before entering Zionist
organizational life, he
had been a reporter for
Reuters and wrote two
books of nonfiction and
two novels. Born in Eng-
land, he moved to Israel
in 1977.
I have an Israel i
passport, he said. Im
a citizen of Israel. I served in the IDF.
My wife and I met there; we lived there
together for eight years.
J Street really reflects what I believe
and have always believed: That the only
way to end the conflict is through the
establishment of a Palestinian state,
and to end the occupation, which is
having a corrupting effect on Israel,
he said.
Last week, Mr. Kerry traveled to the
Middle East, meeting with Prime Minis-
gter Netanyahu and with Palestinian
Authority President Mahmoud Abbas
Following the meeting with Abbas,
Mr. Kerry reiterated U.S. opposition to
Jewish settlements.
We consider now and have always
considered the settlements to be ille-
gitimate, Mr. Kerry said when he was
in Bethlehem. And I want to make it
extremely clear that at no time did
the Palestinians in any way agree, as a
matter of going back to the talks, that
they somehow condone or accept the
settlements.
Thats a restating of long-standing
American policy, Mr. Elsner said.
I think there is a limited tolerance
on the Palestinian side for constant
announcements of new settlement
apartments. It seems every project gets
announced five or six times. The latest
ones were the same ones announced
previously.
I understand Netanyahu may
have domesti c reasons to make
Who: J Street Vice President Alan Elsner
What: When should we speak about Israel and what should we say?
American Jews and the two-state solution a talk with bagel breakfast
When: Sunday, November 17, 9:30 p.m.
Where: Temple Sinai of Bergen County, One Engle St., Tenafly
Alan Elsner
SEE J STREET PAGE 21
Local
14 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-14*
Enlightenment from Elijah
Exploring suicide through Jewish texts in effort to raise awareness
JOANNE PALMER
S
uicide is not a specifically Jewish
problem.
In fact, last week, the spectacular
suicide of Richard Shoop, a young
man from Teaneck who terrorized an entire
huge mall full of people at the Garden State
Plaza, put the issue of suicide prevention (as
well as gun control, mental illness, and drug
addiction) firmly in peoples minds.
Mr. Shoop was not Jewish, but members
of the Jewish community are neither more
nor less immune to suicide than anyone else.
Jews struggle with the urge to kill themselves,
and their friends and families struggle with
the aftereffects of suicide, just like everyone
else does.
But there might be a specifically Jewish
way to discuss the issue.
Text study.
Thats what Efrem Epstein, the founder of
Elijahs Journey, will lead on November 23 in
Teaneck.
Elijahs Journey is an organization that
advocates for an increased awareness of sui-
cide, and for suicide prevention. November
23 is the American Foundation for Suicide
Preventions International Survivors of Sui-
cide Day. Coincidentally, it is also Shabbat,
and the parashah the Torah portion that
will be read in synagogues that day is Vayes-
hev. Thats the one that sees Joseph in prison,
along with Pharaohs butler and baker.
Its one of the most famous stories in the
Torah, but there are a couple of lines in there
that often get missed, Mr. Epstein said.
Joseph is in jail, probably, as far as he
knows, for the rest of his life. He notices
these two people, and the text says that they
looked distressed. So he asks them, Why do
you look so sad today?
And they say, We have had these dreams.
Joseph changes the course of Jewish his-
tory of world history by having the pres-
ence of mind, even in his darkest hour, to
notice other people.
Thats why we say that we all have the
presence of mind to look around, and if
someone doesnt look happy, to ask whats
wrong.
Mr. Epstein, who lives on Manhattans
Upper West Side, will speak at two Teaneck
shuls that Shabbat Netivot Shalom and
Congregation Shaare Tefillah. At each, I will
teach a text study, he said. We will look at
five characters from the Bible, and see how
they struggle.
Moses feels overwhelmed; Chana is in
emotional agony, exacerbated by bullying;
Elijah feels worthless: Jonah suffers from
angst, and Zion, the only non-human charac-
ter here, is suffering through mourning.
Through a close look at those characters,
whose emotional life is immediately recogniz-
able to us although their stories took place so
long ago and their cultural assumptions are
not necessarily ours, it is possible get a better
emotional understanding on the problems of
suicide today.
Perhaps the most telling of all these stories
and the one from which the organization
got its name is the prophet Elijahs. He
asks God to take his life, Mr. Epstein said. In
I Kings 19, in the Jewish Publication Society
translation, Elijah, who had journeyed out
alone into the wilderness, sat under a tree,
and said, It is enough; now, O Lord, take
away my life; for I am not better than my
fathers.
In response, God tells him to go on a
40-day journey, and reassess, Mr. Epstein
said.
Although many people who have been
touched by suicide try to keep it quiet, we
lose about 39,000 people to suicide in this
country every year, he said. Thats con-
firmed and reported suicides. The suicide/
homicide rate is 2 to 1, again confirmed and
reported suicides.
The best estimate is that 13 million peo-
ple seriously contemplate suicide every year,
there are one million attempts, and nearly
40,000 confirmed. By comparison, there
are 17,000 homicides in the United States
every year, he said.
Mr. Epstein began Elijahs Journey after
a tough period in his own life, he said.
Coming out of it, I knew that I wanted to do
something, but I wasnt exactly sure what. I
got involved with the American Foundation
for Suicide Prevention, did a couple of their
walks, and then the New York
City director invited me to
attend World Suicide Preven-
tion Day.
On that day which is
marked on September 10 but
has no connection to the ter-
rorist attacks of September 11
I heard about these amaz-
ing program initiatives in other
communities elderly, LGBT,
people of color, English as a
second language, college but
I heard nothing about the Jewish community.
When Dr. Donna Barnes, the founder of the
community for people of color, talked about
how suicide prevention is most effective in
peoples own communities, I went to her
afterward and asked if she knew if anyone
in the Jewish community had started such a
group.
No one had so Mr. Epstein started it him-
self, and Dr. Barnes became one of his first
board members.
Elijahs Journey is working on information
to send to chesed committees and clery with
advice on what to do when they visit a house
where someone is sitting shivah for someone
lost to suicide. Many of the co-authors of
that document are people who themselves
have been through the experience of sitting
shivah for someone who took their own life,
Mr. Epstein said.
The organization also would like to start
a dialogue between rabbis and mental health
professionals about how to turn synagogues
into safer places, he said.
I often struggle in the morning, and I find
that one thing that helps is going to minyan.
The idea is that perhaps if you are struggling,
and somewhere near you there could be a
room with 10 friendly people, and someone
says, How are you doing this morning? and
you say, Not so well, then someone maybe
the rabbi, maybe not gives you a card,
and says call these people here, and use my
name, and if its okay with you I will call you
to check in and see how youre doing.
This isnt kiruv, or outreach, he said. If
the ym works for you, or Starbucks, or talk-
ing to a friend on the phone, find. But if those
things arent working, then consider the fact
that somewhere near you there might be a
place where you will be welcome. You will be
around people. You will be around a rabbi. It
could be an option.
Its a win-win, Mr. Epstein continued.
Rabbis and congregations need people to
walk through their doors, and people need
help. I would love to work more with rabbis
and mental health professionals, he said.
From what Ive seen so far, the peo-
ple who are most drawn to suicide aware-
ness prevention are people who have been
touched by suicide, not people who have
attempted it, he said. People who have
tried it havent been as comfortable about
telling their stories.
In this Russian icon, Elijah whom
we share with Christians and Mus-
lims is ascending to heaven in his
chariot.
Local
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The communitys understanding of cancer and AIDS
might look a little different if the only people involved in
organizations fighting it were people who are mourning
somebody, as opposed to people who have been through
it themselves.
Elijahs Journey is in a position to give a gift to the Jew-
ish community, and to the world, by raising the profile of
the issue in the Jewish community, he concluded. We
have many people who either have struggled themselves
or have lost a family member. It is painful enough to go
through the death of someone you love imagine also
having to hide it.
There are parts of the community that are not very
open about it. We have to raise the profile on it. By incor-
porating a Jewish lens, we help to give people a place to
talk about it. People who are struggling if they are able
to say if somebody like Moses struggled, then I can strug-
gle. I am human; it is human to struggle.
If Elijah, the ultimate symbol of my faith, struggled
with it, I can struggle with it too.
Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgott of Netivot Shalom said that he
is glad to support Elijahs Journey because, if we can help
even one person, if we can sensitize even one family in the
community, then it is worth doing. Doing whatever we
can to prevent suicide is a holy and sacred task, he said.
Unfortunately, this is a topic to which many of us have
a tangential connection through family or friends. Every
year you hear a story, and its always tragic, whether its
a child or a teenager who commits suicide because of
being bullied, or an adult because theyre overwhelmed
by something that happened, or by financial stress, or
theyre in a deep depression or great physical pain. There
are many situations, but it is always tragic.
I hope that Efrem will be able to give people informa-
tion about what they can do, and what support groups
and resources are available in both the Jewish and general
communities.
Dena Cohen, a co-president of the sisterhood at Shaare
Tefillah, is responsible for bringing Mr. Epstein to speak
at that shul.
I think that Elijahs Journey is a tremendous service to
the Jewish community, she said. It takes a lot of courage
to speak out about a topic that often is swept under the
rug, not only in our community, but in most communi-
ties. We push aside both whatever leads up to it and what
it leaves in its aftermath, but those are huge issues, and
many people are affected by it.
To talk about suicide in a way that adds Jewish text
and learning into the mix is brilliant, she added. It is
an amazing opportunity for us, because we are already
in network and in community, and we have an opportu-
nity to tell people who are facing suicide, and struggling
against the feelings that might lead up to it, that they dont
have to be alone in their struggle.
It is okay for family and friends to speak out. Its
important to have a jumping-off point so we can start to
talk about it in our community.
Who: Efrem Epstein of Elijahs Journey
What: Talking about suicide prevention
through an explicitly Jewish lens
When: Saturday, November 23, which is Shab-
bat Parashat Vayeshev
Where: In Teaneck; at about 11:30 or so, after
kiddush, at Netivot Shalom, 811
Palisade Avenue; and at sudah shlishit at
Shaare Tefillah, 510 Claremont Avenue.
Why: To raise awareness of this widespread
and sensitive issue
Who is welcome: Everyone. There are no res-
ervations, and it is free and open to the entire
community. Just show up, listen, and learn
Local
16 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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www.jstandard.com
Weaving photos,
telling stories
JCC exhibition features a new technique
LOIS GOLDRICH
P
hotographer Rachel Banai of
Teaneck is no stranger to the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades.
Indeed, her current exhibition,
The Man Is a Tree in a Field, is her sev-
enth show at the Tenafly center.
My first exhibition at the JCC was in
1988, Ms. Banai said, pointing out that
this year marks the 25th anniversary of
her artistic association with the facility. I
love showing my photos there, she said.
When I was putting up my new exhibi-
tion, at least 50 people stopped to discuss
it. Everyone came and asked about it.
Ms. Banai, who grew up in Kibbutz
Sarid in northern Israel, moved here in
1985, when she was 37.
I decided late in life to take up photog-
raphy as an occupation, she said, noting
that it was only after moving to Teaneck
that she made that decision. Her first job
after graduating from the International
Center of Photography was working for
the Jewish Standard.
Rebecca Boroson, who was then
the Standards editor called me, and
I began my life as a photographer at the
paper, Ms. Banai said. The following year,
she mounted her first exhibition at the
JCC, featuring pictures of a local Chabad
rabbi.
A lot of my photos are of people, she
said, adding that she is also interested in
varying her technique, exploring differ-
ent ways to work with the photos.
For her 2001 exhibition, Faces of
China for which she did a good deal
of research she worked with Polaroid
transfers, a technique she no longer uses.
Her most recent exhibition features a new
process, photo weaving, which she devel-
oped herself.
One of her favorite JCC shows, mounted
in 1999, focused on chairs around the
world.
I feel like chairs represent culture, Ms.
Banai said. In every country, they look
the way people want them to look.
Israel has figured large in her work. A
1996 exhibition featured a kibbutz date
plantation; in 2008 she presented Israel
at 60, looking at the country through the
eyes of both kibbutz residents and Arab
villagers.
My exhibition now is totally different,
yet similar in showing portraits, people,
and communities, she said. For this
show, she has developed her new tech-
nique, which involves weaving two pic-
tures together.
The pictures were all taken in Kibbutz
Samar, showing residents, dunes, date
plantations, and flowers.
Israel is in my blood, Ms. Banai said.
It is a part of me. It doesnt matter that
Ive been living in the U.S. for 30 years.
My photographic language goes back to
my roots.
Its a very innovative show, she added.
It requires going from picture to picture.
You have to stop and think.
Others have used Photoshop to weave
two photographs together, but nobody
has done it manually, Ms. Banai contin-
ued. I do it by hand, using two pictures
and cutting them, slicing them, and weav-
ing them together into one another. In
selecting the two photos, I try to have a
person in the place he works, or belongs
to, or something he likes, or show his
background.
In this show, Rachel Banais photographs weave disparate pieces to create
an emotional whole. RACHEL BANAI
Local
JS-17*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 17
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While each photo is manipulated differ-
ently , I leave the eyes untouched, she
said. The eyes are the mirror of the soul.
Thats how it works for me.
One of her students wrote her a letter
after viewing the exhibition, demonstrat-
ing that she recognized what Ms. Banai
had done.
One could not have possibly imagined
a more stunning group of people captured
by the artist, the student wrote. They
were from all over the globe and of differ-
ent backgrounds. They were young and not
so young. They were males and females.
They were teachers and carpenters. They
had pale complexion and dark skin. Yet,
there was something special about their
faces, something that made them all look
alike. It took me a while to realize what
it was. As I was going back and forth from
one portrait to another, I was desperately
trying to find the source of this remarkable
resemblance. And then, suddenly, I knew
it. It was their eyes. There was something
in their eyes that unified them and made
them all part of one trajectory.
While Ms. Banai describes herself as
very much a people photographer, she
makes her living mostly by photographing
nature, concentrating on Teaneck Creek.
After working for several years as a
volunteer for the Puffin Foundation, she
developed photography classes there that
are still going strong after 11 years. We have
about 50 people in the two classes over the
weekend.
As part of that program, students get to
exhibit their work at Puffin, and the orga-
nizations annual calendar is made up of
their artwork.
In 2011, Banai took some of her stu-
dents to Israel. In two months, she will
take a second group, who will visit not
only kibbutzim but also Christian and
Arab sites. Her aim, she said, is for them
to see and understand more about the
culture, particularly how Israel is mixed
as a country.
Each week, before students photo-
graph Teaneck Creek, Banai gives them an
assignment. Later, they discuss what they
have done and what might have been done
differently.
They come week after week and start
to see things differently, she said, noting
that some students have been with her for
10 years. It gives them an opportunity to
move beyond their routine.
Banais exhibit will be on display in the
JCCs Waltuch Gallery until November 26.
Local
JS-18*
Big Night Out honors three couples
at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly will
honor three couples for their generosity and
commitment to the JCC at its Big Night Out on
Saturday, November 23, at 7:30 p.m.
The honorees are Nancy and Howard Brown,
Dana and Michael Runyon, and Jodi and Saul
Scherl.
Proceeds from the gala will raise funds that
will allow the JCC to distribute scholarships to
those facing financial difficulty, to offer learning
and social experiences for children and adults
with special needs, and to provide a safe, social,
and engaging environment for the communitys
aging population.
Nancy Brown, a past officer, has served on
the JCC board for more than 30 years, and
founded or chaired many events with her hus-
band, Howard.
Jodi Scherl is an officer and longtime JCC
board member, and Saul has chaired the JCC
Rubin Run for the past 10 years and is an active
committee member for the JCCs Golf Classic
two of the centers most successful annual
events.
Dana Runyon serves on the JCC board, and
she and Michael have worked on JCC programs
including the Golf Classic and Lavish Lunches.
For information, call Sharon Kestenbaum at
(201) 408-1406 or email her at skestenbaum@
jccotp.org.
Nancy and Howard Brown Dana and Michael Runyon Jodi and Saul Scherl
PHOTOS COURTESY JCCOTP
Maayanot chosen to be
technological leader
Maayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls in Teaneck was selected to
offer the CIJE-Tech High School Engineering Program from the Cen-
ter for Initiatives in Jewish Education. The program aims to prepare
students to be 21st century learners and inspire them to explore
careers in what is called STEM science, technology, engineering,
and math.
The CIJE-Tech High School Engineering Program, an innovative
approach to STEM education, provides teacher training, ongoing
teacher mentoring, and all science laboratory equipment and mate-
rials. Focused on scientific and biomedical engineering, CIJE-Tech
exposes students to a range of science and technical areas while
helping them develop multidisciplinary and abstract thinking as
well as leadership and teamwork skills.
Developed in Israel and optimized for the American student in
2011, the two-year curriculum is now in 27 schools nationwide.
Maayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls is a college preparatory
modern Orthodox high school offering a rigorous dual curriculum
in Judaic and general studies. The Maayanot learning environment
encourages students to take initiative, to explore their creative tal-
ents, and to be active, independent learners. To learn more about
the school, go to www.maayanot.org.
Holocaust Torah dedication
Congregation Shomrei Torah in Wayne will dedicate a Torah scroll
that survived the Holocaust and has now been restored on Sunday,
November 17, at 10 a.m. The celebration will include a ceremony
followed by music, singing, and brunch. Call (973) 696-2500 or
email office@shomreitorahwcc.org .
Helping hands are needed
The Chabad Center of Passaic County in Wayne seeks volunteers to
help pack Chanukah presents for its Friendship Circle teen volunteers.
Meet in the centers library, 194 Ratzer Road, on Monday, November
18, at 7 p.m.
The center also is partnering with Flames of Giving to collect new
and gently used toys until December 3; they will be donated to the less
fortunate for Chanukah. Call (718) 483-5682 or email chaya@fcpassaic-
county.com.
Annual IDF tribute dinner
to honor Lone Soldiers
The Friends of the Israel Defense Forcess New Jersey chapter will
host its ninth annual IDF tribute dinner on Saturday, November
23, at the Hilton Secaucus Meadowlands in East Rutherford. More
than 500 lay leaders and FIDF supporters from across New Jersey
are expected to attend the annual gala, called Lone Soldiers as
Ambassadors.
The main speaker will be Israels defense and armed forces atta-
ch to the United States and Canada, Maj. Gen. Yaacov Ayish. Mir-
iam Peretz, whose two sons, 1st Lt. Uriel Peretz and Maj. Eliraz Per-
etz, both died in battle, will speak. Tal Bar-Or, whose father, Sammy
Bar-Or, is one of the founders of the FIDF New Jersey Chapter, will
be the host.
The dinner will honor and celebrate Israels soldiers. Guests will
include IDF soldiers who will come from Israel to New Jersey to meet
with FIDF supporters and former Lone Soldiers from the community.
For more information, call (646) 274-9650 or email www.fidf.org.
18 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
Yavneh Academy race funds scholarships
Yavneh Academy in Paramus held its ninth annual
Benjamin Schwartz Memorial 5K Run/1 Mile Fun
Run/Walk on November 10 at the Westfield Garden
State Plaza. The event, named for the brother of
Yavneh parent Mendy Schwartz, drew over 1,000
people and helped raise over $50,000 for Yavneh
Academy scholarships.
Participants of the run/walk were treated to a pre-
race workout with Donna Riker of Holy Name Hos-
pital (HNH) Fitness in Oradell, tee shirts, and a buf-
fet breakfast. At the culmination of the race, event
organizer Amy Buchsbayew of Teaneck presented
medals to the top runners in the various age catego-
ries. Michael Fonder, 27, of Tenafly, who came in at
15 minutes and 34 seconds, was the overall winner.
The Yavneh family PHOTOS COURTESY YAVNEH
Joel Kirschner, left, Yavneh Academys executive
director, with Paramus Mayor Richard LaBar-
biera, and Mendy Schwartz at the race start.
JS-19
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 19
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades 411 EAST CLINTON AVENUE, TENAFLY, NJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFO, VISIT
jccotp.org OR CALL 201. 569.7900.
UPCOMING AT
XXX
FOR
ALL
TEENS
Dont miss this annual shopping extravaganza featuring
jewelry, womens fashions, stationery, sunglasses,
childrens clothing and accessories and much more.
Its the perfect place and time to pick up holiday gifts
for family, friends and you! Co-chairs: Tara Jagid,
Samantha Zimmerman, Andrea Messinger and Jeanine
Casty. For more information, contact Felice Popper at
201.408.1435 or fpopper@jccotp.org. All proceeds to
benet the Early Childhood Special Programs.
Sun, Nov 17, 10 am-5 pm
& Mon, Nov 18, 9 am-4 pm
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades
FILM
Fall Boutique
March of the Living
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Teens in 10th, 11th and 12th grades can
participate in this once-in-a-lifetime experience
that brings Jewish teens from all over the world
to Poland to commemorate Yom Hashoah and
to learn the lessons of the Holocaust. The group
will then go to Israel to observe Israel Memorial
Day and Independence Day. Applications
now due. Call Sara Sideman, 201.408.1469 or
ssideman@jccotp.org.
April 23May 7, 2014. Cost is $5,205;
Financial assistance available.
An evening of delectable food, drinks, and great music to
raise funds to support JCC programs and services.
Honoring: NANCY AND HOWARD BROWN, DANA AND
MICHAEL RUNYON, and JODI AND SAUL SCHERL
for their extraordinary contributions to the JCC.
To place your reservation or support the event,
please contact Sharon at skestenbaum@jccotp.org
or 201.408.1406.
Sat, Nov 23, 7:30 pm
Before Midnight
A FILM/DISCUSSION SERIES
WITH HAROLD CHAPLER
Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy star in Richard
Linklaters new lm about a French-American
romantic alliance. As a follow-up to Before
Sunrise and Before Sunset, we meet Jesse and
Celine nine years later in Greece. Almost two
decades have passed since their rst meeting
on a train bound for Vienna.
Mon, Nov 18, 7:30 pm, $3/$5
Thanksgivukkah
Feel the spirit throughout the JCC!
FOOD & TOY DRIVE: Collection bin in the lobby
all month. Then join us Nov 21 to stuf donations
for those in need in our community and also hear
a Thanksgivukkah Concert featuring The Young
Peoples Chorus @ Thurnauer 5-5:30 pm in the lobby.
Thurs, Nov 21, 2-6 pm
Join us
FOR THE BIG NIGHT OUT ON 11.23.13
JAMES H. GROSSMANN MEMORIAL JEWISH BOOK MONTH
Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots
WITH AUTHOR JESSICA SOFFER
This lyrically-written novel is about two women adrift in
New York a widow and an almost orphan, who learn
that even in moments of grief and darkness, joys might
be waiting just around the corner. This program is co-
sponsored with Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey
Women's Philanthropy; and is supported by the Kurt &
Henry Mahler Fund for Jewish Book Month.
THURS, DEC 5
7 PM: $36, includes book and wine + cheese reception with
the author, followed by author presentation at 8 pm.
8 PM: Author presentation $8/$10
Local
20 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-20*
Shouldering our responsibility
PHIL JACOBS
O
f all the hours
spent l earni ng
from Torah and
Talmud. All the
discussions in your local
beis medresh, and all of the
research of the great scholars
such as Rashi, Rambam and
Ramban but maybe it was
a man on a New York subway
who taught us thoroughly.
As our sage Hillel said:
That which is hateful to you,
do not unto another: This is
the whole Torah. The rest is
commentary.
For those who dont know,
a man named Isaac Theil, 65,
who was riding the Brooklyn
bound Q train recently, did
not flinch for a second when
a young black man wearing a
hoodie used his shoulder as a
pillow for a short snooze.
As is always the case these
days, there was someone
there who saw in it a photo
opportunity, and soon the
image of the black youth in
the hoodie sleeping on the
Jewish mans shoulder went viral. Its had
millions of likes on Facebook.
He must have had a long day, let him
sleep, Mr. Theil was quoted in Tabletmag.
com as saying to another subway rider.
Today, when the hoodie has become
the symbol of Trayvon Martins death in
Florida, and of tension between people
of different skin colors or backgrounds,
Mr. Theils patience and compassion was
exactly what we needed.
Mr. Theil said he had no hidden agenda
a couple of Thursdays ago, when he let
Garvey Dutes, a John Jay College student,
doze on his shoulder.
Since then, then social media has been
buzzing of this simple act of kindness.
I was going to write about the event,
picking up the quotes from Tablet and
other sources. Use your favorite search
engine and you can see the photo and find
stories about it all over the social network.
But instead of calling the requisite social
commentators to ask about the meaning
of Mr. Theils actions, I decided instead to
take this mans good deed to the what I
call the front lines.
In this case, that is a group of teens I
meet with at a Baltimore area congrega-
tion. We meet for what is called Emet,
the Hebrew word for truth. I really dont
teach these students; instead, I often bring
controversy to them and we talk about the
appropriate responses to it.
Weve spoken to one another over the
years in this class about many issues.
Before last years referendums, we
debated the needed for a marriage equal-
ity act. We took both the idea that mar-
riage should always be between a man and
a woman and the idea that it should be
available to anyone couple very seriously.
We talked about the impact
of casino gambling, consider-
ing the collateral damage of
betting, such as addiction
and ruined lives.
Shoul d anyone ques-
tion Israels right to attack
Iran and destroy its nuclear
capability?
Is the Arab spring really
doing what it was supposed
to do in the Middle East?
Obamacare, the furlough-
ing of federal workers, the
mass shootings in schools,
movie theaters and shopping
centers that are making us all
numb. We talk about all of it.
There were students in the
class who were taken aback
by Isaac Theils decision to
allow a strange man to sleep
on his shoulder.
What stunned me the
most were the words of one
of my high school seniors, a
girl who I have had in class
for four years. She would
tell you herself that shes
not necessarily the most reli-
gious teen on the planet. And
there have been times when
shed rather text on her phone than listen
to me go on and on about terrorism or reli-
gious continuity.
Yet when she gets going about a topic,
she gets going about the topic.
This time, though, Danis quiet voice is
what stunned us all. Without needing to
shout, she simply asked the question.
Why? she asked
Why what?, a classmate responded.
Why should this be such a big deal that
it would go viral? Dani wanted to know. I
mean isnt this the way we are supposed to
be to each other?
Question answered.
When I asked her classmates what they
would do if a young African American man
in a hoodie rested his head on their shoul-
der, none of them felt comfortable enough
to say yes they would let him.
A couple joked that they wouldnt let
anyone rest their heads on their shoulders.
Mr. Theil said he didnt give it a second
thought.
Mr. Theil taught us what Hillel also said
after talking about treating ones neighbor
as one would expect to be treated. All the
rest is commentary.
In performing an act of kindness Mr.
Theil carried the full spiritual weight of a
loving, caring Judaism on his shoulder. We
should all have the opportunity to do the
same.
Youll never know when someone will
seek comfort there.
A random sampling of Huffington
Post comments on the Isaac Theil
story:
I didn't even see the yarmulke
until the reporter mentioned. All
I saw were two people, one was
tired and the other was a kind
soul.
Interesting that people think they
have a right to take a picture of
someone and post it online.
We don't all need to be Mother
Teresa. If people could simply do
the right thing whenever they can,
we'd all be better.
What was really said: "He can't
rob me if he is sleeping."
I think this is really sad that this is
viral. What's next? Someone takes
a picture of someone opening a
door for someone?
This man has a good heart it
seems...because I'm not sure I
personally want someone lean-
ing against me....I have OCD too
bad....good for him.
I would have moved. If I don't
know you, don't touch me.
Compassion is not religious busi-
ness, it is human business, it is not
luxury, it is essential for our own
peace and mental stability, it is es-
sential for human survival.
Good for the kid (with his hoodie
on) that he wasn't in Florida...
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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 21
JS-21*
Dr. Sandra Gold of Englewood, who is, among very
many other things, a former JCC president, president
of the Jewish Home at Rockleigh, and a JFS honorary
trustee, sits on many boards with Mr. Koster.
Bernie is a very singular individual, Dr. Gold said.
He has the passion and the will to actively help
many diverse organizations fulfill their missions by
fundraising. That isnt something that a lot of volun-
teers like to do, or are any good at doing.
Hes always so pleasant and generally makes
the solicitation of a gift another gift an experi-
ence thats not pressured. I think thats why hes so
successful.
Mr. Koster really is so good at soliciting funds, she
continued, that I always look forward to getting a
call from Bernie, even though I know what its about.
And Bernie is so dependable, she concluded.
Volunteers serve at the convenience of their own
schedules, but Bernie always meets his deadlines.
Hes really the ideal volunteer, Dr. Gold said.
Jay Nadel, the chairman of the board of trustees
of Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, said
that Mr. Koster is a great guy. He is a wonderful
man, and when it comes to giving the world is his
community.
He takes good care of the Jewish community, Mr.
Nadel continued. He has been involved in helping
us raise money for the hospital.
In New Jersey, there are two types of hospitals,
he said. There are the ones that have a culture of
philanthropy, and the ones that dont.
Bernie broke the record with our gala journal in
2011, he concluded.
Bernie Koster is one of a kind, his rabbi, Emanu-
Els David-Seth Kirshner, said. He greets you when
you walk into the shul, with a hug and a kiss.
He was kind of effervescent that way. There is not
one organization in town that did not benefit from
him.
And he is omnipresent, Rabbi Kirshner added. I
go to the JCC at 6:30, and hes there on a treadmill.
At 8 Im at Angeliques for coffee and hes there, hes
at a meeting at noon, and at minyan in the evening. If
there is a gala dinner for an organization, hes there.
Thats Bernie. Hes tireless. Hes always present.
Hes always giving his heart.
Koster
FROM PAGE 6
announcements in terms of calm-
ing down elements of his coalition,
but this needs to be weighed against
the international diplomatic conse-
quences every time he makes one of
these announcements.
Mr. Elsner said it was bizarre
that Mr. Netanyahu would have
chosen to free Palestinian prisoners
as a goodwill gesture, rather than
acceded to a settlement freeze.
The release of convicted mur-
derers sparked a wave of revulsion
in Israel that cut across party lines
and united the nation, he said. It
weakened support for negotiations,
since it associates negotiations with
the release of murderers.
I cant really understand why he
would prefer to free murderers than
to freeze settlements.
Mr. Elsner said he doesnt expect
the negotiations between the Israe-
lis and the Palestinians to collapse,
but I do think that some time in the
new year, the U.S. will have a to take
a new role, in terms of putting a new
detailed framework on the table.
J Street
FROM PAGE 13
Bernie Koster matches his considerable ability
to solicit funds for a variety of organizations
with a genuine commitment to tzedakah.
Editorial
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The legacy of a humble hero
W
hen he was 25 years old,
Saul Kagan was a colo-
nel in the U.S. Army
attached to an intelli-
gence unit in occupied Berlin, where
he headed up a unit that investigated
the financial underpinnings of the Nazi
death machine. Just a few years earlier,
he escaped that machine, although
most of his family did not. In occupied
Germany, he encountered survivors,
saw their plight firsthand, and heard
their tragic tales.
And he made a decision: He would
spend the rest of his life trying to bring
a measure of justice, as he put it, for
them, their families, and those who
were martyredespecially for them;
in every negotiation, he was keenly
aware of an invisible presence haunt-
ing that room, the presence of six mil-
lion dead.
One of his first acts was to help pro-
mulgate a military order allowing the
survivors to reclaim the property Ger-
many stole from them. He was then
instrumental in founding and steer-
ing the work of the Jewish Restitution
Successor Organization, which in 1951
gave way to the Conference on Jewish
Material Claims Against Germany. In
1999, he retired as its executive vice
president, although he continued his
work into his 90th year.
On Friday, at the age of 91, Saul
Kagan died. He was a humble man
who never sought glory for himself, a
true hero of the Jewish people, and a
Jewish leader par excellence. (See the
obituary on page 41.)
To him, the work was a mission, not
a job, and he was single-minded in
its pursuit. For that, government offi-
cials in the United States, Israel, and
Germany, among others, are praising
him. For the wisdom he always freely
shared with them, Jewish organiza-
tions and their leaders are mourning
what they correctly call a great loss for
the Jewish people. For what he lov-
ingly fought for and gained for them
more than $76 billion in reparations
and other monies; thousands of hospi-
tal beds, and in-home medical care for
indigent and elderly survivors around
the world; psychological and psychiat-
ric care; meals delivered to the home-
bound, and so much more survivors
grieve at the loss of their champion.
His influence will continue to be felt
for years to come. The negotiations
he helped create and steward, the
historical precedents he helped estab-
lish that have served as the paradigm
in all cases of genocide ever since any-
where in the world, the lines of com-
munication he helped open between
victim and perpetrator, are his legacy,
and that legacy will continue to pay
dividends even as they eke out a little
more justice with each new agreement.
Mr. Kagan was not without his crit-
ics, but he never let the criticism dis-
tract him from his mission, just as he
never let his successes feed his ego.
While he often agreed with his critics
that more should be done, he knew
he had to focus only on what could be
done. Time and again, he pushed the
envelope, usually with great success.
If there is a world to come, Mr.
Kagan arrived there to be greeted by
his two partners in his noble task
Nahum Goldmann, the conferences
first president, and Rabbi Israel Miller,
who followed him. His achievements
are theirs as well, although Mr. Kagan
might argue that the credit is theirs,
not his.
May the memory of Saul Kagan be a
blessing for us all, and may the mem-
ory of his humility and grace guide all
who would be our leaders.
We must not
stand idly by
Tragedy and terror
at the Garden State Plaza
T
he tragic headlines about a gunman enter-
ing the Garden State Plaza, terrorizing hun-
dreds of people, and taking his own life on
November 4, Election Day eve in New Jersey,
reminded me of the ongoing crimes of silence that we
the people continue to commit.
Until there is real gun control, and until we treat
mental illness and addiction as the diseases they
are, attacks such as the one last week, just two miles
from my home, and the attacks such as the one at the
Los Angeles airport the week before, will continue
to foment fear, anger, and frustration in our society.
Knowing that shooters are loose in public places, fir-
ing powerful weapons, makes me and most average
Americans feel powerless.
Yet in this post 9/11 world,
as I write this op-ed on
November 10, the 75th
anniversary of Kristall-
nacht, I find myself com-
pelled to affirm that we
are only powerless if we
stand idly by and excuse
our silence in the face of a
rising incidence of gun vio-
lence. I therefore applaud
the efforts of my colleagues
Rabbi Jordan Millstein
and Rabbi Joel Mosbacher.
They are taking the lead in our community, build-
ing a strong interfaith coalition aimed at demanding
that our newly re-elected governor and legislature
take action to strengthen gun control laws and their
enforcement in our state.
However, gun control is only half of the story of
the tragedy at the Garden State Plaza and its parallels
around our nation. The front page story in the Record
on November points out that mental illness and addic-
tion are neglected areas in American healthcare.
My brother, Rabbi Mark Borovitz, is an alcoholic who
will celebrate 23 years of sobriety next month. Today
he and his wife, Harriet Rossetto, co-lead Beit Tshu-
vah, a residential treatment center in Los Angeles that
uses Judaism, 12-step programs, and psychotherapy to
Neal Borovitz is rabbi emeritus at Temple Avodat
Shalom in River Edge.
Rabbi Neal
Borovitz
22 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-22*
Risky business
The time to oppose [a deal with Iran] is when you see
what it is, Secretary of State John Kerry said this week in
Abu Dhabi, adding that there is no deal yet, so no criticism
is warranted.
Mr. Kerry is wrong. While the details of the agreement
being negotiated are not yet known, its outlines are. Iran
insists that it needs nuclear energy in order to improve
the lives of its people and must be allowed to continue its
nuclear program. The West would be allowed to inspect,
but all too often, as we have seen, agreements for inspec-
tion quickly become allowances for deception.
Iran has done nothing to warrant anyones trust. The
only deal the West should accept is a complete disman-
tling of Irans nuclear program, under the Wests own
watchful eye. Anything else puts the region and the
world at risk.
Responding to disaster
One of the most powerful storms ever recorded has
taken thousands of lives, and destroyed vast areas of
the Philippines. As is almost always the case, Israel
wasted no time in mobilizing rescue teams, trauma
specialists, and other medical professionals, and sent
them to the devastated area. The Jewish world was not
far behind in gearing up, as well.
In our area, the Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jersey is coordinating the effort. The donations it
receives will be channeled to Philippine relief through
the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. To
make a donation online and we strongly urge you
to do so go to www.jfnnnj.org/typhoon or call (201)
820-3937.
Memories of Mitzvah Day
O
n Sunday Novem-
ber 3, I had the
pleasure of visiting
Mitzvah Day sites
from northern Passaic across
Bergen to northern Hudson
counties, watching our com-
munity build bridges and car-
ing for each other.
A 10-year-old boy from Tem-
ple Beth Tikvah pushes an
87-year-old womans wheel-
chair at Cliftons Daughters of
Miriam Center/ Gallen Institutes carnival.
Theyre playing a game of mock bowl-
ing, and they both laugh loudly when the
bowling ball knocks over every pin. Good
job he says to her, with a soft pat on her
hand, and they go over to the prize table
Op-Ed
JS-23*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 23
We must not
stand idly by
Tragedy and terror
at the Garden State Plaza
T
he tragic headlines about a gunman enter-
ing the Garden State Plaza, terrorizing hun-
dreds of people, and taking his own life on
November 4, Election Day eve in New Jersey,
reminded me of the ongoing crimes of silence that we
the people continue to commit.
Until there is real gun control, and until we treat
mental illness and addiction as the diseases they
are, attacks such as the one last week, just two miles
from my home, and the attacks such as the one at the
Los Angeles airport the week before, will continue
to foment fear, anger, and frustration in our society.
Knowing that shooters are loose in public places, fir-
ing powerful weapons, makes me and most average
Americans feel powerless.
Yet in this post 9/11 world,
as I write this op-ed on
November 10, the 75th
anniversary of Kristall-
nacht, I find myself com-
pelled to affirm that we
are only powerless if we
stand idly by and excuse
our silence in the face of a
rising incidence of gun vio-
lence. I therefore applaud
the efforts of my colleagues
Rabbi Jordan Millstein
and Rabbi Joel Mosbacher.
They are taking the lead in our community, build-
ing a strong interfaith coalition aimed at demanding
that our newly re-elected governor and legislature
take action to strengthen gun control laws and their
enforcement in our state.
However, gun control is only half of the story of
the tragedy at the Garden State Plaza and its parallels
around our nation. The front page story in the Record
on November points out that mental illness and addic-
tion are neglected areas in American healthcare.
My brother, Rabbi Mark Borovitz, is an alcoholic who
will celebrate 23 years of sobriety next month. Today
he and his wife, Harriet Rossetto, co-lead Beit Tshu-
vah, a residential treatment center in Los Angeles that
uses Judaism, 12-step programs, and psychotherapy to
treat addictions. In her new book, Sacred
Houskeeping, Harriet details how Jewish
communal support let Beit Tshuvah grow
in 26 years from a homeless shelter for
Jews coming out of jail to a 200-bed resi-
dential treatment center with a very sub-
stantial waiting list.
When I first came to our community in
1988, my brother was in jail. I never spoke
or wrote about him. Like so many of us,
I was embarrassed by his actions and
angered by his inability to just get himself
straight. Today, I know that my sin was
the sin of silence. Marks recovery and the
holy work to which he and his wife have
dedicated their lives stand as an example
that if we do not stand idly by, we the peo-
ple, working together, can help those who
suffer from the diseases of addiction and
mental illness.
The first step in doing so is to acknowl-
edge that it is similar to many chronic
physical diseases in that treatment might
not cure the condition, but it certainly can
help create a state of remission.
But treating drug and alcohol disease
and mental illness is a low priority in our
society. The available and affordable ave-
nues of treatment fail to meet the needs. In
Bergen County, the only in-patient psychi-
atric treatment center for adolescents with
fewer than 20 beds is at Bergen Regional
Medical Center. That is also the countys
only designated detoxification facility, and
its 54 beds always are full.
We the people can do better.
Therefore I ask all of you to join me in
calling upon our newly elected state and
local officials to lead the way by enacting
and enforcing stricter gun control laws
and by making treatment for addiction
and mental diseases both more available
and more acceptable in our society.
Let us all recognize that on November 4,
Richard Shoop, the mall shooter, was not
only a perpetrator of violence but also a
victim of our societal neglect.
Time for Torah
The open Orthodox revolution
I
am a third-year student at what
recently seems to be the most
talked about rabbinical school on
the planet. My rabbinic education
is spent learning Talmud, halachah, and
pastoral counseling. I intern at a local
Orthodox synagogue and secular college
campus, where I teach the weekly Torah
portion and meet with undergraduate stu-
dents. My wife and I host regular Shabbat
gatherings at our home. Radical, no?
I wonder what is so revolutionary
about those of us at Yeshivat Chovevei
Torah, who volunteer at a local assisted
living facility singing Yiddish songs to the
elderly during our lunch breaks. Is it our
hashkafa, our ideological values?
In the fourth chapter of Pirkei Avot
Ethics of Our Fathers, the Mishna
teaches: Ben Zomeh would say: who is
wise? One who learns from all. As it says
in Psalm 119, I have gained understand-
ing from all my teachers. We at Yeshi-
vat Chovevei Torah welcome new ideas.
We come from a tradition that believes
in Bamidbar Rabbahs claim of the 70
faces of the Torah, and in Eruvin, in the
Gemara, which teaches these and these
are the words of the Living God.
Love and fear of God, commitment to
halachah, respect for our fellow human
beings, the place of doubt within religion,
creativity and open thinking, inclusive-
ness to women, to those in the LBGQT
community, and to others marginalized
by Orthodoxy and society all have a place
in our community. If maintaining a wel-
coming tent, as our forefather Avraham
Avinu did thousands of years ago, indeed
is radical, then I guess that we are too.
Our Torah calls on us.
Kdoshim tihiyu, it tells us.
Be holy. Our Talmud cries
to us: Kol yisrael arevin zeh
lazeh Jews are respon-
sible for one another. The
Mishna declares, Judge
people favorably, and in
Baba Batra 60b the Gemara
reminds us: First make
yourself presentable, then
focus on others.
Each of our communities
has its strengths and areas of growth. As
a collective Jewish people, we must sup-
port each other in our successes and fail-
ures. Together, we must feel outrage and
horror and seek justice when we encoun-
ter sexual abuse within our communities.
Together, we must mourn and grieve
over the tragic suicide of the 33-year-old
ostracized Deb Tambor, who took her
own life after leaving the charedi com-
munity. And we must celebrate and learn
together as well.
So join our revolution of open-mind-
edness, learning, and kindness. All are
welcome to enter our beit midrash, our
vibrant learning home, and hear our reb-
beyim, sensitive and passionate scholars
of Torah, and decide for yourself.
Come meet my fellow students and
friends, who are committing their lives
to Torah and serving our Jewish commu-
nity in creative and dynamic ways. And
let not the left or the right be afraid of a
Yiddishkeit that promotes learning over
dogma and partnership over power.
A couple of weeks ago, more than 500
people gathered to mark the installation
of Rabbi Asher Lopatin as
the new president of my
school. Some of the most
prominent leaders of our
time from the Reconstruc-
tionist, Reform, Renewal,
Conservative, and Ortho-
dox communities were
in attendance. When the
Forward focuses more
on Rabbi Asher Lopatins
less-than-warm welcome
in certain sectors than it
does on the historic and hopeful gather-
ing of our Jewish people, it paints a sad
perspective on a most noteworthy pic-
ture. The president of our institution is
trying to engage seriously and honestly
with those to the left and the right.
Some call that nave. I see it as brave.
There is no heavenly voice descend-
ing upon our world, as there is in the
Gemara, to dictate the halachah or the
will of God. Lhavdil to the contrary
we have the Pew study. If this contested
and talked-about research analysis has
anything to show us, its that we are a
fractured bunch. We have plenty of work
to do within each of our communities
and countless bridges to build.
And so I pray: please, let us learn Torah
together, disagree lovingly for the sake of
Heaven, and serve God truthfully.
Avram Mlotek, a rabbinical student at
Yeshivat Chovevei Torah, grew up in
Teaneck, where his parents still live. Last
year, New Yorks Jewish Week named
him to its 36 Under 36 list, calling him a
leading innovator in Jewish life today.
Avram
Mlotek
Memories of Mitzvah Day
O
n Sunday Novem-
ber 3, I had the
pleasure of visiting
Mitzvah Day sites
from northern Passaic across
Bergen to northern Hudson
counties, watching our com-
munity build bridges and car-
ing for each other.
A 10-year-old boy from Tem-
ple Beth Tikvah pushes an
87-year-old womans wheel-
chair at Cliftons Daughters of
Miriam Center/ Gallen Institutes carnival.
Theyre playing a game of mock bowl-
ing, and they both laugh loudly when the
bowling ball knocks over every pin. Good
job he says to her, with a soft pat on her
hand, and they go over to the prize table
together. Young and old
are together here, and at
the Jewish Home at Rock-
leigh, at the Federation
Apartments in Paterson, at
the Lillian Booth Actors
Home in Englewood, and
at Buckingham@Norwood.
The shelves are bare
at CUMAC, the Center of
United Methodist Aid to
the Community in Pat-
erson. BBYO girls from
Wayne arrive. Lets fill them up, they say.
Volunteers return to this food bank year
after year on Mitzvah Day. Each year, they
look around, and they remember. We
painted that bathroom We organized
the thrift shop... We make a difference
every time we are here.
Twelve-year-old Mollie wondered how
she could make a difference. What can
a kid do? Then she had an idea. Let me
collect books as a bat mitzvah project.
And there she was in the lobby of Temple
Israel in Ridgewood with stacks of books
all around her, her eyes shining with pride.
This is how I can make a difference.
The gym at the Fair Lawn Jewish Cen-
ter is humming. Women sit together, knit-
ting colorful works of art created to warm
others, people who feel alone, desperate,
hopeless. These women understand that
each one of us can do something, but
together we can do everything.
Do you think the soldiers would prefer
the chocolate chip or cranberry granola
bars? White socks or black? Sorting,
packing, labeling, collecting. I care We
care We appreciate you. Boxes sent off to
our soldiers overseas.
And across the room are members of the
Pomegranate Guild, whose mission is to
keep needlework traditions alive by shar-
ing the knowledge and techniques needed
to create handcrafted items intended for
both Jewish ritual and cultural use. They
are busy. Children make blankets and stuff
bears for other children and the elderly,
both here and in Israel. Mom, Mom, did I
stuff this bear good for the little kids? The
site is dedicated to Edythe Fried, a volun-
teer in our community, who will be missed.
The trees we plant bear fruit even when
we are gone. What a wonderful thing!
A moment of silence at Barnert Temple
Sarita
Gross
SEE MEMORIES PAGE24
Op-Ed
24 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-24*
in Franklin Lakes. Remembering Kathie
Williams, another special woman in our
community who was lost too soon. Sort-
ing, folding, and packing baby clothing
to send to Israel; Yachad, the National
Council for Disabilities is helping out.
Bonim Builders volunteers renovate,
retrofit, landscape, or do fix-it jobs for
frail seniors, the disabled, and the low-
income populations of northern New Jer-
sey. They painted and freshened up the
walls of the Family Promises day center,
where homeless families and their chil-
dren find a place to call home, if only
temporarily, finding kindness among
chaos.
And Tomorrows Childrens Institutes
hallways are filled. Young people from
the Orthodox youth group NCSY have
partnered with us here for many years.
Children battling cancer and their par-
ents and siblings must live with it every
day, but today is the Mitzvah Day car-
nival, filled with cotton candy, games
and prizes, edible art, and hope. Hope.
Everywhere there is hope. Especially
on the small pale drawn faces. Anyone
want some pizza? Hope.
I end my day in the kitchen at the
County of Bergen Housing, Health, and
Human Services Center in Hackensack.
The line stretches out the door and into
the cold night air. Congregation Bnai
Israel of Emerson is serving food to the
hungry and needy hot meatballs and
pasta, salad, fresh bread, dessert. Peo-
ples needs are great, but tonight we
take comfort that their stomachs are full.
We feel good about the work we have
done but we are also overwhelmed and
inspired by how much more there is still
to do.
Mitzvah Day 2013: 16 years, 44 sites,
5 blood drives, 42 organizations (5 new
this year) collecting items for 27 drives
(6 new), 1000+ volunteers. Next year we
will be back Mitzvah Day 2014!
Sarita Gross of Wayne is a longtime chair
of Mitzvah Day.
Memories
FROM PAGE 23
In its time of need, repaying a debt to the Philippines
A
s the extent of the catastrophic
damage and tragic death toll
continues to grow in the Phil-
ippines, a particularly heroic
piece of history should be recalled by the
global Jewish community, which owes a
debt to the island nation.
Seven decades ago, a Philippine presi-
dent, a globetrotting Jewish family named
Frieder, and the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, my organization,
helped save the lives of more than 1,000
Jews who otherwise almost certainly
would have died in the Holocaust.
Thanks to their initiative, these refugees
were issued rare travel certificates to the
Asian country to work as skilled laborers
in the Frieders cigar factories in Manila
though in reality, few of them had any
experience in the industry whatsoever.
The audacious operation, seemingly
extraordinary today, is the subject of the
recently released documentary Rescue in
the Philippines.
At the time that Manuel Quezon admit-
ted Jews to his country, the Filipino
president made what seems today like a
remarkably prescient statement.
The people of the Philippines will have
in the future every reason to
be glad that when the time
of need came, their country
was willing to extend a wel-
come hand, he was quoted
as saying.
We recalled this moment
in history last week when we
began reading reports and
watching coverage of the
impending super typhoon
Haiyan the strongest storm
in recorded history as it
barreled toward the Philip-
pines. In anticipation of the impact, JDCs
disaster relief and development staff
assembled a contingency plan that went
into full effect once news emerged of the
death and destruction wrought by Haiyan.
As part of our ongoing response to
the typhoon, JDC will ship critically
important food, shelter, and hygiene
and medical supplies as well as ensure
the provision of water and
sanitation items and shelter
support through its part-
ners, the Afya Foundation
and Catholic Relief Services.
JDCs advance team of disas-
ter relief and development
experts will head to the Phil-
ippines later this week to
assess damage and needs
while consulting with our
local/international partners
and the Filipino Jewish com-
munity to ensure maximum impact for
storm survivors.
Locally, funds donated for storm relief
through the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey go to the JDC. (To donate, go
to the federations website, www.jfnnj.org.
The link for donations is at the top of the
homepage.)
About 30 percent of funds raised will
be dedicated to immediate relief for food,
water, shelter, medical supplies, and care,
unless the emergency phase lasts lon-
ger because of expanding critical needs
among survivors. The rest will be invested
in sustainable local projects that will
emerge in the long, slow process of reha-
bilitation that is sure to come.
Its a formula JDC, which is celebrating
its centennial this year, has developed over
decades of efforts in the field, from helping
Ukrainians starved by the Bolsheviks in the
1920s to rehabilitating survivors of geno-
cide in Rwanda. And on behalf of the North
American Jewish community and with its
support, we have over the past decade
delivered tens of millions of dollars in aid to
victims of natural and manmade disasters
in Southeast Asia, Haiti and Japan.
These efforts now come full circle, espe-
cially for one member of our team arriving
in the Philippines later this week, Danny
Pins. In addition to being one of our devel-
opment and employment experts, Pins
mother and grandparents were among the
German Jews who fled to the Philippines
to seek safe haven in 1938. His posting, in
many ways a homecoming despite previ-
ous trips to the country, is highly symbolic.
Today, in the wake of one of the worst
storms in history, with perhaps more
than 10,000 dead and hundreds of thou-
sands homeless, we are fully committed
to fulfilling President Quezons prophecy
and returning the favor to the Filipino
people. Not just because we are Jews, the
heirs to this nations life-saving actions,
but because we firmly believe in mutual
responsibility and the idea that each indi-
vidual life is valuable beyond measure.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Alan H. Gill is the CEO of the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Committee.
Alan H.
Gill
In the Philippines, Alex Frieder, seated, is surrounded by the Jewish refugees whom he and his brothers helped escape
from Nazi Europe. 3 ROADS COMMUNICATIONS
Letters
JS-25
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How kosher
is glatt?
I would like to open a forum here for
a discussion on the concept of glatt
kosher meat. A common misconcep-
tion is that the term glatt refers to a
higher standard. In fact, glatt means
smooth in Yiddish, and refers to the
absence of adhesions on an animals
lungs. If there are no adhesions the
meat is glatt kosher. If there are, the
meat is still perfectly kosher ( at least
for Ashkenazim), it is just not glatt.
For the past few decades the Ortho-
dox community has seemingly taken
upon itself the chumra , or stringency,
of eating only glatt kosher meat. This
has resulted in higher prices for glatt
kosher meat and the apparent disap-
pearance of all other kosher but not
glatt meat. It is almost impossible today
to purchase red meat that is not glatt,
from butchers, restaurants, or markets.
This brings up several important
issues. From just about all sources it
appears that only about 1 in 20 animals
slaughtered actually are glatt. That is 5
percent. This means that it is virtually
impossible for all but a small percent-
age of meat that is sold as glatt to actu-
ally be glatt. Its been said that there are
not enough glatt kosher cows slaugh-
tered in the entire world to account
for the meat sold as glatt in Brooklyn
alone.
So, question #1: How do we account
for the vast amount of meat that is mar-
keted as glatt but obviously cannot be
glatt?
Question #2: What happens to 95
percent of the meat that is not glatt but
nevertheless is kosher? Since it is all but
impossible to purchase this meat, and
it is unlikely that it is discarded or sold
as treif, or unkosher, it seems to have
just disappeared.
Question #3: Why has the Orthodox
community taken this stringency upon
itself, since it has resulted in higher
prices, divisiveness, and apparent mis-
chief, if not outright fraud? If someone
eats only glatt kosher rather than ordi-
nary kosher, does God give that person
some kind of extra credit? Does it cause
some higher level of kedusha (holiness)
or a better spirituality or a better result
in the afterlife? Does it make you a bet-
ter person or a better Jew?
Is it worth the communal problems
that have resulted, including not
being able to eat in the home of some-
one who doesnt eat only glatt, or the
higher prices foisted upon the commu-
nity, causing some to give up keeping
kosher, or the mysterious goings-on in
the kosher meat business?
I would love somehow to be able to
purchase plain ol kosher meat and to
serve it to my fellow Orthodox com-
patriots, and to see a rational, unemo-
tional discussion of these issues.
Jeff Bernstein
New Milford
Discretion,
not passion
Dr. Alex Sinclair is undoubtedly cor-
rect that there are things that diaspora
Jewry and Israeli Jewry can learn from
each other (Space for critiques of
Israel opens essential two-way street,
November 8). But in the wake of the
Pew Research survey report on Ameri-
can Jews, perhaps Dr. Sinclair could
have been more modest in his assess-
ment of his own community when he
writes that Israeli Jews need to be
exposed to the remarkable, inspiring
experience of American Judaism.
Dr. Sinclairs lack of humility is even
more disturbing when it comes to his
view that diaspora Jews ought to be
encouraged to develop a passion-
ate, angry, caring critique of Israels
attitude in peace talks with the Pal-
estinians. Yes, we have First Amend-
ment rights to express our views. I am
not advocating censorship of Jews, or
anyone else, who criticize Israeli for-
eign policy and security policy. That is
their right. But our sisters and brothers
in the land of Israel live in a perilous
region during an extremely threaten-
ing time. Their lives are on the line. It
is easy for us to criticize, but they must
live or die with the consequences
of their decisions. Their children, not
ours, must go into battle to defend
their lives. Given these obvious facts,
it would be better for those of us who
truly care to exhibit more discretion
and more modesty before we decide
to vocally critique Israels security and
foreign policy decisions with passion or
anger.
Harold Weissler
Teaneck
Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Cover Story
26 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-26
John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th
president of the United States, was
assassinated on November 22, 1963.
Although his presidency was too
short and his legacy too truncated to be
assessed dispassionately, the emotions
his youth and good looks evoked, and
the horror and sense of tragedy that his
murder created, made a world that had
seemed newly solid in its postwar clarity
unsafe and upside down once again.
American Jews, like all Americans,
mourned the death both of JFK and of
the possibilities he seemed to embody.
Here, we look back 50 years to JFKs
death, bring you some contemporary
reports, from both here in the Jewish
Standard and the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, and then update you with a look
at Jack Rubys family, new consideration
on whether we should say Kaddish
for JFK, and then an introduction to a
history aficionado.
John Fitzgerald
Kennedy, zl
FROM THE ARCHIVES OF JTA, THE JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY
Kennedy Displayed Deep Interest
in Problems Involving Jewry
WASHINGTON, Nov. 26, 1963 Few
heads of state anywhere have ever been
so accessible to their Jewish fellow-cit-
izens and so informed and concerned
over problems involving the Jewish
people as was John F. Kennedy, thirty-
fifth President of the United States.
Presi dent Kennedy sought to
surround himself with the most able, the
most talented and the most informed
aides and advisors. He appointed
two Jews to his first Cabinetthe first
time that two Jews had ever served
simultaneously in the Cabinet. There
were Jewish members on his personal
White House staff and through them,
as well as through other channels, the
President kept informed on Jewish and
Israeli developments. A member of
his staff disclosed publicly that Jewish
Telegraphic Agency news dispatches
were frequently studied by the
President in his desire to be informed
of all facets of a given situation.
Mr. Kennedys right as a Roman
Catholic to serve in the presidency was
strongly backed by the American Jewish
community. He affirmatively asserted
minority rights. Before the American
Society of Newspaper Editors, he
asked; Are we going to admit to the
world that a Jew can be elected Mayor
of Dublin, a Protestant can be chosen
Foreign Minister of France, a Moslem
can serve in the Israeli Parliamentbut
a Catholic cannot be President of the
United States.
In line with his desire to appoint
officials on a basis of merit, without
regard to their religion, Mr. Kennedy
named a considerable number of Jews
to high office. Among the best known
are Arthur Goldberg, first named as
Secretary of Labor and now serving
as a Supreme Court Justice, and Sen.
Abraham Ribicoff, of Connecticut,
who served as Secretary of Health,
Education, and Welfare.
Was to appear at
Jewish dinner in
New York next week
Consistent with his longtime interest
in a fair immigration policy, Mr. Ken-
nedy sought revision of the McCarran-
Walter Immigration Act and termina-
tion of the discriminatory national
origins quota system.
Mr. Kennedy received many awards
and honors from Jewish organizations.
Perhaps the best publicized occasion
occurred when the anti-Defamation
League of Bnai Brith presented him
with Americas Democratic Legacy
Award on a nationally televised
program. He then asserted the role of
immigrants of all faiths and origins in
building America.
More recently, he sent a warm
greeting to Philip M. Klutznick, who
had served him as Ambassador to
the United Nations. This was on
the occasion of a Chicago dinner
honoring Mr. Klutznick, former
national Bnai Brith president, on
the 120th anniversary of Bnai Brith.
The President wanted to attend the
affair personally but could not and
asked his brother, Attorney General
Robert Kennedy, to represent him in
Chicago. Mr. Klutznick was one of the
Presidents close friends.
President Kennedy was to have been
the guest of honor at the 18th annual
dinner of the American Committee for
the Weizmann Institute of Science in
New York on December 5.
Only a day before his assassination,
the President displayed pleasure with
Jewish efforts on behalf of civil rights
and racial integration. In his last
known message on this subject, Mr.
Kennedy told Rabbi Oscar Groner,
assistant national director of the Bnai
Brith Hillel Foundations, that he felt
a national conference of college youth
to implement civil rights ideals was
inspiring and useful. He expressed
hope that the rabbis experiences
would advance the goals of equal
treatment and equal opportunity for
all Americans. Rabbi Groner had
helped organize the interfaith student
leadership conference on religion and
race held in Washington.
Watched Soviet
acts against Jews;
denounced anti-Semitism
It was for the positions he had held and
the measures he had taken on interna-
tional questions of concern to Jewry,
including matters affecting Israel, that
President Kennedy was best known to
most Jews.
Mr. Kennedy favored American
ratification of the United Nations
Convention on Genocide and was
seeking action by the Senate.
In one of his last meetings with
Jewish leaders, Mr. Kennedy told a
delegation representing the Jewish
War Veterans of the U.S.A. that he
was troubled about the rise of Soviet
anti-Semitism. Shortly thereafter, he
inserted a condemnation of the Soviet
The President
displayed
pleasure with
Jewish efforts
on behalf of
civil rights
and racial
integration.
SEE JEWRY PAGE 29
Cover Story
JS-27
Clippings from the Jewish
Standard 50 years ago.
Cover Story
28 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-28
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STEVE NORTH
W
e were sharing a pastrami sandwich
and pickles at the Los Angeles land-
mark Canters Deli. I was 24. She
was nearly 50 years older, with a
piercing voice as loud as her flaming red wig.
Her name was Eva Rubenstein Grant, and she was
a little-known nightclub manager on the morning of
November 24, 1963, when her brother, Jack Ruby,
left the apartment they shared in Dallas and blasted
his way into infamy by fatally shooting Lee Harvey
Oswald. It was historys first live televised murder.
Eva worked and lived with Jack Ruby, and spent
the rest of her life defending him against various
allegations.
I swear on my life, my brother was not three
things, Eva told me, her voice rising. He was not a
homosexual. He was not with the communists. And
certainly not with the underworld.
I listened with fascination to Eva that day in 1977.
(Years later she was perfectly portrayed in a TV
movie by Doris Roberts, the high-decibel mom on
Everybody Loves Raymond. She died in November
1992 at 83.)
But Mrs. Grant, I said. Jack had ties to the
syndicate, as you call it, as far back as your
childhood in Chicago.
Look, she replied in exasperation. We would
see these people in the neighborhood and wed ask, Hows
your mother? Hows your sister? But that doesnt mean Jack
was connected with them. I grew up with a bunch of boys
who turned out to be no good. Who knew?
It was a quintessentially Jewish response, albeit delivered
in Evas hybrid Chicago-Dallas accent. And the Rubensteins
were a staunchly Jewish family, a fact that may have played a
role in Rubys killing of Oswald, President John F. Kennedys
assassin.
Ruby was born Jacob Rubenstein in 1911 to a family of
Who was Jack Ruby?
Long-time journalist recalls meetings with JFK assassins family
Polish-Jewish immigrants. His parents, Joseph and
Fannie, were a volatile couple. Joseph was a mean
and abusive drunk. Fannie suffered from mental
illness and at one point was committed to an Illinois
state hospital.
Their eight children had their fair share of
problems, both before and after the parents
separated. Ruby and three of his siblings were made
wards of Chicagos Jewish Home Finding Society
and placed in foster homes for periods of time
during the 1920s.
Despi te thei r dysfuncti onal worl d, the
Rubensteins kept a kosher home, observed the
holidays, sent their boys to Hebrew school, and
attended synagogue.
Ruby idolized Chicago Jewish boxing champion
Barney Ross, who later described him as a well-
behaved youth. But others recall Rubys hair-
trigger temper and street brawls, especially when
taunted by the non-Jews in his mixed Jewish-Italian
neighborhood. Rubys biographer, Seth Kantor,
relates that as an Air Force private, Ruby once beat
up a sergeant who called him a Jew bastard.
After World War II, Eva moved to Dallas and
began managing nightclubs and restaurants. Ruby
received an honorable discharge from the Air Force
in 1946 and joined Eva a year later in Texas. It was
in 1947 that Jack, along with brothers Earl and Sam,
legally changed his last name to Ruby.
As a young man in Chicago, Ruby reportedly ran
errands for Al Capones cousin and henchman, Frank
Nitti. A former Dallas sheriff once testified that Chicago
mafia figures told him that Ruby was sent to Texas to
Jack Ruby guns down Lee Harvey Oswald in a Dallas police
station on November 24, 1963.
SEE RUBY PAGE 39
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enforced closure of synagogues into a speech before the
United Nations.
The President was also responsive earlier in his
Administration to reports of anti-Semitism abroad. He
authorized the Alliance for Progress and Agency for
International Development to make known his displeasure
of anti-Jewish terrorism in Argentina and Uruguay.
Assured aid to Israel; sought
to bring peace to Middle East
President Kennedy was deeply concerned over the
future of Israel and the question of peace in the Middle
East. Although their points of view sometimes differed
from those of the President on specific policies, Israe-
lis and their supporters here universally [text is missing
from original dispatch.]
Mr. Kennedys interest in Israel went back many
years to his younger days when he visited the land,
then mandated Palestine. By his actions as a Senator
and a Presidential candidate, even before his election,
Mr. Kennedy made clear his support of Israel. He said
we will never turn our back on our steadfast friends in
Israel, whose adherence to the democratic way must be
admired by all friends of freedom.
Revealing his thinking in 1960, Mr. Kennedy said the
United States has helped Israelbut we have also been
the beneficiarythe strongest army in the Middle East
is not a pawn to be lightly cast aside.
In the view he expressed then, it twists reality to
suggest that Israel is to blame for Near Eastern tensions.
He said that even by the coldest calculations, the
removal of Israel would not alter the basic crisis in that
area although Arab States are generally united in
opposition to Israel, their political unities have not risen
above this essentially negative position.
Mr. Kennedy contrasted Israels progress with
Arab decadence, stating that the United States can
itself profitably study what has been done in Israel
particularly in the fields of education and science.
Mr. Kennedy viewed American-Israel relations as
a subject of such close personal interest that he did
not rely exclusively on the Department of State, He
designated a trusted White House aide, Deputy Special
Counsel Myer Feldman, to maintain a daily watch on
Israeli developments.
Ordered sale of anti-aircraft
missiles to Israel on liberal terms
The Kennedy Administration found itself frequently
in the situation described by Maimonides, dispens-
ing a higher degree of charitythe anonymous variety.
The White House could not take public credit for many
pro-Israel or pro-Jewish actions, disclosure of which
might have provoked Arab attacks and complicated
American diplomacy in Arab capitals.
President Kennedy preferred to keep the reins on
Middle East policy-making as close as he could to the
White House. He overrode State Department objections
and ordered the sale of Hawk anti-aircraft missiles,
on liberal terms, to Israel. He took note of the Egyptian
build-up with Soviet weapons and publicly deplored the
role of ex-Nazi rocket scientists in Egypt.
Following a memorable meeting in New York on May
30, 1961, with former Israeli Premier David Ben-Gurion,
Mr. Kennedy told his personal confidantes how deeply
impressed he was by Ben-Gurion and the Israeli cause.
Mr. Ben-Gurion on that occasion had stressed the danger
of President Nassers ambitions, the rocket menace and
the problem of continued Arab intransigence.
Mr. Kennedy personally intervened with King Saud of
Saudi Arabia during the latters visit to Washington in the
Spring of 1962. The President told the King that the anti-
Jewish ban imposed by Saudi Arabia was an American
domestic matter in that it discriminated unfairly against
a section of American citizenry. It was not just a foreign
policy issue linked with Israel when American citizens
were banned from a friendly nation merely because of
their religion, in Mr. Kennedys view.
This led to a firm policy this year resulting in the
stationing in Saudi Arabia of new American armed force
units which included Americans of Jewish faith. Pressures
were also brought to bear to get certain Arab states to lift
restrictions against visa applicants of Jewish faith.
Under Mr. Kennedys direction, loans to Israel were
provided by the United States Government at low
interest to help Israels economic consolidation.
Although some American diplomats urged the
President to invite President Nasser of the United Arab
Republic to Washington when the latter attended the
United Nations sessions in New York, the White House
view was that such honor to Nasser was inappropriate.
He was never invited. -JTA WIRE SERVICE ARCHIVES
Jewry
FROM PAGE 26
Jews in Washington
Hold Memorial
for Kennedy;
Five Rabbis Officiate
WASHINGTON, Nov. 26, 1963 The two Govern-
ment officials who were President Kennedys clos-
est associates of Jewish faith, during his Adminis-
tration, tonight eulogized the late President at a
Jewish community memorial, held at the Wash-
ington Hebrew Congregation. The speakers were
Associate Justice Arthur J. Goldberg, of the United
States Supreme Court, and Myer Feldman, dep-
uty special counsel to the President, of the White
House staff.
The meeting was held under the auspices of
the Greater Washington rabbinate and the Jewish
Community Council of Greater Washington. Five
rabbis participated in the memorial. They were
Rabbi Norman Gerstenfeld, spiritual leader of
the congregation; Rabbi Lewis A. Weintraub,
president of the Washington Board of Rabbis;
Rabbi Eugene J. Lipman spiritual leader of Temple
Sinai; Rabbi Stanley Rabinowitz, spiritual leader
of Adas Israel Synagogue; and Rabbi Martin
S. Halpern, vice-president of the Washington
Board of Rabbis. Prayers were chanted by Cantor
Raphael Edgar. JTA WIRE SERVICE ARCHIVES
Gary Glaser, Paramus
Mr. Glaser was only 8
years old. He was in third
grade at PS 64 in the
Bronx.
We were in the audi-
torium for an assembly,
he said. I remember all
of the teachers started
to cry. I heard someone
say that the president
had been killed. You have
a different perspective as a child, but I do re-
member watching it all on TV. You could never
forget what happened.
Cover Story
30 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-30
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Should we say Kaddish for JFK?
RABBI DR. TZVEE ZAHAVY
T
his year, the
50th anniver-
sar y of t he
assassination of
John Fitzgerald Kennedy,
I want to recant my opin-
ions and actions at JFKs
30th yahrzeit.
I should have said
Kaddish for JFK then. I
didnt. I was wrong. I will
do it this year.
Yes, we should say Kaddish for JFK.
Here is what I wrote in 1993:
It was bright and sunny in Washington
on November 22, 1993, 30 years after the
assassination of John F. Kennedy. I was
attending an annual conference of more
than 7000 professors of religion and
biblical studies in the capital city. What
a shame, I thought, that there was no
formal recognition of the anniversary
of the death of this leader at this
conference. Here were gathered so many
experts in religion and ritual, and they
made no attempt to memorialize the day.
At a break between sessions of the
conference I headed directly for the
hotel entrance. A quick negotiation with
a taxi driver confirmed that for $15 to $20
and less than an hours time, I could get
out to Arlington National Cemetery, walk
up the path to JFKs gravesite, spend a
few minutes, and return to the learned
discourse of the meeting.
In the cab I wondered what I would
do when I stood at the memorial in front
of the eternal flame. It was JFKs yahrzeit,
the anniversary of his death. In Judaism,
members of the family recite the Kaddish
prayer for a deceased relative each year
on the specified day.
But Kennedy was not Jewish and
not my relative. I could not see myself
reciting a mourners prayer for this hero.
What then? Id wait until I got to the site
and play it by ear.
What would I find when I got out
there? Would it be crowded? Would it be
emotional? Would it be a media circus?
In Beijing, China, people wait on line for
hours on an ordinary day just to pass in
front of Chairman Maos mausoleum.
What drew me out to Arlington?
I was 14 when JFK died, too young to
attain a deep appreciation of the man
and his politics. I was neither obsessed
with theories of his death, nor was I
particularly enamored by his biography.
Yet I felt a strong, almost mystical force
drawing me out to his monument on
that day.
The site was much smaller than I
had imagined, a few minutes walk up a
path from the entrance to the cemetery.
I passed groups of Japanese tourists on
the way up. They worship the dead,
I thought to myself. No wonder they
find the time to visit Arlington. When
I reached the place, I saw
that right in front of the
memorial flame a lone TV
journalist with a microphone
was interviewing a teenaged
boy wearing a baseball cap.
About 50 people surrounded
the site of the grave itself.
Young and old, men and
women, For a moment I
felt the presence of a fearless
man, the energy of a leader,
the spirit of a visionary. And
as I looked around I saw that nobody was
crying or somber. A few people looked
serene and some appeared satisfied.
I took a deep breath and sighed but
uttered no prayer, no Kaddish.
On the way back down the path,
I noticed the reporter still talking to
the boy in the cap. What deep insights
has this young man shared with the
viewing public? I wondered which of his
soundbites will make it on the air. And
the Japanese tourists were in no hurry
to get through the cemetery to the main
memorials. But I had lectures to attend
and promises to keep.
In the taxi I reflected on how
American public national expression
treads so lightly over history and
fashions such simple symbolism.
What a contrast between this brief
trip and my extraordinary experience
of the previous morning at the new
Holocaust museum. I might have written
here more about the depths of historical
memory and the complex symbolic
statements at that memorial site. I might
have recounted now that throngs of
somber folk inched through the exhibits
there, afraid to go too fast lest they miss a
detail of the enormous evil of the epoch
or blur a depiction of the unbelievable
suffering.
And I might have explained how I
could not cry or utter the Kaddish prayer
at that site either. Maybe the museum
was too public. Perhaps the exhibit was
too complete.
Out of the memories and symbols of
so many martyrs, victims and heroes in
our nations capital, I sat at this season
to write and reflect first about JFKs 30th
yahrzeit.
Well, I suppose I can confess that as
I sat on the plane, as we were leaving
Washington, I did say a few words in
an undertone: May your memory be a
blessing for us all, Mr. President.
Rabbi Dr. Tzvee Zahavy of Teaneck
was president of the Young Democrats
at Yeshiva College from 1968 to 1970;
he was ordained at Yeshiva University
and received his Ph.D. from Brown
University. He was an award-winning
professor at the university of Minnesota
from 1976 to 1995.
Cover Story
JS-31
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Should we say Kaddish for JFK?
find the time to visit Arlington. When
I reached the place, I saw
that right in front of the
memorial flame a lone TV
journalist with a microphone
was interviewing a teenaged
boy wearing a baseball cap.
About 50 people surrounded
the site of the grave itself.
Young and old, men and
women, For a moment I
felt the presence of a fearless
man, the energy of a leader,
the spirit of a visionary. And
as I looked around I saw that nobody was
crying or somber. A few people looked
serene and some appeared satisfied.
I took a deep breath and sighed but
uttered no prayer, no Kaddish.
On the way back down the path,
I noticed the reporter still talking to
the boy in the cap. What deep insights
has this young man shared with the
viewing public? I wondered which of his
soundbites will make it on the air. And
the Japanese tourists were in no hurry
to get through the cemetery to the main
memorials. But I had lectures to attend
and promises to keep.
In the taxi I reflected on how
American public national expression
treads so lightly over history and
fashions such simple symbolism.
What a contrast between this brief
trip and my extraordinary experience
of the previous morning at the new
Holocaust museum. I might have written
here more about the depths of historical
memory and the complex symbolic
statements at that memorial site. I might
have recounted now that throngs of
somber folk inched through the exhibits
there, afraid to go too fast lest they miss a
detail of the enormous evil of the epoch
or blur a depiction of the unbelievable
suffering.
And I might have explained how I
could not cry or utter the Kaddish prayer
at that site either. Maybe the museum
was too public. Perhaps the exhibit was
too complete.
Out of the memories and symbols of
so many martyrs, victims and heroes in
our nations capital, I sat at this season
to write and reflect first about JFKs 30th
yahrzeit.
Well, I suppose I can confess that as
I sat on the plane, as we were leaving
Washington, I did say a few words in
an undertone: May your memory be a
blessing for us all, Mr. President.
Rabbi Dr. Tzvee Zahavy of Teaneck
was president of the Young Democrats
at Yeshiva College from 1968 to 1970;
he was ordained at Yeshiva University
and received his Ph.D. from Brown
University. He was an award-winning
professor at the university of Minnesota
from 1976 to 1995.
Marietta Kalin, Hackensack
Ms. Kalin was com-
ing home from
Englewood Hospi-
tal from her obste-
tricians office with
wonderful news
of her pregnancy
when she arrived
at the busy inter-
section of Palisade
Avenue and Dean
Street. She saw other driv-
ers, some with mouths
agape, others crying.
Ms. Kalin turned on her
radio, and when she first
heard that President John
F. Kennedy had been assas-
sinated, she didnt believe
it. She thought for a mo-
ment it was a War of the
Worlds-type radio prank.
I thought this cant be,
she said. The looks on the
faces of the people around
me, I just immediately
thought of Orson Welles.
But when she changed
the station on
her car radio,
the news was
just as difficult.
I went from
a feeling of
elation to utter
disbelief, she
said.
Since then,
she still has a
vivid image of then Vice
President Lyndon Johnson
being sworn in with Jackie
Kennedy standing next to
him. I was stunned, stricken
and shaken, and I was re-
ally angry about it.
She said she had been
looking forward to Ken-
nedys presidency.
Ill never forget that
car trip, she said. I just
wanted to get through that
intersection.
Her son Steven will be
50. I always think of him
and JFK, she said.
Gloria Moskowitz, Mahwah
Ms. Moskowitz
was doing the
ironing that mid-
morning, as she
had done many
times before. She
was in front of
the TV, watch-
ing a soap opera,
when a news bul-
letin interrupted
the show. Like the rest of
America, she learned the
bad news.
I was devastated, she
said. I remember my kids
were in school. JFK was
like the shining light of the
world. I didnt know how I
was going to tell my kids.
We were so into the Ken-
nedys, their lives and their
kids. I remember I had to
tell my children in a nice
way. I didnt want to break
down.
But Ms. Moskowitz had
even more to deal with.
JFK was killed
on a Friday and
he was buried on
Monday, Novem-
ber25. She had a
family wedding
to attend on Sun-
day, November
24.
Everyone
wore black at
that wedding, she said.
Everyone looked sad.
She remembers picking
her children, then 8 and
5, up from school. They
kept asking me why it hap-
pened.
I remember that it
messed up that wedding
pretty bad, she said.
But the news for Mos-
kowitz got yet worse
when she and her husband
returned home from the
wedding to learn that her
brother-in-law had died
suddenly.
Bobby Shor, Hillsdale
Mr. Shor was a 7-year-old second
grader at Edison School in Fair-
lawn when Kennedys death was
announced via loud speaker in his
classroom.
When I went home we watched
it on TV, but we only had like two
channels, he said.
To make it worse, Mr. Shor broke
out in chickenpox. There were no
cartoons for a child home sick with
chickenpox to watch, only Kenne-
dy-related news.
He said that if something like this
happened today, every kid would
know about it right away, because
of the technology available.
Where were you when you heard the news?
Cover Story
32 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-32
T
h
a
n
k
to everyone and our sponsors
who gave a little bit of themselves
to make Mitzvah Day a success
For volunteer opportunities for everyone
- during the year -
contact AliceB@jfnnj.org or 201-820-3948
Mitzvah Day is sponsored & coordinated by
Jewish Federations Jewish Community Relations Council.
Northern Valley Affairs
at Temple Emanu-El, Closter
Century 21 Associates Foundation
Holy Name Medical Center
Maadan
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Glen Rock Jewish Center
Laurie Ann and Jeffrey Weinstein
Rabbi Neal Borovitz
Sari, Steve, Lauren & Bobby Gross
Shoprite of Rochelle Park
Temple Avodat Shalom
DubeZone
Parisian Beauty Academy
Jewish Standard
PJ Library
Congregation Shomrei Torah, Wayne
Congregation Ahavath Torah
Henry & Florence Dubro
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Everett, Laraine
& Hilary Fergenson
Myra and Arnold Gans
Genene & Mark Kaye
Ilana Matteson
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Michele Resnick
Annette Seigel
Rabbi Randall Mark
Sherri Tobias
Paulette Wolff
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B.L.D. Fine Art Gallery
Yisrael Frenkel
Sarah Adelson
Lawrence Gross
Jill Shuman
Myrna Block
Terry Levy
Michael Chananie
Simon Goodman
Carol & Paul Newman
Jason Snyder
Solomon Family
Bais Medrash of Bergeneld
Harry & Joyce Shaner
Y
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Congregation Beth Sholom
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/Congregation Bnai Israel
Temple Beth El of Northern Valley
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Sharon and Michael Glass
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Love It!
Edward Zizmor,
Teaneck
Edward Zizmor was 16. He was
a junior at Yonkers High School,
getting ready to take a Spanish
test.
It was two in the afternoon,
and they announced over the
loud speaker that the president
had been shot, he said. Half an
hour later, everyone was told to
go home. I spoke to my English
teacher, who told me that Ken-
nedy was dead.
It was shocking, Mr. Zizmor
added. You didnt expect this
sort of thing with government.
Zizmor then was a member of
the Young Republicans and an
ardent Barry Goldwater support-
er. The assassination changed the
political landscape, he said.
Goldwater was running close
to Kennedy in the polls, but after
the assassination Kennedy be-
came like this god, he said.
Eric Weis,
Wayne
I was in my fifth grade home-
room, Mr. Weis said. It was a sci-
ence lab, a very crude science lab
with a big black and white TV in
the corner that was used once in
a blue moon in those days.
He said he remembers the
teacher turning on the TV set, be-
cause it was unusual, and we saw
the news, what had happened.
Weis added that his school was
closed immediately. He still has
that visual image of the black and
white TV screen in that science
classroom.
Weis grew up in Pittsburgh,
Pa. He remembers learning that
suspected assassin Lee Harvey
Oswald was shot dead, another
horrible thing.
The United States was falling
apart and what are we going to
do now?, he remembers thinking.
Rochelle Lazarus,
Tenafly
She was only 5 and in kindergar-
ten when the news came to her
school in Ridgefield. A teary-eyed
teacher dismissed the class, and
she started walking home.
What she noticed what was
branded in her memory were
the crossing guards.
Each crossing guard was
weeping, she said. Ill never for-
get it.
The adults the teachers and
crossing guards told the chil-
dren to ask their parents what
had happened. We learned as
little children about something
terrible that occurred outside of
regular life, Ms. Lazarus said.
Sam Davis,
Englewood
I was coming out of the Elisa-
beth Morrow School in Engle-
wood and was walking up this
hill, Mr. Davis said. It was a
sunny day and the sky was a
bright blue, and I was 11. I was in
the fifth grade.
Everything seemed normal
until he and his classmates got
to the top of the hill. Thats
where they ran into the waiting
arms of their parents.
My mother was wearing this
big black dress and she was cry-
ing, he remembered. I think
that was the first time I had ever
seen my mother cry. It was kind
of surreal. It was like, oh my
God, weve just lost someone.
Where were you?
JS-33
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 33
NaLonal Jazz Month CelebraLon
Afordable luxury with amenities that include:
Scan with your smart phone
for more information
To Schedule a Tour, Call 973.929.2725
Lester Senior Housing Community
HELLER
Independent Living Apartments
WESTON
Assisted Living Residence
Glatt kosher dining
On-site dental/MD/physical therapy suites
Computer lab
Full activities/cultural & creative arts programs
Movie theatre
Elegant dining
Advanced resident emergency response
On-site synagogue and rabbi
Concierge service
And much, much more...
Owned and Managed by the Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey
903-905 Route 10 East, Whippany, NJ
Low and moderate income units also available, as low as
$
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Dont Just Live Life
Love It!
Where were you?
Cover Story
34 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-34
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One womans
presidential ambition
An up close and personal quest
to find the men behind the title
JOANNE PALMER
S
arah Novellos hobby is presi-
dents not only learning about
them in the abstract, but visit-
ing their homes and libraries,
seeking out their artifacts, trying to
understand them not only as historical
personages but also as people.
At the end of the month, Ms. Novellos
passion will take her to back to Dallas,
where President John Fitzgerald
Kennedys life will be celebrated on the
50th anniversary of his assassination.
It already has taken Ms. Novello,
who lives in Bergen County, across the
country; she has visited 12 of the 13
presidential libraries along with scores
of houses and museums. In fact, as she
commemorates President Kennedy in
Dallas, she will complete her library
list with a tour of the recently opened
George W. Bush repository.
Not surprisingly, I am a history buff
and a presidential geek, she said.
Ms. Novellos interest in solid history
began when she was a student at the
Yeshiva Ohel Moshe in Brooklyn. I
learned about sites in Israel, and when
I was 16 I went to Kever Rachel there,
she said. Rachels Tomb, outside
Bethlehem, is a magnet for pilgrims and
their prayers. My love of history hit me
when I was a young woman, and it has
never left me.
And her interests are in American and
Jewish history because thats who I am,
an American Jew, she said.
Her focus on the presidency grew
logically.
Only 43 have held the position of
president have been most powerful
man in the world, she continued. I
wondered what drove them. I wanted
to learn more about them not just the
mainstream things that you get from
books and I thought that it would be
nice to see the presidents homes. And
then I realized that they were available,
and people could see them.
She began close to home, with the
Roosevelts; Franklin Delano in Hyde
Park, N.Y., and cousin Theodores
townhouse in Gramercy Park in
Manhattan, and Sagamore Hill, his large
house in Oyster Bay on Long Island. He
was a conservationist all those animals
he shot were thinning the herd, she
said, talking about the huge taxidermied
animal heads that jut out aggressively,
glassy eyes combative, at his Long
Island estate. The 150th anniversary of
his birth was a big shindig, she added
appreciatively.
Ms. Novello went to Springfield,
Ill., for the 200th anniversary of the
birth of Abraham Lincoln. President
Obama was there, she said. It was his
first public appearance as president.
President Obama feels particularly close
to President Lincoln for many reasons,
including his service in the Illinois state
senate, which meets in the state capital,
SEE NOVELLO PAGE 40
Sarah Novello
stands between
two Lincoln
impersonators.
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Experienced Staff Personalized Menus
Affordable Pricing
Avi Levenbrown Marc Rosen
RCBC
Madison Caterers
A division of Kosher Experience
669 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 201-787-9333
Holiday Dining & Catering
36 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-36
O
s
s
y
s

C
a
f
e
FINE
ITALIAN
DINING
Elegant Dining In A Casual Atmosphere
Rated

160 Lincoln Ave., Hawthorne


973-423-9203
OPEN 6 DAYS CLOSED MONDAYS
RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED ON WEEKENDS
LUNCH
DINNER &
COCKTAILS
Variety of
Pasta Dishes,Veal,
Chicken, Steak,
Chops &
Fresh Seafood
FRIDAY
NIGHT CHOP
SPECIALS
LAMB PORK
VEAL
NOW ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS:
Thanksgiving Christmas Eve New Years Eve
Book now for your special occasions:
graduation, proms, communions, weddings & more
Private Rooms Available
seating 30, 70 and 120 guests
www.ossycafe.com
Visit our site & see video of our rooms,
restaurant & check our reviews
Alfresco Dining
Daily Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials
Salads Sandwiches Burgers
Paninis Wraps Soups Pasta
Steaks Seafood
201-398-9700
39-10 Broadway Fair Lawn NJ
201-943-5664
Fri. & Sat. Open 24 Hrs.
550 Bergen Blvd. Ridgeeld NJ
www.gothamcitydiner.com
Open 7 Days A Week 6am-2am
Experience the vintage era
of old New York. Featuring
an extensive menu of
old-fashioned homemade
diner classics, fresh seafood,
chopped salad station,
sandwiches, Italian gelato,
delicious desserts
and a full bar.
Free Delivery No Minimum Order Required
Where Good Food
Meets Good People
RESTAURANT, OYSTER BAR
& SEA GRILL
THE RECORD
ZAGATS RATED



L
U
N
C
H & DIN
N
E
R
NEW YORK STYLE
ATMOSPHERE
LARGEST VARIETY OF
FRESH SEAFOOD FOR
SEAFOOD LOVERS
PRIME SELECT BLACK ANGUS BEEF
PRIVATE PARTIES AVAILABLE
TEL. 201-796-0546
INFO@OCEANOSRESTAURANT.COM
2-27 SADDLE RIVER ROAD
FAIR LAWN, NJ
WWW.OCEANOSRESTAURANT.COM
641 Main St. Hackensack, NJ
(201) 489-3287 (Eats) Fax (201) 489-4442
Sun-Thurs 7am-11pm Fri, Sat 7am-Midnight
Email: fairmounteats@aol.com www.fairmount-eats.com
LET US HAVE YOUR FAX NUMBER.
WE WILL FAX YOU DAILY SPECIALS AND SOUPS.
THANKSGIVING
SPECIAL
INDIVIDUAL TURKEY PLATTER ..... $9.95
Includes traditional stufng, yams, potatoes, turkey
gravy & cranberry sauce
WHOLE TURKEY & STUFFING .......... $80
WHOLE TURKEY & TRIMMINGS .... $120
Includes traditional stufng, yams, potatoes, turkey
gravy & cranberry sauce
WE WILL ACCEPT YOUR ORDER AT ANY TIME
132 Veterans Plaza, Dumont, New Jersey 201.384.7767
(Corner of West Madison Ave.) www.njdiningguide.com/ilmulino
ExcellentThe Record, 3/17/2000
Parties up to 120 to fit any budget, call Jimmy.
Beautifully Renovated
Voted Top 5
BYOB
Restaurant
Spring 08
Italian
Restaurant
Winner 2009
You dont have to break the bank for top-notch
Italian fare at this charming Dumont eatery. All
regular dinner menu entres cost under $20, and on
Mondays through Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
diners can order off the specially priced Sunset
Dinner menu, which includes an appetizer choice of
soup or salad, an entre, fresh fruit and coffee or tea
(price levels range from $13.95 to $17.95).
Bergen Health & Life, Sept 2009
Best Value even during these economic
times, you can afford to dine at Il Mulino.
#1 Italian Restaurant #1 BYOB Restaurant
#1 Best Prices #1 Family Friendly Restaurant
Bergen Health & Life, Sept 2009
Open 7 Days A Week
Excellent
The Record, 3/17/2000
132 Veterans Plaza, Dumont, NJ
201.384.7767
www.njdiningguide.com/ilmulino
Not afliated with Il Mulino, NY
Voted #2
BYO Restaurant
Spring 2008
132 Veterans Plaza, Dumont, New Jersey 201.384.7767
(Corner of West Madison Ave.) www.njdiningguide.com/ilmulino
ExcellentThe Record, 3/17/2000
Parties up to 120 to fit any budget, call Jimmy.
Beautifully Renovated
Voted Top 5
BYOB
Restaurant
Spring 08
Italian
Restaurant
Winner 2009
You dont have to break the bank for top-notch
Italian fare at this charming Dumont eatery. All
regular dinner menu entres cost under $20, and on
Mondays through Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
diners can order off the specially priced Sunset
Dinner menu, which includes an appetizer choice of
soup or salad, an entre, fresh fruit and coffee or tea
(price levels range from $13.95 to $17.95).
Bergen Health & Life, Sept 2009
Best Value even during these economic
times, you can afford to dine at Il Mulino.
#1 Italian Restaurant #1 BYOB Restaurant
#1 Best Prices #1 Family Friendly Restaurant
Bergen Health & Life, Sept 2009
Open 7 Days A Week
Voted #3
Italian Restaurant
Winter 2009
Parties up to 120 to t
any budget, call Jimmy
Book your Parties Now!
Best Value even during these economic
times, you can afford to dine at Il Mulino.
Open 7 Days a Week
RISTORANTE
2012
#2 Best Italian
#2 BYOB
#2 Prix Fixe Menu
2011
#1 Best
Restuarant
#1 BYOB
Restaurant
2009
#1 Italian
Restuarant
#1 BYOB
Restaurant
#1 Family Friendly
Restaurant
1
S
T

P
L
A
C
E
4 YEARS
IN
A

R
O
W
-

I
T
A
L
I
A
N
RI STO
R
A
N
T
E

-
2010, 2011
2012, 2013
Traditional Tanksgiving
Call for Reservations
17 S. Broad St. Ridgewood 201-857-5100
Located next to municipal parking lot
pearlridgewood@gmail.com www.pearlridgewood.com
PEARL
R E S TA U R A N T
American Nouveau Cuisine*
*$24.95 per person
First Course - Choice of One
Potato & Goat Cheese Croquette
with Chive Cream & Baby Arugula
House Made Soup Du Jour
Pearl Prince Edward Island Specialty
with Andouille, White Bean,
Pimento & Herb Broth
Entres Choice of One
Broiled Florida Red Snapper
with Dijon Herb Beurre Blanc
Pearl Butternut Squash Ravioli
with Brown Butter, Sage & Pistachio
Pan Roasted Gofe Farm Cornish Hen
with Roasted Garlic,
Creme Fraiche & Pan Jus
Homemade Dessert
& Choice Of American Coffee or Tea
Reservations a Must!
*Not to be combined with other
promotions or coupon vouchers!
*Sunday thru Thursday
Open 7 Days for Dinner at 5 pm
Fine Dining in
a Relaxed Atmosphere
Before or After Dinner
Enjoy Live Music in our Lounge
Fri. & Sat. Evenings
53 W. Passaic St., Rochelle Park
201-843-1250
Lunch 11:30 am-3 pm Dinner 5 pm - 11 pm
Lunch on Saturday from 1:00 on
Open Monday-Sunday for lunch & dinner
Ask about our party facilities
The Dispatch 7/11/87
and The Herald News 8/12/87
The Record 8/14/98 - 2/1/02
Excellent - Zagat
1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2014
Open
Thanksgiving Day
TAVERNA
Authentic
Greek
Cuisine
201-703-9200
238 Broadway Rt. 4 East
Elmwood Park, NJ 07407
WWW.TAVERNAMYKONOS.COM
LUNCH & DINNER
Holiday Dining & Catering
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 37
JS-37
Charming & Casual Atmosphere
CLOSED ON TUESDAY
Fabulous Traditional
Italian Food
RESTAURANT
12 TAPPAN ROAD
HARRINGTON PARK, NJ
Tel. 201-767-4245
Fax 201-768-9271
www.dinoshp.com
Dinos Restaurant
When looking for a restaurant that has a menu
offering a wide selection of both traditional and
contemporary Italian dishes, and also has a com-
fortable, casual atmosphere in which to enjoy a deli-
cious meal, DINOS RESTAURANT in Harrington
Park is the place to go.
The welcoming atmosphere is the first thing to be
noticed. The fireplaces, rich colors and beautiful
artwork set the tone of quality.
If just in the mood for drinks or wine selected
from an extensive list, take a seat at the cozy bar and
enjoy the atmosphere.
But food is the main draw and guests get to
choose from unique dishes representing many
regions in Italy. Closed Tuesdays.
12 Tappan Road, Harrington Park
(201) 767-4245 www.dinoshp.com
2771106-Dinos
Carr
201 MAG
AMY
___ OK AS IS
___ OK W. CHANGE
________________
approved by
This ad is copyrighted by North Jersey Me
Group and may not be reproduced in any
form, or replicated in a similar version, wit
out approval from North Jersey Media Gro
2771106-Dinos 1/22/10 12:01 PM Page 1
La Lanterna Cafe & Grill
29 West Ridgewood Avenue, Ridgewood
201-444-5520 www.lalanternaofridgewood.com
Open Saturday and Sundays
for Private Parties
La Lanternas Customer Parking lot is available
behind the restaurant off Liberty St.
Major Credit Cards Accepted
Open for Dinner Tues-Thurs 5-10 Fri & Sat 5-11
Sun 5-9 Closed Mondays
Small but elegant Tuscany setting,
where food and great service make
friends out of our customers.
Reserve Now
For Your Holiday
Parties
Daily Luncheon Specials Take out or Dine in
Ample Parking Reservations Recommended Gift Cards Available
Party Facilities Available for up to 100 People
Est. since 1991
295 Kinderkamack Rd, Hillsdale 201-358-8685
825 Franklin Lakes Rd, Franklin Lakes (By Market Basket) 201-891-7866
www.goldendynastynj.com
CHINESE CUISINE COCKTAIL LOUNGE
HILLSDALE
JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE SUSHI BAR
FRANKLIN LAKES
Recommended by: Rated ### Excellent by The Record
The Best Chinese Restaurant in the Pasack Valley Zagat
Great service, great food, and is arguably one of the consistently best
Chinese restaurant in the Rockland/Bergen area
Rated ##### by The Courier Rated ##### by Gail Gerson for the NY Daily News
Everything on the menu there is good. New Jersey Monthly
Taking
reservations for
Christmas Eve & Day
and New Years Eve
and Day
INDIAN CUISINE
Finest in Rockland & Bergen Counties
BUFFET
LUNCH
TUES-FRI 12:00 TO 2:30
Sat. 12-2:30 pm Regular Menu
GOURMET
DINNER & COCKTAILS
Tues. thru Thurs. - 5:00-10:00 pm
Fri. & Sat. - 5-11 pm Sun. 1-9:30 pm
All major credit cards accepted
Find us on the web
www.priyaindiancuisineny.com
36 Lafayette Avenue
Suffern, NY 10901
845-357-5700
Fax 845-357-5821
Since 1986
Its worth the trip from anywhere to the famous
Country Pancake House & Restaurant.
Customers leave our restaurant with a smile
on their face and a doggie bag in hand.
Sun-Thurs 6:30am-9pm Fri & Sat 6:30am-10pm
140 E. Ridgewood Avenue Ridgewood
201.444.8395 www.countrypancakehouse.net
Country Pancake House
& Restaurant
Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
7 Days a Week
FEATURED ON: CHANNEL 7 ABC NEWS Eat in our neighborhood
TRAVEL CHANNEL Rated extreme pig-out. One of the top 50 in the country.
TRAVEL CHANNEL Rated #1 Breakfast
(201) MAGAZINE Best Place for Breakfast. 6 time winner.
FOX NEWS 17 Years ZAGAT RATED Best Bang for Your Dining Buck
NEW JERSEY MAGAZINE Best of Jersey 2011
BRI GANTI NE
SEAFOOD
112 Linclon Ave., Hawthorne, NJ
973-949-5600
Mon-Thurs 12-10, Fri 11:30-10, Sat 12-10, Sun 1-10
www.BrigantineSeafoodNJ.com
Ample parking in rear
RESTAURANT &
FRESH FISH MARKET
All food prepared
with the nest ingredients
LUNCH & DINNER
Offering Sustainable Fish &
Organic Farm Raised Fish
We Select Fresh Fish Daily
From The Fulton Fish Market
Chef Owner Alfred Ianniello
formelry of Stony Hill Inn, SPQR,
and Umbertos Clam House.
Eat in
or
take out
Off premise catering
for all occasions, corporate luncheons/
business meetings
Breakfast Lunch Dinner snacks catering
2191 fLetcher aVe
fOrt Lee nJ 07024
201-461-0075 f: 201-461-0078
hours: sun-Wed: 6am-1am
thurs-sat 24 hours
Delivery hours: 7 Days: 7am-11pm
Always Free Delivery
NO MINIMUM
www.chillersgrill.com
Online ordering
available at
Holiday Dining & Catering
38 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-38
The three essentials to a long life Chef John A. Halligan
PRIVATE PARTY ROOMS AVAILABLE AT BOTH RESTAURANTS
STEAKHOUSE: Seven Nights for Dinner; Lunch: Monday-Friday
TAVERN: Seven Days for Dinner, Lunch, &Weekend Brunch
A Classic American Steakhouse
151 Kinderkamack Road, Park Ridge
201.930.1300
www.theParkSteakhouse.com
A Modern American Tavern
30 Oak Street, Ridgewood
201.445.5400
www.ParkWestTavern.com
3
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The three essentials to a long life Chef John A. Halligan
PRIVATE PARTY ROOMS AVAILABLE AT BOTH RESTAURANTS
STEAKHOUSE: Seven Nights for Dinner; Lunch: Monday-Friday
TAVERN: Seven Days for Dinner, Lunch, &Weekend Brunch
A Classic American Steakhouse
151 Kinderkamack Road, Park Ridge
201.930.1300
www.theParkSteakhouse.com
A Modern American Tavern
30 Oak Street, Ridgewood
201.445.5400
www.ParkWestTavern.com
3
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JS-39
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 39
Cover Story
JS-39
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 39
Celebrate a Joyous
Hanukkah with
Jewish Homes FREE,
HOT, KOSHER Meals!
Members of
We will deliver free hot kosher meals
to the door of seniors in Bergen County
on Wednesday, December 4th.
To Register:
Whether you or someone you know is 65
or older, call 201-784-1414 Ext. 5532 by
November 25nd to register.
Volunteers Needed!
YOU can help the Jewish Home perform
this mitzvah by volunteering to help
deliver meals! Call 201-750- 4237
to volunteer.
RCBC
Glatt
Kosher
Caterers
8th Annual
Latke Eating Contest
SUNDAY, DEC. 1 10:00 A.M.
At Cedar Lane Plaza
CATEGORIES: Ages 18 & up 13 to 17 12 and under
Cash & Prizes!
446 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 201-692-0192 Fax 201-692-3656
www.maadan.com for complete menu
www.jstandard.com
run nightclubs that were fronts for illegal
gambling operations.
According to evidence uncovered
by the U.S. House of Representatives
Assassinations Committee in the 1970s,
Ruby was later linked to mobsters Carlos
Marcello and Santo Traficante, who the
panel considered prime suspects in a
possible mob conspiracy to assassinate
Kennedy.
Whatever he was doing behind
the scenes, Ruby became known as
a nightclub owner and at some point
began attending services at Congregation
Shearith Israel. Rabbi Hillel Silverman,
who was the Dallas synagogues spiritual
leader from 1954 to 1964, says Ruby
came to say Kaddish for his father.
He came to minyan one day with a
cast on his arm, Silverman recalled. I
said, Jack, what happened? He said, In
my club, somebody was very raucous,
and I was the bouncer.
Silverman, now 89 and still leading
High Holy Days services every year,
remembers Ruby well. Once Ruby
showed up at the rabbis house with a
litter of puppies and insisted that the
rabbi take one. When the family went
to Israel one summer, Ruby looked after
the dog.
The day of the assassination, we
had our regular Friday night service,
which became a memorial service for
the president, Silverman said. Jack
was there. People were either irate or
in tears, and Jack was neither. He came
over and said, Good Shabbos, rabbi.
Thank you for visiting my sister Eva in
the hospital last week. I thought that
was rather peculiar.
Two days later, Silverman spoke to
his Sunday morning confirmation class,
expressing relief to the students that Lee
Harvey Oswald was not Jewish or there
might have been a pogrom in Dallas.
He then switched on the radio and heard
that a Jack Rubenstein had killed the
assassin.
I was shocked, Silverman said. I
visited him the next day in jail, and I
said, Why, Jack, why? He said, I did it
for the American people.
I interrupted Silverman, pointing out
that other reports had Ruby saying he
did it to show that Jews had guts. The
rabbi sighed.
Yes, he mentioned that, Silverman
said. But I dont like to mention it. I
think he said, I did it for the Jewish
people. But Ive tried to wipe that
statement from my mind.
Another person close to Ruby who
tried unsuccessfully to block out the past
is his nephew, Craig Ruby. (He asked
that I not publish his real first name.)
His early memories are pleasant: Uncle
Jack having a shot of whisky with Craigs
father, doling out silver dollars to the
kids, his flashy sports cars.
Like millions of Americans, Craig
watched Oswalds murder live on
television. Soon afterward, he and his
mother heard the name of the gunman.
Did you ever hear the expression
The color drained from her face? I
literally saw my mothers face go from
flesh to green, he recalled. At age 12,
that was a little freaky to watch.
Half a century after the fact, Craig
still is bitter over the dramatic effect his
childless uncles act had on the extended
family, including bomb threats and huge
legal bills. Given his last name, Craig
was an easy target for bullies during
his junior high school years in Dallas.
But worst of all was facing Uncle Jack
himself.
One Sunday my dad insisted we go
to see Jack in jail, Craig said. Outside, a
police cars siren started up, and my uncle
was standing there with this incredibly
intense, wild-eyed look on his face, and
he yelled, You hear that? You hear that?
Theyre torturing Jews in the basement!
That particular experience was traumatic
enough to where talking about it right
now, 50 years later, is turning my gut into
a knot.
Silverman, who later testified before
the Warren Commission, also vividly
remembers his jailhouse visits.
I n pr i son, he det er i orat ed
psychologically, the rabbi said. One
time I walked in and he said, Come
on, rabbi, duck underneath the table.
Theyre pouring oil on the Jews and
setting it on fire. He was quite psychotic.
My initial connection to the Ruby
family was through Eva, who I convinced
to appear on ABCs Good Night
America program in 1976. Later I visited
her several times at her apartment in Los
Angeles, where she once gave me the last
piece of stationary from Jacks Carousel
Club.
She introduced me to her brothers
Earl, who owned a dry cleaning store in
Detroit, and Sam, who lived in the Los
Angeles suburb of Sylmar. Sam showed
me the one picture he had of their
immigrant parents as well as the rusting
car Jack drove to the Dallas police station
the morning he shot Oswald.
In 1991, Earl allowed me to rendezvous
with him in Dallas on the day he
retrieved Jacks gun, which he won
after a decades-long legal battle. I later
showed the weapon on television for
the first time since 1963, shortly before it
was auctioned off for $220,000.
The brothers also downplayed Jacks
ties to the mob. Sam, who died in 2006
at 90, leaned in close and lowered his
voice, confiding: These guys would
come into Jacks club, and you had to be
nice to them, ya know.
Ironically, when Earl chose a place
for us to meet in Dallas the day he was
given Jacks gun, he picked an Italian
restaurant better known for its links to
the Mafia than its lasagna.
Some conspiracy theorists believe
Ruby
FROM PAGE 28
SEE RUBY PAGE 40
Sarah Novello
stands between
two Lincoln
impersonators.

40 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-40
Cover Story
40 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-40
AHS 1117 FF FLYER9 4C
(13) Excludes consumer electronics. Additional exclusions apply.
See below for details. Offer good 11/17/13. Total capacity.
For all appliances: Colors, connectors, ice maker hook-up and installation extra.
ALMOST
EVERYTHING
13
10
%
OFF
SAVE AN EXTRA
MEMBER PREVIEW EVENT
OPEN - 6PM SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17
TH
FRIENDS
FAMILY&
6PM - 9PM SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17
TH
POWER LAWN & GARDEN
EQUIPMENT AND
OUTDOOR STORAGE
BUILDINGS
ON TOOL PURCHASES OVER $299 WITH A QUALIFYING SEARS CARD
INSTANT SAVINGS
10
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PLUS PLUS
INSTANT
SAVINGS
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(8) See below for offer details. Offer good thru 11/18/13. (9) See store for details. Offer good thru 11/18/13. (10) See below for offer details. Offer good thru 11/18/13. (11) See store for details. Offer good thru 11/18/13.
SAVE ON ALL
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5
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OFF
WITH YOUR SEARS CARD
ALL APPLIANCES
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APPLIANCES
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UP TO
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OR 12 MONTHS
SPECIAL FINANCING
3
ON ALL APPLIANCES OVER $499
WITH A QUALIFYING SEARS CARD
OR 12 MONTHS SPECIAL FINANCING
11
ON TOOL PURCHASES OVER $299 WITH A QUALIFYING SEARS CARD
OR 12 MONTHS SPECIAL FINANCING
9
ON LAWN & GARDEN PURCHASES OVER
$299 WITH A QUALIFYING SEARS CARD
(1) Advertised savings are valid in-store only and range from5%-20%. (1,2) Exclusions apply. See belowfor details. Offers good thru 11/18/13. (3) See belowfor offer details and Important Special Financing/Deferred Interest Details. Offer good thru 11/18/13.
IMPORTANT SPECIAL FINANCING/DEFERRED INTEREST DETAILS (when offered): Interest will be charged to your account fromthe purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. Minimumpayments required. With credit approval, for qualifying purchases made on a Sears
card (Sears Commercial One

accounts excluded) Sears Home Improvement Account


SM
valid on installed sales only. Offer is only valid for consumer accounts in good standing; is subject to change without notice; see store for details. May not be combined with any other promotional offer. Sears cards: As of 9/3/2013, APR for purchases: Variable
7.24%-27.24%or non-variable 14.00%-29.99%. Minimuminterest charge: up to $2. See card agreement for details, including the APRs and fees applicable to you. Sears cards issued by Citibank, N.A. APPLIANCE OFFER: (1) Advertised savings are valid in-store only and range from5%-20%. (1,2) Bosch

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and Samsung

appliances limited to 10%off. Offers exclude Hot Buys, Super Hot Buys, Special Purchases, Jenn-Air

, Dacor, air conditioners, closeouts and Everyday Great Price items. Offers good thru 11/18/13. (2) Cannot be combined with other Sears card discounts. Excludes Sears Commercial One


accounts and Outlet Stores. Sears Home Improvement Account
SM
applies on installed merchandise only. (3) Offer applies to all appliances over $499 after discounts and coupons when you use a qualifying Sears card. See above for Important Special Financing/Deferred Interest Details. Excludes Outlet Stores. Offer good thru 11/18/13. FRIENDS &
FAMILYOFFER: (13) Additional exclusions apply. 10%savings off regular, sale and clearance prices apply to merchandise only. May not be used to reduce a layaway or credit balance. Not valid on Special Purchases, Everyday Great Price items, Stearns &Foster, iComfort, iSeries, Simmons Beautyrest Elite, Jenn-Air

, Dacor, Weber

, air conditioners,
generators, Gift Cards. Bosch

, Whirlpool

, KitchenAid

, Maytag

, Amana

, GE

, GE Prole

, GE Caf

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, Electrolux

, Electrolux Icon appliances brands limited to 10%off. Not valid on commercial orders or previous purchases. Tax and shipping not included. Available only at Sears Hometown Stores, Hardware Stores andAppliance
Showrooms. See store for Shop Your Way Rewards details. Shop Your Way Rewards offer valid for members open - 6pmSunday 11/17/13. Family and Friends offer valid for all stores 6pm-9pmSunday 11/17/13. LAWN & GARDEN OFFER: (8) 5%instant savings offer applies to lawn & garden purchases over $299 and is calculated on purchase
price less all coupons, discounts and reward certicates, not including tax, installation or delivery. Offer not valid with Sears Commercial One

accounts and Sears Home Improvement Account


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. Cannot be combined with other Sears card discounts. Excludes Hot Buys, Special Purchases, Everyday Great Price items and generators. Offer good
thru 11/20/13. (9) Offer applies to lawn & garden purchases over $299 after discounts and coupons when you use a qualifying Sears card. See above for Important Special Financing/Deferred Interest Details. Excludes Outlet Stores. Offer good thru 11/18/13. TOOL OFFER: (10) 5%instant savings offer applies to tool purchases and is calculated
on purchase price less all coupons, discounts and reward certificates, not including tax, installation or delivery. Offer not valid with Sears Commercial One

accounts and Sears Home Improvement Account


SM
. Cannot be combined with other Sears card discounts. Excludes Everyday Great Price items and generators. Offer good thru 11/18/13. (9)
Offer applies to tool purchases over $299 after discounts and coupons when you use a qualifying Sears card. See above for Important Special Financing/Deferred Interest Details. Excludes Outlet Stores. Offer good thru 11/18/13.
SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 17
TH
, 2013
HOURS: M-F: 8:00 AM - 9:00 PM Sat: 8:00 AM - 9:00 PM Sun: 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
EXTRA DISCOUNTS ALL DAY
ON SUNDAY TIL 9:00PM
BRING IN COPY OF AD FOR A
FREE GIFT WITH APPLIANCE
OR SNOW THROWER
PURCHASE
HARDWARE & APPLIANCE
450 S. WASHINGTON STREET
BERGENFIELD, NJ 07621
PHONE: 201.244.9160
Ruby was ordered to silence Oswald by his organized
crime contacts. Others, who think the murder was an
impulsive act, point to Rubys fury over an anti-Kennedy
advertisement in a Dallas newspaper the morning of the
presidents visit. It was paid for by a right-wing Jewish
activist named Bernard Weissman, which Ruby thought
put Jews in a bad light.
We will never know for sure. What Craig Ruby knows
for certain is that he did not mourn his uncles death from
cancer in 1967. His family had moved to Chicago by then,
and when he saw the headline announcing Rubys death,
he felt like a weight had lifted.
As for having a connection to one of the darkest
moments in American history, Craig Rubys view has not
changed in 50 years.
I wish to God it hadnt happened to us.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Steve North is a broadcast journalist with CBS News whos
been reporting on the Kennedy assassination since 1976.)
Ruby
FROM PAGE 39
Springfield. President Obama took his oath of office on
Lincolns Bible, Ms. Novello said so there was even more
resonance to his talk.
My sister calls this my dead presidents tour, but on
this one I was greeted by a living president, she said. And
not only that the current one!
But back to dead presidents she also traced the escape
route that Lincolns assassin, the actor John Wilkes Booth,
hoped would lead him to a new life, rather than to his
death.
The sitting president sends a wreath to commemorate
each earlier president on the day of his birth, and Ms.
Novello has been to some ceremonies where the wreath
is laid on the grave. She was at Calvin Coolidges grave in
Vermont he was the only president to be born on the
Fourth of July, although three of them, Founding Fathers
John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe, died
on the Fourth. (The always-at-each-other Adams and
Jefferson famously both died in 1831; Monroe died exactly
five years later.)
Sarah Novello with a faux Teddy Roosevelt.
Novello
FROM PAGE 34
As a Jew, Ms. Novello feels a special connection
to President Kennedy, who, as our first and only
Catholic president, broke some ceilings and rattled
some chains. And he opened doors for Jews in his
administration, she said. He appointed Arthur
Goldberg as labor secretary and then to the Supreme
Court, Abraham Ribicoff as secretary of health,
education and welfare, and Mortimer Caplin as
internal revenue commissioner. And a striking number
of the non-Jews in his administration had Jewish roots:
Speechwriter Ted Sorensen was a self-described
Danish Russian Jewish Unitarian, while treasury
secretary C. Douglas Dillon and White House aide
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. both had Jewish immigrant
grandfathers.
As she has pursued her hobby, Ms. Novello has met
some presidential descendants Carolyn Kennedy;
Gerald R. Fords daughter, Susan; Ulysses S. Grants
great great grandson; Roosevelts great great nephews.
Her most surprising meeting was with the wife of the
grandson of John Tyler. Thats Tyler as in Tippecanoe
and Tyler, too, the Whig Partys campaign song in
1840.
Remember Tippecanoe and Tyler, too? (Not
firsthand, of course. If you are reading this, you
couldnt have, or we would be writing about you.)
Tippecanoe was William Henry Harrison, who led
his troops to victory in a famed 1812 battle near the
Tippecanoe River. Harrison was elected president in
1840, but died just a month or so after his inauguration;
Tyler became president.
Tyler was born in 1790. He kept very busy his
two wives (its okay; his marriages were serial, not
bigamous) bore him 15 children. His second wife was
30 years younger than he, and his youngest child
was born in 1860, when he was 70. Tylers grandson
Harrison was born in 1928.
There was a phone number in a book; it said to
call to arrange tours, Ms. Novello said. I called
it was in Virginia and a woman answered. After
arranging the tour, I asked who I was talking to, and
she said Mrs. Tyler. I said, as a joke, Any relation to
the president? and she said, Well, yes. My husband
is his grandson.
What is even more amazing is that the family still
uses the home, Ms. Novello said. Most presidential
homes are museums, but this one the Sherwood
Forest Plantation in Charles City, Va., which the Tyler
family bought in 1842 is still in use.
I saw the pipe that the president smoked, and I
looked in the mirror and saw my reflection where he
once saw his.
I heard a grandfather clock tick in President
Adams home. (Thats the Old Home at Peacefield
in Quincy, Mass.) He heard it, and it is still running
today.
Jewish World
JS-41
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 41
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Saul Kagan,
architect of
Holocaust Restitution
SHAMMAI ENGELMAYER
Saul Kagan, longtime executive director and then
executive vice president of the Conference on Jew-
ish Material Claims Against Germany, died on Fri-
day, November 8. He was 91 years old. Ironically, his
death came only hours before the 75th anniversary of
Kristallnacht, the night of broken glass that signaled
the beginning of the Holocaust, the aftermath of which
occupied Mr. Kagans life for the last 65 years.
Mr. Kagan made it his lifes work to gain as much money
in reparations as possible for the survivors of the Shoah,
and to see cultural and real property returned to the fami-
lies of its victims. In these efforts, he once explained, he
was guided by words spoken by the prophet Elijah to King
Ahab, when he benefitted materially from the execution
of a man falsely convicted of treason. Said Elijah to Ahab,
Would you murder and also inherit?
Over the last 60 years, Mr. Kagan asked that question
over and again in negotiations with Germany and its
World War II European allies. He played a pivotal role in
those talks, ever mindful of their unprecedented nature.
For the first time in history, the Jewish people confronted
those who would destroy them, demanding a measure of
justice from them.
The momentousness of the task was never lost on Mr.
Kagan. If you look back to the destruction of the [Jeru-
salem] Temple, the Crusades, the expulsion of the Jews
from Spain in 1492, or, in more recent times, the pogroms
in Russia in the 1890s, these catastrophes inflicted
on the Jewish people over 3,000 years of its history
resulted in mass exiles, he said in a 2002 interview.
They were major human disasters, followed by exile and
resettlement.
Only after the Shoah, Mr. Kagan said, did the orga-
nized Jewish world begin to think seriously about facing
the perpetrators.
That confrontation came at a castle outside the Hague
in early 1952 and led to a series of historic and game-
changing agreements with West Germany in September
of that year.
The Luxembourg agreements, as the early pacts were
called, represent our efforts to achieve a measure of jus-
tice for Holocaust survivors, Mr. Kagan recalled some
years ago. The principles embodied in them have aided
hundreds of thousands of victims of Nazi persecution and
have radiated far beyond Germany. What began as a revo-
lutionary idea between a voluntary Jewish organization
and the new state of West Germany has attained a tran-
scendent and enduring significance.
The momentous nature of the Luxembourg Agree-
ments was not lost on others, as well. Israels founding
prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, echoed Mr. Kagans
thoughts in a letter he wrote to the first president of the
Claims Conference, Nahum Goldmann, after the pacts
were signed. For the first time in the history of the Jewish
people, oppressed and plundered for hundreds of years
the oppressor and plunderer has had to hand back some
of the spoil and pay collective compensation for part of
the material losses, Mr. Ben-Gurion wrote.
From the beginning, Mr. Kagans influence was consid-
ered crucial. His influence never waned. It was still crucial
earlier this year, when Germany agreed to add approxi-
mately $1 billion towards homecare for Jewish Nazi vic-
tims through 2017, and to extend compensation from two
SEE KAGAN PAGE 42
Jewish World
42 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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Others have referred to Mr. Kagan as a giant of Holocaust
compensation and restitution, but he always downplayed
his role, never seeking any credit for himself, always quick
to give credit to others. Morality trumped organizational
politics, he once explained, and the end result was always
more important to him than whether his name was associ-
ated with it. This is not a job, he told a Jewish Telegraphic
Agency reporter in 2002. It never was.
The results Mr. Kagan and his colleagues achieved were
significant and impressive: approximately $70 billion paid
in pensions by Germany directly to survivors as a result of
negotiations in the 1950s; another $6 billion paid in addi-
tional programs created since 1980.
Sometimes, survivor groups and others would criticize
decisions made by Mr. Kagan and the Claims Conference.
In the early days, some of that criticism turned to confron-
tations that were so violent, some New York hotels refused
to rent meeting rooms to the organization, and the Claims
Conference president, Nahum Goldmann, was always
accompanied by a bodyguard. Mr. Kagan recalled that in
one early protest, a survivor tried to crack my head open
with his wooden leg.
Mr. Kagan often found that the criticisms being leveled
were meritorious, as he put it, but not practical. He
made no apologies for what he and the Claims Conference
achieved.
At every stage of our activities, he once recalled, we
were confronted with the question: After serious negotia-
tions, after using all the means at our disposal, are we going
to achieve what we set out to achieve? Do we ultimately
settle because a significant number of Holocaust survivors
will benefit, or not? Whatever we have achieved was always
some kind of a compromise. Our overriding consideration,
from day one, is to secure optimum compensation for the
survivors within the framework of the attainable.
It was this approach of seeking the achievable rather than
the ideal, Mr. Kagan felt, that allowed compensation pro-
grams to expand to include more money and additional sur-
vivors over the years.
Mr. Kagan also was willing to hold talks he knew would
lead nowhere, but served a moral purpose. In 1987, for
example, he held talks with the East German leader Erich
Honecker about the German Democratic Republics respon-
sibilities to Holocaust victims. Those talks did not result in
any agreements, but established the principle that Germa-
nys obligation to Nazi victims extended to both sides of the
Berlin Wall.
Building on that, in 1990 Mr. Kagan was instrumental in
negotiating expanded restitution and reparations agree-
ments with the government of the newly unified Germany.
He also pushed for the right of the Claims Conference to
recover any Jewish properties that went unclaimed, so that
they would not revert to the state, or remain in the hands of
wartime non-Jewish owners.
The sale of these recovered properties provided enough
revenue to fund over $1 billion in vital social services to
Shoah victims worldwide, including hunger relief, homec-
are, medical aid, and other assistance needed by aging, frail
survivors.
Mr. Kagan also helped spearhead decades of negotia-
tions with the government of Austria, which refused for
decades to accept responsibility for its role in the persecu-
tion of its Jews. After achieving several smaller agreements
over the decades, Mr. Kagans efforts bore fruit in 2001,
when Austrias government and industry jointly agreed to
a $500 million compensation and restitution package for
Kagan
FROM PAGE 41
Jewish World
JS-43
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 43
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the countrys Jewish survivors. That deal was brokered by
the U.S. State Department in the final days of the Clinton
Administration.
Saul Kagan was born in Vilna, Lithuania, in 1922. He left
in 1940 and traveled by trans-Siberian railroad to Vladivo-
stok. From there, he sailed to Japan, then on to Hawaii, to
San Francisco, and finally to relatives in New York.
After settling there, Mr. Kagan joined the U.S. Air Force.
He was assigned to a special intelligence unit that pro-
vided close air support to U.S. infantry. He landed on a
Normandy beach three days after D-Day, and he took part
in the Battle of the Bulge.
After the war, Mr. Kagan served as a colonel in the
U.S. military government in Berlin. As chief of financial
intelligence, he uncovered the role the German banking
system played in financing the war and in the confis-
cation of Jewish property. The information Mr. Kagan
uncovered was used in the Nuremberg war crimes trials.
From the beginning of his tour in Germany, Mr. Kagan
recalled in 2002, he encountered many Jewish and non-
Jewish slaves along the roads. I came across survivors of
all kinds.
Those encounters determined for Mr. Kagan the road
he felt he had to take for the rest of his life.
In 1947, he helped promulgate U.S. Government Mili-
tary Order #59, which gave Holocaust survivors or families
of victims the ability to file claims for property confiscated
by the Nazis. Mr. Kagan then was asked to create the first
asset restitution body, which became known as the Jewish
Restitution Successor Organization. In 1951, the JRSO gave
way to the Claims Conference, and Mr. Kagan was named
its executive director.
That brought Mr. Kagan to the center of history in
the making on March 21, 1952, when he and Nahum
Goldmann led the delegation that met with West Ger-
man officials in a castle in Wassenaar in a Hague sub-
urb. The meeting had been called by West German
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, who made no secret
either of his desire to meet the Jewish demand for
reparations, or of his loathing of everything Nazi. As
Mr. Kagan recalled it, however, Adenauers posture
did nothing to ease the tension.
At the opening session, not a greeting was exchanged
between the Jews and the Germans; every word spoken
was icily correct, but no more. Every Jew at the confer-
ence was keenly aware of an invisible presence haunting
that room, the presence of six million dead.
Mr. Kagan also recalled to an interviewer what he
thought before entering that first meeting. Whatever will
come out of these negotiations is not going to be German
philanthropy or charity or goodwill, he said, but it will
be in payment of legally established and legally anchored
claims and demands.
During his six decades with the Claims Conference, Mr.
Kagans memory for details of agreements and negotia-
tions was flawless. He could be asked a question about an
agreement with Austria in the 1960s, for example, and pro-
vide not only details, but historical context and the names
of key players in the talks. He spoke eight languages.
Reparations and restitution were not the only concerns
of the Claims Conference under Mr. Kagan. He was deter-
mined that the memory of the Shoah would never disap-
pear. As such, he led the organization to help establish the
Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial and museum in Jerusa-
lem, as well as its program to honor righteous non-Jews
who risked their own lives to save Jewish lives during the
Holocaust. In 1965, he and Goldmann also oversaw estab-
lishment by the Claims Conference of the Memorial Fund
for Jewish Culture.
Mr. Kagan was buried earlier this week in a private ser-
vice. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; a daughter, Julia,
and two stepchildren, Jonathan and Emily Lobatto.
Jewish World
44 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
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At G.A., fight for
religious pluralism
BEN SALES
JERUSALEM It is a cause that elicited
cheers from a roomful of participants at
the Jewish Federations of North Ameri-
cas General Assembly.
Leading politicians long have cham-
pioned it and are now trying to push it
through a divided Knesset. Nearly two-
thirds of Israelis support it, and activists
say its crucial for ensuring Israels future
as a Jewish and democratic state.
Opponents say it could augur the
downfall of Israel as we know it.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus
stance is hard to read.
Its not peace with the Palestinians or a
military strike on Irans nuclear program.
It is the institution of civil marriage in
Israel.
Under current law, the Orthodox chief
rabbinate in Israel controls marriage for
Jews, which leaves Conservative, Reform,
civil, or same-sex marriages not to
mention interfaith marriages unrecog-
nized by the state.
Responding to growing calls for
change, a bill proposed last month by
the centrist Yesh Atid party would insti-
tute civil unions with the same rights as
the marriages now permitted by the chief
rabbinate.
The Jewish Federations, which held its
annual General Assembly in Jerusalem
this week, soon may be joining that fight.
CEO Jerry Silverman said that the federa-
tions are studying the issue without a
definite goal in mind.
But advocating for religious pluralism
in Israel was a recurring theme at the
assembly. Susie and Michael Gelman, the
confabs North American co-chairs, laid
out that goal on opening night.
We look forward to the day when
Israel will realize the dream of being a
Jewish, democratic, and pluralist state,
they said.
A panel discussion moderated by
Susie Gelman on Monday specifically
addressed the issue of civil marriage,
with five of six panelists advocating
before an enthusiastic crowd.
The panel charged those of us who
attended to get involved and to raise our
voices, Susie Gelman said. In terms
of civil marriage, this is an issue that
touches all of us. It is not just an Israeli
issue.
On Monday night, Labor Party Chair-
woman Shelly Yachimovich said her
party is planning to introduce its own
civil marriage bill.
Delegates to the Jewish Federations of North America General Assembly con-
ducting an egalitarian prayer service at the Western Wall. JFNA
Jewish World
JS-45*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 45
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We support civil marriage and gay
rights, including same-sex marriage,
Yachimovich said. We currently have
a unique opportunity. Parties in the
coalition and opposition are capable of
joining forces to pass this law.
Her speech followed calls by Finance
Minister Yair Lapid to equalize the
Jewish denominations.
Its very important to us that Israel
would be pluralistic, Lapid said.
Civil marriage would not be the first
religious pluralism fray that the Jewish
Federations has entered.
The umbrella group of American Jew-
ish federations was stridently opposed
to the 2010 Rotem bill, which would
have consolidated authority over con-
versions in the hands of the chief rab-
binate. Silverman called it a betrayal,
and Netanyahu suspended debate on
the bill, which still has not come to a
vote, three years later.
More recently, the Jewish Federa-
tions advocated for a plan formulated
by Jewish Agency for Israel Chairman
Natan Sharansky to expand Robin-
sons Arch, a non-Orthodox prayer site
immediately south of the Western Wall
plaza.
The plan has received support, in
principle, from Women of the Wall,
the womens prayer group whose
monthly services at the wall brought
global attention to the issue. Western
Wall Rabbi Shmuel Rabinowitz also has
given the plan his tacit approval.
Netanyahu endorsed the idea to rau-
cous cheers in his Sunday night speech
at the G.A.
The Kotel is in Israel, but the Kotel
belongs to all the Jewish people, the
prime minister said, using the Hebrew
term for the wall. We have to consult
together and reach a solution together.
On Tuesday, the G.A. ended with
hundreds of delegates walking from
Jerusalem City Hall to Robinsons Arch,
where they participated in an egali-
tarian prayer service. Speaking after-
ward, Sharansky praised the service as
an example of Jewish unity, though he
acknowledged that the temporary plat-
form erected there is only a first step to
a solution.
Were not fighting to defeat the
other, Sharansky said. Were fighting
to see how we can be one people with
one God, one prayer, and one Kotel.
Regardless of whether the federa-
tions support it, Yesh Atids civil unions
bill is likely to fail in the Knesset. The
Jewish Home party is expected to block
the measure a prerogative it enjoys
as a member of the governing coalition.
Yesh Atid ran for Knesset on a plat-
form opposing Orthodox privileges in
Israeli law. But while the party has won
Jewish Homes support in ending the
charedi Orthodox exemption to Israels
mandatory military draft, Jewish Home
opposes any change to the religious sta-
tus quo.
A Jewish Home bill passed last month
allows Israelis to register for marriage
anywhere in the country, not just in
their home districts a move that elim-
inates one of the more onerous restric-
tions of the marriage laws but leaves
the Orthodox-controlled system intact.
But judging from the tenor of this
years G.A., such changes wont sat-
isfy North American Jewry. While he
emphasized that the Jewish Federations
had not made a decision on whether to
engage in the civil-marriage debate,
Michael Gelman said he personally felt
that American Jews should be assertive
in advocating for marriage reform in
Israel.
When it comes to things that affect
worldwide Jewry, we need to get
involved, he said. There needs to be a
lot of noise coming out of North Amer-
ica on this issue.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Jewish Federations of North America CEO Jerry Silverman, left, and Jewish
Agency for Israel chair Natan Sharansky, second from left, lead a march to
the Western Wall. JFNA
Jewish World
46 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-46
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BRIEFS
Iraqi Jewish Archive
goes on display in Washington
The U.S. National Archives is now dis-
playing 24 out of 2,700 Jewish books and
ancient documents that were recovered
in the basement of the Iraqi intelligence
ministry, the Mukhabarat, during the
U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. The exhibit
opened November 8 and will run through
January 5.
According to an agreement the U.S.
signed with Iraqi authorities, the collection
known as the Iraqi Jewish Archive will
be returned to the Iraqi government when
its restoration is complete. But the Iraqi
Jewish community says the Saddam Hus-
sein government originally confiscated the
materials from a synagogue in 1984.
Stanley Urman, executive vice presi-
dent of Justice for Jews from Arab Coun-
tries, said, We believe the agreement is
based on a flawed premise, that premise
being that the archives are the property
of the Iraqi government. Our question is
how did they get into the basement of
the Mukhabarat?
A State Department official said last
month that the departments primary
concern in bringing the objects to the
United States was that they be pre-
served, conserved, restored, and exhib-
ited for the benefit of the Iraqi Jewish
community, as well as posterity.
JNS.ORG
Israel beats Guinness record
for donating hair to cancer patients
Israel broke the Guinness world record
for donating the most hair to cancer
victims in a single drive, producing
117 pounds on Monday, Israel Hayom
reported. The previous Guinness
record was 107 pounds.
About 250 women attended the hair
drive in Jerusalem, organized by the
Zichron Menachem Association for the
Support of Children with Cancer and
Their Families, which worked in con-
junction with the Pantene hair prod-
ucts company. Among the donors were
three sisters whose father is battling
cancer and a young girl who had recov-
ered from the disease and donated the
wig she wore during her illness.
JNS.ORG
Pollards Mossad handler:
I was promised he would be freed
Former Israeli cabinet minister Rafi
Eitan, the ex-Mossad agent who han-
dled Jonathan Pollard in the mid-1980s,
told Army Radio on Monday that he
handed over incriminating informa-
tion about Pollard because the U.S.
had promised Israel that Pollard would
serve no more than 10 years in prison.
Pollard, now 59, was arrested by U.S.
authorities in 1985 and later convicted
of spying for Israel. November 21 marks
the 28th anniversary of his incarcera-
tion. He is the only person in U.S. his-
tory to receive a life sentence for spying
for an American ally.
Culture and Sport Minister Limor
Livnat said Monday that the Israeli gov-
ernment should condition any further
gestures to the Palestinians, including
the release of terrorists, on the United
States freeing Pollard.
JNS.ORG
Kerry criticized on Palestinian comments
American Jewish leaders, in interviews
published Sunday by the Algemeiner,
blasted U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
for his comments last week on the Israeli-
Palestinian conflict.
Kerry had said that failed Israeli-Pales-
tinian conflict negotiations could lead to a
third Palestinian intifada, and that the U.S.
agrees with the Palestinian Authoritys
position that Israeli construction beyond
the 1967 lines is illegitimate and presents
an obstacle to peace.
Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chair-
man of the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organizations,
said, The danger [of Kerrys comments]
is that you legitimate an escalation by say-
ing that because there is no progress it
can start an intifada. There are elements
there that will use this to legitimize what
[the Palestinians] are doing.
Daniel Mariaschin, executive vice presi-
dent of Bnai Brith International, said
Kerry introduced views that can only
complicate the [negotiations] process.
It would be more productive to exhort
the parties to work toward compromise,
rather than speculating on worst-case sce-
narios, Mariaschin said.
And Abraham Cooper, associate dean at
the Simon Wiesenthal Center, said, Why
would the Palestinians negotiate on any-
thing when the secretary of state calls
settlements illegal, when he says Israeli
troops have to leave the west bank, when
he increases aid to the PA when their cor-
ruption infuriates the Palestinian street,
and seems to make no demands for Pales-
tinians to once and for all stop the attacks
on their neighbors legitimacy? JNS.ORG
Healthy Living & Adult Lifestyles
JS-47
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 47
Cancer-resistant mole rat may yield ultimate cure clue
We have a clinical goldmine in our hands, and we must dig deeper,
says lead Israeli researcher proposing that wild blind mole rats replace lab mice.
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
Picture the cancer research lab of the future: white
coats, test tubes, and, if Prof. Aaron Avivi at Haifa Univer-
sity has his way cages of mole rats.
Pioneering studies in Israel appear to demonstrate that
the subterranean Israeli blind mole rat, Spalax, is far supe-
rior to lab mice for the purpose of cracking the mystery
of human cancer.
These wild rodents are extremely resistant to cancer
and live 10 times as long as mice, according to Prof. Avivi,
head of the Laboratory of Subterranean Mammals Biology
in the Evolution Institute of Haifa University, and senior
researchers Imad Shams, Ph.D., and Dr. Irena Manov.
Farmers may hate these hairy, sausage-shaped pests
that live in underground tunnels, but cancer researchers
will learn to love them, Prof. Avivi promises.
We claim that defense mechanisms developed along
tens of million years of evolution must necessarily be a
better key to solving cancer and not the cancer-prone,
short-lived inbred rat and mouse that are already labora-
tory products, Prof. Avivi says.
We truly believe that we have found the potential
missing good organism that the community of cancer
researchers is seeking to progress in our effort to solve
cancer in humans.
Their remarkable longevity and lack of age-related dis-
eases is also being studied by Israeli and other scientists
around the world.
Why dont they get cancer?
Since retired Prof. Eviatar Nevo initiated Spalax research
40 years ago at the Haifa campus, none of the thousands
of animals ever developed spontaneous tumors.
Prof. Avivi and his colleagues suspect the creatures
cancer resistance is tied to their ability to survive abrupt
and sharp changes in oxygen supply. Hypoxia, a condition
caused by a lack of oxygen, leads to human heart and lung
diseases, brain strokes and cancer.
The fact that it is tolerant to hypoxia is related to the
fact that it is free of ailments as it ages, and we deduce
that this is the reason why it survives over 20 years, while
rats of the same size and weight survive only four years,
Prof. Avivi says.
The teams August article in BMC Biology proved for the
first time that it is nearly impossible to induce cancer in
the BMR through treatment with carcinogens that always
caused tumors in mice and rats.
The diamond in the crown is that normal cells propa-
gated from this little animal fight off cancer cells from dif-
ferent tissues and different species, including human. The
same cells from control groups of lab mice, rats and wild
spiny mice lack this remarkable ability.
Our effort now is to try and identify, isolate and purify
the substance/s that only the blind mole-rat secretes, and
to discover with what component/s it interacts that is
active only on cancer cells, he says. This might lead to a
medicine for humans suffering from cancer.
The search for funding
So far, so good.
The problem is that grant proposals from Prof. Avivis
team get routinely rejected, on the grounds that funding
sources are not familiar with this wild, natural organism,
and will not support studies on non-classical organisms,
Prof. Avivi explains.
Last year, the popular journal Nature devoted an editorial
to this frustrating situation.
We do not underestimate the huge amount of knowledge
accumulated from decades of cancer studies on mice, Prof.
Avivi says. They have taught us a great deal on cancer initia-
tion, progression, inhibition and cure in mice.
Yet, many leading cancer researchers agree with MIT
Prof. Robert Weinbergs statement to Newsweek in 2008:
Mice have little predictive value and a negligible relation to
human cancer. Far more than anything else, the lack of good
experimental animals has become the rate-limiting step in
human cancer research.
Our results are original, never have been demonstrated
or published, and open a completely new horizon in cancer
research for human welfare, claims Prof. Avivi.
The world scientific community has encouraged the Israeli
team.
We concluded that we have a clinical goldmine in our
hands, and we must dig deeper, asserts Prof. Avivi.
ISRAEL21C.ORG
Healthy Living & Adult Lifestyles
48 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-48
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Easy ways to improve
your smile
RACHEL JACOBS, DMD
A beautiful smile can increase your confidence and make
everyday life more enjoyable. With modern dentistry
techniques, you may be able to achieve the white, per-
fectly straight teeth of your dreams without the lengthy
and costly route of braces. Here are 3 quick solutions for
a better smile.
Whitening is the easiest way to give you a brighter,
more youthful smile. Within 1 hour, we can get your teeth
eight to ten shades lighter and remove those nasty stains.
Bonding, or tooth colored fillings, can improve the
shape, color and size of teeth in just one short visit. This
is the best option for small chips, discolorations, or even
small gaps between teeth, with a price that will fit most
budgets.
Veneers are thin shells of porcelain that are fabricated
in a lab and bonded to teeth. Veneers can change the size,
shape, color, and even the position of teeth. Done in as
little as 2 visits, most veneers require very little or even no
preparation of teeth. That means no drilling and no shots.
Porcelain veneers can be as thin as .3 mm the thick-
ness of a contact lens and are great for misaligned teeth,
chips, cracks, and small or misshapen teeth. Once they
are bonded to teeth, they are extremely strong. Think of
them as a good alternative to braces, and a chance to have
a permanently white smile.
We can help you decide which route is the best for your
teeth. You dont have to settle when you can have a com-
plete smile makeover in no time at all.
Dr. Rachel Jacobs is in practice with her father, Dr. Herbert
Schneider. Their office has been consistently voted as one of
the top dental practices in Bergen County by 201 Magazine.
For more information, visit www.dumontdentist.com.
TravelJules: A
companion for your
Israel travel
TravelJules is a new company dedicated to providing
companions and assistants for travel to and from Israel.
Travelers who prefer not to travel alone or who have mild
disabilities will appreciate the peace of mind that comes
from traveling with a friendly, knowledgeable, bilingual
companion.
For people who wish to pursue philanthropic work,
attend special occasions, visit relatives, or enjoy luxury
travel, TravelJules will take you! Services include com-
panionship and assistance for door-to-door travel and
throughout your stay in Israel if you wish. (Costs include
expenses and a daily fee.)
Owner Julie Haskovitz takes care of her guests like they
are family, making every effort to ensure that their travel
needs are met and that they have a comfortable, memora-
ble and enjoyable experience. She has more than 30 years
of experience as an executive assistant to prominent busi-
nesspeople and judges in both Israel and the U.S. Small or
large requests are welcomed with equal enthusiasm and
it is her goal to be the catalyst for bringing together every
trip in a way that is meaningful to her guests. Her pas-
sion lies in sharing Israel with others. TravelJules works
with your travel agents or invites you to use their team
of experts.
For more information, call (612) 616-9195, email
jules1116@gmail.com, or visit traveljules.com.
Free CEU seminar for registered nurses
Registered nurses from throughout northern New Jersey are
invited to attend a free seminar on the legal aspects of doc-
umentation in various long-term care settings on Thursday,
December 12. The seminar, titled Risks in Health Care: How
to Avoid Walking on Thin Ice will be held at The Lester Senior
Housing Community, 903-905 Route 10 East in Whippany.
The presenter is Georgette Bieber, RNC, LNCC, an expert in
clinical care coordination and compliance. She is currently
the director of clinical services at Dellridge Health & Rehabili-
tation Center in Paramus.
Registration and breakfast are at 8:30 a.m.; the seminar will
run from 9:00 to 11:30 a.m. The program will cover the dos
and donts of documentation in New Jersey in skilled nursing
facilities, assisted living facilities, and adult day care centers,
with a focus on long-term care patients. Upon completion of
the seminar, attendees will earn 2.5 continuing education cred-
its. Seating is limited and pre-registration is requested by Fri-
day, December 6, 2013; contact Laurie Loughney, COO at (973)
530-3962 to reserve a seat. The Lester Senior Housing Commu-
nity is located on the Aidekman campus of the JCC MetroWest.
Healthy Living
JS-49
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 49
Want to know about
Heritage Pointe of Teaneck?
Who better to hear it from than
the people who live here.
Listen to what our residents have to say at
www.heritagepointeofteaneck.com
(Heritage Pointe resident testimonials).
For a tour call Joel Goldin at
201-836-9260
www.heritagepointeofteaneck.com
600 Frank W. Burr Boulevard, Teaneck, New Jersey
When I Leave My
Sons House,
I Tell Him Im Going
Back to Utopia
Heritage Pointe
of Teaneck
www.jstandard.com
Easy ways to improve
your smile
RACHEL JACOBS, DMD
A beautiful smile can increase your confidence and make
everyday life more enjoyable. With modern dentistry
techniques, you may be able to achieve the white, per-
fectly straight teeth of your dreams without the lengthy
and costly route of braces. Here are 3 quick solutions for
a better smile.
Whitening is the easiest way to give you a brighter,
more youthful smile. Within 1 hour, we can get your teeth
eight to ten shades lighter and remove those nasty stains.
Bonding, or tooth colored fillings, can improve the
shape, color and size of teeth in just one short visit. This
is the best option for small chips, discolorations, or even
small gaps between teeth, with a price that will fit most
budgets.
Veneers are thin shells of porcelain that are fabricated
in a lab and bonded to teeth. Veneers can change the size,
shape, color, and even the position of teeth. Done in as
little as 2 visits, most veneers require very little or even no
preparation of teeth. That means no drilling and no shots.
Porcelain veneers can be as thin as .3 mm the thick-
ness of a contact lens and are great for misaligned teeth,
chips, cracks, and small or misshapen teeth. Once they
are bonded to teeth, they are extremely strong. Think of
them as a good alternative to braces, and a chance to have
a permanently white smile.
We can help you decide which route is the best for your
teeth. You dont have to settle when you can have a com-
plete smile makeover in no time at all.
Dr. Rachel Jacobs is in practice with her father, Dr. Herbert
Schneider. Their office has been consistently voted as one of
the top dental practices in Bergen County by 201 Magazine.
For more information, visit www.dumontdentist.com.
Senior living community
seeks nurses and certified aides
In spite of an 8.5 percent unemploy-
ment rate in New Jersey, there are
abundant nursing job opportunities in
the assisted living and long-term care
field. According to Laurie Loughney,
chief operating officer of the Jewish
Community Housing Corporation of
Metropolitan New Jersey ( JCHC), job
prospects for acute and long-term care
nurses, nurse assistants, and certified
medication aides are strong due to the
growing population of elderly people,
and longer life spans.
This is exactly the case at The Lester
Senior Housing Community in Whip-
pany, which is owned and managed by
the JCHC. The community offers both
independent and assisted living arrange-
ments, and has a fully equipped on-site
Wellness Center to administer to resi-
dents healthcare needs. It is actively
seeking nursing aides, certified medica-
tion aides, and registered nurses to care
for the residents at its Weston Assisted
Living Residence. Weekday, weekend,
and overnight positions are open for
qualified candidates as:
Full-time personal care aides either
certified nursing aide (CNA) or certified
home health aide (CHHA)
Full-time certified medication aides
(CMA)
Part-time registered nurses (RN) for
weekends and evenings
Per diem CNAs and RNs
This is a great career pathway for
the new person in health care, said Ms.
Loughney, who started her health care
career as a nursing aide over 30 years
ago. Lessons I learned as a nursing aide
gave me the foundation to grow into
high-level management positions.
Since the passage in 1987 of the Nurs-
ing Home Reform Act and the standards
of care it stipulates, nurses and certified
nursing aides are now recognized as the
most vital and viable care team mem-
bers. To that end, Weston Assisted Liv-
ing provides an incubator for education,
experience, and commitment to the care
of the elderly, with strong emphasis on
skill training and hands-on experience.
Our internal training, coupled with
the extensive programs and services we
offer at the community, allow our nurs-
ing and medication aides to explore
other career avenues and grow in the
assisted living field, explained Ms.
Loughney. We encourage anyone with
the right certifications and the right
heart to apply for our open jobs.
As part of its commitment to providing
quality care for its residents and a career
path for employees, the residence is will-
ing to train new RNs and CHHAs who
apply for the open positions. The com-
munity will also host a free seminar on
December 12 for registered nurses who
will earn continuing education credits
upon completion of the program.
All full-time wellness employees at
the senior living community receive full
benefits, competitive pay, and have the
potential to build a rewarding career in
the assisted living field through ongo-
ing training and opportunities for
advancement.
The Lester Senior Housing Commu-
nity has 55 apartments for older adults
who require assisted living accommoda-
tionsone of the smallest of its kind in
New Jerseyand 120 apartments in its
Margaret & Martin Heller Independent
Living Apartments. All residents have
access to medical professionals on site
including a physician, dentist and podia-
trist, and a telemedicine system that can
send test results directly to their phy-
sicians. In addition, individuals in the
Weston Assisted Living Residence may
receive assistance from licensed practi-
cal nurses, certified medication aides,
and certified nursing assistants; and
medication monitoring and administra-
tion under an RNs supervision in the
Wellness Centers medical suite.
Our assisted living home offers an
intimate, warm environment for both
our residents and our staff, said Harold
Colton-Max, CEO of the JCHC, which also
owns and manages three other senior
communities located in Essex County.
We are actively seeking applicants
whose first qualifications are a positive
attitude and sincere desire to work with
older adults.
Anyone interested in applying for
a position as a certified nursing aide,
certified medication aide, or regis-
tered nurse should contact Alex Gross
at (973) 929-2747. The Lester Senior
Housing Community is located at 903-
905 Route 10 East in Whippany, on the
Aidekman campus of the JCC MetroW-
est. For directions or more information
visit www.jchcorp.org.
Learn how to navigate Medicare
Congregation Shomrei Torah in Wayne
is offering a program for those involved
with Medicare or approaching that age.
Learn how to navigate Medicare, Sup-
plement a Insurance and prescription
drug plans.
The program, sponsored by the Mens
Club of Shomrei Torah, will take place 8
p.m. November 20 at Shomrei Torah, 30
Hinchman Ave., Wayne.
Healthy Living
50 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-50

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Three
dimensions
plus time
RICHARD PORTUGAL
T
he universe we humans inhabit is huge,
almost beyond reckoning. It seems to
stretch past the limits of knowledge, both
in wonder and light-years. To conceive
its majesty is simply to stare into space on a star-
lit night and realize you are peering back in time,
but simultaneously into the future. We ponder on
matter, on anti-matter, on dark matter, and on dark
energy. Sub-atomic particles, the Higgs boson, and
before the big bang all enter our vocabulary as
if these large concepts are easily assimilated and
understood.
We are told that this is a multidimensional uni-
verse, possibly ten dimensions or more. But we live
in a three-dimensional world with a fourth dimen-
sion of time that gives direction to depth, height, and
length. The human experience, our reality, seems to
be bordered by these three dimensions plus time. Yet
there are two facets of our minds which bestow upon
us such abilities to wonder and conceive that perhaps
they should be considered the super dimensions.
We are blessed with memory and imagination, a
combination which permits us to ponder the uni-
verse, accept its grandiosity, and appreciate its
layers. We can imagine big, appreciate the small,
remember the past, and believe in the future. We
can witness a shooting star and recall a night walking
hand-in-hand with a loved one or contemplate Ein-
steins world of mass, energy, gravity, and the speed
of light. It seems to me we live way beyond our lim-
ited three dimensions, permitting our memory and
imagination to take us to the stars.
And this is especially true for each individual as
time guides us inexorably towards the end of our
sojourn on our green planet. As our universe is
expanding, changing and racing towards its own
conclusion, so do we humans race towards our sin-
gular end. As our planet earth, some four billion
years from now, will be consumed by our life giving
sun, so do our individual bodies mature into the sun-
set within a normal lifespan of about eighty years.
So how do we, in so few years, learn so much about
our almost timeless universe? How can we appreci-
ate a shooting star for its romantic overtones and
Memory and
imagination enable
the human species to
be creative, to see
beyond the veil of
three dimensions, to
dance with time even
as it warps the very
fabric of our universe.
Healthy Living
JS-51
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 51
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Spice Up Your Holiday Table:
NE W WAY S OF COOK I NG WI T H P UMP K I N
Monday,
November 18th
10:30 am
FI VE STAR
PREMI ER RESI DENCES
OF TEANECK
Join us for a cooking demonstration presented by our executive chef, Rob Derin.
Sample new takes on the familiar fall favorite, and discover all the ingredients for
engaging retirement living.
Pet
Friendly
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Like us
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jewishstandard
concurrently value its complicated scientific con-
cepts? How does living in three dimensions plus time
permit us to contemplate ten dimensions?
Memory and imagination enable the human spe-
cies to be creative, to see beyond the veil of three
dimensions, to dance with time even as it warps the
very fabric of our universe. We know that time can
speed up or slow down. Einstein and the astronauts
have proven those principles. We know that the uni-
verse is expanding due to dark matters gravitational
pull. We also know that there exists dark energy and
miniscule strings that vibrate and may be the basis
of the universes very existence. We know these
things to be true, but it is our ability to remember
and imagine that makes our universe pulsate to the
rhythms of our daily existence.
We humans are magical. We do not require wands
or incantations. We require only that our minds
function and that our bodies perform. We can con-
template physics and envision a power greater
than physics. We can diagram an atom and postu-
late sub-atomic particles; and we can create music
and art which seem to capture our universes gran-
deur as well as its simplicity. We are practical and
we are dreamers; we demonstrate memory and
imagination.
But as seniors, can that magic erode or disap-
pear? Normal aging is witness to our brains slight
shrinkage. We simply do not hydrate as efficiently
as in younger days; our cells do not retain water in
an economical manner and thereby the brain liter-
ally decreases in size. This does affect our neurons
and gives rise to a harmless forgetfulness as misplac-
ing your keys or a lack of effectual noun retrieval.
This is easily overcome through concentration,
mind tricks, or using spellcheck. Normal aging
translates to a conscious utilization of memory and
imagination.
But what of Alzheimers, Parkinsons, and a host
of other auto-immune diseases that attack the brain
with devastating consequences? Are memory and
imagination ruthlessly destroyed? Is the magic gone?
To some degree, of course! It is not in the nature of
these diseases to be forgiving. It is in their nature to
be progressive and brutal. Yet it is a constant wonder
to me that a human being so infected with a vicious
disease will not easily relinquish their memories
and imagination. There exists a willfulness born of
the human spirit which tenaciously clings to their
humanity.
I have witnessed clients with advanced dementia
perfectly sing along, with words and rhythm, to the
Big Band songs from the 1940s; another, who could
not walk, successfully dance to tunes from her youth;
and another, in a beautiful soprano voice, hum to the
strains of a Chopin etude or a Strauss waltz. These
are not miracles, for their brain cells are being
attacked and their neural pathways encumbered.
But the human dimensions of memory and imagina-
tion do not go lightly into the night. These magical
dimensions of memory and imagination tenaciously
hang on even with the insult of progressive diseases.
Even though there is as yet no cure and we are ulti-
mately felled, there is still wonder to behold in the
songs and motion of our memories and imagination.
Richard Portugal is the founder and owner of Fitness
Senior Style, which exercises seniors for balance,
strength, and cognitive fitness in their own homes. He
has been certified as a senior trainer by the American
Senior Fitness Association. For further information,
call (201) 937-4722.
Memory and
imagination enable
the human species to
be creative, to see
beyond the veil of
three dimensions, to
dance with time even
as it warps the very
fabric of our universe.
Healthy Living & Adult Lifestyles
52 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-52
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www.teaneckdentist.com
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New device for sleep apnea
is easier on the heart
Israeli companys SomnuSeal mask is more comfortable
and it protects cardiac health too
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
A
sound night of sleep is only a dream for
at least 15 million Americans and 350 mil-
lion people worldwide who suffer from
obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This most
common form of sleep apnea is caused by tissues in
the throat obstructing the airway during sleep. It leads
to frequent awakenings and potentially also to severe
cardiopulmonary complications as the heart and lungs
are deprived of adequate oxygen.
The Israeli company Discover Medical is introducing
a product to make the most effective treatment option
more tolerable.
The problem theyre addressing is discomfort and
irritation caused by the mask that gets strapped over
the nose and mouth to deliver continuous positive
air pressure (CPAP) from a special machine. In 2011,
CPAP interface sales totaled about $1.4 billion. How-
ever, more than half of diagnosed sleep apnea patients
would rather live with the condition which is costly
to their health and to the healthcare system.
Discovers SomnuSeal, a unique mask for CPAP
machines, is a small, self-adjusting device that fits
between lips and teeth like a boxers mouth guard. It
does not touch the nose, lips or tongue and requires
no straps.
Two clinical trials at independent sleep labs in Israel
showed that 22 percent of people who have refused to
use other CPAP masks were fully compliant with Som-
nuSeal, which earned the European CE Mark in 2010.
It will be another option for me to offer my
patients, says Dr. Giora Pillar, associate professor of
sleep medicine at the Technion-Israel Institute of Tech-
nology and director of the Sleep Medicine Lab at Clalit
Health Services in Haifa. He conducted trials of Som-
nuSeal on patients with moderate to severe OSA who
were going untreated because of discomfort from the
regular CPAP mask.
Translated into market potential, even this moder-
ately increased compliance rate represents possible
increased revenues of $3 billion per year for the mar-
ket-leading supplier of CPAP masks.
These results are extremely encouraging in this
difficult field, says Dr. Brian Glenville of Jerusalem, a
director of the company.
Discover is now seeking an investment of $3 million
to $4 million to begin marketing the one-size-fits-all
device. If well-received in Europe, the company would
then set its sights on the US market, Glenville says.
Better for heart health
Dr. Glenville, formerly a cardiothoracic surgeon in
England and now an adviser to Israeli high-tech com-
panies, learned about the device three years ago at an
International Biotechnology Conference in Tel Aviv.
As he listened to CEO Eran Lavi describe Som-
nuSeal, Dr. Glenville realized it had a secondary but
critical advantage its inventors hadnt fully appreci-
ated: It allows the CPAP machine to apply two times
less air pressure than usual.
Because of my background in cardiac surgery, I
know that if you have heart disease, the last thing you
want to do is apply additional pressure, Dr. Glenville
says.
Dr. Glenville explains that about one-third of
patients with sleep apnea also have some form of car-
diac dysfunction.
When I heard there was a mask found to work at
lower pressure, I almost bit Erans arm off. I said, Do
you understand what you have here? I was pleased
the mask is comfortable and doesnt need nasal pegs
and straps, but the implications of the lower pressure
are significant.
Discover Medical raised startup capital from Israels
Office of the Chief Scientist of the Ministry of Industry
and Trade; from Yehuda Zisapel of the RAD Group;
and from private investors. Cofounded with Dr. David
Madjar, former chief of oral rehabilitation at Sheba
Medical Center, Discover is hosted in RADs incubator
in Givatayim.
The mask is manufactured in Israel of high-grade
medical plastic.
We are absolutely sure there is nothing quite like it
out there, Dr. Glenville says. The nearest thing was
a New Zealand companys mask that was similar to
ours and it worked brilliantly, but it touched both lips
and tongue and as a consequence it wasnt marketable
because patients could never habituate to it.
Sleep specialist Dr. Pillar points out that 78 percent
of the 50 non-compliant patients in his SomnuSeal tri-
als remained non-compliant.
But if we manage to convert the 22 percent from
untreated patients to treated patients, its dramatic
for them and for society, he says. Sleep apnea is a
substantial and common disease with a lot of conse-
quences to health and a lot of burden on the health-
care system.
ISRAEL21C.ORG
It will be another
option for me to offer
my patients.
DR. GIORA PILLAR
www.jstandard.com
Healthy Living
JS-53
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 53
Wishing you a
Happy Passover


The Chateau
At Rochelle Park

96 Parkway
Rochelle Park, NJ 07662
201 226-9600


Sub Acute Rehabilitative Care Center for Hospital After Care


After care is so important to a patients recovery once a patient is released from the
hospital the real challenges often begin the challenges they now have to face as they
try and regain their strength and independence.

Here at The Chateau we combine the very same sophisticated technologies and
techniques used by leading hospitals with hands on skilled rehabilitative/nursing care.
Sub Acute care ensures that patients return home with the highest degree of function
possible.

Our Care Service
Ventilator Care/Vent-Dialysis
IV Therapy
Tracheotomy Care
Physical, Speech and Occupational Therapy
Physician Supervised Wound Care
On-Site Internal Medicine Physicians
24 Hour Nursing Care

For more information, or to schedule a tour of The Chateau at Rochelle Park,
please call our Admissions Department at 201 336-9317



Wishing you a
Happy Passover


The Chateau
At Rochelle Park

96 Parkway
Rochelle Park, NJ 07662
201 226-9600


Sub Acute Rehabilitative Care Center for Hospital After Care


After care is so important to a patients recovery once a patient is released from the
hospital the real challenges often begin the challenges they now have to face as they
try and regain their strength and independence.

Here at The Chateau we combine the very same sophisticated technologies and
techniques used by leading hospitals with hands on skilled rehabilitative/nursing care.
Sub Acute care ensures that patients return home with the highest degree of function
possible.

Our Care Service
Ventilator Care/Vent-Dialysis
IV Therapy
Tracheotomy Care
Physical, Speech and Occupational Therapy
Physician Supervised Wound Care
On-Site Internal Medicine Physicians
24 Hour Nursing Care

For more information, or to schedule a tour of The Chateau at Rochelle Park,
please call our Admissions Department at 201 336-9317



Sub Acute Rehabilitative Care Center for Hospital After Care
Alaris Health at The Chateau
At Rochelle Park
96 Parkway Rochelle Park, NJ 201-226-9600
For more information, or to schedule a tour of Alaris Health at Te Chateau at
Rochelle Park, please call our Admissions Department at 201 336-9317
Family owned community
Spacious, fully furnished apartments
Daily Lifestyle Activities to enrich mind, body & spirit
RN Director of Wellness Program
Respite Program available
Licensed by NYSDOH
Conveniently located on the Rockland/Bergen border
The Esplanade at Chestnut Ridge
168 Red Schoolhouse Rd.
Chestnut Ridge, NY 10977
845-620-0606
www.EsplanadeChestnutRidge.com
where our residents maintain the level of independence
they desire while receiving the care they need.
(Resident, Lillian Grunfeld with her daughter,
Dir. of Community Relations, Debbie Corwin)

C
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ur W
armth
ES P L ANADE
T H E
C H E S T N U T R I D G E
L U X U R Y A S S I S T E D L I V I N G
Visit our other locations at
www.PromenadeSenior.com
Be a part
of our Family
Welcome Home Care
offers essential services to seniors
Welcome Home Care of Englewood
Cliffs is a nonmedical home health care
agency that is licensed, bonded, and
insured in New Jersey. The staff offers a
variety of services that allow seniors to
enjoy their lives to the fullest.
Services are customized to each cli-
ents needs and capabilities by Welcome
Home Cares licensed and registered
nurses. The staff of certified home health
aides and certified nursing assistants are
licensed by the state and provide com-
passionate and high quality care to each
client. All certified aides are overseen by
nurses.
Welcome Home Care provides assis-
tance for daily activities such as com-
panionship, light housekeeping , meal
preparation, as well as basic personal
needs in a clients own home, nursing
home or during a hospital stay. Call (201)
568- 7729 for a free consultation.
Holy Names Dr. Kutzleb
receives nursing award
Dr. Judith Kutzleb received the Mary Anne
Rooney Essence of Nursing Award pre-
sented by New Jersey Consortium Sigma
Theta Tau International (STTI), the nurs-
ing honor society. She earned this presti-
gious award for her contributions to the
profession of nursing, her dedicated men-
torship to those in the field, and her inter-
national mission work.
Dr. Kutzleb is the vice president,
advanced practice professionals at Holy
Name Medical Center, and associate pro-
fessor and coordinator of the Advanced
Nursing Program Track in the graduate
program at Fairleigh Dickinson University
in Teaneck.
In addition to this accomplishment,
Dr. Kutzleb has also been honored by
the Department of Health and Human
Services with a certificate of recogni-
tion for Excellence in Nursing; nomi-
nated by the graduate student body at
Fairleigh Dickinson University for the
Outstanding Teacher Award; named
a finalist in the New York/New Jersey
Nursing Spectrums Nurse of the Year;
and received the Governors Award in
the Educator Category.
www.jstandard.com
Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Healthy Living & Adult Lifestyles
54 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-54
Evening and Friday
hours now available.
Certifed Laser Dentist
Latest in digital X-ray technology
Profcient in all forms of
cosmetic dentistry
Great with children and adults
Sensitive to the needs of the
Orthodox community
Most major insurances accepted
Rachel Jacobs, DMD
55 Grant Ave. Dumont, NJ 07628
201-385-5538
www.DumontDentist.com
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Jacqueline Kates, Community Relations Coordinator
Holy Name Medical Center
Although November is COPD Awareness
Month, most readers probably know very
little about the disease or even what
those initials stand for, despite the many
commercials on television advertising drugs
that treat COPD. According to the American
Lung Association, Chronic Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease is the third leading cause
of death in the United States, surpassed only
by heart disease and cancer, and COPD is
not decreasing as quickly as either of those
conditions. Clearly, this is a disease of which
we all should be more aware.
COPD, which includes emphysema and
chronic bronchitis, is a progressive lung
disorder that makes it difcult to breathe
and can eventually lead to death. Almost
13 million American adults have been
diagnosed with COPD, and the American
Lung Association estimates that 12 million
more people may be suffering with the
disease who have not been diagnosed.
COPD is preventable, however, and
although it cannot be cured, it can be
treated through medications, exercise and
other options that may help improve the
patients quality of life - if the disease is
diagnosed early enough.
Symptoms of COPD include:
Persistent cough
Shortness of breath during everyday
activities
Producing a large amount of sputum
Wheezing
Feeling as if one cant breathe or take a
deep breath
The primary cause of COPD is smoking.
The most important preventative measure
against COPD is not to smoke, or to stop,
if you are a smoker. The number of deaths
among women from COPD has more
than quadrupled since 1980, as smoking
increased among women. Since 2000,
more women than men have died from
the disease. Women are also at greater
risk from other causes of the disease, such
as secondhand smoke, harmful workplace
exposures and outdoor air pollution.
Living with chronic lung disease can be
increasingly debilitating, impacting every
aspect of life. If you or a family member
are at risk, please see your physician and
request a screening for COPD, including a
spirometer breathing test.
On Monday, November 18, Holy Name
pulmonologist Brian Benoff, MD, will
present an Update on Chronic Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease through Holy Names
Center for Healthy Living. The program will
include information about prevention and
early detection as well as recommendations
to help people with COPD to live more
comfortably and with minimal complicating
conditions.
For additional information, or to register for the program, please call HNMCs Ask-a-Nurse at
1-877-HOLY-NAME (1-877-465-9626).
201.530.5956
PTSD passes from mother to child
Israeli study reinforces the importance of evaluating
and treating parental responses in time of stress.
VIVA SARAH PRESS
A new Israeli study shows that preschool children have a
high probability of developing substantial post-traumatic
symptoms if their mothers suffered anxiety as well.
The Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and ASHALIM-
JDC joint study interviewed 160 mothers of preschool chil-
dren (four to six-and-a-half years) about post-traumatic
and psychosomatic symptoms among their children and
also their own response to 2008s Grad missile attacks on
Beersheva during Operation Cast Lead.
The study showed that 8.4 percent of mothers and 21%
of children were suffering substantially from PTSD symp-
toms. There was no association between the diagnosis of
post-traumatic symptoms and socio-demographic vari-
ables. The only risk factor that was associated with the
diagnosis of PTSD among children was having a mother
who also suffered from these symptoms.
The study came about after a team of researchers from
the Department of Epidemiology and Health Services
Evaluation at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, led by
Profs. Danit Shahar and Drora Fraser, were researching
the nutrition habits of preschool children in the southern
city in 2008. In the course of the study, Operation Cast
Lead began and families being evaluated were exposed to
ongoing missile attacks from the Gaza Strip.
Dr. Vered Kaufman-Shriqui, who was conducting the
research as part of her doctoral thesis, turned to the Pre-
school Psychiatric Unit at Soroka University Medical Cen-
ter and, in collaboration with Dr. Michal Faroy and Dr. Gal
Meiri, broadened her study to include the mental state of
the children as well.
This study reinforces the existing body of knowledge
regarding the importance of evaluating and treating
parental responses in time of stress. Parents are often the
key to understanding childrens responses generally and
specifically in times of stress. The study also highlights the
close interrelations between body and soul among chil-
dren and adults.
The research paper was published in the Journal of
Depression & Anxiety. Psychologists Dr. Ilan Harpaz-
Rotem and Dr. Robert Pietrzak from Yale University, and
Dr. Nomi Werbeloff from the Department of Psychiatry,
Sheba Medical Center, Ramat-Gan, contributed to the
development of the paper.
The study was conducted in collaboration with and
funded by the Association for Planning & Development
of Services for Children and Youth at Risk and their
Families, American Jewish Joint Distribution Commit-
tee (ASHALIM-JDC). ISRAEL21C.ORG
JS-55
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 55
CareOne at Teaneck Programs
For Our Jewish Residents and Families
CareOne is committed to satisfying
the cultural and religious needs
of the residents and families
that we serve. For our Jewish
customers, we are pleased
to offer an array of
programs to enhance
each residents
stay with us.
These programs
include:
Celebration of all Jewish holidays with traditional foods. We are Glatt Kosher
Accommodation for residents preferences in Jewish programs and activities
Under Kosher supervision of RCBC
Full calendar of Jewish services and programs
CareOne provides a greater sensitivity to the needs of the Jewish customers we
serve. We strive to meet the needs of all our residents and guarantee your stay
with us.
Visit our Web site at www.care-one.com and take a virtual tour of our center.
5
6
5
1
8
1
544 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666 201-862-3300
Gallery
56 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-56*
1 2
3 4
5 6
7
n 1 The Israeli Scouts of North America orga-
nize a yearly seminar for young leaders from the
United States and Canada. This year it attracted
55 participants, who met at the Wayne YMCA.
The weekend including learning and connect-
ing to Israel and their own Jewish identity. The
Metropolitan YMCA of the Oranges is a partner
of the YM-YWHA of North Jersey. COURTESY YMCA
n 2 Gary Lipman, CEO of the Bergen County
YJCC, gets ready to cut the ribbon for the
Gift Closet, a new shop at the YJCC. With
him are store volunteers Heather Stein, left,
and Liz Sagat. The shop carries Judaica
and gifts for people all ages; right now the
store focuses on Chanukah. COURTESY YJCC
n 3 Women from Bergen County joined the
Chabad Tenafly Mikvah of Lubavitch on the Pali-
sades in celebrating its bat mitzvah year or 12th
anniversary. Sarah Karmely led the inspirational
program and also donated gifts for the recently
renovated mikvah. COURTESY CHABAD WOMENS CIRCLE
n 4 Inge Silbermann, left, and Gerda Roth-
schild, right, residents at the Jewish Home
Assisted Living in River Vale, work on a sun
catcher with recreation aide Gina Viola dur-
ing an arts and crafts class. COURTESY JHAL
n 5 Veterans from the Englewood Recreation
Department partnered with students at the
Moriah School for a flag-folding ceremony
in honor of Veterans Day. COURTESY MORIAH
n 6 Last month, members of Temple Beth Or
in Washington Township enjoyed the Gold-
man Family Scholar-In-Residence program with
Rabbi Rex Perlmeter. From top left, teacher
Jay Glaser, members of TBOs youth group,
and Rabbi Perlmeter. Below, Rabbi Ruth A.
Zlotnick, Cantor Regina Lambert-Hayut, and
youth director Shawn Fogel. COURTESY TBO
n 7 The Ilanot class at Gan Aviv in Fair Lawn
collected leaves to use for projects in the
schools science center. COURTESY GA
Vayishlach: Pay it forward
I
t turns out that to pay it forward
might have its origins in the Torah.
When someone does something
nice for you say, calls to wish you a
happy birthday you have a choice. You can
pay them back, which means to call them
on their birthday. Or you can pay it forward,
which means to do a favor for someone else
entirely. In other words, the first persons
kindness inspires you to pass it on to another.
This week we read in Vayishlach a series of
transitions in Jacobs life. He sends an extrava-
gant gift to his brother Esau in the hopes of
reconciling; he divides his family into two
camps in case Esau decides to attack; he out-
lasts a wrestling man/angel and limps away
with a new name, Israel; he makes amends
with his brother Esau at last.
After this brotherly reconciliation, Jacob
arrived intact (shalem) at the city of Shechem,
which is in the land of Canaan, upon his
arrival from Paddan-Aram. He encamped
(vayihan) before the city (Genesis 33:18).
According to the contextual, or peshat,
reading of the verse, the Torah tells us
that Jacob arrived safely after a trek. It
mentions that Jacob set up camp outside
Shechem. These det ai l s
arent exactly riveting.
But the interpretive read-
ing of the verse, the drash,
speaks of Jacob paying it
forward.
Jacob arrived shalem,
which means complete,
sound, safe. Its the same
root of the word shalom,
peace, because a true peace
i s tot al , compl ete. The
midrash explains that Jacob
arrived with his body safe,
with his children safe, with
his money safe, and with his Torah learn-
ing safe (Beresheet Rabbah 79:5).
The midrash examines these one at a
time.
First, Jacobs body was injured in his
bout with the man/angel. Yet God now
heals Jacob physically, allowing him to
walk without a limp.
Second, Jacobs family was threatened
in the face-off with Esau. Jacob divided
the family into two groups as a means of
cutting his losses in case Esau decided to
attack. Yet Esau offers peace
and spares Jacobs family.
Third, Jacob paid excessively
for his gift to his brother, send-
ing him 550 animals. Yet God
sees to it that Jacob somehow
does not incur a financial loss.
Finally, Jacob neglected
Torah study in his 20 years
with Laban. Yet he some-
how retains his earlier Torah
knowledge.
Even though these four
pieces of Jacobs identity were
seriously threatened his
body, his family, his finances, and his edu-
cation God enables each to recover. Jacob
feels abundant gratitude toward God for
these blessings and thanks God by setting up
an altar and proclaiming Gods name (31:20).
Yet he does this only after paying forward
Gods kindnesses to others. To understand
that, we turn to the Talmud.
Our verse explains that Jacob encamped
(vayihan) facing the city. The rabbis make a
play-on-word with hen, which means grace.
As in, hen vahesed virachamim which
means grace, kindness, and mercy. Under-
stood this way, our verse now means, Jacob
was gracious to the city (BT Shabbat 33b).
The rabbis imagine that immediately
after his four miracles, Jacob extended his
good fortune to the city of Shechem. He
established a new currency, marketplaces,
and bathhouses for these total strangers,
of course none of whom was Jewish. Thus
Jacob paid it forward by sharing his gratitude
not only with God (back) but with the city of
Shechem (forward).
One interesting idea is that Jacobs four
recoveries are the same issues we Americans
concern ourselves with on a national scale:
health insurance, stable families, good wages,
and quality education.
A second idea deals with Chanukahs
upcoming overlap with Thanksgiving. Its a
moment to consider the blessings and grat-
itude we feel for our own Jewish miracles
and pay them forward to a larger group of
strangers who could always use our help
in different ways. By doing so we would
be following Jacobs model, and as such be
in good company. We might even call him
forward-thinking.
Rabbi Alex
Freedman
Temple Emanu-El,
Closter,
Conservative
Dvar Torah
JS-57*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 57
Create a
Jewish
Legacy
Create a
Jewish
Legacy
Jewish Federation
is proud to partner with
Jewish Family Services of North Jersey
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Through Jewish Federation, you can
support Jewish Family Services with
a lasting legacy gift to strengthen the
future of our Jewish community.
LAURIE SIEGEL | legacy@jfnnj.org | 201.820.3956
THE STRENGTH OF A PEOPLE. THE POWER OF COMMUNITY.
58 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-58
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
Friday
November 22nd 8pm
Michael
Feinstein Trio
Sponsored by
The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation
Saturday
November 23rd 8pm
Jackie
Mason
For more information call or email:
Leorah 201-837-8309 lmarcus14@gmail.com
Laurie 201-387-8218 blgopin@verizon.net
Aggie 201-833-1134 x 105 asiletski@sinaischools.org
CHANUKAH
Boutique
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
6:30-10 p.m.
at Marriott Glenpointe
100 Frank W Burr Blvd.
Teaneck, NJ 07666

NEW
LOCATION!
Refreshments from GOTHAM BURGER.
Chanukah Oil
Hats
Judaica
Gifts for Every Occasion
Jewelry
Toys, Games & Stationery
Tablecloths
Childrens & Ladies Clothing
Mens Shirts & Ties
Kippot & Tzitzit
Headbands & Hair Accessories
AND LOTS, LOTS MORE!!
Across
1. Tooth parts
6. New moon, for one
11. Efrem Zimbalist Jr. series, with The
14. Make ___ (succeed a la Loman)
15. Artist Anna
16. Beverly Hills 90210 actor Ziering
17. They resemble the ears of an enemy
of Israel
19. Baggage tag for OHare
20. Ladino water
21. Piece of Commentary
22. Magaziner and Gershwin
23. It can be used to make a kind
of kippah
25. Madeleine Albrights bailiwick, once
27. Subject of the Newsweek cover story
Rhymes with Rich
32. Trading Places producer Aaron
33. Rav Nachmans wifes name
34. ___ HaBayit (Temple Mout)
37. Archeologist-politician Yigael
40. Electricians mantra?
41. Hitler or Eichmann
44. Become violent
47. He was known as the Rama
51. ___ Hermon
52. Separator of a kind
55. How to Draw Comics the Marvel
Way author ___ Lee
57. Little one roped by a cowpoke
60. Cause agitation
61. ___ Somayach (Jerusalem yeshiva)
62. Famous captive from 2006 to 2011
64. Fermented taro root
65. Histadrut demand, perhaps
66. Chaim Topol, famously
67. Shabbat begins when it sets
68. Ma ___ Kettle
69. Sauce type
Down
1. Forward editor Abraham
2. Linguists concern
3. He anointed David
4. Lawyer, at times
5. Al Franken, e.g.: Abbr.
6. Education-minded orgs.
7. Cat sound
8. On ___ (pursuing)
9. Orthodox womans wig
10. Many, many moons
11. First name in New York City history
12. Theda of silent films
13. Sen. Bernie Sanders and others
18. Really small
22. ___ New World (Arlen/Gershwin
song)
24. Rocker Reed
26. First Conservative woman rabbi
Eilberg
28. Solomons great-grandson
29. Rick ____ (Jewish doctor known for
working in Ethiopia)
30. Bible verb ending
31. ___ Suf (The Red Sea)
34. Ikey, Mikey, Jakey, Sam! Were the
boys that eat no ___!
35. Oklahoma! character ___ Annie
36. Trude Weiss-___ (Jewish feminist)
38. Righteous indignation
39. I. V. league?
42. 1940s French Socialist leader Blum
43. Whence many early 90s olim
45. Abbass grp.
46. A nice one in Jerusalem might
oversee the Old City
48. Blazing Saddles extra
49. Not exactly manic
50. Poles with footrests
53. Former New York Governor Spitzer
54. So old its back into fashion
55. Saturates
56. ___ shalt not kill
58. Stunned sound
59. Revelation
62. Elijah of Vilna, for short
63. Chance
The solution to last weeks
crossword puzzle is on page 67.
Arts & Culture
JS-59*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 59
Its not all wine and roses
Israeli-born diva Rinat Shaham talks to the Jewish Standard
WARREN BOROSON
I
f youre among the tippity-top opera
singers, like Rene Fleming, maybe
you enjoy a glamorous life, full of
parties, fine food and fine clothing,
sunny seas, and celebrities. Otherwise,
says Israeli-born mezzo soprano Rinat
Shaham, Its loneliness, baggage, waiting,
cold, disease.
And Shaham is one of the more successful
young opera singers of today. Shes sung in
opera houses around the world, and for
the most famous conductors, including
Sir Simon Rattle, Daniel Barenboim, and
Andre Previn. (Her brother is not the
violinist Gil Shaham, who is no relation, but
the violinist Hagal Shaham.)
By the way, the voices of mezzo
sopranos, like Shahams, are not so high as
those of sopranos, but higher than those of
contraltos.
Her key rol e: Carmen, t he
tempestuous gypsy in George Bizets
opera. Says Rinat Shaham, with a laugh,
It might have to do with the chutzpah I
have, coming from Israel. She has covered
for the lead Carmen at the Metropolitan
Opera House, a hint that someday she
may assume the role there. Shes also
sung Melisande in Pelleas, Charlotte in
Werther, Dorabella in Cosi, Cherubino
in Nozze, and many other roles.
For a diva, she seems very modest and
unpretentious. And her down-to-earth
blog has gotten plenty of attention. (A
memorable line: Lucky I just had a 2nd
look at the full-length mirror.... Back
side of my dress was well tucked into my
undies.)
She was born in Haifa, the daughter
of a music teacher. And early in life
she discovered she had a passion for
performing on stage. She took music
courses in Israel, which she says were quite
good, but finished her musical education
at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.
She has worked with the famous mezzo
Marilyn Horne at the Music Academy of
the West (the chief music critic of the New
York Times once wrote that Horne was
the best mezzo ever to sing at the Met).
It was there that Shaham met her future
husband, violinist and filmmaker Peter
Bucknell, an Australian. She now lives in
New York.
Here are excerpts from a recent phone
interview:
Jewish Standard: Youre a mezzo
soprano. Can you sing soprano roles?
Rinat Shaham: Sometimes. It really
depends on the role and the orchestration.
Where it lays most of the time.
JS: Can you sing contralto? There are
hardly any contraltos around these days.
RS: Its not a matter of can you? Yes, of
course I can sing parts that were written
for contralto and sometimes for soprano,
but it depends on the piece, how it sounds.
Whether the voice is loud enough for the
part written.
JS: There are fewer key roles for mezzos
than there are for sopranos isnt that
true?
RS: I think its almost equally divided. In
most operas, you can find almost all voice
types on stage. Baritone, base, mezzo,
soprano, and everything in between. And
for mezzo sopranos there are different
categories within that title theres a lyric
mezzo and a dramatic mezzo, there are
many different voice types.
JS: How many operas have you learned?
RS: Around 20. In recent years,
Im pretty much typecast into doing
Carmen. So it leaves me a lot of time to
explore many other roles.
JS: Are there any operas you would love
to perform?
RS: There are a few Id like to check
out, and Id like to do some more concert
work, not necessarily opera. Chamber
music, concert work, even acting, some
jazz, some crossover. And operas I havent
sung Don Giovanni, for example.
JS: What about Cenerentola?
RS: Well, thats a Rossini opera. I could,
but its not really my niche.
JS: Did you get good music training in
Israel?
RS: I grew up with music. My father was
a music teacher, and my brother, Hagal,
is a violinist. I started playing the piano
when I was 6, then I went to a high school
for the arts. I had a wonderful music
education there. And then I left and came
to the States, and did my bachelors and
masters in music at the Curtis Institute. All
in all, Im very happy with my education.
JS: When did you come to the United
States?
RS: A long time ago! (laughs)
JS: Are you still an Israeli citizen?
RS: Yes. Of course.
JS: Are you a United States citizen, too?
RS: Yes.
JS: Are you familiar with the long
tradition of Jewish opera singers? Right
now theres Natalie Dessay, who converted
because she married a Jewish man.
RS: Yes, I just sang with him in Vienna.
He [bass-baritone Laurent Naouri] was my
Escamillo.
JS: Fritzi Jokl. Beverly Sills. Richard
Tucker. Joseph Schmidt.
RS: I have studied the history of opera
singing, so we have a pretty good
tradition of cantors, and so originally in
Judaism if you are religious you grow up
learning singing in the synagogue. The
cantors actually use the same technique
as opera singers.
JS: Do you think there may be something
genetic? The cantors were popular, got
married, and had a lot of children with
good voices? Thats a theory.
RS: (laughs) I dont think so. I think its
a matter of technique, and technique is
something that you can learn. Music has
been a big part of Judaism, of this religion,
and the way of living, playing the violin,
thats why you see so many Jewish violinists
throughout history. So when you talk about
the talent and the soul, youre talking
about something that passes through the
generations. I think that being a good opera
singer or a good cantor, on the top of the
soul and on the top of the talent, you have
to have a very solid technique.
JS: When you take a role, do you do
historical research? For Carmen, the
history of the Gypsies?
RS: Yes, a little bit, but not too much
because I dont believe its as important
as getting into the character and
understanding the action. I do research
and read about the background, but my
main work is in the translation of the
piece into English or Hebrew, and then
realizing whats actually happening there,
the undercurrent of the story, what are the
SEE SHAHAM PAGE 63
Calendar
60 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-60*
Friday
NOVEMBER 15
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: The Chabad
Center of NW Bergen
County holds its monthly
character tot Shabbat
with songs, cartoon
character guests, food
crafts, and Southern-
style dinner, for children
up to 6, 4 p.m. 375 Pulis
Ave. (201) 848-0449 or
www.chabadplace.org.
Shabbat celebration:
Shaar Communities
hosts Friday Night
Live! with music and
melodies, inspiring
teachings, spirituality,
creative rituals, activities,
and food, at a private
location, 6:30 p.m.
JoAnne, (201) 213-
9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Shabbat in Ridgewood:
Families with 4- to
13-year-olds are invited
to a participatory service
at Temple Israel & Jewish
Community Center in
Ridgewood, 7 p.m.,
followed by a celebratory
oneg Shabbat. 475 Grove
St. (201) 444-9320 or
office@synagogue.org.
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
services led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and
Cantor Rica Timman with
the Shabbat Unplugged
Band, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.
Saturday
NOVEMBER 16
Shabbat in Jersey
City: Congregation
Bnai Jacob offers Torah
lessons with Cantor
Marsha Dubrow following
services, 9:15 a.m.
Chanukah workshop for
kids and kiddush lunch
follow. (201) 435-5725 or
bnaijacobjc.org.
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai Israel
offers its monthly family
Shabbat, with separate
groups for different ages,
celebrating Chanukah,
10 a.m. Pizza, salads,
and ice cream lunch.
53 Palisade Ave. (201)
265-2272 or bnaioffice@
bisrael.com.
Shabbat in Teaneck:
Scholars-in-residence
Rabbi Elie Kaunfer and
Joey Weisenberg lead
Meaning, Music and
Poetry: A Closer Look
at Tefillah, a special
davening/learning
experience during
Shacharit, between
Mincha and Maariv,
beginning at 4 p.m., at
Congregation Netivot
Shalom. Melave malka to
follow. 811 Palisade Ave.
info@netivotshalomnj.
org.
Gemini
Family entertainment/
dinner in Paramus:
The APT parents
group of the JCC of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah offers
entertainment by Gemini,
including comedy,
ventriloquism, and
magic, 7 p.m. Gemini has
performed in Las Vegas,
Atlantic City, Carolines
Comedy Club, and on
Letterman, Leno, and
HBO. Chinese dinner
and kid-friendly food.
East 304 Midland Ave.
Reservations, (201) 262-
7691, www.jccparamus.
org, or julieleopold@
yahoo.com.
Music in Leonia: Eugene
Marlows Heritage
Ensemble performs
at Congregation Adas
Emuno, 7 p.m. Featured
band members include
Grammy Award-nominee
Bobby Sanabria. Coffee
and dessert. 254 Broad
Ave. (201) 592-1712 or
www.adasemuno.org.
Sunday
NOVEMBER 17
Chanukah concert in
New Milford: Solomon
Schechter Day School
of Bergen Countys
Schechter Rocks For All
Ages, presents a concert
for 2- to 7-year-olds with
Funkey Monkeys! 10 a.m.
www.ssdsbergen.org/
schechter-rocks or (201)
262-9898, ext. 213.
Breakfast/film in Jersey
City: Congregation
Bnai Jacob continues
its Lox n Learning
series with a screening
of The Harmonists,
in commemoration of
Kristallnacht, 10 a.m. Lox
and bagels. 176 West
Side Ave. (201) 435-5725
or bnaijacobjc.org.
Holiday boutique:
The Sisterhood of
the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation
Bnai Israel offers its
vendor boutique, with
handcrafted jewelry,
ceramics, scarves, art,
buckles, makeup, As
Seen on TV items,
Judaica from Priceless
Possessions, and gifts
from Teanecks Cohen
Printing, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.
10-10 Norma Ave. (201)
796- 5040.
Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds Club Katan
for children who will
begin kindergarten
in September 2014,
10:15 a.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801,
ext. 12.
Preschool program in
Ridgewood: Temple
Israel and JCC hosts
Music Speaks, a
program/performance
for help preschoolers and
their younger siblings
celebrate Chanukah,
noon. Also crafts, latkes,
and bagels. 475 Grove
St. (201) 444-9320 or
office@synagogue.org.
Sefer Torah writing
in Woodcliff Lake:
Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley offers
the opportunity to write
a letter in its new sefer
Torah, by appointment,
noon-6 p.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801.
Chanukah in Wayne:
The Wayne YMCA hosts
its annual Chanukah
Festival, with face
painting, arts and crafts,
chocolate making,
food, music with Mr.
John, storytelling,
and a Scholastic book
fair, 12:30-2:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey. For Flames
of Giving Holiday Gift
Drive, participants are
asked to donate a new,
unwrapped gift, including
kitchen towels for the
elderly; warm socks and
scarves for homeless
veterans; board games,
arts and crafts supplies,
books, dolls, sports
equipment and toys,
music and movie DVDs
for local foster children;
slipper socks for the
hospitalized; and small
stuffed animals. 1 Pike
Drive. (973) 595-0100.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey.
Yiddish film in Franklin
Lakes: Temple Emanuel
of North Jersey
screens Yiddle Mitn
Fiddle, presented by
Charlie Sokol, 2 p.m.
Refreshments. 558
High Mountain Road.
Donations accepted.
(201) 560-0200 or www.
tenjfl.org.
Film series: The Glen
Rock Jewish Center
Film Series kicks off its
third season with AKA
Doc Pomus, 4 p.m. The
films director, Peter
Miller (Jews In Baseball:
An American Love
Story), will be there. 682
Harristown Road. (201)
652-6624.
Dr. David Pelcovitz
Balancing family
life/technology:
Dr. David Pelcovitz,
professor of education
and psychology at
Yeshiva University,
discusses Balancing
the Challenges of
Family Life and
Digital Technology, in
Englewood, 8:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Kav
LNoar Center for
Families & Young Adults
in Jerusalem. Not a
fundraiser. 300 Sunset
Ave. Barbara, (201) 692-
0725 or Amy, (201) 923-
6358.
Artist-in-residence in
Teaneck: David Moss,
world-renowned artist/
animator/transformer of
Jewish texts and objects,
is the artist in residence
Family concert: Kids indie rock band Tim and the Space Cadets
songwriters Tim Kubart and Matt Puckett performs at
the Jewish Museum on Sunday, November 17, at 2 p.m. The
concert celebrates the museum exhibit Art Spiegelmans Co-
Mix: A Retrospective, and is aimed at 2- to 6-year-olds; adults are asked
to accompany their children. The museum is at 1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd
Street. For information, call (212) 423-3337 or to TheJewishMuseum.org/
familyconcerts. COURTESY JM
NOV.
17

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 61
JS-61*
at Congregation
Beth Sholom. Moss
is best known for the
Moss Haggadah and
is working on a new
project, The Garden of
Jewish Exploration. A
multimedia presentation,
From Word to Image,
begins at 7 p.m. Copies
of his works will be for
sale and personalization.
35 Maitland Ave. (201)
833-2620 or office@
cbsteaneck.org.
Monday
NOVEMBER 18
Feature film: The
Treasure Hunting in Film
program at the Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
in Tenafly continues a
series, Top Films of the
Decade, with Before
Midnight, 7:30 p.m.
Harold Chapler introduces
the film and leads the
discussion afterwards. 411
East Clinton Ave. (201)
408-1493.
Grief workshop in
Hoboken: Grief: Before
and After the Loss of a
Loved One, a workshop
for anyone anticipating
or suffering from the
death of a loved one,
led by Anne Mollen,
will be at the United
Synagogue of Hoboken,
7:30 p.m. Sponsored
by Jewish Family
Service of MetroWest
115 Park Ave. office@
hobokensynagogue.org.
Tuesday
NOVEMBER 19
Modern day slavery:
National Council
of Jewish Women
Bergen County Section
presents a discussion,
Human Trafficking/
Modern Day Slavery,
at Temple Emeth in
Teaneck, 12:30 p.m. Panel
includes moderator
Assemblywoman Valerie
Vainieri Huttle, author
and prime sponsor of
the Human Trafficking
Prevention, Protection
and Treatment Act;
Agent Keyla Munoz, an
FBI victim specialist;
Lesley Frost, NJ
Coalition Against Human
Trafficking; and Lauren
Hersh, New York director
of Equality Now. 1666
Windsor Road. (201) 385-
4847, or www.ncjwbcs.
org.
Boutique in Teaneck:
Sinai School holds
its annual Chanukah
boutique at the Teaneck
Marriott at Glenpointe,
6:30-10 p.m. Items
include Chanukah oil,
hats, Judaica, gifts,
jewelry, toys, games,
stationery, tablecloths,
clothing, ties, kippot,
tzitzit, headbands
and hair accessories.
Refreshments by Gotham
Burger. 100 Frank W.
Burr Blvd. (201) 837-
8309 or (201) 387-8218
or asiletski@sinaischools.
org.
Aspergers Syndrome:
Jewish Family Service
of North Jersey offers
a community program,
A Dual Perspective on
the Life of a Child with
Aspergers Syndrome,
with therapist Steven
Paglierani, who both
has Aspergers and
treats children and
adults who have the
syndrome, at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel,
7 p.m. 10-10 Norma Ave.
(973) 595-0111 or www.
jfsnorthjersey.org.
Rabbi Debra Orenstein
Joy in everyday life:
Rabbi Debra Orenstein,
leader of Congregation
Bnai Israel in Emerson,
continues a spiritual
conversation focusing
on Creating More Joy in
Everyday Life, 7:30 p.m.
53 Palisade Ave. (201)
265-2272 or www.bisrael.
com.
Wednesday
NOVEMBER 20
Fall turkey/food
drive: The Jewish
Community Center of
Paramus collects solidly
frozen kosher and non-
kosher turkeys and
nonperishable food for
its Fran Leib Memorial
Food Drive, in the
parking lot, 7:15-9 a.m.
Food donated to the
Center for Food Action
in Mahwah. ShopRite gift
certificates welcome.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.
Networking in Fair
Lawn: The Jewish
Business Network meets
for breakfast at the
Ives Architectural Firm
offices, 8:30 a.m. 14-25
Plaza Road, Suite S-3-5.
www.jbusinessnetwork.
net.
Networking in Wayne:
The Passaic County
Jewish Business &
Professional Network
hosted by the Chabad
Center of Passaic County
meets there, 7 p.m.
194 Ratzer Road. (973)
694-6274 or www.
Jewishwayne.com.
Thursday
NOVEMBER 21
Loren Roth
COURTESY HADASSAH
Hadassah lunch: Loren
Roth, president of
Hadassahs Northern
New Jersey region, is the
special guest speaker
at River Dell Hadassahs
fundraising luncheon,
Making Miracles
Happen, at Sanduccis
Trattoria in River Edge,
Noon. $36. Fish or
pasta entre. Proceeds
benefit Hadassah
and the Hadassah
Medical Organization.
Door prizes. 620
Kinderkamack Road.
Amy (201) 967-8919.
Big Jewish questions:
Rabbi Neil Tow continues
with Big Jewish
Questions at the Glen
Rock Jewish Center,
noon. Bring a dairy
lunch. 682 Harristown
Road. (201) 652-6624 or
rabbi@grjc.org.
Hadassah meets: New
Jersey author Deb Levy
discusses her book,
Bury the Hot, for a
Pascack Valley/Northern
Valley Hadassah meeting
at the Bergen County
YJCC in Washington
Township. Refreshments,
2:30 p.m.; meeting at 3.
605 Pascack Road. (201)
664-5626.
School parlor meeting:
Solomon Schechter Day
School of Bergen offers
parents an opportunity
to discuss the school
with administrators
at a private home in
Englewood, 7-9 p.m.
Also Tuesday, December
10, 7-9 p.m., in Fort Lee.
More information at
www.ssdsbergen.org/
schechter-rocks or (201)
262-9898, ext. 213.
Dental school
discrimination: The
Daniel Pearl Education
Center in East Brunswick
welcomes Atlanta
oral surgeon Dr. Perry
Brickman as the
inaugural presenter in
the new Daniel Pearl
Education Center
Speaker Series, at the
Daniel Pearl Education
Center in Temple Bnai
Shalom, 7:30 p.m.
Refreshments. Fern
Road and Old Stage
Road. (732) 251-4300 or
rbrenowitz1@aol.com.
Jews coming to
America: Gary Baskind,
history buff/congregant
at the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation
Bnai Israel, discusses
The First 23 Jews to
Reach America at the
shul, 8 p.m. 10-10 Norma
Ave. (201) 796-5040.
Friday
NOVEMBER 22
Tot Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El holds
its monthly tot Shabbat
led by Rabbi David S.
Widzer, Cantor Rica
Timman, and Music Lisa,
with songs, stories, and
crafts, 5:15 p.m. Family
Shabbat dinner at 5:45
followed by services at
6:45. 221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112 or
www.tbenv.org.
Rabbi Noam E. Marans
COURTESY TEMPLE ISRAEL
Shabbat in Ridgewood:
Former Temple Israel &
JCC spiritual leader Rabbi
Noam E. Marans returns to
the synagogue as scholar-
in-residence to talk about
Jewish-Catholic relations
today in his capacity as
director of interreligious
and intergroup relations
at the American Jewish
Committee (AJC). He
will present two talks:
Christian-Jewish
Relations Today: Themes
& Trends at a Friday
night dinner following
Kabbalat Shabbat services
that begin at 6:30 p.m.;
and Pope Francis & the
Jewish People: A New
Era in Catholic-Jewish
Relations? during
lunch following Shabbat
services that begin at
9 a.m. on Saturday.
Babysitting provided. 475
Grove St. Reservations,
(201) 444-9320 or
office@synagogue.org.
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israels mens club hosts
its annual Chanukah
dinner, 6:30 p.m.,
followed by services at
7:30. 53 Palisade Ave.
Reservations, (201) 265-
2272 or office@bisrael.
com.
Saturday
NOVEMBER 23
Shabbat in Teaneck:
The Jewish Learning
Experience resumes
its Shabbat morning
educational prayer
service led by Zvi
Weissler, 9:45 a.m. at
Young Israel of Teaneck.
Programs for youth. 868
Perry Lane. Rabbi David
Pietruszka, (201) 966-
4498, rabbip@jle.org,
www.jle.org.
In New York
Sunday
NOVEMBER 17
School open house for
men: Yeshiva University
holds an open house for
men. 500 West 185th St.
(212) 960-5277 or www.
yu.edu/NJstandard.
Aliyah seminar: Nefesh
BNefesh holds an aliyah
seminar for students and
young professionals in
the Convene Conference
Center, 730 Third Ave.,
between 45th and 46th
streets, 12:30 p.m. (866)
4-ALIYAH or www.nbn.
org.ilthinkisraelNYC.
Author in NYC: Slavko
Goldstein discusses his
book 1941: The Year
That Keeps Returning
at the Museum of
Jewish Heritage A
Living Memorial to the
Holocaust, 2:30 p.m.
He will be joined by
bestselling author Daniel
Mendelsohn (The Lost).
36 Battery Place. (646)
437-4202 or www.
mjhnyc.org.
Thursday
NOVEMBER 21
Chanukah in NYC:
The Young Friends
of the Museum of
Jewish Heritage A
Living Memorial to
the Holocaust, area
young professionals,
21-39, hosts its annual
Light Up The Night
Chanukah event, 8 p.m.
The annual party in the
museums special events
hall, with 500 guests a
year, includes dancing,
premium open bar,
dinner buffet with sushi
and latkes, and a high-
end raffle. All proceeds
benefit the museum. 36
Battery Place. (646) 437-
4202 or www.mjhnyc.org.
Singles
Sunday
NOVEMBER 17
Singles meet in
Caldwell: New Jersey
Jewish Singles 45+ hosts
a pre-Thanksgiving/
Chanukah celebration at
Congregation Agudath
Israel, 12: 30 p.m. Lunch.
$10. 20 Academy Road.
(973) 226-3600 or
singles@agudath.org.
Wednesday
DECEMBER 4
Dealing with separation/
divorce in Livingston:
Jewish Family Service
of MetroWests free
support group for women
dealing with separation
and divorce is at the
agencys offices, 7 p.m.
570 West Mount Pleasant
Ave. Missy Jacobs, (973)
765-9050, ext. 1754, or
mjacobs@jfsmetrowest.
org.
Simcha vendor fair
in Moriahs new hall
The Moriah School invites the community to the
Herschmann Social Hall dedication and vendor fair
on Tuesday, November 19 at 8 p.m.
There will be more than 20 vendors on hand for
simcha planning including caterers, florists, event
planners, simcha specialists, and entertainers
including DJs, bands, and singers.
It offers an opportunity to catch a glimpse of what
a simcha in the Herschmann Social Hall would look
like. Call (201) 567-0208, Nlazarus@moriahschool.
org, or www.moriah. org.
Calendar
62 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-62*
JFSNJ offers memory screening
Jewish Family Service of North Jerseys
Wolff Caregiver Support Center, in part-
nership with the Alzheimers Founda-
tion of America, is offering free memory
screenings on November 19.
The screening is in recognition of the
annual Alzheimers Foundation of Ameri-
cas National Memory Screening Day.
JFSNJ will also have educational mate-
rials about memory concerns, dementia,
caregiving, and successful aging.
JFSNJ ofices are at 1 Pike Drive in Wayne,
(973) 595-0111, and 17-10 River Road in Fair
Lawn, (201) 796-5151.
More information is available at www.
jfsnorthjersey.org.
3 shows billed
at WPO center
The Shea Center for Performing
Arts at William Paterson University
in Wayne will feature two shows
on Sunday, November 17 at 2 p.m.
The Story Pirates, is a musical
sketch comedy based on funny
stories written by children around
the country. The show features the
debut of four new stories written
by child authors in attendance.
There will be pre-show activities
at 1:15.
Also at 2, there will be a vocal
performance, Time Stands Still,
by Fulbright scholar Artemisz Pol-
onyi. His repertoire ranges from
Bach to Debussy; from Bernstein
to Ellington. The performance will
be in WPUs Hobart Manor.
On Tuesday, November 19, at
12:30 and 7 p.m., the American
Place Theatres Literature to Life
Stage presents The Glass Castle
by Jeannette Walls, performed
by Sarah Franke and adapted/
directed by Wynn Handman.
The Shea Center for Perform-
ing Arts at William Paterson Uni-
versity is located at 300 Pompton
Road. Call (973) 720-2371 or www.
wp-presents.org.
Manischewitz recipe contest is extended
Submi t reci pes unt i l
November 17 f or t he
Manischewitz Thanksgiv-
vukah Mash-Up Recipe
Contest for a chance to win
$1,000.
The contest encourages
at-home chefs to experiment with kosher
products while preparing recipes that
highlight the culinary offerings of Cha-
nukah and Thanksgiving in one unique
recipe.
Recipes will be accepted
on the Manischewitz Face-
book page. The top 10 reci-
pes with the highest scores
will be the inalists. Of the
inal 10, one will be deter-
mined by a panel of judges
to be the Grand Prize Winner, with an
additional three inalists chosen as run-
ners-up. The three runners-up will receive
$100 American Express gift cards. Visit
www.manischewitz.com.
Kaplen JCC presents
Peter and the Wolf
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades continues
its Professional Childrens Theater Series
with Peter and The Wolf, a Pushcart
Players production, on Sunday, November
17, at 2 p.m. The series, for children 3 and
older, includes performances by different
New York City traveling companies.
For information, call (201) 408-1493 or
www.jccotp.org/theaterseries.
Peter and the Wolf cast members.
COURTESY JCCOTP
Mon-Wed 8-6; Thurs 8-7; Fri 8-4; Sun 8-3; Closed Saturday
Prices subject to change without notice. Not responsible for typographical errors.
67A E. Ridgewood Avenue
Paramus Opp. Lord & Taylor 201-262-0030
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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 63
JS-63
Trimming Thanksgivings calories
The Wayne YMCA and ShopRite have
teamed up to demonstrate how to cut
calories without cutting the taste at your
holiday feast. A free cooking demonstra-
tion will be held at the Y on Tuesday,
November 19, at 9:30 a.m.
Allison Smith and Heather Shasa,
registered dietitians from ShopRite, will
give a cooking demo on how to trim
down a Thanksgiving dinner. Samples,
handouts, and recipes will be provided.
The Metro YMCAs of the Oranges is a
partner of the YM-YWHA of North Jersey.
Call (973) 595-0100.
Shul will host trip advisory
All are welcome to join Rabbi Ronald
Roth and members of the Fair Lawn Jew-
ish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel for
an information meeting about the shuls
upcoming Jewish tour of Central Europe
on November 18 at 8 p.m. The trip, led by
Rabbi Professor Ron Hoffberg, is sched-
uled for June 24 to July 4, and includes
stops in Prague, Budapest, and Vienna.
Representatives of ITC, the tour com-
pany organizing the trip, will be on
hand to answer questions. For informa-
tion, call (201) 796-5040, email rabbi@
fljc.com, or go to www.israeltour.com/
RRoth2014.php.
Jackie Mason
Jackie Mason at bergenPAC
The Bergen Performing Arts
Center in Englewood pres-
ents Jackie Mason on Satur-
day, November 23, at 8 p.m.
For tickets, call (201) 227-
1030 or go to www.ticket-
master.com or www.bergen-
pac.org.
NEW JERSEY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER ONE CENTER STREET, NEWARK, NJ
Frank Sinatra, Jr.
and Steve Tyrell
sing the songs of
Sammy Cahn
with NJSO
Sun, Nov 24 at 3pm
Proceeds benet arts education
programs of NJPAC and NJSO
The Montclair
Film Festival presents
Jimmy Fallon
in Conversation with
Stephen Colbert
Sun, Nov 24 at 8pm
Presented in association with NJPAC.
Savion Glover
in The Apollo
Theaters Ellington
at Christmas
Holiday Salute to
Ellingtons
Nutcracker Suite
Sun, Dec 8 at 4pm
Cirque loize
Cirkopolis
Fri, Dec 13 at 8pm
Forces of Nature
Dance Theatre
A Kwanzaa Celebration
Sun, Dec 14
at 2pm & 5pm
For tickets and full 201314 schedule
visit njpac.org or call 1-888-GO-NJPAC
Kenny Rogers
Christmas
and Hits
Through the Years
with special guest
Linda Davis
Thu, Dec 5 at 8pm
NJPAC_jewishmedgroup_5x6.5_ad_11-15.indd 1 11/12/13 2:15 PM
motivations of the characters.
JS: When I go to concerts or operas
in this country, it seems to me that I see
mostly older people going there. Has that
struck you?
RS: First of all, I think it depends on
where. If youre talking about the United
States, it might be more true than if youre
looking at Europe, because when I sing
in Europe I see a lot of young people
who go to classical concerts and opera.
In the United States, I just think we need
more musical education, to educate
young people. We need to emphasize
the importance of studies of the arts and
music with young children.
JS: Are any singers your favorites?
Youve mentioned Roberto Alagna.
RS: I like singers who are not really the
old-type singers who just stand on stage
and sing loud. Thats going away because
were taking opera into the cinema, people
expect to not only hear the opera singers
but to see them. So acting skills are more
important, as are the looks. So the singer
today, you like to hear her and watch her.
Theyre not just great singers but great
actors. So if you start with Maria Callas
you go through todays singers, theres a
whole array Teresa Stratas, Julia Migenes
you can be fascinated by how they act
on stage.
JS: If you ever stop singing, might you
ever become a music teacher?
RS: No, I dont want to teach. I dont
think I have the skill. But I could teach
music therapy.
JS: Any roles you would like to sing in
the future?
RS: There are many in the French
repertoire Id like to sing.
JS: Are there promising Israeli singers
coming along?
RS: Yes, there are. But somehow Israel
has not trained a huge international
stardom on the stage of opera. Yet. It
depends on the vocal education in Israel.
Exposure to opera there is getting better
and better, but its still not like if youre
born in Germany and you hear opera
everywhere around you, theres an opera
house in every little town. Israel has
just one opera house, so opera is not as
approachable as it is in other countries, as
well as the vocal studies. So now, if there is
a good generation of opera singers, making
great careers abroad, and they come back
there and start teaching those techniques
to singers in Israel, maybe we have a good
chance. I dont know.
Shaham
FROM PAGE 59
JS-64*
64 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
Local
The 14 boys who participated in the
Colorado mission 10 are students at
Torah Academy of Bergen County and
four attend Teaneck, Marlboro, and Free-
hold Boro high schools arrived in Lyons
on October 20, accompanied by Rabbi
Rael Blumenthal, director of the Bergen
County NCSY chapter. Lyons is some 15
miles north of Boulder. It experienced the
worst of the September storm damage
up to 17 inches of rain fell there in two days
and power and running water still have
not been restored.
Our worksite was a small house that
had already been gutted and is now a
shell, Rabbi Blumenthal said, explaining
that the groups assignment was to remove
mud from under the floor beams to rec-
reate the crawl space where new plumb-
ing and electrical supply lines had to be
installed.
It was crazy, said Matthew Wexler of
TABC. We went into the house next door,
and there was literally ive feet of mud all
the way up the refrigerator. Everything
was covered in mud. At a trailer park a
couple of blocks away, all the trailers were
upended and trees had speared through
them.
This was the irst time Ive seen
destruction like this irsthand. I really
wanted to help these people get back on
their feet.
Rabbi Blumenthal reported that over
the course of three days the boys wheeled
out buckets and buckets of mud and debris
from their worksite to the curb for collec-
tion. At one point it started to rain, but
despite the cold and damp, they perse-
vered and continued even when other
volunteers called it a day, Rabbi Blumen-
thal said, noting that the homeowner was
someone who could not afford the cost of
paying workers to do the job. The boys
did excellent work. The homeowner was
humbled and grateful.
What we did was take a person with
no house, no hope, and no place to turn
and give him all three, said Judah Sti-
efel of TABC. With every shovel of mud
and stroke of hammer, we didnt just
take a step toward the reconstruction of
someones home, but also a step toward
rebuilding his life.
In addition to mud removal, the boys
took down two sheds and helped dis-
mantle a wing of a house that was
uninhabitable.
It was a very meaningful experience
for me because at TABC Im the head of
chesed. But this was a totally different kind
of chesed, said Michael Feuerstein-Rudin.
At TABC, our projects are small in com-
parison to what we did in Lyons. There, we
all pitched in and made a difference. And
because we all worked together, we got so
much more done. I loved it, and Id love to
go back and do it again.
Matthew Wexler feels the experience
changed him. First, I learned that we can
help one another regardless of where we
come from, he said. Also, I understood
that we can never anticipate whats going to
happen to us, but like the people in Lyons
who had their lives ripped apart, we can
accept it and deal with it. That is their atti-
tude and I found it really inspiring, he said.
Its a lesson Rabbi Katz hopes all his NCSY
volunteers learn.
There is no training for certain things
that happen in life, and although there
is nothing you can do about the storms
that may come your way, what matters is
how you handle them in the aftermath,
he said. Thats what we want our kids to
internalize.
There are two ways to view bad things
that happen: as destruction or as an oppor-
tunity for rebirth. We want our kids to
understand that, no matter what life throws
at you, you can weather it.
Beth Sholom in Teaneck invited him to be
artist in residence this Sunday.
Mr. Moss lives in Jerusalem; he is in the
United States for a ive-week tour, with
some artist-in-residence gigs lasting a full
week.
In Teaneck, Mr. Moss will work with
teenagers in creating a Chanukah mural,
and then meet with the congregations
Artists Beit Midrash, which combines text
study and artistic production.
On Monday, he will present a workshop
for the Schechter Day School Network
which Ms. Cohen led for many years on
Enhancing and inspiring students Jewish
learning through the artistic and creative
process.
Mr. Moss has no formal artistic training.
Im sort of self-taught, he said. I
started with calligraphy. I later got started
with the ketubot as something to do with
the calligraphy.
He was raised in Dayton, Ohio, in a
very strong, committed Reform family,
with a lot of connections to the teachers
at the Hebrew Union College seminary in
Cincinnati, just an hour away.
I got more involved and interested in
Jewish learning in college and after col-
lege, he said.
I do what I call teachable art. Every
piece starts with an idea, a Jewish value,
a text, and then I bring it to life, creatively
and aesthetically.
When he works with young people, he
said, the main mission is to help them
learn how the artistic process works. We
start with nothing, and then I start them
on deciding on some issue or problem that
is important to them, and how that can be
transformed into a creative artistic solu-
tion, and then designed and built and put
together and presented.
I take them from the beginning to the
end of an example of an artistic process,
he said.
His own artistic work usually will start
with an insight or a question or a chal-
lenge or some kind of problem Im trying
to solve, and then I igure out the best way
to solve that. Everything is Jewish, based
in tradition and research and study, and
ideally everything has the spark of cre-
ativity in it, freshness and difference. The
other point is that the craft be well done,
he said.
The medium is less important.
He has designed buildings. He is work-
ing on an ambitious large project, a
garden of Jewish exploration, a kind of
interactive aesthetic garden where Jewish
values will be shared.
And he has a subscription program to
which fans and collectors can subscribe in
advance and receive three or four works a
year, anything I send them.
Ms. Cohen irst saw his work 10 years
ago, when she visited a day school in
Atlanta where Mr. Moss had been artist in
residence for a week.
There were four lockers in the school
that had been decorated as if they were
the lockers of Rabbi Akiva and other rab-
bis of old, she said.
Hes not merely an artist who does
gorgeous work. Hes an artistic educator.
Thats a singular contribution.
David Moss in his Jerusalem studio. DAVID LONNER / SHMA.COM
A map of David Mosss daily bicycle journey from my apartment in Bakaa to
my studio near the Jaffa Gate. It merges words and thoughts, memories and
resonances, history and musings, the ancient and recent past with my very
present quotidian reality. (C) 2013 DAVID MOSS / COURTESY WWW.BET-ALPHA-EDITIONS.COM)
Getting dirty
FROM PAGE 12
Moss
FROM PAGE 12
Most of our
teens live insular
lives, and have
never seen
poverty or
devastation.
RABBI ETHAN KATZ
Obituaries
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 65
JS-65
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Stanley M. Siegel
Stanley M. Siegel died on November 1, 2013 after
a long illness. He was 85. Born in Brooklyn, NY,
he was graduated from Boys High School and
City College of New York (CCNY). He served his
country in the Army during the Korean War. A
Washington Township resident since 1963, he was
founder and president of NBS Cosmetics (based
in Emerson) from 1971-2010. Among the many
services Stan performed for his community, he sat
on the Westwood Chamber of Commerce for several
years and was a member and long-time President of
the Board of Health in Washington Township for
over 35 years. Stan was a true mensch, beloved by all
who knew him, especially his wife of 63 years Rosalie,
his children Neal (Barb) and Janice, and his three
grandchildren Elizabeth, Anna, and Joel. He was
predeceased by his parents and two younger brothers,
Allan and Billy. Internment was at Mt. Hebron
Cemetery in Flushing, Queens. Te family wishes
to thank Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel for the
services they provided and Rabbi Lenny Mandel
of Congregation Bnai Israel for his compassionate
presence.
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Hannah Gold
Hannah B. Gold, ne Kaplan, 85, of Wayne, formerly of
Paterson, died on November 12.
Before retiring, she worked as a bookkeeper for the
Felsway Corporation (Shoe-Town).
Predeceased by her husband, Bernard, she is survived
by her children, Robert (Hannah Lee) of Wayne and
Hilary (Mahmoud) of Paterson; and four grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to Hospice of New Jersey or the
Hebrew Free Burial Association. Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Myron J. Goldsmith
Myron Goldsmith, 91, of Fair Lawn died on November 6.
A Navy veteran of World War II and Korea, he
continued serving in the Naval Reserve, retiring as a
captain. He received the Navy Cross in 1945 for his
heroism while serving as pilot in Torpedo Squadron
94 based aboard the USS Lexington. He is pictured in
Tom Brokaws book, The Greatest Generation.
Predeceased by his wife, Claire, a daughter, Margaret,
and a grandson, Matthew, he is survived by his children,
James (Arlene), and Jane Pine (Andrew); grandchildren,
and great-grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to Valley Home Cares Hospice
Program, c/o Valley Home Care, Paramus.
Arrangements were by Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.
Jay Kaplan
Jay Allen Kaplan of Nanuet, N.Y., formerly of Harrington
Park and Englewood, died on November 11.
Born in Summit, he was president /advertising-public
relations of JKAPLAN Inc.
He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Dolores,
children, Barry ( June), and Lisa Press (Gary); a brother,
Donald; and three grandchildren.
Shiva minyans will take place in Park Ridge and
Englewood through Monday, November 18, 6:45 a.m.
Donations can be sent to United Hospice of Rockland,
New City, N.Y.
Arrangements were by Gutterman and Musicant
Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.
Edwin Mantel
Edwin Mantel of Pinehurst, N.C., formerly of Jersey City,
North Arlington, Rutherford, Amherst, N.H.; Fairless
Hills, Pa., and East Brunswick, died on October 25.
A World War II veteran, he worked for American
Can Company as a mechanic for 42 years. After
retiring, he did volunteer work, most recently
serving as a bnai mitzvah teacher at Temple Beth
Shalom of Foxfire, N.C.
He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Audrey, ne
Ebert; three children, Andrew, Steven, and Ellen
Pfann; and grandchildren, Kevin, Jill, Erica, and
Michael.
Contributions can be sent to Sandhills Jewish Cong.
Beth Shalom, POB 2121, Pinehurst, N.C. 28370 or the
Foundation of FirstHealth, 150 Applecross Road,
Pinehurst, N.C. 28374.
Arrangements were by Mt. Sinai Memorial Chapel
in East Brunswick.
Gerald Susman
Gerald S. Susman, 71, of the Bronx, died on November 3.
Born in the Bronx, he was a self-employed CPA and
lawyer in Philadelphia.
He is survived by a son, Jacob S; a sister, Barbara
Mitchell; and two grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial Chapels, Inc.,
Fort Lee.
Classified
66 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-66
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ing to give TLC to sick/elderly. Also
Light Housekeeping. Flexible
hours.Live-in or shifts. References.
Call Julia 347-707 5065
CLEANING SERVICE
AN experienced European woman
willl clean houses/apartments and
do some laundry one day a week
or every other week. Own car.
Great references & rates. 201-313-
0849
POLISH CLEANING WOMAN
- Homes, Apartments, Offices-
14 years experience, excellent
references.
Affordable rates!
Izabela 973-572-7031
WOMAN offers her Cleaning Serv-
ices; homes, apartments, offices. 8
years experience. Speaks English.
References. Free estimates. Call
Karnet 201-519-2461
FLOORING
American Oak
Hardwood Floors
25 Years of Experience
Installation of All Types of
Carpets, Floors & Borders
Staining & Refinishing
Complete Repair Service
Quality Products
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
Oakland Rutherford
201-651-9494 201-438-7105
FURNITURE FOR SALE
PARSON TABLE
Contemporary
Cherry wood sides & frame
Glass Top
25H x 56L x 21W
Like New $125.00
Call Karen
201-321-1839
HANDYMAN
Your Neighbor with Tools
Home Improvements & Handyman
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
Over 15 Years Experience
Adam 201-675-0816 Jacob
Lic. & Ins. NJ Lic. #13VH05023300
www.yourneighborwithtools.blogspot.com
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BEST BEST
of the
Home Repair Service
Carpentry
Decks
Locks/Doors
Basements
Bathrooms
Plumbing
Tiles/Grout
Painting
Kitchens
Electrical
Paving/Masonry
Drains/Pumps
Maintenence
Hardwood Floors
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL
24 Hour x 5 1/2 Emergency Services
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
1-201-530-1873
BH
General Repairs
PROGRESSIVE CONSTRUCTION
Driveways Belgian Block
Retaining Walls Pavers
Snow Plowing Steps
Firewood (delivered at stacking)
Bob Cat Service available
201-543-3795
Lic#13VH0314200
PLUMBING
Complete Kitchen &
Bath Remodeling
Boilers Hot Water Heaters Leaks
EMERGENCY SERVICE
Fully Licensed, Bonded and Insured
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL!
201-358-1700 Lic. #12285
APL Plumbing & Heating LLC
RUBBISH REMOVAL
CHICHELO
RUBBISH REMOVED
973-325-2713 973-228-7928
201-704-0013
Appliances
Furniture
WoodMetals
Construction
Debris
Homes Estates
Factories Contractors
PARTY PLANNER
To advertise call
201-837-8818
Jewish Music with an Edge
Ari Greene 201-837-6158
AGreene@BaRockorchestra.com
www.BaRockOrchestra.com
Call us.
We are
waiting
for your
classifed
ad!
201-837-8818
MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger is
a national nonprot organization working to
end hunger among people of all faiths and
backgrounds in the United States and Israel.
(800) 813-0557 | mazon.org
Together we can
transform how it is
into how it should be.
www.jstandard.com
68 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-68
YES, I WOULD LIKE
A CHANUKAH GREETING
#1 #2 #3 #4
(or call 201-837-8818 for other sizes)
Wording ____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
I want a shared greeting
Name _______________________________________________________________
Town _______________________________________________________________
Name ______________________________________________________________
Address ____________________________________________________________
Phone ______________________________________________________________
Credit Card # ________________________________________________________
Exp. date _________________________ Code _____________________________
Fax to 201-833-4959 or mail (with a check if you prefer) to:
The Jewish Standard 1086 Teaneck Rd. Teaneck, NJ 07666
DEADLINE NOV. 22
Wish your family, friends,
Jewish Standard readers
and customers a
Happy Holiday in our
CHANUKAH
GREETING
SECTION
NOVEMBER 29
You can have your
own personal greeting
(see samples at right)
OR add your family or
business name and town
to a shared greeting for $36
T
r
a
d
itio
n
!
-NAME-
Ad #1 - 1
1
/2"w x 2"d $36
Best Wishes
for a
Happy
Chanukah
-NAME-
Ad #4 - 5"w x 2"d $135
We wish
the Jewish
Community
a Very Happy
Chanukah
Ad #3 - 3
1
/8"w x 2"d $72
May Your Home be Blessed
with Joy and Peace this
Chanukah Season

-NAME-
Wishing you a
Happy Chanukah
Mr. & Mrs. Mel Schwartz, Fair Lawn
Abby, Len, Rhea & Barry Roth, Teaneck
Dr. & Mrs. Steven Katz, Paramus
The Feingolds, Englewood Clifs
The Jewelry Place, Mahwah
Regal Realtors, Wayne
The Dental Group, Bergenfeld
SAMPLE SHARED GREETING PAGE
Ad #2 - 1.5"w x 3"d $54
-NAME-
Wishing
You a
Joy-Filled
Chanukah
Real Estate & Business
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 69
JS-69
SERVING BOCA RATON,
DELRAY AND BOYNTON BEACH
AND SURROUNDING AREAS
Advantage Plus
601 S. Federal Hwy, Ste. 100
Boca Raton, FL 33432
Elly & Ed Lepselter
(561) 826-8394
THE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE
Now Selling Valencia Cove
and Villaggio Reserve
FORMER NJ
RESIDENTS
SPECIALIZING IN: Broken Sound, Polo, Boca West, Boca Pointe,
St. Andrews, Admirals Cove, Jonathans Landing, all the Valencia
communities and everywhere else you want to be!
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
RIVER VALE ELEGANT $1,399,000
Graceful multi-level manor at end of cul-de-sac, mosaic foyer with Juliet balcony,
state of the art chefs kitchen, private entry to master suite with fireplace & spa
bath, finished lower level, fabulous .66 acre with waterfall, koi
pond, heated pool & tiered deck.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
568-1818
TENAFLY
894-1234
CRESSKILL
871-0800
ALPINE/CLOSTER
768-6868
RIVER VALE
666-0777
TEANECK & VICINITY
BY APPOINTMENT
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS
CHOICE
2013
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
N MILFORD $420s
Updated 4 BR, 3 Bth Cape on 75'X109' Prop. Mod Kit open
to Fam Rm/Sliders to Deck. Sunken Den/Off/Priv Ent. Fin
Bsmt. Gar. Room to Expand Up & Out.
TEANECK 290s
Open, Spacious S/L. Updated Kit, DR, LR. 3 BRs, 3 Bths. Fam
Rm. High Ceil Bsmt.
TEANECK $330s
Lov 3 BR Col on Quiet St. Mod Kit/Granite Cntrs/Bkfst Bar/
Door to Patio. H/W Flrs, C/A/C, Fin Bsmt, 2 Car Gar.
TEANECK $380s
Grand Colonial. Cent Ent, Liv Rm/Fplc & Bkcases, Form Din
Rm, Mod Eat In Kit. 4/5 Brms, 3.5 Bths. Oversized Prop. Fin
Bsmnt. Beaut details & High Ceil. 2 Car Gar.
TEANECK RENTALS
BY APPOINTMENT
$3,500/mo. Contemp Col. LR/fplc, DR, Updated EIK, Glass
Encl Prch. 4 BRs, 3.5 Designer Bths. C/A/C. Fin Bsmt.
$4,500/mo. Lg Renov Col. 6 Brms (one on 1st Flr), 4.5 Bths.
LR, Banq DR, Gran Kit w/Bkfst Area. Laund on 2nd Flr. C/A/C.
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
$1,250/mo. Beaut 1 BR, 1 Bth Condo/2nd Flr. Ent Foyer, Lg
LR/Din Area. EIK. H/W Flrs. Park Spc Inc. Laund Onsite.
$1,750/mo. Spacious, Bright 3 BR, 1 Updated Bth in
2-Family on 2nd Flr. Priv Ent & Priv Deck. Liv Rm, Din Rm,
MEIK. Lots of Closets!
$2,100/mo . 3 Brm S/L. Close to All! Liv Rm, Din Area, Large
Country Kit, Cov Porch. Laund in Bsmt. Tandem Gar.
$2,985/mo. Tudor on Tree Lined St. 4 BRs, 3.5 Bths. LR/fplc,
DR, Lg Kit. Fin Bsmt. 2 Car Gar.

FOLLOW TEAM V&N ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
www.vera-nechama.com
201-692-3700
SMART * EXPERIENCED * BOLD
SUNDAY NOV 17TH - OPEN HOUSES
348 Winthrop Rd, Tnk $639,000 1:00-3:00pm
641 Ogden Ave $599,000 1:00-3:00pm
129 Wilbur Rd, Bgfld $469,000 1:00-3:00pm
BY APPOINTMENT TEANECK
6 Bedroom, Luxury Center Hall Colonial. All amenities
including Chefs Kitchen with double SS Appliances,
stunning Master Suite/cathedral ceiling. $1,295,000
Short Term Rental available thru June 1, 2014
Bergenfield/Teaneck - $2,700/month
Real Estate Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI
Sales Associate
NJAR Circle of Excellence Gold Level, 2001, 2003-2006
Silver Level, 1997-2000, 2002,2009,2011,2012
Direct: (201) 664 6181, Cell: (201) 981 7994
E-mai l : anni eget si t sol d@msn. com
123 Broadway, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677
(201) 573 8811 ext. 316
Each Ofce Independenty Owned and Operated
ANNIE GETS IT SOLD
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
HOUSING EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
bergenPAC launches food drive
The Bergen Performing Arts Center is sponsoring a
community food drive on behalf of The Center for
Food Action.
Please drop off nonperishable items at bergenPAC, 30
N. Van Brunt St., Englewood.
The most urgently needed items include canned
meat (tuna, chicken, etc.); canned hearty soup;
canned vegetables; macaroni and cheese; pea-
nut butter and jelly; cereal; dry milk; canned fruit;
instant potatoes, and 100 percent juice.
Zamir is recognized
for performance
at Prominent Properties
Zohar Zack Zamir, a broker associate at Prominent Prop-
erties Sothebys International Realty in Tenafly, has been
named a 2014 Five-Star Real Estate Agent by Five Star
Professional, an independent research organization that
identifies trustworthy and reputable service professionals
throughout the United States and Canada.
This is the second consecutive year Zohar has been rec-
ognized by Five Star, said Nancy Bunin, manager at the
Prominent Properties Sothebys Real Estate Tenafly regional
office. Its an amazing accomplishment. No one out-works
Zohar, hes so focused and determined, its inspiring to work
with him.
Zamir, scored in the top one percent of all real estate
agents in New Jersey (over 80,000 licensed real estate
agents in the geographic coverage area that was surveyed)
in which approximately 600 winners were chosen. Zamir
brings extraordinary professionalism, market knowledge
and state of the art marketing techniques to the Bergen
County area.
Prominent Properties Sothebys International Realty has
eleven regional offices serving northern and central New
Jersey with approximately 400 regional sales and market-
ing associates as well as highly accomplished administra-
tive staff and experienced management team. The Tenafly
office is located at 90 County Road and can be reached at
(201) 568-5668. Zamir can be reached directly at (201) 780-
7884 or via email at zohar.zamir@sothebysrealty.com.
Visit Prominent Properties Sothebys International Realty
at www.prominentproperites.com.
www.jstandard.com
Allan Dorfman
Broker/Associate
201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Ofce
Realtorallan@yahoo.com
FORT LEE - THE COLONY
Serving Bergen County since 1985.
One bedroom. High oor. New parquet
oors. $179,900
One bedroom. Renovated. High oor.
Sunset views. $184,900
Two bedroom. Renovated. Full river
views with laundry. $399,000
Two bedroom. Total gut renovation.
Also available fully furnished.
Congratulations to Randy and Charlie
on your well-deserved honor.
Real Estate & Business
70 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-70
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
FORT LEE
Full service bldg w/gym & pool.
FORT LEE
A jewel. Updated corner unit.
FORT LEE
2 BR/2.5 BTH. NY skyline view. $599K
FORT LEE
Great 2 BR/2.5 BTH corner unit. $538K
S
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ENGLEWOOD
Beautiful Center Hall Colonial. $699,800
ENGLEWOOD
401 DOUGLAS ST $1,395,000
ENGLEWOOD
Fabulous Colonial. $1,550,000
ENGLEWOOD
Incredible 8 BR estate. $2,400,000
I
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O
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H
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ORADELL
Dramatic construction. Numerous amenities.
CLOSTER
Magnicent East Hill Colonial.
CLOSTER
All brick Colonial w/pool & cabana.
DEMAREST
Classic elegance. Luxurious living.
S
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TENAFLY
Spacious brick Col. $879,000
TENAFLY
Beautiful E.H. Contemp. Cul-de-sac.
TENAFLY
Old world charm. Timeless elegance.
TENAFLY
One-of-a-kind manor. $3,748,000
B
E
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G
E
N
C
H
A
L
E
T
!
J
U
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S
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J
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S
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B
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TEANECK
Charming Tudor. Great curb appeal.
TEANECK
240 SCHLEY PLACE $379K
TEANECK
Phenomenal Ranch. Every amenity.
TEANECK
Vintage Col. Great potential. $649,900
L
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
70 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-70
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11/17 1 -3 PM
TEANECK: 495 Sagamore Avenue
$
685,000 Expanded and
renovated 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath colonial. First oor features
formal living room, den with pocket doors, large dining room,
modern top of the line kitchen with appliances and opened to
the family room. Second oor has huge master suite with 2
walk in closets and bathroom with oversized shower, 3 large
bedrooms, full bath and laundry closet. Tird oor features
bedroom, ofce and full bathroom. Basement is nished with
guest room, a huge recreation room and lots of storage.
NEW LISTING
Rena Strulowitz
We l c o m e t o
O u r N e w A g e n t
Rena has lived in Bergen County for over 20
years, she utilizes her extensive real estate
expertise and local market knowledge to
guide home buyers and sellers throughout
the entire real estate process. She also
has had much experience guiding clients
through each stage of successful renovation
and construction projects. Rena possesses
great listening skills and really enjoys both
getting to know and educating her clients to ensure that they will
secure the property that will be a perfect t.

Prior to becoming a real estate professional, Rena was an
actuarial consultant in a managerial role at Ernst & Young LLP,
in New York. Renas consulting, analytical and management
experiences coupled with her keen attention to detail, have
positioned her for success in the real estate industry. When
Rena is not working with buyers and sellers to nd them their
next dream home you can nd her with her husband and three
children enjoying various activities.
You can contact her at 201.214.1131 or at rena@linksnj.com
202 Te Plaza, Teaneck, NJ 07666 MLS
201.992.3600 I LINKSNJ.COM
LINKS
R E S I DE NT I A L
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com Cell: 201-615-5353
Symposium: Is Wall Street gaming the system?
Five years ago, frightening and desta-
bilizing events took place in the finan-
cial world. Institutions collapsed, and
it seemed that they required life sup-
port through huge infusions of taxpayer
money.
At 7:30 p.m. on November 21, three
speakers will explain what happened,
why, and how to prevent such devastation
from happening again.
The event, the third in a series sponsored
by the North Jersey Public Policy Network,
will take place in Wilson Auditorium in
Dickinson Hall on the Hackensack side of
Fairleigh Dickinson Universitys Metro-
politan Campus. A Q&A will follow the
presentation.
Banks that were considered too big to fail
have gotten even bigger, Wall Street contin-
ues to bundle and trade the many debts of
average Americans, and big trading risks
are taken by people who continue to ignore
regulations and their own internal warning
systems.
The speakers will explore what has hap-
pened to strengthen financial regulations,
to hold significant players accountable, or
to improve the way business is conducted
on Wall Street and what still needs to hap-
pen. The speakers represent a collabora-
tive that has recently published a book
that makes it easy to understand how Wall
Street functions.
About the speakers:
Dr. Cathy ONeil earned a Ph.D. in math
from Harvard, was postdoctoral in math
at MIT, and a professor at Barnard College
where she published a number of research
papers in arithmetic algebraic geometry.
She moved to the private sector working
as a quantitative analyst for the hedge
fund D.E. Shaw in the middle of the credit
crisis, and then for RiskMetrics, a risk soft-
ware company that assesses risk for hedge
funds and banks. She is currently a data
scientist at Johnson Research Labs and
writes a blog at http://mathbabe.org.
Tamir Rosenblum, a graduate of Tufts
and University of Chicago Law School,
serves as general counsel to a district
council of construction and industrial
unions in New York and was previously
a partner in the labor law firm Cohen,
Weiss and Simon. He also worked in
Ralph Naders office, The Center for Study
of Responsive Law.
Linda Brown is a graduate of Cor-
nell University with a masters degree
from Yeshiva University, and is a retired
teacher. She taught in the Peace Corps
in Uganda, at the Bronx House of Deten-
tion, in adult literacy programs at CUNY,
and for the New York City Department of
Education. She worked for United Farm-
workers and helped start United Literacy
Workers.
To attend, reserve a seat and pre-regis-
ter, send an email to info@njppn.org. The
program is free and open to the public.
NJPPN welcomes optional donations of
$5. For more information, visit the NJPP
Network at www.northjerseypublicpolicy.
org. Memberships are available.
Wilson Auditorium is located at Fair-
leigh Dickinson Universitys Metropolitan
Campus in Hackensack. For GPS direc-
tions, use 800 University Plaza Drive
(Temple Place) off Hackensack Avenue.
JS-71
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013 71
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
FORT LEE
Full service bldg w/gym & pool.
FORT LEE
A jewel. Updated corner unit.
FORT LEE
2 BR/2.5 BTH. NY skyline view. $599K
FORT LEE
Great 2 BR/2.5 BTH corner unit. $538K
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
T
H
E
P
A
L
I
S
A
D
E
S
B
U
C
K
I
N
G
H
A
M
T
O
W
E
R
ENGLEWOOD
Beautiful Center Hall Colonial. $699,800
ENGLEWOOD
401 DOUGLAS ST $1,395,000
ENGLEWOOD
Fabulous Colonial. $1,550,000
ENGLEWOOD
Incredible 8 BR estate. $2,400,000
I
D
E
A
L
L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
!
O
P
E
N

H
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2
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T
R
U
C
T
I
O
N
!
P
R
I
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E
A
R
E
A
!
ORADELL
Dramatic construction. Numerous amenities.
CLOSTER
Magnicent East Hill Colonial.
CLOSTER
All brick Colonial w/pool & cabana.
DEMAREST
Classic elegance. Luxurious living.
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
TENAFLY
Spacious brick Col. $879,000
TENAFLY
Beautiful E.H. Contemp. Cul-de-sac.
TENAFLY
Old world charm. Timeless elegance.
TENAFLY
One-of-a-kind manor. $3,748,000
B
E
R
G
E
N
C
H
A
L
E
T
!
J
U
S
T
S
O
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D
!
J
U
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S
O
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D
!
B
R
E
A
T
H
T
A
K
I
N
G
V
I
S
T
A
S
!
TEANECK
Charming Tudor. Great curb appeal.
TEANECK
240 SCHLEY PLACE $379K
TEANECK
Phenomenal Ranch. Every amenity.
TEANECK
Vintage Col. Great potential. $649,900
L
E
A
S
E
D
!
O
P
E
N

H
O
U
S
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S
U
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2
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P
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!
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
72 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 15, 2013
JS-72
RCBC
1404 Queen Anne Road, Teaneck 201-837-2326
Sun 7-4, Mon-Thurs 7-6, Fri 7-2
Come in
out of the cold
and warm up with
our homemade
Belgium Wafes
and
French Crepes!

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