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BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy Programme Modules

2012

Programme Modules Occupational Therapy

BSc (Hons)

Profile of Student Experience: Level One Theme: Occupational Therapy: Values and Beliefs Level One Coordinator Associate Coordinator
Eliza Maglari Katerina Bourika

Semester One University contact weeks Average contact hours per week Semester Two University contact weeks Average Contact hours per week Professional Practice Placement 1 (6 weeks @ 36 hours, minimum, per week)

12 weeks 11 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 216 hours

Learning Experience and Assessment


Semester One Modules Occupation, Interaction & Performance

Assessment Report/Evaluation Self assessment Conceptual Foundations of Occupational Therapy Essay/portfolio Participation in Occupation Mind-Brain-Body & Context 1 Essay First Aid and Manual Handling One Practical examination & One 1 hour multiple choice written assessment

Semester Two Modules Conceptual Foundations of Occupational Therapy Participation in Occupation Mind-Brain-Body in Context 1 Research 1 Professional Practice Placement 1 Musculoskeletal Anatomy: Theory 1,5

Online test Oral Presentation Essay Assessment Report hour written examination

Student Support
Academic Tutor Groups Group Size 8 9 Students Meetings Semester 1: 2 meetings (both individual and group meetings) Semester 2: 1 meeting (both individual and group meetings)

Student Representation
Level One students will be represented on the following committees Student Staff Consultative Committee (4 representatives)
2

Programme Committee (2 representatives)

Module Descriptor
Title
Occupation, Interaction and Performance

Code (if known)


O1118 Semester 1 FT

Leve l

SHE Level 1 SCQF Level 7

Semester & Mode of Study

Credit Rating SCQF: 10 ECTS:5

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Ioanna Tsipra Polixeni Skaltsi


None Normally all concurrent SCQF Level 7 modules or equivalent None

The aims of this module are: 1. To build upon the existing interpersonal skills of students by exploring and practicing skills of professional practice 2. To increase self awareness of personal strengths and aspects which challenge individuals within interpersonal situations commonly encountered in professional practice 3. To understand the contribution of communication and interpersonal skills to occupational performance

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Identify interpersonal and communication skills which underpin the practice of occupational therapy L2 L3 Analyse the contribution that involvement in occupation makes to human communication and interaction Identify specific interpersonal and communication skills required for individual, group or teamwork situations Outline the theoretical underpinning for analysis of communication and interaction within professional practice

Assessed in this module

A B
* * * * * *

C D
* * * * * *

Yes: summative Yes: summative Yes: summative

L4

Yes: summative

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences
The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 100 hours notional student effort 12 hours of interactive lectures which have a peer teaching component in the construction of group concept maps 12 hours of experiential workshops involving role-play as the main learning and teaching strategy 6 hours of directed learning involving either reading or observation to be completed before sessions 70 hours of independent learning

TOTAL 100 Hours

Assessment Pattern
Formative weekly informal group feedback on role-play exercises within half year groups. Self assessment of participation within the module. Summative an evaluation of the interpersonal, communication and interviewing skills of a therapist talking with an older client within a video presentation. (1000 words evaluation) Weighting - Evaluation (100%)

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.


Yes

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Content
Constituents of the therapeutic relationship within occupational therapy Relationship between communication, interaction and engagement in occupation Theories of interaction and communication in relation to the practice of occupational therapy Non verbal and verbal facilitation skills used within occupational therapy Interviewing skills processes and documentation skills relevant for professional practice Assertiveness, interaction and performance Oral presentation skills teaching peers, small groups and teamwork contributions Therapeutic group-work theories, skills and processes within occupation focused practice Introduction to counselling skills and the relationship to occupational therapy Interactive analysis and reasoning strategies within professional practice

Main Texts th Argyle, M. 1999.The psychology of interpersonal behaviour.5 ed.Harmondsworth:Penguin nd Burnard, P.1997.Effective communication skills for health professionals. 2 ed. Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes Publishers nd Faulkner, A. 1998. Effective interaction with patients. 2 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Keats D.M . 2000.Interviewing: a practical guide for students and professionals.Buckingham:Open University Press Schwartzberg, S.L. 2002.Interactive reasoning in the practice of occupational therapy. Upper Saddle River, NJ.: Prentice Hall OToole, G. 2008. Communication: core interpersonal skills for health professionals . Sydney: Churchill Livingstone-Elsevier. nd Sumison, T. ed. 2006.Client-centred practice in occupational therapy. 2 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Donnelly, E. & Neville, L. 2008. Communication and interpersonal skills. Exeter: Reflect Press. Swain, J., Clark, J., Parry , K., French, S. &Reynolds , F. 2004.Enabling relationships in health and social care:a guide for therapists. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.

Other relevant details


There is a bank of videos which are used for the purposes of modular content and assessment. They are regularly updated with the cooperation of local practitioners and their clients. (full informed consent and ethical issues are complied with)

Signed Registry use only

Date Date received

Module Descriptor
Title
Conceptual foundations of Occupational Therapy Level 1 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1 and 2 FT

Code (if known)


O1119 Credit Rating

SHE Level Level 7 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations

SCQF: 30 ECTS: 15
Polixeni Skaltsi

Ioanna Tsipra
None Normally concurrent SCQF level 7 modules or equivalent None

Aims
To introduce the student to occupational therapy, its value to people and the contexts in which it is practised Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Outline the major historical, social and contextual factors influencing the practice of occupational therapy L2 Describe key established theories and principles that underpin occupational therapists practice L3 L4 L5 Analyse selected elements of human occupations and the resultant demands on the individual Describe the influence of occupation upon a persons health and well being Outline the principles of ethical, anti-oppressive practice and the social inclusion agenda Appraise his/her own ability to apply theoretical knowledge to the practice context Demonstrate skills in oral and visual presentation Given specific case scenarios, discuss the principles of risk assessment
Assessed in this module

A B
* * * * * * * * * *

C D

Yes: summative Yes: summative Yes: formative Yes: summative Yes: summative

L6

Yes: summative

L7 L8

No Yes: summative

* *

* * *

A Knowledge and UnderstandingB Intellectual SkillsC Practical SkillsD Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:

Semester One
Keynote lectures: 12 hours Workshops: 36 hours Directed study: 42 hours Independent study: 100 hours Total: 200 hours TOTAL 300 hours

Semester Two
Keynote lectures: Workshops: Directed study: Independent study: Total 8 hours 12 hours 16 hours 60 hours 100 hours

Assessment Pattern
Semester 1:Summative: A 2000 word portfolio/essay containing two questions that explore topics covered within the module. The topics will relate specifically to learning outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. (Weighting: 60%) Formative: (Learning outcomes 3) Analysis of an occupation using proforma provided in workshops. Semester 2 : Summative: (Learning outcome 8) On-line manual handling test. Each student must attain the identified pass mark. (Weighting: 40%) Students cannot compensate one component of assessment with another on this module. 5

Can this Module be Anonymously marked?


Yes

Yes/No

If No please provide an explanation.

Content
Historical development of and future directions for the profession Understanding and analysing human occupation Introduction to theories and models of practice Overview of an occupational therapy process Working in the practice context: codes of ethics, anti-oppressive and non discriminatory practice, introduction to the social inclusion agenda, principles of risk assessment, presentation skills Exploration of users perspectives Continuing professional development Practice placement one preparation and debriefing

Main Texts
Atwal, A. & Jones, M. eds. 2011. Preparing for practice in health and social care. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell th Blesedell Crepeau, E.B., Cohn, E. S. & Boyt Schell, B. A. eds. 2008. Willard and Spackmans occupational therapy. 11 ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Christiansen, C.H. & Townsend, E.A. eds. 2010. Introduction to occupation the art and science of living: new multidisciplinary perspectives for understanding human occupation as a central feature of individual experience and social organization. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. th Creek, J. & Lougher L. eds 2008.Occupational therapy and mental health. 4 edEdinburgh:Churchill Livingstone. Curtin, M., Molineux, M. & Supyk-Mellson, J. eds. 2011. Occupational therapy and physical dysfunction: enabling th occupation. 6 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone th Duncan, E. A. S. ed. 2011. Foundations for practice in occupational thera py. 5 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Duncan, E. A. S. ed. 2009. Skills for practice in occupational therapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. nd Hasselkus, B.R. 2011. The meaning of everyday occupation. 2 ed. Thorofare,NJ: SLACK Inc. Health Professions Council. 2010. Guidance on conduct and ethics for students. London: Health Professions Council. th Kielhofner, G. 2009. Conceptual foundations of occupational therapy practice. 4 ed. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Co. Kielhofner G. ed. 2008. Model of Human Occupation: theory and application. 4th ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Pearce, R. 2003. Profiles and portfolios of evidence. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes th Smith, J. M. ed. 2011. The guide to the handling of people: a systems approach . 6 ed. Teddington:BackCare. Thomas, H. 2012. Occupation-based activity analysis. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Inc. nd Thomson, N. 2003.Promoting equality: challenging discrimination and oppression. 2 ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. Townsend, E.A. & Pollatajako, H. eds. 2007. Enabling occupation II: advancing an occupational therapy vision for health, well being and justice through occupation . Ottawa: Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Turpin, M. & Iwama, M. K. 2011.Using occupational therapy models in practice: a field guide. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date Date received

Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level
Participation in Occupation: Mind-Brain-Body and Context 1 1 7 Semester & Mode of Study 1&2 FT

Code (if known)


O1120

Credit Rating
SCQF:30 (ECTS 15)

SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Eliza Maglari Katerina Bourika, Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas


None Concurrent SCQF level 7 modules or equivalent None

1. To introduce students to selected, integrated subject matter from biological and social sciences, applied to practice situations 2. To integrate the multi-factorial relationships between mind-brain-body, well being, health, pathologies/impairments, contextual factors and occupation Assessed in this Learning Outcomes A B C module On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Identify and describe biological, social and psychological concepts Yes: Summative * * relevant to healthy functioning, life-span & pathology/impairments commonly encountered in the practice setting L2 Identify and describe the aetiology, signs and symptoms, and general management of pathologies/impairments commonly encountered in the practice setting Outline the occupational consequences of selected pathologies/impairments and contexts, commonly encountered in the practice setting Integrate mind-brain-body and contextual factors within a selected case study/scenario using the WHO ICF (2001) framework. Yes: Summative

D *

L3

Yes: Summative

L4

Yes: Summative

L5

Apply knowledge gained during the module to Professional Practice Placements.

No (assessed during Practice Placement)

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences
The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Semester 1 Semester 2 Lectures 20 hrs Lectures 12hrs Directed learning 50hrs Directed study 10hrs Integrative seminars 20hrs Integrative seminars 12hrs Private study 110 hrs Private study 60 hrs Total = 200 hrs (contact hrs = 40 hrs) Group presentations 6hrs Total = 100hrs (contact hrs = 30hrs) TOTAL 300 hours

Assessment Pattern
Summative Two Distinct Assessment Components. Part 1 - Undertake a poster outlining a contemporary issue in occupational therapy. The choice of topic will be influenced by student experience during PPP4 and of current issues in policy, research, theory or practice. Weighting = 50%. Part 2 Undertake a 10 minute verbal defence of the poster designed in Part 1, which will focus on the development of your chosen topic within occupational therapy and how the chosen issue is (or has the potential to be) valuable to the practitioner or patient within contemporary practice.

Weighting = 50%
Students can not compensate and must pass both components of the module assessment.

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Semester 2: NO. Group presentation. Two members of the module team will assess at each group presentation.

Content
Introduction to the WHO ICF 2 framework/other frameworks Psychology: motivation; anxiety; learning; cognition; memory; perception; Anxiety disorder; obsessional & phobic disorder; depression; stress; schizophrenia; dementia; learning disabilities; drug and alcohol misuse. Sociology and socio-cultural factors. Life span (briefly) Anatomy and physiology: introduction to bodily systems/structures and functions, all with related pathologies and impairments Bones, muscles, joints, gait, vertebral column, upper limb/hand function . Introduction to nervous system- brain, spinal cord.

Main Texts
Bernstein, D.A., Penner, L.A., Clarke-Stewart, A.& Roy, E.J.2012.Psychology.9th ed.Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. th Gates, B.ed. 2007.Learning disabilities: towards inclusion. 5 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Johnstone, E.C., Cunningham- Owens, D.G., Lawrie, S.M., McIntosh, A.M. & Sharpe M.D. eds. 2010. th Companion to psychiatric studies. 8 ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone McMillan, I.& Carin-Levy, G. 2012. Tyldesley and Grieves muscles nerves and movement in human occupation. 4th ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Nettleton, S. 2006. Sociology of health and illness. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Polity. th Tortora, G.J. & Derrickson, B. 2012. Essentials of anatomy and physiology. 9 ed. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Thibodeau, G.A. & Patton, K.T. 2009.The human body in health and disease.5thed. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby. nd Wilcock, A.A.2006. An occupational perspective of health . 2 ed. Thorofare, NJ:SLACK Inc. World Health Organisation. 2008.International classification of functioning, disability and health: ICF. Geneva: World Health Organisation.

Other relevant details


Aims and learning outcomes are informed by Health Professions Council (2007) Standards of Proficiency: Occupational Therapist and QAA Subject Benchmark Statements.

Module Descriptor
Title MUSCULOSKELETAL ANATOMY: THEORY Code (if known) TWO FT Credit Rating

SHE Level

SCQF 7 SCQF:10 Level Module Co-ordinator Dr. G. Koumantakis Module Team Dr. G. Koumantakis , Mr. Efstratios Xanthos, Mr. C. Comissopoulos Pre-requisites None Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims 1. To develop a thorough understanding of the anatomical structure and function of the musculoskeletal system. 2. To develop an ability to apply anatomical knowledge of the musculoskeletal system to the analysis of movement and functional activities.

Semester & Mode of Study

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Use universally recognised anatomical and movement descriptive terminology appropriately *

Assessed in this module

A B x

L2

Relate general features and concepts common to each system, to each of the regions studied Describe the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system and the formation, course and distribution of the main peripheral nerves Deduce the functional effects of damage to peripheral nerves at specified levels and discuss the features normally influencing joint range of motion Deduce the action and function of muscles from a knowledge of gross structure, position and attachments. Analyse movement and
muscle activity in a range of functional activities

L3

L4

L5

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Total student effort - 100 hours

Includes approximately: Tutorials / half group sessions: prepared questions are discussed within groups relating to theoretical, applied and functional regional anatomy - 26 hours Self-Directed: - 50 hours Directed study: Independent learning is supported by specific references to texts, articles and a range of DVD, CD ROM materials, web-based medium - 24 hours

Assessment Pattern Assessment is by one written, closed-book examination, comprising unseen questions from each region, to enable broad coverage of the modular content. The essay-type questions test knowledge, understanding, analysis and synthesis, and selected areas of applied anatomy. 100% weighting 1,5 hour written examination Submission date: End of Semester Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an explanation.

Content 1. Introduction to anatomy: How to study Anatomy; anatomical terminology and descriptive terms; anatomical position and movement terminology 2. Posture: analysis of normal posture; muscle balance; examples of the main postural abnormalities and their possible causes. 3. Regional study: for each region studied: normal structure and function of the musculoskeletal system bones, joints and muscles; features normally influencing joint range of movement; deduction of actions and functions of muscles from a knowledge of gross structure, position and attachments; some common clinical problems (including severe conditions/ emergencies) associated with joints and muscles. 4. Formation, course and distribution of the main peripheral nerves; deduction of functional effects of damage to peripheral nerves at specified levels. 5. Analysis of movement and muscle activity in a range of functional activities, with specific emphasis on shoulder, arm and hand function, neck ,trunk (emphasizing to muscles contributing to breathing) and normal gait. Main Texts

10

Field D. (2006) Anatomy, Palpation and Surface Marking. 4th ed. Butterworth & Heinemann Kendall, FP, Kendall McCreary, E & Provance, PG (2005) Muscles Testing and Function (5th. ed) Williams & Wilkins Moore, Keith & Dalley, Arthur E (2006) Clinically Oriented Anatomy(5 ed.) Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, th 5 edition (2006) Hislop H., Montgomery J. Daniels and Worthinghams Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination., Parisianou Scientific Editions (2000) (English Ed of 1995), translated by Patatoulas D.S., Fotaki S.G. Texts in Greek Michel Dufour, Anatomie de l'appareil locomoteur (2002)- 3 Volumes, Ed. Masson Version in Greek: Michel Dufour, Anatomy of The Musculoskeletal System Vol I,II,III,Paschalides Medical Editions, Schunke M Schumacher U. (2005) Prometheus: LernAtlas der Anatomie Vol I. Thieme Verlag Ed. Version in Greek: Schunke M Schumacher U: Prometheus -Basic Descriptive Anatomy, General Anatomy & Musculaskeletal System, Vol I, Paschalides Medical Editions, 2007 Tixa Serge, Anatomie palpatoire. cou, tronc, membre suprieur (1st Ed, Vol I in 1997, Vol II in 1999)Version in Greek: Tixa S Atlas of Surface Palpation: Anatomy of the Neck, Trunk, Upper and Lower Limbs, Vol I & II, Parisianos Medical Publications, 2003
th

Registry use only

Date received

11

Module Descriptor
Title First Aid and Manual Handling Semester & Mode of Study 1 FT Code (if known) Credit Rating SCQF:10

SHE Level 1 SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Nicolas Mazis Maria Tsekoura

Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims To enable students to Recognize and Evaluate an emergency, to develop skills in Applying first aids and to undertake manual handling of patients with safety in a variety of environments and conditions Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Recognise critical conditions and emergencies Assessed in this module Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Practical Examination Yes Summative Yes Practical examination A B X X C X D

L2

Assess an emergency using the ABCD (Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability) protocol or a variation of this Apply Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation

L3

L4 L5

Analyse first aid to various critical conditions Evaluate proper and safe handling of a patient prompted for occupational therapy as well as an emergency

X X

X X

X X

X X

A;Knowledge and Understanding B;Intellectual Skills C;Practical Skills D; Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures key lectures will introduce topics to students 2hrs Practical classes 28 hrs Directed Study - involving the whole year working in pairs or as individuals. A full programme of directed study as an integral part of all group-based learning is presented and the students are guided to explore key issues in preparation for practical classes through this process- 35 hrs Independent Study 35 hrs Total student effort : 100 hours Assessment Pattern 1. One Practical examination (60%) Submission date: Week 8 1. One 1 hour multiple choice written assessment (40%) Submission date: End of Semester Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes/No If No please provide an explanation.

12

Yes for the written assignment. No for the practical exam as the students will be face to face with the examiner Content Assessment models of an emergency The ABCD assessment. Basic Life Support The Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation process Anaphylactic Shock Drowning Choking Electrical injuries Hyperthermia Hypothermia, Cold injuries Poisoning, Bite wounds Burns Bone fractures Emergencies in children and infants Manual Handling legislation principles of moving and handling Practical application of moving and handling in a range of situations Safety precautions on providing first aid Infection Control Main Texts American Heart Association (Corporate Author) (2006) BLS for Healthcare Providers. Amer Heart Assn. ISBN-10: 0874934613 Field J, Hazinski MF, Gilmore D (2008) Handbook of Emergency Cardiovascular Care: for Healthcare Providers. Amer Heart Assn. ISBN-10: 0874935407 Textbooks in Greek Flengel M (2007) Sport First Aid 3rd ed. Paschalidis Medical Publications Paterson JG, Armstrong VJ (2006) Practical First Aid. Paschalidis Medical Publications The UK Resuscitation Council website http://www.resus.org.uk/ American Heart Association websitehttp://www.americanheart.org/ Other relevant details

Signed

Date

13

Module Descriptor
Title
Research Skills 1: Introduction to Research & Critical Appraisal 1 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 FT

Code (if known)


O1122 Credit Rating SCQF10 ECTS 5

SHE Level 7 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations

Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas

Normally all concurrent Level modules or equivalent None

Aims
1. To introduce students to the principles of scientific enquiry including knowledge of the research process and different research paradigms. 2. To introduce students to the place of research in health and social care in general, and occupational therapy in particular 3. To introduce students to the social and political context of research Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Describe the key features of participatory and emancipatory research Describe the relative merits and forms of quantitative and L2 qualitative research. Explain the use and value of descriptive statistics. L3
Assessed in this module

A B
* * * * * * * * * * * *

C D * * * *

No Yes - Summative No No Yes - Summative Yes - Summative

L4 L5 L6

Explain the use and practical application of scales of measurement within research. Identify the relationship between research and practice within occupational therapy Evaluate the quality of specified aspects of published research within occupational therapy.

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
Lecture: 10 hours Tutorial: 10 hours Web based learning: 45 hours Independent learning (including assignment completion): 35 hours

TOTAL 100 hours Assessment Pattern


1000 word critical appraisal of a research article from an occupational therapy journal. Weighting 100%

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.


Yes

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Content

14

The social and political context of research: Who funds the research, who controls the research, who does it benefit, what gets published; the development of patient involvement and research governance; participatory and emancipatory research Key features of quantitative and qualitative research:Scales of measurement; descriptive statistics; types of qualitative analysis; sources of non-numerical data (interviews, diaries and other documents, observation) Critical appraisal: How to read a research paper, quality appraisal checklists

Main Texts
Aveyard, H. 2009. A beginners guide to evidence based practice in health and social care. Buckingham: Open University Press Bryman, A. 2012.Social research methods. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press Girden, E.R. 2001. Evaluating research articles: from start to finish. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Sage Cornish K (1998) An Introduction to Using Statistics in Research. Trent Focus Primary Care Research Network O Leary, Z. 2004. The essential guide for doing research. London:Sage th Polgar, S. & Thomas, S.A. 2008. Introduction to research in the health sciences.5 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Robson, C. 2011.Real world research: a resource for users of social research methods in applied settings.3rd ed. Chichester:Wiley

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date received Date

15

Module Descriptor
Title
Professional Practice Placement 1

Code (if known)


Semester 2 F/T O1123 Credit Rating SCQF: 20 ECTS:10

Level 1 SHE Level Level 7 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites

Semester & Mode of Study

Eliza Maglari
Personal academic tutors Successful completion of risk assessment test in Conceptual Foundations of Occupational Therapy Normally, concurrent SCQF level 7 modules or equivalent None

Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations

Aims
1. To provide an introduction to the practice placement context 2. To form the foundation for development of interpersonal, applied and practical skills 3. To explore factors which may impact on health / ill health / well being and their occupational performance 4. To explore a range of pathologies / impairments and examine how these impact on occupational performance 5. To examine aspects of occupational performance and effects on health / ill health 6. To develop an understanding of risk assessment and its consequences in practice 7. To gain experience and develop skills in interviewing and assessment 8. To provide an introduction to major aspects of and influences on the practice of occupational therapy 9. To gain experience in working in a professional / interprofessional environment 10. To provide the foundation for clinical reasoning skills 11 .To form the foundations for personal reflection and goal setting in practice 12. To establish a baseline for future professional practice / development Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Identify the occupational therapy role and major influences on it within the practice context L2 Demonstrate understanding of the significance of and effectively utilise interpersonal and practical skills Demonstrate knowledge of factors which may impact on health and occupational performance Demonstrate knowledge of occupational analysis and its application Accurately assess risk and handle service users safely Carry out initial interviews and basic assessments and report and record the findings logically, accurately and precisely Work collaboratively with others in the practice setting Identify personal and professional goals and targets
Assessed in this module

A B
* * * *

C D
* * *

Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative

L3 L4 L5 L6

* * * *

* * * * * * * * *

L7 L8

* *

* *

* *

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

16

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: This practice placement will be of 6 weeks full time duration. By the end of the practice placement each student should have successfully completed 216 hours of assessed practice education The placement will give studentstheir first experience of practice and will form the foundation for the development and application of professional knowledge and skills. Students will be supervised by qualified occupational therapists and will work under their guidance. Students will be expected to work in an ethical and non-discriminatory manner. Students will be expected to collect and collate information for future studies and to establish the practice placement element of the professional development portfolio. Students will be actively involved in supervision and the preparation for it.

Assessment Pattern
Formative:Students are assessed by their practice educators. At the mid way appraisal the practice educator compiles the practice placement assessment report form, providing students with written feedback on their performance. It guides the actions to be taken by the practice educator and student during the remainder of the placement. Summative:The final evaluation is completed and graded by the practice educator at least one day before the end of the practice placement and discussed with the student. This provides the student with the opportunity to review the report before signing it and returning it to the practice educator . Weighting 100%. Students engage in a self-appraisal of their performance in preparation for both the mid way and final evaluations

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation Content


Yes/No

If No please provide an

No. Assessment of students performance during practice placement relies upon personal supervision Introduction and orientation to the service and its context Observation of and collaborative working with the practice educator and others Experience of working with service users and others Practice of interpersonal and communication skills Risk assessment Interviewing and assessment Participation in aspects of intervention/case management Documentation skills

MainTexts

Atchison, B. & Dirette, D.K. eds. 2012. Conditions in occupational therapy: effect on occupational performance. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. Atwal, A., & Jones, M. eds. 2009. Preparing for practice in health and social care. [on-line book] Oxford: WileyBlackwell. Bossers, A., Bezinna, M.B.,Hobson, S. Kinesella, A., MacPhail, A., Schurr, S. , Moosa, T., Rolleman, L., Ferguson, K., Deluca, S., Macnab, J. & Jenkins, J. 2007. Preceptor Education Program (PEP) for Health Care Professionals and Students.[on-line]. Available at: www.preceptor.ca Duncan, E.A.S. ed. 2009. Skills for practice in occupational therapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Duncan, E.A.S. ed. 2011. Foundations for practice in occupational therapy . 5th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier Healey, J. & Spencer, M. 2008. Surviving your placement in health and social care: A student handbook. [online book]. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Health Professions Council. 2010. Guidance on conduct and ethics for students. London: Health Professions Council.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date Date received

17

Programme Modules Therapy

BSc (Hons) Occupational

Profile of Student Experience: Level Two Theme: Enabling Occupation Level Two Coordinator Associate Coordinator
Polixeni Skaltsi Ioanna Tsipra

Semester One University contact weeks Average contact hours per week Semester Two University contact weeks Average Contact hours per week Professional Practice Placement (8 weeks @ 36 hours, minimum, per week)

10 weeks 9.5 hours 12 weeks 8 hours 288 hours

Learning Experience and Assessment


Semester One Modules Assessment Occupational Therapy as an Enabling Profession Reflective Essay Research Skills Timed Test Participation in Occupation Mind-Brain-Body & Context 2 Plan/deliver peer tutorial Musculoskeletal Anatomy: Practical Application 1 Practical Examination & One (1.5 hr) written analysis Semester Two Modules Occupational Therapy as an Enabling Profession Participation in Occupation Mind-Brain-Body in Context 2 Professional Practice Placement 2 Health and Welfare (sociology)

Occupational Analysis & intervention objectives Debate (oral)

Assessment Report Essay 1000 - 1500 word

Student Support
Academic Tutor Groups Group Size 9 10 Students Meetings Semester 1: 1 meeting (individual and group meeting) Semester 2: 1 meeting (individual and group meeting)

Student Representation
Level Two students will be represented on the following committees Student Staff Consultative Committee (4 representatives) Programme Committee (2 representatives)

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Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level
Occupational Therapy as an Enabling Profession. 2 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1 and 2. FT

Code (if known) O2120 Credit Rating SCQF: 30


ECTS. 15

8 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator

Polixeni Skaltsi Ioanna Tsipra


Normally successful completion of SCQF Levels 7 or equivalent Normally all concurrent level modules or equivalent None

Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

1. To enable the student to analyse and work within the complex dimensions of occupational therapy practice. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Evaluate the theories, paradigms and models currently used within occupational therapy. L2 L3 L4 L5 Analyse the impact of context upon the service user. Debate the notion of occupational therapy as a complex intervention. Demonstrate the theoretical and practical skills of occupational analysis. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the relationship of occupational science to the practice of occupational therapy. Evaluate current practice of occupational therapy in relation to the social inclusion agenda. Identify and discuss the values of anti-oppressive practice. Reflect upon his/her ability to analyse an occupation using an appropriate framework. Yes. summative
Assessed in this module

A B
* * * * * * * * * *

C D

Yes. summative Yes Yes. summative Yes. Summative and formative

L6 L7 L8

* * *

* * *

* * *

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: ISemester 1 Semester 2 Lectures. 10 Lectures. 20 Tutorials. 5 Tutorials. 10 Seminars. 5 Seminars. 10 Workshops. 4 Workshops. 8 Directed Learning. 30 Directed Learning. 60 Independent Study. 46 Independent Study. 92 TOTAL 100 Hours TOTAL 300 hours TOTAL 200Hours

19

Assessment Pattern
Summative: Semester 1.To administer an occupation-focussed assessment with a peer and write an evaluative and reflective commentary. 2000 words. Summative: Semester 2.To write intervention objectives and a relevant occupational analysis for a selected case. 2000 words. Formative: critical discussion and feedback in small groups. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an

explanation. Content
Models of practice; occupation focused and introduction to related knowledge models. Occupational Science. Contexts of practice. Core competencies. Occupational therapy as a complex intervention/an occupational therapy process. Occupational analysis. Concept of enabling occupation. Practical skills/involvement in occupations. (ADL, work, leisure, various occupation etc) An introduction to Clinical Reasoning. Reflective practice. Evidence Based Practice. Professional Practice Placement 2 Preparation and debriefing.

Main Texts
Christiansen, C.H.&Townsend, E.A. eds. 2010. Introduction to occupation the art and science of living: new multidisciplinary perspectives for understanding human occupation as a central feature of individual nd experience and social organization. 2 ed.Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. th Creek, J. & Lougher, L. eds. 2008. Occupational therapy and mental health. 4 ed. Churchill Livingstone. Curtin, C., Molineux, M. & Supyk-Mellson, J. eds. 2010. Occupational therapy and physical dysfunction: th enabling occupation. 6 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Duncan, E.A.S. ed. 2011. Foundations for practice in occupational therapy. 5th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Duncan, E. A. S. ed.2009. Skills for practice in occupational therapy. Edinburgh: Elsevier. Jasper, M. 2003. Beginning reflective practice. [online book]. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes. th Kielhofner, G. 2009. Conceptual foundations of occupational therapy practice. 4 ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott. th Kielhofner G. ed. 2008.Model of Human Occupation:theory and application. 4 ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Mackenzie, L. & O Toole, G. eds. 2011. Occupation analysis in practice. Chichester:Wiley Blackwell. nd Sumsion, T. ed. 2006. Client centred practice in occupational therapy: a guide to implementation . 2 ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Townsend, E.A. & Pollatajako, H. eds. 2007. Enabling occupation II: advancing an occupational therapy vision for health, well being and justice through occupation. Ottawa: Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Turpin, M. & Iwama, M.K. 2011. Using occupational therapy models in practice: a field guide. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date Date received

20

Module Descriptor
Title
Research Skills 2: Introduction to Data Analysis and Evidence Based Practice 2 8 Semester & Mode of Study Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas Normally successful completion of SCQF Levels 7, 8, and 9 or equivalent Normally all concurrent Level modules or equivalent None Semester 1 FT

Code (if known)


O2121 Credit Rating SCQF: 10 ECTS: 5

SHE Level SCQF Level

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites


Prohibited Combinations

Aims
1. To develop students understanding of principles of scientific enquiry (including knowledge of the research process, quantitative and qualitative paradigms). 2. To provide students with knowledge and understanding of evidence-based practice. 3. To introduce students to key elements of research proposals Assessed in this Learning Outcomes A B C module On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Describe key features of inferential statistics and their Yes - Summative * * appropriate use. L2 Describe key features of qualitative analysis. Yes - Summative * * L3 L4 L5 Outline the role and process of evidence based practice within occupational therapy. Explain the benefits and limitations of an evidence-based approach. Extract key information from a research proposal. Yes - Summative Yes - Summative Yes - Summative * * * * * * * *

D
* *

A Knowledge and Understanding B ntellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
Lecture 6 hours Tutorial 6 hours Web based learning 48 Independent study (including test revision) 40 TOTAL 100 Hours

Assessment Pattern
One end of semester test requiring short answers based on a seen research proposal given to students two weeks prior to test. The research proposal will incorporate information presented to students throughout the course of the module. A minimum of 40% must be achieved in the test. Weighting 100%

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.


Yes

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Content

21

Quantitative and qualitative research Inferential statistics; parametric and non-parametric statistics, reasons why certain tests will be chosen, role of computer assisted analysis. Qualitative analysis; coding and categorizing data, thematic analysis, discourse analysis, policy analysis, justification of methods, role of computer assisted analysis. Evidence based practice; definition and development within practice, hierarchy of evidence, and integration with practice. Construction of research proposals. Advanced literature search strategies

Main Texts Bryman, A. 2012. Social research methods.4 ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press rd Creswell, J.W. 2009. Research design: Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches .3 ed. London: Sage Denzin, N.K.& Lincoln, Y.S. eds. 2005. The SAGE handbook of qualitative research.3rd ed. London:Sage th Flick, U. 2009. An introduction to qualitative research.4 ed. London: Sage Grbich, C. 1999. Qualitative research in health: an introduction. London: Sage rd Robson, C. 2011. Real world research: a resource for users of social research methods in applied settings.3 ed.Chichester: Wiley Blackwell Salkind, N.J. 2004. Statistics for people (who think) they hate statistics . 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks,Calif: Sage. nd Taylor, C.M. 2007. Evidence-based practice for occupational therapists. 2 ed. Oxford:Blackwell Science
th

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date received Date

22

Module Descriptor
Title
Participation in Occupation: Mind-Brain-Body and Context 2 2 Semester & Mode of Study 1&2 FT

Code (if known)


O2122

SHE Level

Credit Rating
SCQF: 30 (ECTS 15)

8 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Eliza Maglari Katerina Bourika , Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas


Successful completion of SCQF level 7 modules or equivalent Concurrent SCQF level 8 modules or equivalent None

1. To enable students to: 2. Integrate subject matter from biological and social sciences, applied to common practice situations 3. Synthesise the relationships between mind-brain-body, well being, health, pathologies/impairments, life-span, contextual influences and occupation Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Describe and explore biological, social and psychological concepts relevant to healthy functioning, life-span & pathology/impairments commonly encountered in the practice setting L2 Identify and describe the aetiology, signs and symptoms, and general management of pathologies/impairments commonly encountered in the practice setting Explore the occupational consequences of multiple health factors, pathologies/impairments and contexts commonly encountered in the practice setting Critically explore the WHO ICF as an integrative framework for understanding the relationships between mind, brain, body, health impairments, disability, context and occupation Apply knowledge gained during the module to Professional Practice Placements. Assessed in this module Yes: Summative

A B
* *

C D *

Yes: Summative

L3

Yes: Summative

L4

Yes: Summative

L5

No (assessed during Practice Placement)

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skill

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
Semester 1 Lectures 24 hrs Directed learning 42hrs Integrative seminars 24hrs Private study 110 hrs Total = 200 hrs (contact time = 48hrs) TOTAL 300 hours Semester 2 Lectures 9hrs Directed study 15hrs Integrative seminars 9 hrs Private study 55hrs Group presentations 6hrs Total = 100hrs (contact time =24hrs)

23

Assessment pattern:
Semester 1. Summative To deliver a 30 minute group led tutorial on topics selected by the teaching team. Weighting 80% To develop a group handout to guide the workshop participants (1,000 word) Weighting 20% Semester 2. Summative Assessed debate on teams of four students. A joint mark will be allocated to the team. The students will be assigned topics that relate to the integration of underpinning sciences, impairment/pathology, health, disability, context and occupation Weighting 50% Development of an individual essay to support a balanced view of the selected issue (1,500 words) Weighting 50%

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.


No. Two team members will assess each presentation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Content
Life-span and WHO ICF as key frameworks Emphasis on sociology and social policy (context) Expanding and deepening material from level one for psychology, anatomy, physiology and sociology Introduction of new and complex pathologies/impairments e.g.: eating disorders, progressive neurological disorders, motor learning and control. Integration of mind-brain-body and context, using increasingly complex case studies to explore occupational consequences

Main Texts
Johnstone, E.C., Cunningham- Owens, D.G., Lawrie, S.M., McIntosh, A.M. & Sharpe th M.D.eds.2010.Companion to psychiatric studies.8 ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone. McMillan. I.& Carin-Levy, G. 2012. Tyldesley and Grieves muscles nerves and movement in human th occupation. 4 ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Nettleton, S. 2006. Sociology of health and illness. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Polity. th Pinel, J.P.J. 2011.Biopsychology. 9 ed. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Rogers, A . &Pilgrim, D 2003.Mental health and inequality. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan. Tortora, G.J. & Derrickson, B. 2012. Essentials of anatomy and physiology. 9th ed. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Thibodeau, G.A. & Patton, K.T. 2009. The human body in health and disease. 5th ed. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby. Cattan,M. & Tilford, S. eds. 2006. Mental health promotion: a lifespan approach.Maidenhead: Open University Press. Wilcock, A.A. 2006. An occupational perspective of health. 2nd ed. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Inc World Health Organisation. 2008. International classification of functioning, disability and health: ICF. Geneva: World Health Organisation.

Other relevant details


Aims and learning outcomes are informed by Health Professions Council (2007) Standards of Proficiency; Occupational Therapist and QAA Subject Benchmark Statements. There will be opportunities to integrate and align with Occupational Therapy as an Enabling Profession, in both semester one and two. Themes each week will be integrated with a case study.

Signed Registry use only

Date Date received

24

New Module Descriptor


Title Musculoskeletal Anatomy: Practical Application Code P1114
SEMESTER ONE FT Credit Rating SHE 2 Semester & Level Mode of Study SCQF:10 SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Christos Comissopoulos Module Team Christos Comissopoulos -Efstratios Xanthos- Dr G. Koumantakis Pre-requisites NONE Co-requisites Musculoskeletal anatomy: theory (or similar theoretical study) Prohibited NONE Combinations Aims 1. To develop students abilities to apply anatomical knowledge to the analysis of human movement and function. 2. To allow students to develop the practical anatomical skills of observation, palpation, joint and muscle testing and an ability to recognise normal anatomical presentation and variations from this. 3. To develop the ability to examine and analyse posture, recognising features of normal posture and postural variation.

To develop skills of Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Identify/palpate named soft tissues and bony landmarks on the living body. L2 Observe and analyse normal posture and recognise postural abnormalities. Demonstrate normal ranges of movement of different joints. Identify the position and attachment of muscles with reference to the living body and the skeleton. Select and apply appropriate muscle testing procedures. Demonstrate different types of muscle contraction and recognise different muscle function. Select and demonstrate appropriate stretch techniques for selected muscles. Analyse selected functional activities including recognition of different types of muscle contraction

Assessed in this module * *

A B x

C D x

L3

x x

x x

L4

L5

A: Knowledge and Understanding B: Intellectual Skills C: Practical Skills D:Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:

25

Musculoskeletal anatomy is presented using a student-centred, directed, group-based approach, with half year student groups. 100 hours student effort includes approximately: Practical application of skills : 24 hours Students are required to apply theoretical anatomical knowledge and understanding to the living body, using a hands-on approach. Students will work with each other in pairs, and in small groups and are required to practise practical skills on each other. Self-Directed: - 32 hours Directed study: - 44 hours Independent learning is encouraged with provision of a workbook and reading references, and access to a range of anatomical models, charts and skeletons. Practical rooms are booked for self study time to encourage practice of hands-on practical skills. Provision of anatomy DVDs and CD ROM learning material with self-testing programmes are also provided to support group learning. Total student effort Assessment Pattern 1 Practical Examination Students will undertake 1 short practical viva test, which will last approximately 15 minutes. 50%. Week 7 All students must meet the core standards which are a Pass/Fail element related to professional behaviour (Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics HPC 2003 & Standards of Ethics and Conduct, Panhellenic Physical Therapy Association). The student must obtain a pass in all core pass/fail elements within the Practical examinations in order to pass this module. One (1.5 hr) written analysis of functional activity (WA) at the end of semester 50% - 100 hours

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? No If No please provide an explanation. Due to the nature of the practical viva examinations these cannot be anonymous. Content

26

1. Introduction and guidance on how to learn practical skills; professional skills 2. Observation and palpation of musculoskeletal structures 3. Analysis of normal posture and normal positional relationships between musculoskeletal structures 4. Recognition of postural deviations and analysis of possible causes 5. Testing of normal ranges of active and passive movement 6. Discussion of factors normally influencing joint range of motion 7. Examples of clinical problems which may affect normal ranges of joint movement and muscle function (including emergency conditions such as fractures, dislocations, severe ligament strains e.t.c.) 8. Demonstration of procedures involved in manual muscle strength testing, and examples of stretch positions for muscles 9. Analysis of movement and selected functional activities 10. Analysis of rib cage movement in breathing and factors that may affect normal ranges of movement and muscle function (including Diaphragm). 11. Recognition of different types of muscle action 12. Identification of the 3-D relationship between musculoskeletal structures, nerves and blood vessels (including structures and anatomical areas relevant to cardiorespiratory function such as neck blood vessels and trachea palpation) 13. Clinically oriented references to musculoskeletal problems.

Main Texts Field D. (2006) Anatomy, Palpation and Surface Marking. 4th ed. Butterworth & Heinemann Moore, Keith & Dalley, Arthur E (2006) Clinically Oriented Anatomy(5th ed.) Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 5th edition (2006) Kendall, FP, Kendall McCreary, E & Provance, PG (2005) Muscles Testing and Function (5th. ed) Williams & Wilkins Shacklock M. (2005) Clinical Neurodynamics; A new System of Musculoskeletal TreatmentButterworth-Heinemann. Texts in Greek Wirhed R. Athletic Ability and the Anatomy of Movement., Parisianou Scientific Editions (2003) (English Ed of 1995 ), translated by Tsakoniti A. Hislop H., Montgomery J. Daniels and Worthinghams Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination., Parisianou Scientific Editions (2000) (English Ed of 1995), translated by Patatoulas D.S., Fotaki S.G. Tixa S. Atlas of Surface Palpation: Anatomy of the Neck, Trunk, Upper and Lower Limbs., Vol I & II, Parisianou Scientific Editions (2004) (foreign editions: 1st Ed, Vol I in 1997, Vol II in 1999) Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date received Date

27

Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level SCQF Level Health and Welfare (sociology) 2 8
Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 F/T

D1145 Credit Rating SCQF:10

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Tatiana Xenou Tatiana Xenou and visiting health psychology practitioners

Pre-requisites Course entry requirements for level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To provide students with a framework of concepts and theories used in social policy analysis To use this framework to understand the nature and development of contemporary welfare in Greece and the UK To provide students with a cross-national perspective on issues within health and social care
Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Understand and apply key concepts used in social policy Assessed in this module Yes

A B
X

D X X

X X

analysis L2 Understand the historical development of the Greek welfare and the welfare in selected EU countries (e.g. UK) Be aware of the different models of welfare in the EU Analyze the key health and social care issues in contemporary Greek welfare Evaluate the differences between the Greek approaches to these issues with those in selected other countries (e.g. UK) Yes X X

L3 L4 L5

Yes Yes Yes

X X X X X X

X X X

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 10 hours lectures 5 hours tutorials 85 hours of independent study Assessment Pattern Assignment: 1000 - 1500 word Essay (100%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes Yes/No If No please provide an

28

Content Key concepts, models and theories in welfare.


Overview of the development and revision of the Welfare State in Greece.

Health: the Greek National Health System (ESY) and the welfare state; the NHS and the Welfare State; recent changes in the structure and management of the Greek National Health System (ESY) and NHS; funding health care existing mechanisms and some alternatives. Social care: the rethinking of community care; new approaches in the management of social care in Greece and the UK; children, elderly people and community care. Health and social care in selected countries: some cross-national comparisons.

Main Texts Alcock, C., Payne, S. and Sullivan, M. (2004) Introducing Social Policy (Revised edn.), Harlow: Pearson Education. Alcock, P., Erskine, A. and May, M. (eds.) (2003) The Students Companion to Social Policy (2nd edn.), Oxford: Blackwell. Glennerster, H. (1997) Paying for Welfare: Towards 2000, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf. Hughes, G. and Lewis, J. (eds.) (1998) Unsettling Welfare: the Reconstruction of Social Policy, London: Routledge/Open University. Langan, M. (ed.) (1998) Welfare: Needs, Rights and Risks, London: Routledge/Open University. Midwinter, E.C. (1994) The Development of Social Welfare in Britain, Buckingham: Open University Press. Greek Texts selected material from main sources in a handout format Other relevant details This is a level 2 module which will be vired down to level 1 for DNBS students accessing it.

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

29

Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level SCQF Level
Professional Practice Placement 2 Level 2 Level 8 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 FT

Code (if known) O2124


Credit Rating SCQF: 30 ECTS: 15

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites


Prohibited Combinations

Eliza Maglari
Personal academic tutors Normally, successful completion of all SCQF Level 7 modules or equivalent Normally, all concurrent SCQF Level 8 modules or equivalent None

Aims
1. To develop a broader understanding of the practice placement context 2. To develop and practice a range of interpersonal / applied and practical skills 3. To explore factors which impact on health / ill health / well being and occupational performance 4. To develop a broader understanding of a range of pathologies / impairments and how they might impact occupation 5. To enhance knowledge and skills relating to risk assessment and working with service users 6. To gain further experience in assessment, goal setting, prioritisation and intervention strategies 7. To broaden understanding of influences on practice and implications for intervention 8. To participate in all aspects of case management / intervention 9. To develop and expand knowledge and understanding of components of clinical reasoning 10. To gain experience of working in a professional / inter professional / inter agency context 11. To develop skills in personal reflection and goal setting Assessed in this Learning Outcomes A B module On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Effectively utilise interpersonal and other practical skills Yes: formative * * and summative L2 Demonstrate understanding of influences on health / ill health / Yes: formative * * well being and occupational performance and to appraise factors and summative impacting on intervention L3 Accurately assess risk and handle service users competently and Yes: formative * * safely and summative L4 Work collaboratively to assess, prioritise and plan intervention Yes: formative * * strategies and act as a co-therapist in all aspects of case and summative management / intervention L5 Demonstrate understanding of the occupational consequences of Yes: formative * * conditions relevant to the placement setting and summative L6 Demonstrate understanding of the theory and practice of clinical Yes: formative * * reasoning and summative L7 Work with others in a professional/ inter professional / inter agency Yes: formative * * context and summative L8 Evidence personal reflection and goal setting Yes: formative * * and summative
A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

on

C D
* *

* *

* *

* * * *

Learning Experiences
The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: This practice placement is of 8 weeks full time duration and occurs at the end of level 2. By the end of the placement student should have successfully completed 288 hours of assessed practice education. Students will be expected to work in an ethical and non-discriminatory manner. Students will work closely with qualified occupational therapist(s) and will be guided by them. The placement will provide the student with experience of working in a different area from

30

professional practice placement 1 and will aim to explore the transfer of knowledge and skills within the practice setting. Students will continue to collect and collate information in their personal and professional development portfolios. Students will be actively involved in the evaluation of their own performance.

Assessment Pattern
Formative: Students are assessed by their practice educators. At the mid way appraisal the practice educator compiles the practice placement assessment report form, providing students with written feedback on their performance. It guides the actions to be taken by the practice educator and student during the remainder of the placement. Summative: The final evaluation is completed and graded by the practice educator at least one day before the end of the practice placement and discussed with the student. This provides the student with the opportunity to review the report before signing it and returning it to the practice educator. Weighting 100%. Students engage in a self-appraisal of their performance in preparation for both the mid way and final evaluations

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Content


Yes/No

If No please provide an

No. Assessment of students performance during practice placement relies upon personal supervision . Experience of a different area of practice from PPP1 Experience of working with service users as part of a team Risk management: risk assessment and its application Practice of interpersonal and communication skills Collaborative working with practice placement educator and others Assessment , intervention and evaluation Documentation skills Preparation of case studies Main Texts.Atchison, B. & Dirette, D.K. eds. 2012. Conditions in occupational therapy: effect on occupational performance. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. Atwal, A., & Jones, M. eds. 2009. Preparing for practice in health and social care. [on-line book] Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Bossers, A., Bezinna, M.B.,Hobson, S. Kinesella, A., MacPhail, A., Schurr, S. , Moosa, T., Rolleman, L., Ferguson, K., Deluca, S., Macnab, J. & Jenkins, J. 2007. Preceptor Education Program (PEP) for health care professionals and students. [on-line].Available at: www.preceptor.ca College of Occupational Therapists. 2011. Professional standards for occupational therapy practice .[on-line] London: College of Occupational Therapists. Available at: www.cot.co.uk/standards/ethics/professionalstandards-occupational-therapy-practice Duncan, E.A.S. ed. 2009. Skills for practice in occupational therapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Gahye, T. & Lilleyman, S. 2006. Learning journals and critical incidents: reflective practice for health care professionals. 2nd ed. London: Quay Books Healey, J. & Spencer, M. 2008. Surviving your placement in health and social care: A student handbook. [on-line book]. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Health Professions Council. 2010. Guidance on conduct and ethics for students. London: Health Professions Council. Laver Fawcett A.J. 2007. Principles of assessment and outcome measurement for occupational therapists and physiotherapists: theory skills and application. [on-line book]. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. Mckenzie, L. & OToole, G. eds. 2011. Occupation analysis in practice. Chichester: Wiley-Backwell. Sumsion, T. ed. 2006. Client centred practice in occupational therapy: a guide to implementation . 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date Date received

31

Programme Modules

BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

Profile of Student Experience: Level Three Theme: Reflecting on Occupation Level Three Coordinator Associate Coordinator
Eliza Maglari

Semester One University contact weeks Average contact hours per week Semester Two University contact weeks Average Contact hours per week Professional Practice Placement 3 (6 weeks @ 36 hours, minimum, per week) Weighting 100%.

12 weeks 8.5 hours 10 weeks 7 hours 216 hours

Learning Experience and Assessment


Semester One Modules Contemporary Epistemologies of Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy: Reflecting on Practice Research Skills 3 Participation in Occupation Mind-Brain-Body & Context 3 Interprofessional Education Assessment Essay (only Semester 2 assignment) Essay Resource Pack Group Presentation

Semester Two Modules Occupational Therapy: Reflecting on Practice Options (see Assessment Pattern or Module Proforma)

Oral Presentation Essay & Individual Participation Grade Mind-Brain-Body in Context 3 Teaching Session & Reflective Report Interprofessional Education: delivering integrated careGroup presentation& Essay Research 3 Professional Practice Placement 3 Essay Assessment Report

Student Support
Academic Tutor Groups Group Size 9 10 Students Meetings Semester 1: 1 meeting (individual and group meeting) Semester 2: 1 meeting (individual and group meeting)

Student Representation
Level Three students will be represented on the following committees Student Staff Consultative Committee (4 representatives) Programme Committee (4 representatives)

32

Module Descriptor
Title
Contemporary Epistemologies of Occupational Therapy Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1 FT

Code (if known)


O3134 Credit Rating

3 SHE Level 9 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator

SCQF:10 ECTS : 5 Polixeni Skaltsi


Andrew Muir Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7,8 or equivalent Normally all concurrent level 3 modules or equivalent None

Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites


Prohibited Combinations

Aims
1.To achieve a broad theoretical scholarship and praxis 2.To subject existing knowledge claims concerning epistemologies of practice to scrutiny 3.To enable the students to practice in an uncertain and unpredictable professional world 4.To enable students to develop as reflexive practitioners 5.To identify the influence of postmodernism on the study and practice of occupational therapy Assessed in this Learning Outcomes A B module On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Identify epistemologies informing current practice Yes summative * *

C D
*

L2

Problematise dominant epistemologies of practice

Yes summative

L3

Deconstruct practice by reflecting upon personal modes of practice

Yes summative

L4

Apply a reflexive framework to practice

Yes summative

L5

Integrate ideas of reflexive practice with the constructs of client centred practice, empowerment and social inclusion

Yes summative

L6

Subject a critical incident or a journal article to reflexive analysis

Yes:Formative

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

33

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: This module will engage the student in the following learning experiences
Interactive lectures - 6 hours Student led seminars - 6 hours Reflexive dialogue with module co-ordinators and peers in preparation for student led seminars - 2 hours Keeping a collective group diary - 6 hours Directed Reading 14 hours Self Directed Study 66 hours. TOTAL 100 hours

Assessment Pattern
Summative assessment: 2000 word assignment. 100% Formative assessment: Students will be given an opportunity to subject a critical incident or a journal article to reflexive analysis. This will be undertaken in small groups and feedback will be provided by module team using a proforma designed for this purpose.

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Content


Yes

If No please provide an

An overview of the ontology and epistemology of occupational therapy Postmodernism and allied health professions Critical social theory Anti-oppressive practice The concept of the advanced practitioner A critical overview of evidence based practice in relation to occupational therapy A critical overview of reflective practice in relation to occupational therapy A critical overview of reflexive practice Reflexivity within research in occupational therapy

Main Texts
Brown, G., Esdaile, S.A.& Ryan, S.E.2003.Becoming an advanced healthcare practitionerLondon: Butterworth Heinemann. nd Burr, V.2003.Social constructionism. 2 ed. London: Routledge. Dominelli, L. 2002.Anti-oppressive social work theory and practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Finlay, L.& Gough, B. eds. 2003. Reflexivity: a practical guide for researchers in health and social sciences . Oxford: Blackwell Science. Fook , J. & Gardner, F. 2007. Practising critical reflection: a resource handbook . Maidenhead: Open University Press Fook, J. 2002.Social work:critical theory and practice.London: Sage nd Gergen, K.J.2009. An invitation to social constructionism.2 ed. London: Sage. Gergen, K.J. & Gergen, M.eds. 2003.Social construction:areader. London: Sage. Gutting ,G, 2005.Foucault: a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Higgs, J& Titchen, A.eds.2001.Professional practice in health, education and the creative arts.Chicester: Wiley-Blackwell. Taylor, C. & White, S. 2000.Practising reflexivity in health and welfare: making knowledge work Buckingham: Open University Press. nd Thomson, N. 2000.Theory and practice in human services. 2 ed.Buckingham:Open University Press. Buckingham Tremain, S. 2005.Foucault and the government of disability. [on-line book] Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Whiteford, G.E. & Hocking, C. eds. 2012.Occupational science: society, inclusion, participation. Chichester:Wiley-Blackwell.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date received Date

34

Module Descriptor
Title Occupational Therapy: reflecting on practice.
Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1 and 2. FT.

SHE Level 3 Level SCQF SCQF 9 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Code (if known) O3136 Credit Rating SCQF: 20 ECTS: 10

Ioanna Tsipra To be confirmed Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7 and 8 or equivalent Normally all concurrent level modules or equivalent.

1. To enable the student to critically reflect on occupational therapy, its theory, its value to people and the contexts in which it is practised

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Critically evaluate the professions response to the

Assessed in this module

A B
*

C D

No

contribution of occupational science. L2 Plan strategies to foster occupational engagement. Yes. Summative Yes. Summative Yes. Summative Yes. Summative Yes. Summative * * *

L3

Critique and debate current assessment and intervention practices in occupational therapy.
Demonstrate ability to incorporate users perspectives in the therapeutic process.

L4

L5

Demonstrate competence in advanced presentation and design skills. To analyse theoretical concepts/models relating to clinical reasoning and evaluate their application to practice.

L6

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:

35

Semester 1. Lectures 9 hours Tutorials 3 hours Seminars 3 hours Workshops 3 hours Directed Learning 40 hours Independent Learning 42 hours TOTAL 100 hours
TOTAL 200 hours

Semester 2 Lectures Tutorials Seminars Workshop Directed Learning Independent Learning TOTAL

10 hours 2 hours 2 hours 4 hours 40 hours 42 hours 100 hours

Assessment Pattern
Semester 2. A 20 minute oral presentation and defence of a selected case study. 100% weighting.

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? No If No please provide an explanation. The nature of the assessment (oral presentation) makes it impossible to mark it anonymously. Content
Occupational risk factors. Concepts and operationlisation of occupational justice. Intervention and evaluation strategies for OTs. Critique of interventions. The users perspective. Design and presentation skills. Clinical reasoning. Reflective practice. Cultural issues. Professional Practice Placement preparation and debriefing

Main Texts
Boyt Schell, B.A. & Boyt Schell J.W. eds. 2008. Clinical and professional reasoning in occupational therapy . Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Creek, J. & Lougher, L. eds. 2008. Occupational therapy and mental health. 4th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Curtin, C., Molineux, M. & Supyk-Mellson, J. eds. 2010. Occupational therapy and physical dysfunction: enabling occupation. 6th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Goodman, J., Hurst, J. & Locke, C. 2009. Occupational therapy for people with a learning disability. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. rd Hinjosa, J., Kramer, P. & Crist, C. eds. 2012. Evaluation: obtaining and interpreting data. 3 ed. Bethesda: American Occupational Therapy Association Laver Fawcett, A. 2007. Principles of assessment and outcome measurement for occupational therapists and physiotherapists: theory, skills and application. [on-line book]. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Meriano, C. & Latella, D. eds. 2008. Occupational therapy interventions: function and occupations. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Inc McIntyre, A. & Atwal, A. eds. 2005. Occupational therapy and older people. Oxford: Blackwell. Rolfe, G., Jasper, M. & Freshwater, D. 2011 Critical reflection in practice: generating knowledge for care. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan. Rodger, S. 2010. Occupation-centred practice with children: a practical guide for occupational therapists . [online book] Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Taylor, C.M. 2007. Evidence based practice for occupational therapists. 2nd ed. Oxford: Wiley- Blackwell Publishers. Taylor, R. E. 2008. The intentional relationship: occupational therapy and use of self . [on-line book] Philadelphia: F. A. Davis Co.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date Date received

36

Module Descriptor
Title
Research Skills 3: Theory & Practice (Exploring Methodology and Data Analysis)

Code (if known)


O3137 Credit Rating

3 SHE Level 9 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations

Semester & Mode of Study

Semester 1 and 2 FT

SCQF:20 ECTS 10 Dr Panagiotis Siaperas Katerina Bourika


Normally successful completion of SCQF Levels 7 and 8 or equivalent Normally all concurrent Level modules or equivalent None

Aims
1. To develop skills in the analysis of data with particular focus on numerical and non-numerical approaches relevant to occupational therapy. 2. To introduce students to critical debates in methodology. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Demonstrate skills in manipulation, analysis and presentation of numerical data.
Assessed in this module

A B
* *

C D
* *

Yes Formative

L2

Demonstrate skills in analysis and presentation of nonnumerical data.

Yes Formative

L3

Critically analyse and debate issues concerning methodology within a written assignment

Yes Summative

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
Semester 1 Semester 2 Lectures: 10 hours Lectures: 3 hours Group work: 11 hours Seminars: 2 hours Workshops: 4 hours Independent learning (including assignment completion) 95 hours Directed learning: 75 hours TOTAL 200 hours

Assessment Pattern
Formative: (Learning Outcome 1): Students will complete a group exercise using SPSS and involving data input and running specified statistical tests. (Learning Outcome 2): Students will complete a group exercise involving the thematic analysis of qualitative data and presentation of findings. Summative: (Learning Outcome 3): 3000 word essay concerning a methodological issue. Students will construct their own question. The question will require that implications for occupational therapy, theoretical and philosophical, as well as practical issues be addressed. Weighting 100%

37

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.


Yes

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Content
Survey construction. Collection and analysis of quantitative data from within the cohort; incorporating: Tests of reliability, correlation, and difference. Interviews and focus groups: constructing question schedules. Collection and analysis of qualitative data from within the cohort, incorporating assessment of rigour, and identification of themes. Methodological debates: e.g. Complementary or competing paradigms; the possibility of objectivity; the influence of values; what can be measured; validity, reliability and associated concepts.

Main Texts Cornish K (1998) An Introduction to Using Statistics in Research. Trent Focus Primary Care Research Network Hancock B (1998) An introduction to Qualitative Research. Trent Focus Primary Care Research Network Lacey A, Luff D (2001) Qualitative Data Analysis. Trent Focus Primary Care Research Network May T (2001) Social research: issues, methods and processes (3rd ed). OU Press: Buckingham Murphy E, Dingwall R, Greatbatch D, Parker S, Watson P (1998) Qualitative research methods in health technology assessment: a review of the literature. Health Technology Assessment 2 (16) Pallant J (2007) SPSS Survival Manual. (3rd ed) OU Press: Buckingham Other relevant details This module makes use of the web based teaching tool WebCT; internet access outwith QMU is useful but not essential. Signed Registry use only Date received Date

38

Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level
Exploring Participation in Occupation: Mind-Brain-Body and Context 3 3 Semester & Mode of Study Eliza Maglari Normally successful completion of SCQF Levels 7/8 or equivalent Normally all concurrent Level 3 modules or equivalent None Semester 1 FT

Code (if known)


O3138 Credit Rating SCQF: 10 (ECTS 5)

9 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites

Prohibited Combinations

Aims 1. To allow students to demonstrate an in-depth analysis of an issue influencing participation in occupation 2. To provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in peer teaching.
Assessed in this module Yes - Formative

A B
* * * * * *

C
* * * * *

Demonstrate skills in the presentation of complex material to a student audience Demonstrate skills in analysis and synthesis of current evidence Yes Summative L2 in relation to a specific topic Critically analyse and debate issues concerning mind, brain body, Yes Summative L3 and context in relation to occupational therapy A Knowledge and UnderstandingB Intellectual SkillsC Practical Skills D -Transferable kills

L1

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
Lecture: 1 hour Group work: 47 hours Group supervision: 2 hours Independent learning (including assignment completion): 50 hours

TOTAL 100 hours Assessment Pattern


Formative:(Group) Design and delivery of a 1 hour teaching session on a topic selected by the students (Learning Outcome 1) Summative:(Individual) 2000 word resource pack to accompany the teaching session (Learning Outcomes 2 & 3).Weighting 100%.

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes Content


Yes/No

If No please provide an explanation.

No formal teaching. Students will work in small groups to design a one hour workshop on a topic of their choosing that reflects the content of Mind-Brain-Body and Context 1 & 2.

Main Texts
Brooks-Harris, J.E. & Stock-Ward, S.R. 1999. Workshops: designing and facilitating experiential learning. Thousand Oaks: Sage Cameron, E. 2005. Facilitation made easy: practical tips to improve meetings and workshops . 3rd ed. [on-line book]. London: Kogan Page Deck, M.L. 1995. Instant teaching tools for healthcare educators. St Louis: Mosby Finlay, L. 2004. The practice of psychosocial occupational therapy . Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes Tiberius, R.G. 1999. Small group teaching: a trouble-shooting guide. London: Kogan page Moynihan, M., Guilbert, J., Walker, B. & Walker, A. 2004. How to run a workshop. [on- line book] (resource available on the self-directed studying WebCT area of the module) MacDonald, R. 1997. Teaching and learning in small groups. Birmingham: Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA).

39

McMillan. I. & Carin-Levy, G. 2012. Tyldesley and Grieves muscles nerves and movement in human occupation. 4th ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Pinel, J.P.J. 2011. Biopsychology . 9th ed. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Thibodeau, G.A. & Patton, K.T. 2009. The human body in health and disease. 5th ed. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby. Tortora, G.J. & Derrickson, B. 2012. Essentials of anatomy and physiology. 9th ed. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Wilcock, A.A. 2006. An occupational perspective of health. 2nd ed. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Inc World Health Organisation. 2008. International classification of functioning, disability and health: ICF. Geneva: World Health Organisation nd Young, P.A. Young, P.H. & Tolbert, D.L. 2007. Basic clinical neuroscience. 2 ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date received Date

40

Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level SCQF Level Interprofessional Education: delivering integrated care 3 9 Semester & Credit Rating Mode of 1&2 SCQF:20 Study Nicolas Mazis Nicolas Mazis, Tatiana Xenou Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7/8/9 or equivalent Normally all concurrent Level modules or equivalent None

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

To enable students to: Participate in the assessment and management of patient/client care Critically explore team working and team dynamics Learning Outcomes On successful completion the student, taking an interprofessional team approach, will be able to: L1 Critically analyse and challenge their own and others roles in caring for patients/clients Integrate their professional skills with an interprofessional approach to care co-ordination Critically debate the different practical, ethical and communication issues used within interprofessional care of patients or clients Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of group dynamics within teams Participate in a student conference Assessed in this module Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Yes Summative Yes Summative A B C D

L2

L3

L4

L5

L6

Reflect on the interprofessional education process

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Key-note lectures Collaborative seminars Group presentations Electronic learning resources Conference

Key-note lectures 6 hours Facilitated sessions 20 hours Directed group work 60 hours Individual study 110 hours Conference attendance 4 hours Total student effort :200 hours Assessment Pattern

41

1. A leader-and peer-assessed 30 minute group presentation within a conference setting 20% 2. A 1500 word reflective report on the individuals participation in the interprofessional education learning process 80% Can this Module be Anonymously marked? If No provide an explanation

Content Inter-agency team roles Group dynamics and group roles Leadership skills in clinical problem solving and decision making Professional ethics in the context of interprofessional practice Peer assessment and appraisal Patient empowerment Exploration of the evidence base relating to interprofessional management of clients and patients Current professional issues and their impact on team roles and interprofessional practice

Main Texts Ovretveit J, Thompson T (1997) Interprofessional working in health and social care. London: Macmillan. Elwyn G, Greenhalgh T, MacFarlane F (2000) Groups: a guide to small group work in healthcare management, education and research. Oxford: Radcliffe Medical Press. Jaques D (2000) Learning in groups: a handbook for improving group work. London: Kogan Page. Payne M (2000) Teamwork in multiprofessional care. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Martin V, Henderson E (2001) Managing in health and social care. London: Routledge. Tope R (1996) Integrated interdisciplinary learning between the health and social care professions. Aldershot: Avebury. Schon D (1997) Educating the reflective practitioner. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Centre for the Advancement of Interprofssional Education (CAIPE): http://www.caipe.org.uk Learning and Teaching Support Network (Health Science and Practice): http://www.health.ltsn.ac.uk A Knowledge and UnderstandingB Intellectual SkillsC Practical SkillsD Transferable Skills Other relevant details The contact time of the module will be during Weeks 1, 24, 33 with the conference in Week 35 or 36. This module will focus on individual case studies and the respective roles each profession plays in the case management of the individual. Each group will work on a case which will be provided and each professional group/student will be expected to contribute the role they would play in the patient/client pathway. Following identification of roles discussion will focus on the generic and profession specific roles and their interface. Additionally discussion will focus on roles of other staff involved in the patient/client journey i.e support workers/assistants, hospital scientists, physiologists etc. Staff will present the case and facilitate group discussion. Signed Registry use only Date received Date

42

Module Descriptor OPTION


Title
Enabling occupational performance through assistive technology 3 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 FT

Code (if known)


O3141 Credit Rating SCQF: 10 ECTS: 5

SHE Level 9 SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations

Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas


Normally successful completion of all SCQF Levels 7 and 8 or equivalent Normally concurrent SCQF level 9 modules or equivalent Other level 3 optional modules

Aims
1. To provide a forum in which students explore the role of assistive technology within a variety of practice contexts. 2. To enable students to critically evaluate the contribution of assistive technology to suppor ting peoples participation in and/or satisfaction with occupational performance. 3. To reflect upon and plan for personal and professional development. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Delineate the characteristics of assistive technologies and the major considerations to be taken into account when designing assistive technology systems/services L2 Select and apply established frameworks and assessment tools to facilitate successful matching of person(s) and technology
Assessed in this module

A B
* *

C D
* *

Yes: Summative

Yes: Summative

L3

Debate the relationship between the consumers life roles, performance areas and his/her use of assistive technology

Yes: Summative

L4

Critically appraise how regulatory frameworks underpinning the delivery of assistive technology services within the United Kingdom relate to the social inclusion agenda Explain how reflective learning from experience can enhance self assessment and continuing professional development

Yes: Summative

L5

Yes: Summative

A Knowledge and UnderstandingB Intellectual SkillsC Practical SkillsD Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
12 hours directed learning 18 hours experiential workshops: 70 hours independent learning TOTAL 100 hour

Assessment Pattern
Summative: Submission of a 2000 word reflective portfolio demonstrating evidence of development of understanding and learning on an assistive technology topic selected by the student (Weighting 100%)

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

43

Reflective portfolio: No. The student is expected attend a meeting with the module coordinator/ member of the module team to discuss his/her proposal for the portfolio Individual participation grade: No. The student will be expected to arrange an individual meeting with the module coordinator/ member of the module team in order to negotiate his/her participation grade.

Content
The content of the module will be flexible to reflect current practice and technological advancements and might include: Context for assistive technology: review of legislation and social policy Characteristics of and critical evaluation of assistive technologies; Universal and inclusive design; Ergonomics; Matching person and technology- application of occupation- focussed and related- knowledge frameworks and models for practice for example MPT process; Human Activity Assistive Technology Model; Model of Human Occupation; CMOP-E;PEO. SMART technology

Main Texts
Bryant, D. P. & Bryant, B. 2011. Assistive technology for people with disabilities. 2 ed. Boston: Pearson. Conway, M. 2008. Occupational therapy and inclusive design: principles for practice . Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Cook, A. M. & Polgar, J.M. 2012. Essentials of assistive technologies. St Louis: Elsevier:Mosby rd Jacobs, K. ed . 2007. Ergonomics for therapists. 3 ed.London: Elsevier, Mosby. Oishi, M.M.K., Mitchell I.M. &Van der Loos, H.F. M. eds. 2010. Design and use of assistive technology: social, technical, ethical and economic challenges. [on-line book]. New York: Springer Scherer, M.J. 2011. Assistive technology and other supports for people with brain impairment . New York: Springer Publishing. th Scherer, M.J.2005.Living in the state of stuck: how technology impacts upon the lives of disabled people. 4 ed. Brookline, Mass:Brookline Books.
nd

Other relevant details


This module requires that students have access to the programmes specialist assistive technology teaching resources. These resources are in limited availability, therefore an upper limit of 14 students may participate in this module.

Signed Registry use only Date received

Date

44

Module Descriptor OPTION


Title
Working with Children

Code (if known)


O3143

SHE Level

SCQF 9 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Semester & Mode of Study Optional Module

Credit Rating
2 FT SCQF: 10 ECTS: 5

Katerina Bourika VLs Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7 and 8 or equivalent Normally all concurrent level modules or equivalent Other level 9 optional modules

1. To enable students to critically reflect on key conditions and approaches to intervention in relation to working with children and their families Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Describe current understandings of key processes and mechanisms of development L2 L3 Evaluate key theories of child development Discuss the issues surrounding key conditions relevant to children Assessed in this module Yes: Summative Yes: Summative Yes: Summative

A B
x x x x x x

C D
x x

L4

Consider some of the treatment approaches available within paediatric occupational therapy and provide arguments about their impact in light of evidence based practice Consider the impact of impairment on the child, family and society

Yes: Summative

L5

Yes: Summative

A Knowledge and UnderstandingB Intellectual SkillsC Practical SkillsD Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences:
9 hours lectures 9 hours seminars 82 hours Independent learning TOTAL 100 Hours

Assessment Pattern
Summative - 2500 word assignment. Students will design their own question around one of the four key themes explored in this module i.e. child development, key conditions, intervention, impact of impairment. Students are encouraged to have dialogue with the module team to determine their final assignment question. Weighting x 100% Formative a personal reflective account of the learning process experienced during this module

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

No

If No please provide an

Because the essay title will be discussed with the module team and student numbers will be small, anonymity may be compromised

Content
45

Definitions of development (stages, phases of development in infancy and childhood) Key models and theories for understanding growth and development (concepts of vulnerability, risk, delay, plasticity) Areas of development (motor, neurodevelopmental, social, cognitive) Conditions may include: Failure to Thrive / Developmental delay, CP, Muscular Dystrophy, Juvenile RA, DCD, ADHD, Pervasive Developmental Disorders/ Autism Range of treatment approaches may include sensory integration, neurodevelopmental, cognitive behavioural therapy, developmental play therapy, educational Collaborative practice issues Impact of impairment on occupational performance of the child and their family

Main Texts

Case-Smith, J . & O Brien, J.C. eds. 2010. Occupationaltherapy for children. 6 ed. Maryland Heights: Elsevier Mosby rd Kramer, P. & Hinojosa, J.eds. 2010.Frames of reference for pediatric occupational therapy.3 ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. nd Dunn, W. 2011.Best practice occupational therapy in community settings with children and families. 2 ed. Thorofare: Slack Inc. Lougher, L. ed. 2001.Occupational therapy for child and adolescent mental health. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Messer D& Millar, S. eds. 1999. Exploring developmental psychology: from infancy to adolescence. London: Arnold. Mulligan, S. 2003.Occupational therapy evaluation for children: a pocket guide. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. nd Case-Smith, J. ed. 1998. Pediatric occupational therapy and early intervention. 2 ed. Oxford: ButterworthHeinemann nd Parham, L. D. & Fazio, L.eds. 2008.Play in occupational therapy for children. 2 ed. St Louis: Mosby Elsevier. nd Schonkoff, J. P., Meisels, S.J. & Zigler, E. F. 2000.Handbook of early childhood intervention. 2 ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Empson. J.M. 2003. Atypical child development in context.[ on-line book].Houndsmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Rodger, S. ed. 2010. Occupation centred practice with children: a practical guide for occupational therapists . Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Rodger, S. & Ziviani, J. eds. 2006. Occupational therapy with children: understanding childrens occupations and enabling participation. Oxford: Blackwell

th

Other relevant details

Signed Registry use only Date received

Date

46

Module Descriptor
Title
Professional Practice Placement 3

Code (if known)


Semester 2 FT O3145 Credit Rating SCQF: 20 ECTS: 10

SHE Level SCQF Level

3 9

Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites


Prohibited Combinations

Eliza Maglari Personal academic tutors Normally, successful completion of SCQF level 8 modules or equivalent Normally, concurrent SCQF level 9 modules or equivalent None

Aims
1. To develop, practice and consolidate a range of interpersonal / applied and practical skills 2. To enhance knowledge and understanding of the application of theory and the integration of theory and practice 3. To select and utilise assessment tools and intervention strategies 4. To evaluate the contribution to practice of occupational science 5. To evaluate reflective / reflexive practice in the placement context 6. To evaluate service user perspectives of health and social care provision 7. To examine the operationalisation of legislation / policy and to explore factors impacting on its application 8. To actively contribute to departmental / professional and inter professional team working 9. To critically explore the actual or potential impact on service provision of evidence based practice 10. To critically reflect on generic and discipline specific skills encountered in practice 11. To reflect on and plan for personal professional development Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Transfer and apply a range of interpersonal and practical skills L2 L3 Apply and integrate theory from course modules in a meaningful and realistic manner Select, justify and utilise assessment tools and intervention strategies Evaluate the contribution to practice of occupational science Appraise the significance of reflective / reflexive practice
Assessed in this module

A B
* * * * * *

C D
*

Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative

L4 L5

* *

* *

L6 L7

Evaluate legislation and policy and its impact on service provision Critique generic and discipline specific skills and knowledge and their uses in practice Appraise personal performance and plan development

* *

* * *

L8

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Assessment Pattern

47

Formative: Students are assessed by their practice educators. At the mid way appraisal the practice educator compiles the practice placement assessment report form, providing students with written feedback on their performance. It guides the actions to be taken by the practice educator and student during the remainder of the placement. Summative: The final evaluation is completed and graded by the practice educator at least one day before the end of the practice placement and discussed with the student. This provides the student with the opportunity to review the report before signing it and returning it to the practice educator. Weighting 100%. Students engage in a self-appraisal of their performance in preparation for both the mid way and final evaluations

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

No. Assessment of students performance during practice placement relies upon personal supervision

Content
Experience of a third area of practice Working as a co-therapist Taking responsibility for all aspects of case management / planning under supervision Liaison with other staff / agencies Assessment and evaluation of service users and practice Report writing / recording / presentation Preparation of case study material Thinking and clinical reasoning Active integration of theory and practice

Main Texts
Atchison, B. & Dirette, D.K. eds. 2012. Conditions in occupational therapy: effect on occupational performance. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. Atwal, A., & Jones, M. eds. 2009. Preparing for practice in health and social care.[on-line book] Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Bossers, A., Bezinna, M.B.,Hobson, S. Kinesella, A., MacPhail, A., Schurr, S. , Moosa, T., Rolleman, L., Ferguson, K., Deluca, S., Macnab, J. & Jenkins, J. 2007. Preceptor Education Program (PEP) for Health Care Professionals and Students. [on-line]Available at: www.preceptor.ca Boyt Schell, B.A. & Boyt Schell, J.W. eds. 2008. Clinical and professional reasoning in occupational therapy . Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. College of Occupational Therapists. 2011. Professional standards for occupational therapy practice .[on-line] London: College of Occupational Therapists. Available at: www.cot.co.uk/standards/ethics/professionalstandards-occupational-therapy-practice Creek, J. & Lawson Porter, A. eds. 2007. Contemporary issues in occupational therapy: reasoning and reflection. 2nd ed. [on-line book]. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. Duncan, E.A.S. ed. 2009. Skills for practice in occupational therapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Healey, J. & Spencer, M. 2008. Surviving your placement in health and social care: A student handbook . [online book]. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Health Professions Council. 2010. Guidance on conduct and ethics for students. London: Health Professions Council. Taylor, R.R. 2008. The intentional relationship: occupational therapy and the use of self . [on-line book]. Philadelphia: F.A.Davis Co.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date Date received

Programme Modules

BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

48

Profile of Student Experience: Level Four Theme: Scholarship & Evaluation of Occupation Level Four Coordinator Associate Coordinator
Panagiotis Siaperas

Semester One University contact weeks 6 weeks Average contact hours per week 5 hours Professional Practice Placement 4 (8 weeks @ 36 hours, minimum, per week) 288 hours Semester Two University contact weeks Average Contact hours per week

12 weeks 6 hours

Learning Experience and Assessment


Semester One Modules Assessment Professional Practice Placement 4 Assessment Report Research Skills 4 Project Counselling & Group-Work in Occupational Therapy Essay & Presentation Semester Two Modules Contemporary Issues in Occupational Therapy Poster/Paper and Portfolio Options (see Assessment Pattern or Module Proforma) Essay or Oral Presentation Research 4 Essay

Student Support
Academic Tutor Groups Group Size 9 -10 Students Meetings Semester 1: 1 meeting (individual and group meeting) Semester 2: 1 meeting (individual and group meeting)

Student Representation
Level Four students will be represented on the following committees Student Staff Consultative Committee (4 representatives) Programme Committee (2 representatives)

49

Module Descriptor
Title
Professional Practice Placement 4 4
10

Code (if known) TBC


Semester 1 FT Credit Rating SCQF: 30 ECTS:15

SHE Level SCQF Level

Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites


Prohibited Combinations

Eliza Maglari Personal academic tutors Normally, successful completion of all SCQF level 9 modules or equivalent Normally all concurrent SCQF level modules 10 or equivalent None

Aims
1. To practise and demonstrate competencies commensurate with those of a qualifying occupational therapist 2 To select, analyse, utilise, transfer, integrate and adapt practical and theoretical skills and knowledge from previous practice placements and course modules 3. To expand and consolidate knowledge of a range of conditions and their occupational consequences 4. To critically appraise current health and social care policies and their relationship to practice and to service users 5. To promote occupational balance and to facilitate personal change and positive attitudes to health 6. To work in collaboration with other towards desired outcomes 7. To contribute to and critically evaluate the effectiveness of case management at personal/ professional and inter professional levels 8. To explore current priorities in health and social care and to critically evaluate the impact of these on service users in relation to occupational justice 9. To critically evaluate and seek to apply research findings in the practice context 10. To reflect on and critique personal and professional development Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Integrate theory, knowledge and skills to work effectively with people with multiple / complex needs L2 Demonstrate the ability to carry and manage all aspects of a small caseload Demonstrate self management skills and independence in professional judgement Make informed decisions based on reflection, clinical judgements and research evidence Work both independently and collaboratively to meet agreed goals
Assessed in this module

A B
* * * *

C D
* * * *

Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative Yes: formative and summative

L3 L4

* *

* *

* *

L5

L6

Critique service and care provision from an occupational perspective Contribute effectively to professional / inter-professional and inter agency working Define a framework for continuing personal / professional development

L7

L8

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

50

Learning Experiences
The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: This practice placement will be of 8 weeks duration. By the end of the placement students will have successfully completed 288 hours of assessed practice education and along with other relevant placement experiences, have completed a total of at least 1000 hours of assessedpractice education. Students will be expected to work in an autonomous manner and, following an induction period, to carry responsibility for a small caseload and to collaborate with others in meeting needs. Students will be expected work in an ethical and non-discriminatory manner Students will be actively involved in evaluation of their own performance Students will have opportunities to consider and plan for future professional development

Assessment Pattern
Formative: Students are assessed by their practice educators. At the mid way appraisal the practice educator compiles the practice placement assessment report form, providing students with written feedback on their performance. It guides the actions to be taken by the practice educator and student during the remainder of the placement. Summative: The final evaluation is completed and graded by the practice educator at least one day before the end of the practice placement and discussed with the student. This provides the student with the opportunity to review the report before signing it and returning it to the practice educator. Weighting 100%. Students engage in a self-appraisal of their performance in preparation for both the mid way and final evaluations.

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

No. Assessment of students performance during practice placement relies upon personal supervision

Content
Following an initial introduction and orientation to the placement context the student will be expected to take responsibility for a small caseload and to reflect on and evaluate personal performance and to feed back to the practice placement educator and others involved in service provision.

Atchison, B. & Dirette, D.K. eds. 2012. Conditions in occupational therapy: effect on occupational performance. 4th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. Atwal, A., & Jones, M. eds. 2009. Preparing for practice in health and social care. [on-line book] Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Boyt Schell, B.A. & Schell, J.W. eds. 2008. Clinical and professional reasoning in occupational therapy . Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins College of Occupational Therapists. 2011. Professional standards for occupational therapy practice.[on-line] London: College of Occupational Therapists. Available at: www.cot.co.uk/standards/ethics/professionalstandards-occupational-therapy-practice Health Professions Council. 2010. Guidance on conduct and ethics for students. London: Health Professions Council. Health Professions Council. 2007. Standards of proficiency: Occupational Therapist. London: Health Professions Council. Healey, J. & Spencer, M. 2008. Surviving your placement in health and social care: A student handbook . [online book]. Maidenhead: Open University Press Rose, M. & Best, D. eds. 2005. Transforming practice through clinical education, professional supervision and mentoring. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.

Other relevant details Signed Registry use only Date received Date

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Module Descriptor
Title
Research Skills 4: From Research Consumer to Research Producer: First Steps. Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1& 2 FT

Code (if known) O4127


Credit Rating

4 SHE Level SCQF Level 10 Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations

SCQF: 40 ECTS: 20

Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas Course team Normally successful completion of SCQF Levels 7, 8, and 9 or equivalent Normally all concurrent Level modules or equivalent None

Aims
1. To develop the ability to systematically gather, evaluate, and use evidence from a wide range of sources. 2. To develop skills in the use of methods of enquiry to inform or benefit practice. 3. To critically evaluate the nature of evidence and its influence on practise Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Confidently identify and define an issue relevant to
Assessed in this module

A B
*

C D *

Yes - Summative

occupational therapy that can be addressed within a research proposal at undergraduate level 4. L2 Use highly developed search strategies to identify literature relevant to a proposed research project.
Critically analyse literature within the context of a systematic review/literature review.

Yes - Summative

L3

Yes - Summative

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Semester 1: Group supervision 2 hrs Lectures 4 hrs. Independent study 194 hrs Assessment Pattern
3,000 word systematic review or 4,000 word literature review. Weighting 50% 3,000 word research proposal. Weighting 50% Semester 2:

Group supervision 3 hrs Lectures 4 hrs. Independent study 193 hrs

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes/No If No please provide an explanation. Yes Content Lectures: review of Levels 1-3 research modules, systematic reviews, evidence based practice, research ethics procedures, current research (QMU Staff) There will be a total of 5 hours worth of group supervision the timing to be determined by the group taking into account the supervisors timetable. Topics will be negotiated by the group but may include: having a clear focus for the project, how to structure a large piece of work, time management, analysis and synthesis, writing clearly, methodology and methods.

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Supervisors will not provide comments on individual drafts; however during group supervision students written work may form the basis of the session. Students must attend the first and last session unless there are extenuating circumstances. The final meeting will be no later than two weeks before submission. The introduction to the systematic review / literature review will include a robust justification of the relevance of the project to occupational therapy. The research proposal will include a copy of the data collection tool to be used. The proposal will also include a detailed justification of the proposed methodology and methods/procedure/sampling, clear coverage of ethical issues and procedures (including completed QMU and external ethical approval forms as appropriate), and an estimate of the resources required. Main Texts
Aveyard, H. 2009. A beginners guide to evidence based practice in health and social care. Buckingham: Open University Press. Aveyard, H. 2008. Doing a literature review in health and social care: a practical guid e. Maidenhead: Open University Press. nd Bailey, D.M. 1997 Research for the health professional: a practical guide.2 ed. Philadelphia: FA Davis. Bryman, A. 2012. Social research methods. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Dey, I. 1993.Qualitative data analysis: a user-friendly guide for social scientists. London:Routledge Grbich, C. 2008. Qualitative data analysis: an introduction. London: Sage. Grbich, C. 1999. Qualitative research in health: an introduction. London: Sage Hart, C.2001.Doing a literature search: a comprehensive guide for the social sciences. London: Sage. Hart, C. 1998. Doing a literature review: releasing the social science research imagination . London: SAGE/Open University Press. rd May, T. 2001.Social research: issues, methods and processes.3 ed. Buckingham: Open University Press Murphy, E., Dingwall, R., Greatbatch, D., Parker, S.,& Watson, P. 1998.Qualitative research methods in health technology assessment: a review of the literature. Southampton: National Coordinating Centre for Health Technology Assessment. Robson, C. 2011. Real world research: a resource for users of social research methods in applied settings.3rd ed. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell nd Taylor, C.M. 2007.Evidence-based practice for occupational therapists. 2 ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Other relevant details

Signed Registry use only Date received

Date

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Module Descriptor
Title SHE Level Counselling &Group-Work in Occupational Therapy Level 4. Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1 & 2 FT. Code (if known) O4131 Credit Rating SCQF:20 ECTS. 5 SCQF Level Level 10 Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas Polixeni Skaltsi Normally successful completion of SCQF Levels 9 or equivalent Normally concurrent level 10 modules or equivalent. Other level 4 optional modules

To evaluate theories and research concerning counselling of individuals. Discuss different theories about group process and group leadership.To understand and discuss group processes, structures and theories To reflect upon and critically evaluate current practice of counselling. To offer practical experiential sessions in order to learn, develop and utilise counselling skills and of group leadership skills. To facilitate student debate on the value of counselling and groupwork in occupational therapy. To explore the links between occupational and counselling and groupwork theories Assessed in this module A B C D

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding and synthesis of counselling theories and Group work L2 Critically engage with counselling theories and group models and make links to occupational therapy.

Summative; essay

Summative; essay.

L3

Evaluate participation in contribution to debates and skills workshops.

Formative; personal journal Summative: participation grade. Summative; essay

L4

Evaluate the contribution of counselling theory and group-work practice to occupational therapy.

L5

Critically engage in the design and formation of Group work.

Yes Practical examination

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Experiential learning: workshops, groupwork 24hours Seminars/lectures. 24hours Directed Study (incl. personal journal) 60 Independent learning, 92 TOTAL 200 hours

Assessment Pattern

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Semester 2. Formative: this will include feedback on workshop experiences and the writing of a personal journal. Summative: an essay of 2500 words which explores the topic of counselling (skills and knowledge), including critical reflection of the students practice.(2000 words) 50% 50% In pairs design, formation and presentation of an occupational therapy group. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an explanation.

Content An overview of Counselling and of the use of Group Work in therapy Self Evaluation Theories of counsellingand group work in occupational therapy Current practise of Group work in occupational therapy (Design, Formation, Development and Termination of a Group) Group membership and group leadership and its effects Person Centred Counselling. Person Centred Counselling and OT, Rogers Core Conditions and OT. Psychodynamic Counselling. Psychodynamic Theory and OT. Cognitive Behavioural Counselling. Cognitive Behavioural Counselling and OT Counselling Research and Models. Group models in occupational therapy Main Texts Bunard P (1994) Counselling for Health professionals. 2nd ed. Egan G (1986) The Skilled Helper. 5th Ed Feltham C (1995) What is counselling? Sage. Jacobs M (1988) Psychodynamic counsellingin action Sage McLeod J (2003) An Introduction to Counselling. Open University Press. Maidenhead. UK Mearns D, Thorne B (1998) Person Centred Counselling in Action. Sage Merry T (1999) Learning and Being in Person-Centred Counselling. PCCS Books. Nelson Jones R (1993) Practical Counselling and Helping Skills. Swan J (1995) The use of Counselling Skills A Guide for Therapists . Trower P, Casey A and Dryden W (1992) Cognitive Behavioural Counselling in Action. Finlay, L. (1997).Groupwork in Occupational. Therapy. London: Nelson Thornes. Cole M.B. (2005)Group Dynamics in Occupational Therapy: The Theoretical Basis and Practice Application of Group Intervention.Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated. Howe M.C., Schwartzberg, S.L. (2001). A functional Approach to Group Work in Occupational Therapy. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company. Other relevant details

Signed Registry use only Date received

Date

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Module Descriptor
Title
Contemporary Issues in Occupational Therapy Semester and mode of study Polixeni Skaltsi Dr. Panagiotis Siaperas

Code (if known) O4129 Credit Rating SCQF:20 (ECTS 10)

SHE 4 Level SCQF 10 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations

Normally successful completion of all SCQF level 9 modules or equivalent Normally all concurrent SCQF level modules 10 or equivalent None

Aims On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: 1. To evaluate contemporary occupation focused theory building and its effect on practice within occupational therapy 2. To critically analyse ideas of occupational justice, occupation for health and the development of occupational science towards the end of the decade 3. To evaluate the impact of current health and social care policy and the ways that occupational therapists interpret this within practice (links to PPP4) 4. To appraise the impact of contemporary international perspectives on current practice Learning Outcomes Assessed in this A B C On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: module L1

D *

Demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate contemporary theory building within occupational therapy
Critically evaluate the impact on practice of ideas concerning occupational justice and the relationship between occupation and health

Yes Summative

L2

Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Summative

L3

Provide arguments concerning the contribution of an occupation focused perspective within policies concerned with social inclusion and social justice Evaluate the impact of evidence based practice, reflective practice and reflexive practice within PPP4 Demonstrate the ability to evaluate contemporary occupational therapy within a local, national and international context

L4

L5

A Knowledge and UnderstandingB Intellectual Skills.C Practical Skills.D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following type of learning experiences:
Interactive keynote lectures 9 hours Student led seminars including peer evaluation 3 hours Tutorials/workshops 12 hours One day seminar 6hours (assessed time) Directed study 12 hours Independent study 158 hours

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Assessment Pattern
Summative Two Distinct Assessment Components. Part 1 - Undertake a poster outlining a contemporary issue in occupational therapy. The choice of topic will be influenced by student experience during PPP4 and of current issues in policy, research, theory or practice. Weighting = 50%. Part 2 Undertake a 10 minute verbal defence of the poster designed in Part 1, which will focus on the development of your chosen topic within occupational therapy and how the chosen issue is (or has the potential to be) valuable to the practitioner or patient within contemporary practice. Weighting = 50%

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? If No provide an explanation The seminar presentations cannot be anonymously marked The portfolio entry can be anonymously marked Content
Current policy directives from the Scottish Executive and the impact upon practice and research Current theoretical developments within occupation focused practice Systematic inquiry within the practice of occupational therapy and how this contributes to contemporary theory and practice International contributions towards policy, theory, research and practice Professional debates of the moment including how occupation focussed practice contributes to social and human capital

Main Texts Christiansen C.H. Townsend E.A. (2004) Introduction to occupation the art and science of living Prentice Hall, New Jersey College of Occupational Therapists (2003) Professional standards for occupational therapy practice College of Occupational Therapists, London Creek J. Ormiston C.(2005) Occupational therapy and mental health Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh Creek J. (2003) Occupational therapy as a complex intervention College of Occupational Therapists, London Creek J (2005) Perspectives in occupational therapy Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh Health Professions Council (2003) Standards of conduct, performance and ethics Health Professions Council, London Pearce R. (2003) Profiles and portfolios of evidence Nelson Thornes, Cheltenham Wilcock A.A. (1998) An occupational perspective of health Slack Thorofare, New Jersey Other relevant details Organisation of the daylong seminar will be the responsibility of the student group who will need to form a committee to deal with decisions about chair, hosts, administration. This can also form part of their portfolio entry. Signed Registry use only Date received Date

57

Module Descriptor OPTION


Title SHE Level SCQF Level 10 Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims Childhood Studies 4 Semester & Mode of Study Optional Module Ioanna Tsipra Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7,8 and 9 or equivalent Normally all concurrent level modules or equivalent Other level 10 optional modules Code (if known) O4133 Credit Rating SCQF: 10 ECTS: 5

2 FT

1. To enable students to critically reflect on key issues and debates specifically relating to working with children Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Critically evaluate a range of conceptual frameworks of childhood, child development and childrens rights L2 Discuss the sociological and psychological theories and practical issues raised in working with children Articulate the nature Vs nurture debate and demonstrate an understanding of the theories surrounding emotional development Assessed in this module Yes: Summative A B * * C D *

Yes: Summative

L3

Yes: Summative

L4

Demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate the social and legislative issues surrounding working with children

Yes: Summative

L5

Critically analyse the range of treatment approaches within child and family mental health and provide arguments about their impact in light of evidence based practice

Yes: Summative

A:Knowledge and Understanding. B:Intellectual Skills. C:Practical Skills. D;transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 6 hours interactive lectures 6 hours seminars 88 hours independent study TOTAL 100 Hours Assessment Pattern Summative 2500 word assignment. Students will design their own question around one of the three key themes explored in this module i.e. sociological and systems issues, psychological influences and child development, intervention and evidence based practice. Students are encouraged to have dialogue with the module team to determine their final assignment question. Weighting 100% Formative a personal reflective account of the learning process experienced during this module

Programme Document

BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? No If No please provide an explanation. Because the essay title will be discussed with the module team and student numbers will be small, anonymity may be compromised Content Sociological theories of childhood and the meaning of the child in society today Draw on social policy, inclusion, social justice etc in relation to children Childrens rights, consent to treatment, who is the client? collaborative practice issues Key theories and research around the nature Vs nurture debate Models for understanding emotional growth and development and the concepts of vulnerability, risk, attachment, deprivation, abuse How children communicate psychodynamic principles, active listening, methods for communicating etc Conditions may include a range of emotional and behavioural difficulties Range of treatment approaches may include play therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, family therapy, parenting etc Main Texts Foley P, Roche, J & Tucker S (2001) Children in Society. Palgrave, Hampshire Gittins D (1998) The Child in Question . Macmillan Press, London Lee N (2001) Childhood and Society Growing Up in an Age of Uncertainty. Open University Press, Buckingham Lougher L (2001) Occupational Therapy for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Churchill Livingstone Messer D, Millar S (1999) Exploring Developmental Psychology Arnold London Schonkoff J P, Meisels S J (2000) Handbook of Early Childhood Intervention Cambridge University Press Cambridge Zeanah C H (1993) Handbook of Infant Mental Health Guilford Press New York

Other relevant details

Signed

Date

Registry use only

Date received

Programme Document

BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

Module Descriptor OPTION


Title Creative Studies 4 10
Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 FT

Code (if known)


O4135

SHE Level SCQF Level

Credit Rating . SCQF: 10

ECTS. 5 Module Co-ordinator Katerina Bourika Module Team Pre-requisites Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7, 8 and 9 or equivalent Co-requisites Normally all concurrent level modules or equivalent Prohibited Other level 10 optional modules Combinations Aims To enable students to critically reflect upon their practical experience of using a creative medium within the context of human occupation.
Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Critically evaluate a creative medium with respect to its
Assessed in this module

A B
*

C D * * * * * * * * *

Summative

* *

L2 L3 L4 L5

therapeutic potential. Critically examine how the creative occupations could be utilised within group work. To enable students to critically analyse current practice in a professional context.
Critically evaluate the creative process utilising different modes of reflection.

Formative Summative Summative Summative

* * * *

* *

Synthesise theory with experience and constructively appraise current practice

A Knowledge and Understanding. B Intellectual Skills. C Practical Skills. D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 6 hours Tutorials 6 hours Independent Study 88 hours Total 100 hours Assessment Pattern
Formative The module is occupationally focused where students will choose their own creative media (clay, batik, paper, silk painting etc.) and develop an understanding and potential of the material. Each student will contribute completed work/s to a small exhibition, held at the end of the module. Summative 2500 word theoretical, critical evaluation of the students experience. (100%)

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Programme Document

BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

No. The choice of creative medium used by each student will be known by the marker/s. Content Personal exploration of a chosen creative medium Practical demonstrations from occupational therapists utilising creative activities within their practice Flow Group work Design and Presentation skills Reflective Practice Occupational risk factors Main Texts Atkins S and Murphy K (1993) Reflection: A review of the literature, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 18, 1188-1192 Breines EB (1995) Occupational Therapy activities from clay to computers: theory and practice. Philidelphia: F A Davis. Creek J (2002)Creative activities. In: J Creek, ed. Occupational Therapy and Mental Health. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Csikszentmihalyi M (1990) Flow: the psychology of optimal experience. New York: Harper Collins. Hasselkus B (2002) The meaning of everyday occupation. Thorofare, NJ: Slack. Johns C (2000) Becoming a reflective practitioner Blackwell Science, Oxford Reynolds F (1997) Coping with chronic illness and disability through creative needlecraft. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60(8), 353-56. Reynolds F (2002) Symbolic aspects of coping with chronic illness through textile arts. The arts in psychotherapy, 29(2), 99-1006. Reynolds F (2002a) Exploring the meanings of artistic occupation for women living with chronic illness: a comparison of template and interpretative phenomenological approaches to analysis. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66(12), 551-58. Reynolds F (2002b) Reclaiming a positive identity in chronic illness through artistic occupation. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 23(3), 118-27. Reynolds F (2004) Textile art promoting well-being in long-term illness: some general and specific influences. Journal of Occupational Science, 11(2), 58-67. Reynolds F, Prior S (2006) Creative adventures and flow in art-making: a qualitative study of women living with cancer. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(6), 255-62. Sadlo G(2004) Creativity and occupation. In: M Molineux, ed. Occupation for occupational therapists. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 90-100. Thompson M, Blair S (1998) Creative arts in occupational therapy: ancient history or contemporary practice? Occupational Therapy International, 5(1), 49-65. Timmond A, MacDonald E (2008) Alchemy and Magic: the experience of using clay for people with chronic illness and disability (2008) British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71(3), 86-94. Tubbs C & Drake M (2007) Crafts and creative media in therapy. Thorofare, Slack Inc