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Name: Osuoji Dave Aguguo Index No.

: 5891411 COE 381 Introduction to Microprocessors Assignment I

TO BUILD A 1-BIT ARITHMETIC LOGIC UNIT (ALU)

Operations for an ALU


The ALU can perform many different kinds of operations: arithmetic (+, -, *, /), logic operations (AND, OR, Negate (NOT)), and shift and rotate operation, but we will be dealing with the following in this assignment: f1 f0 Operation 0 0 a + b + cin 0 1 1 0 1 1 The table shows the following operations:

NOT a a AND b a OR b

adding a and b, and the carry in, cin negating a bitwise ANDing a and b bitwise ORing a and b

The ability of the ALU to do the different kinds of operations is derived from a many-to-one switch - the multiplexer. The ALU performs every possible operation on its inputs and then uses multiplexers to pick out the desired result.

THE DESIGN

To implement this 1-bit ALU, we will have the following inputs and outputs:

Three data inputs: a, b, and cin, which is the carry in (needed to do addition). Two control inputs: f1, f0. Two outputs: zi (the result of the operation) and cout, the carry out (needed to do addition).

Since we want to choose between one of four possible operations, we can use a 4-1 MUX.
How It Works:

The circuit first computes all the possible outcomes: a+b, NOT(a), (a AND b), and (a OR b). The desired result is then selected using a multiplexer. The control signal of the multiplexer will be the operation code in the computer instruction (stored in the IR instruction register). The control signal is programmed into the multiplexer using the control inputs the control inputs and their functions are explained in more detail on the next page.

THE CONTROL INPUTS: To select the desired operation among the 4 different possible operations, we will need to input our operation code using 2 "function" bits:

00 will mean: operand1 + operand2 ( a + b ) 01 will mean NOT(operand1) ( NOT a ) 10 will mean operand1 AND operand2 ( a AND b ) 11 will mean operand1 OR operand2 ( a OR b )

THE GATES AND SUB-CIRCUITS


The Multiplexer: The multiplexer uses the control inputs to select the desired output.

Truth Table for Multiplexer:

f1 0 0 1 1

f2 0 1 0 1

zi D0 D1 D2 D3

zi = f1 f0 D0 + f1 f0 D1 + f1 f0 D2 + f1 f0 D3
Note: D0, D1, D2 and D3 are the outputs from the different gates, respectively.

The Full Adder: When the control inputs/function bits are set to 00, the data inputs a and b are added. Truth table for Full Adder: Function 1: a+b a 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

f1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

f0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

cin 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

b 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

D0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1

cout 0 0 1 0 1 1 1

The NOT Gate: When the function bits are set to 01, the complement of input a is found. Truth table for NOT Gate: f1 0 0 0 0 f0 1 1 1 1 a 0 0 1 1 b 0 1 0 1 D1 1 1 0 0

The AND Gate: When the function bits are set to 10, the result of the operation (a AND b) is found. Truth table for AND Gate: Function 3: (a) AND (b) a 0 0 1 1

f1 1 1 1 1

f0 0 0 0 0

b 0 1 0 1

D2 0 0 0 1

The OR Gate: When the function bits are set to 11, the result of (a OR b) is found. Truth table for OR Gate: Function 4: (a) OR (b) a 0 0 1 1

f1 1 1 1 1

f0 1 1 1 1

b 0 1 0 1

D3 0 1 1 1

The above design is for a 1-bit ALU. An 8-bit ALU can be built from 8 identical 1-bit ALUs connected together in cascade. An 8-bit ALU can be used to perform many kinds of operations on 8-bit numbers. When cascading 1-bit ALUs, the carry output of each ALU is the carry input of the following ALU.