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by, Alissa Tubbs ESL Teacher Lawrence The Language & Learning Post Weekly News, Tips and

by, Alissa Tubbs ESL Teacher Lawrence

The Language & Learning Post Weekly News, Tips and information for the classroom teacher of
The Language & Learning Post
Weekly News, Tips and information for the classroom teacher of English Language Learners!
ELPS FOCUS For the week of 12/9/13

Kinder

FIrst

Second

Third

Fourth

 

Fifth

 

Sixth

ELPS: listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language

* ELPS: 4G

demonstrate

* internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment.

ELPS: [2F] listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media… [4I] demonstrate English comprehension… of supporKng ideas and details in text and graphic sources…

*

*

*

*

ELPS: 4K Demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analyKcal skills such as evaluaKng wriBen informaKon and performing criKcal analyses commensurate with content-area and grade-level needs.

ELPS: 4K

demonstrate comprehension by employing analyKcal skills such as evaluaKng wriBen informaKon and performing criKcal analyses.

ELPS: 4D use

pre-reading supports such as graphic organizers, illustraKons, and pre-taught topic- related vocabulary and other pre- reading acKviKes to enhance comprehension of wriBen text.

comprehension

of increasingly

complex English

by parKcipaKng

in shared

reading, retelling

[1E]

or summarizing

learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard

material and

 

responding to

quesKons.

 

aBainment.[2F]

during classroom instruction and

interactions.[2C]

during classroom instruction and interactions.[2C] Key Ideas-- MODELING, MODELING, MODELING!!! Everyone of us

Key Ideas--

MODELING, MODELING, MODELING!!! Everyone of us should be a SUPER MODEL. Yes I said it. YOU ARE or SHOULD BE A SUPER MODEL!

It is easy as we move through the year to fall into a rut of

“telling” our students vs. “showing” them WHAT we expect and HOW to do it. For the ELL, your modeling during a lesson, is often the difference between success and failure. I know, that is a lot of responsibility on your shoulders, but I know you can do it!

Now I know a few of you are thinking, “ They just end up

copying me.” That may be true to some extent, but doesn’t

a baby learn to talk my copying the sounds they hear?

Eventually those babies do manage to talk on their own and are not just repeating what we say. (except of course when we don’t want them to and they tell the outside world what daddy said when he dropped the hammer on his finger!) Any way, you get the drift!

One KEY area of curriculum for modeling is writing. To create good writers, you have to model good writing. (I said good writing not award winning composition!) All students, especially ELLS, need to see you think through getting thoughts onto paper. They need to see and hear how you

notice your mistakes for editing. They need to have practice helping you revise your work so that they know how to do it

in theirs!

So be brave, become a SUPER MODEL!

A Word about VOCABULARY Academic language is just as important as the content vocabulary! BE
A Word about VOCABULARY
Academic language is just as important as the content
vocabulary! BE careful to not make assumptions about
the knowledge level of your students. Sometimes we
ask students to “clarify” “predict” “evaluate”
and so
on. The words that go along with reading can be just as
difficult as the content specific words in the text. Take
time to explicitly teach the academic language as well
as the words that will be unfamiliar in the text.

Just a thought A couple of weeks ago I went to a writing training with Kathy Shada! She had a few toys that went well with idioms (figurative language) that we often use. One cute one that I thought you might like is “keep an eye out ”

for

ball on the end of a stick and painted and eyeball on it. As student read a section of text, hold up you “eyeball” and tell them to “keep an eye out for answeres to their prereading questions. Then as the students read give them a couple of “wiggly eyes”. When they find an answer to a question (or whatever it is you want them to look for) they lay their “eye” on the text that supports their response. -- Pretty cute, I thought! I have a large styrofoam eyeball if anyone wants to see.

or “keep you eye on

She put a large styrofoam