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1 Canberra Airport Master Plan Preliminary Draft - February 2009
1 Canberra Airport Master Plan Preliminary Draft - February 2009

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1 Canberra Airport Master Plan Preliminary Draft - February 2009
1 Canberra Airport Master Plan Preliminary Draft - February 2009
1 Canberra Airport Master Plan Preliminary Draft - February 2009

Canberra Airport Master Plan

Preliminary Draft - February 2009

1 Canberra Airport Master Plan Preliminary Draft - February 2009

This Master Plan has been prepared by Canberra Airport Pty Limited as part of the Airport’s internal strategic planning processes and in accordance with the provisions of Part 5 of the Airports Act 1996 (“the Act”) and the Regulations made under that Act, and should be read in that context only. The assumptions and forecasts in this Master Plan should not be used or relied upon by any person or entity for any other purpose.

This Master Plan replaces the existing Master Plan approved by the Minister for Transport on 11 February 2005 (“2005 Master Plan”).

The maps and plans within this Master Plan are indicative only, actual developments and the timing and placement of those developments will be subject to demand, detailed planning and the obtaining of relevant approvals.

The words “include”, “including”, “for example” or “such as” and “in particular” are not used as, nor are they to be interpreted as, words of limitation and when introducing an example, do not limit the meaning of the words to which the example relates to that example or examples of a similar kind. Where the use of the word “may” is used in the Master Plan where associated with a right of Canberra Airport it means to be

allowed or permitted to, rather than a measure of likelihood or possibility.

Photos courtesy of: Ginette Snow, Paul Sadler, Alison Rowell and The University of Canberra.

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Table of Contents

Foreword

5

1.

Introduction

7

1.1 Vision

10

1.2 Purpose and development objectives

11

1.3 Location

13

1.4 History

13

1.5 Existing and future facilities

15

1.6 Master Plan Statutory Requirements

16

2.

The economic impact of Canberra Airport

19

2.1 Airport businesses

23

2.2 Conclusion

23

3.

Consultation process

25

3.1 Ongoing Consultation

28

3.2 Master Plan Consultation

32

4.

Integration with local planning strategies

35

4.1 National Capital Authority

38

4.2 ACT Government

40

4.3 NSW Government and Queanbeyan City Council

43

4.4 Cross-border land-use planning issues

45

5.

Airline Growth

47

5.1 Domestic and regional airlines growth

50

5.2 International growth opportunities

59

5.3 Impact of Sydney Airport on passenger growth

62

5.4 Second Sydney Airport

63

6.

Freight Operations

65

6.1 Existing Overnight Express Freight Network

69

6.2 Regional, domestic and Trans-Tasman Airfreight growth

71

6.3 International Airfreight opportunities

76

6.4 Regional infrastructure and planning implications of freight growth

77

6.5 Community Impact of freight growth

79

7.

General Aviation and Military operations

83

7.1 General Aviation Operations

86

7.2 Military Operations

87

7.3 VIP Operations

87

8.

Passenger terminal facilities

89

8.1 Current terminal facilities

92

8.2 New passenger terminal facilities

94

8.3 Busy hour passenger forecasts

95

8.4 RPT apron stand demand

95

8.5 Passenger terminal ground transport, car parks and roads

95

9.

Runways and airfield developments

101

9.1 Runway and taxiway system demand

104

9.2 Airport ultimate capacity and future new runway requirements

105

9.3 Airspace capacity

105

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

 

9.5

Apron capacity

106

9.6

Augmentation of runway and taxiway system

106

9.7

Enhancement of navigation aids and flight procedures

109

9.8

Canberra Air Traffic Control Tower

110

9.9

VHST Implications

110

9.10

Implementation

111

10

Development concept and options

115

10.1

Intended uses of the Airport site

118

10.2

Indicative precinct planning vision

118

10.3

Permitted land uses in the Airport precincts

128

10.4

External planning context and potential conflicts

131

10.5

Signage policy

133

11

Road access issues

135

11.1 External Road Connections

139

11.2 Internal road access and parking

149

12.

Engineering Services

153

12.1 Gas

156

12.2 Sewerage

157

12.3

Stormwater

157

12.4 Potable Water Supply

157

12.5 Non-Potable Water Supply

158

12.6 Electrical

158

12.7 Telecommunications

158

12.8 Airport access

158

13.

Airspace Protection

159

14.

Aircraft noise

165

14.1

Noise outcomes specifically excluded by this Master Plan

174

14.2

High Noise Corridor

176

14.3

Current measures to avoid noise disturbance

177

14.4

Noise respite measures under investigation

181

14.5

Community aircraft noise complaint behaviour

183

14.6

Community and industry consultation

183

14.7

Describing and displaying high levels of aircraft noise

184

14.8

Noise beyond the noise contours

195

15.

Environmental Management

199

15.1

Vision for environmental management

202

15.2

Major achievements to date

202

15.3

Identification of environmental issues

203

15.4

General environment

204

15.5

Canberra Airport Referral

213

Appendices

217

Appendix 1 – Definitions, Abbreviations, Acronyms

218

Appendix 2 – Airservices Australia References

223

Appendix 3 – Implementation and Staging

227

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Foreword

Through this Master Plan, the airport team is delighted to be able to share our vision for Canberra Airport with the community.

We have worked very hard in the decade since the Airport’s sale and are proud of what we have managed to achieve so far. Canberra Airport has evolved from a small, dilapidated facility to an international-capable, world- leading, sustainable multi-purpose Airport development.

This Master Plan recognises the importance of working with the community for the community, to deliver an asset that not only delivers jobs and economic growth, but one of which the region can rightly be proud.

The Master Plan revolves around three key themes:

Infrastructure-ready: the community expects an airport that is ready for growth, has airlines that fly to a range of destinations and wants competitive airfares. An airport must ensure that all of its facilities – runways, aprons, navigation aids, terminals, car parks, freight facilities and roads – are ready for growth. Such investment requires long term planning and major investments.

Through unprecedented levels of investment in aviation and community infrastructure, including roads, Canberra Airport is ready to meet the needs of all Airport users.

Generator of economic and employment growth: in today’s difficult times more than ever, communities want jobs for their citizens and for their children as they grow up. An airport is a significant

economic engine driving the development of a city and the region around it. The growth of an airport not only delivers large numbers of jobs but

it stimulates a range of other industries that creates many more jobs in restaurants, hotels, warehouses and other transport businesses. As such, airports play

a leadership role in investment and confidence for

other businesses to grow their activities. Airports are the 21st century seaports and railway stations – major transport gateways that are attractive locations for businesses (and government) to congregate around.

Canberra Airport is the primary economic and social gateway for the region, employing thousands of people and generating a massive regional economic impact.

Meeting the needs of the community in

sympathy with the community: Canberra Airport is committed to working with its community to deliver the outcomes sought by the community: growth

in flights and destinations, upgraded roads, and

residential amenity without the adverse impact of aircraft noise.

Through this Master Plan, Canberra Airport is working with the community to develop infrastructure, deliver jobs and ensure residents are protected from aircraft noise.

We have pleasure in presenting to you Canberra Airport’s Preliminary Draft Master Plan, and invite you to consider the Master Plan and submit your comments or suggestions in writing by close of business on Friday 8 May 2009.

in writing by close of business on Friday 8 May 2009. Terry Snow Executive Chairman Stephen

Terry Snow

Executive Chairman

in writing by close of business on Friday 8 May 2009. Terry Snow Executive Chairman Stephen

Stephen Byron

Managing Director

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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CHAPTER ONE

InTRODuCTIOn

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009
Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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Chapter one | Introduction

Canberra Airport’s vision for the future is clear and bold.

With community support, Canberra Airport is developing an Airport that is truly worthy of Australia’s national capital city and is doing it in a way that maximises economic growth and jobs for the region. In recognition of this, Canberra Airport was awarded the Australian Capital City Airport of the Year Award in both 2002 and 2007.

Following the additional aviation capabilities developed through the extension and strengthening of the main runway in 2006, this Master Plan reinforces Canberra

Airport’s critically important role as the only curfew-free airport between Brisbane and Melbourne capable of handling 747 and A380 aircraft 1 , its increasing role as an airfreight hub and as a back-up for Sydney’s increasingly crowded skies. To this end, to respond to the needs of the community and business, this Master Plan foreshadows

a continuation of the massive investment in aviation

infrastructure, including a new integrated domestic and international terminal, runway, apron and taxiway upgrades, and improvements to the Airport’s aircraft navigation aids.

To support these aeronautical plans, and to respond to the increasing needs of business to seek to locate themselves

at or near airports, Canberra Airport continues to develop

a range of commercial uses on-Airport using attractive

buildings and surrounding landscapes that are designed to create a ‘sense of arrival’ in the nation’s capital.

They also reflect the Airport’s absolute commitment to environmental sustainability.

Locally owned and managed, Canberra Airport is a family business that is proud of its role as an economic engine for the region, not only through its role as a transport gateway, but also through the delivery of new businesses and new jobs. Since 1998 the number of

Airport businesses has grown from 70 to over 180 and the number of jobs has similarly increased significantly. This is in addition to both the ongoing employment of over

500

construction workers and the engagement of some

950

businesses in the ongoing operation of the Airport.

Canberra Airport’s major investment, over $600 million so far, is playing a major role in the economic growth of the

region.

Canberra Airport is also committed to continuing to do everything possible to minimise the impact of aircraft noise on the community. This is notwithstanding short- sighted plans by developers to build homes under flight paths will lead only to long-term problems for future residents of those homes, and then in time, the broader community as a whole. Canberra Airport has and will continue to steadfastly oppose such plans that risk the introduction of noise sharing over Canberra and Queanbeyan and future Airport operations.

This chapter of the Master Plan sets out a coherent vision for the Airport’s growth over the next 20 years.

vision for the Airport’s growth over the next 20 years. 1 It is noted that operations

1 It is noted that operations by A380 aircraft are not expected at Canberra Airport during the life of this Master Plan, aside from VIP visits and ad-hoc diversions from other Airports. It is also noted that A380 aircraft are significantly quieter than B747 and other widebody aircraft.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Chapter one | Introduction

Draft Master Plan 2009 Chapter one | Introduction 1.1 Vision Our vision is to develop Canberra
Draft Master Plan 2009 Chapter one | Introduction 1.1 Vision Our vision is to develop Canberra

1.1

Vision

Our vision is to develop Canberra Airport as a first-class facility by responding to the needs of business and the community to serve the region’s evolving transportation, business and development needs and to maximise the growth of a wide range of aeronautical and other businesses.

Key elements are:

development of an airport worthy of the Nation’s

Capital - the development of first-class aeronautical and commercial facilities, customer services and amenities appropriate to the character of Australia’s capital;

development of Canberra Airport as a major capital city and regional hub for passengers and freight - to

facilitate Canberra’s direct links with major cities in Australia and with smaller communities in the region, enhancing the attractiveness of Canberra as a location for business and tourism, and to make the Airport a base for a range of airlines and significant aircraft maintenance centres as well as a rail, bus and coach hub;

development of a critical national aviation

infrastructure asset - as the only 24-hour Boeing 747 and Airbus A380 capable airport between Melbourne and Brisbane, with a key role as a passenger and freight hub for traffic unable to access Sydney Airport, catering to overnight freight during the Sydney curfews and to overflow due to capacity constraints on Sydney in the longer term;

development of new integrated airport terminal

facilities - to maximise the benefits to the region of airline, potential high-speed rail, bus and regional coach services through a multi-modal terminal development offering the highest level of service and convenience to the travelling public;

commitment to environmental sustainability - to

develop the Airport sympathetically with Canberra’s community and environment;

creation of opportunities - to make Canberra Airport

and its environs the centre of a business, retail, transport and freight hub to respond to the needs of users, providing economic impetus for office parks

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and, subject to legislation, specialist tax free trade zones;

maximise business opportunities - to maximise

total on-Airport employment and business growth in response to increasing business demands to be located on-Airport, without compromising on aviation operations;

commitment to respond to the needs of users - grow

aviation and non-aviation development at Canberra Airport in response to the needs of aircraft operators, business and the general public; and

commitment to the community - to continue to

work with and in the regional community to ensure Canberra Airport consults, operates and grows with its community, including minimising the adverse impacts of aircraft noise.

1.2 Purpose and development objectives

1.2.1 Overall purpose of this Master Plan

In addition to meeting the requirements of the Airports Act, the purpose of this Master Plan is:

• to establish the strategic direction for the efficient and economic development of the Airport over the next 20 years as well as to outline detailed development objectives for the next five years;

to provide for the development of additional aviation and other uses of the Airport site;

to communicate to the public the intended uses of the Airport site and growth of the Airport;

• to reduce potential conflicts between uses and users of the Airport site, and to ensure that uses of the Airport site are compatible with the areas surrounding the Airport; and

to grow the Airport in sympathy with the broader region by responding to the needs of the community, both in terms of delivering flights, jobs, and business opportunities as well as minimising the impact of noise on people’s lives.

1.2.2 Detailed development objectives

As required under the Airports Act, Canberra Airport’s

development objectives are as follows.

Objective 1

Ensure the Airport is operated and developed in a safe, comfortable, secure and environmentally sustainable manner.

This objective involves:

ensuring that the maintenance of operational safety is paramount to the planning of all Airport development. This corresponds with the Commonwealth Government’s number one priority of safety in aviation as outlined in the 2008 Aviation Green Paper. This focus on safety at Canberra Airport will significantly influence form, location and construction methods;

maintaining security standards in accordance with Government regulations;

working with government, industry and the community to ensure appropriate land uses under flight paths;

the continuing development of Canberra Airport as a leader in environmental sustainability, supported by the parameters outlined in the Environment Strategy (approved 1 June 2005); and

maintaining and improving the comfort of travellers and of Airport visitors.

Objective 2

Develop Canberra Airport as a multi-modal transport hub for passenger and freight connections.

The integration of a number of passenger and freight modes of transport into a single location in Canberra offers significant opportunities. The concentration of road, rail and air services in one location offers a unique ability to seamlessly transfer between transport modes.

The provision of a new, substantially larger, multi-level terminal with international capabilities and multi-modal linkages (including freight facilities) is a key objective of the Master Plan as a logical and long-term strategy to further enhance the Airport’s transport hub concept. The new Airport terminal building has been designed to reflect Canberra Airport’s role as a regional and national gateway and will reflect design concepts used by national institutions elsewhere in Canberra.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Objective 3

Develop a culture of excellence based on customer service and quality.

Development of the Airport should demonstrate a commitment to excellence by:

providing high levels of customer service;

adopting airport management best practice; and

adding value to services for stakeholders, including the aviation industry, customers, lessees, the travelling public, Airport visitors and/or the region’s community.

Objective 4

Ensure that the design of the Airport reflects its role as a gateway to the National Capital.

The form and image of all airport buildings should reflect:

the creation of an exciting ‘sense of arrival’ experience for passengers;

the creation of a wide range of attractive, environmentally friendly and user-friendly buildings, including but not limited to office and retail;

an introduction to the unique aspects of the national capital and the region; and

high quality contemporary airport design.

The new Airport terminal building has been designed to reflect Canberra Airport’s role as a regional and national gateway and will reflect design concepts used elsewhere in Canberra.

Objective 5

Maximise the economic growth of the Airport and the surrounding Region.

The development of the Airport will seek to maximise economic growth in the region through activities such as:

maximising aeronautical growth;

proactively introducing initiatives to take full advantage of aeronautical and other opportunities; and

maximising the range of aeronautical and commercial development options to the Airport.

Objective 6

Provide a business environment that allows the Airport and its associated businesses to reach their potential.

A vibrant, flexible and supportive commercial and physical environment will be created at the Airport to create

substantial development opportunities and to allow businesses to respond to changing market needs, maintain viability and achieve growth in both aeronautical and other activities.

Objective 7

Being in a position to meet the needs of Sydney Airport users, including overflow domestic and international passenger and freight services.

Given the curfew imposed on Sydney Airport, the 80

movements per hour cap, restrictions on aircraft parking, and rapidly increasing demand for flights, Canberra Airport is expected to play an important longer-term role

in meeting the overflow aviation needs of the Sydney

region. By providing easy access, excellent infrastructure and competitive pricing, Canberra Airport expects to attract passenger and freight operations from Sydney. This is likely to include a 24-hour domestic and international freight operation and overflow passenger services. Please refer to Chapter 6.

Objective 8

Develop non-aeronautical land to support future aeronautical infrastructure development.

Increasingly, businesses are recognising the role of airports as economic drivers for their region and are demanding

a presence on or near major airports. Commercial

development in response to this demand and the

alternative revenue streams (i.e. independent of airlines)

it delivers has enabled the Airport to fund major aviation

infrastructure developments such as runway and terminal upgrades. Commercial land will be put to productive use where commercially possible, considering surrounding land uses and transport linkages, by incorporating a wide range of activities, including office and retail.

Objective 9

Adopt best available technology to improve all-weather utilisation of the Airport.

To make the most effective use of the Airport, systems are expected to be progressively upgraded so aircraft can operate efficiently under a wide range of weather

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conditions and with a greater range of capabilities.

Objective 10

Respond to the needs of the community.

The community has an ongoing expectation that Canberra Airport meets local demand for additional flights, as well as a reasonable expectation that Airport growth will not adversely impact on its residential amenity via increased levels of aircraft noise. Canberra Airport will grow the Airport in response to community and business needs, while continuing to strongly oppose inappropriate residential development under flight paths. Canberra Airport also commits to investigating further noise respite measures for existing residents of the region.

Objective 11

Be open and accountable.

Canberra Airport has always been open with its stakeholders, including the broader regional community, as to current and future planned developments at Canberra Airport. Canberra Airport commits to remaining open and accountable to the community, and it is intended that this, and all future Master Plans, underpin this commitment.

1.3

Location

Canberra Airport is located in the Majura Valley, eight kilometres east of Canberra’s CBD and four kilometres north-west of Queanbeyan. It is located on the East-West Transport Corridor defined in the National Capital Plan and on the major East-West Employment Corridor defined in the Canberra Spatial Plan, which contains 70% of Canberra’s employment. It is also denoted as a Defined Office Employment Centre in the National Capital Plan and as an Activity Node in the Canberra Spatial Plan.

Most of the land north and south of the Airport is used for Broadacre purposes because it is overflown by aircraft or because of its long association with Defence activities. This land (including the Airport) is denoted as a new Employment Corridor in the Canberra Spatial Plan.

Civil aviation facilities have historically been confined largely to the south-west corner of the Airport (apart from some Airservices Australia facilities), with the Department of Defence occupying Fairbairn, to the north-east of the Airport site.

The withdrawal of Defence facilities from Fairbairn in May

2004 and the inclusion of these facilities as part of the

Airport lease has presented opportunities for civil aviation and commercial expansion on the eastern side of the Airport, the uses for which are outlined in greater detail in Chapter 10.

The aviation impact of Canberra Airport extends well beyond the Airport itself. Aircraft noise exposure zones, prescribed airspace and other safety requirements affect much of the land to the north and south of the Airport. Planning for land use in the Majura and Jerrabomberra valleys and in the vicinity of Canberra Airport is affected by aviation requirements and needs to recognise and protect the 24-hour curfew-free operation of the Airport.

1.4

History

Canberra Airport was established on the existing site in

1927 and controlled by the civil authorities until 1940,

when responsibility passed to the Department of Air. From

1940 it was used by civil aircraft under the terms of a Joint

User Agreement between the Department of Civil Aviation

(and its successors) and the Department of Defence. In

1989 the Federal Airports Corporation (FAC) assumed

control of the civil (or western) side of the Airport under a Crown Lease arrangement with the Commonwealth.

The first structure on the Airport site, a hangar, was completed in 1936. Construction of RAAF facilities and accommodation began in 1940. Runways were initially hard surfaced in 1948.

Significant construction of the present civil aviation area began in the early 1960s. By the mid 1960s these facilities comprised the passenger terminal, airfreight sheds and the Department of Civil Aviation hangar and workshop. The civil aviation side of Canberra Airport around 1970 is shown in Figure 1.1.

Until 1972, the main access road (Fairbairn Avenue, later Pialligo Avenue) ran parallel to the cross Runway 12/30 and passed roughly in front of the current terminal building. A 650 metre extension of the main north-south runway at that time required the construction of the present Pialligo Avenue deviation to the south and the extension of the Fairbairn access road (Glenora Drive).

Passenger terminal extensions by the Commonwealth, Ansett and Australian Airlines commenced in the mid 1980s but were in need of a major refurbishment by the mid 1990s. Due to a lack of investment in the 1980s

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Figure 1.1 Canberra Airport, circa 1970

Master Plan 2009 Figure 1.1 Canberra Airport, circa 1970 and 1990s by the Commonwealth, Airport infrastructure

and 1990s by the Commonwealth, Airport infrastructure had deteriorated by the time of sale and consequently significant investment was needed by the new owners in the runways, taxiways, apron, terminal and other Airport infrastructure.

In recognition of the critical need for major capital investment as well as the significant opportunities and developments that could be progressed at airports throughout Australia under private ownership, the Commonwealth Government decided to divest itself of its airport assets in the early 1990s. In order to maximise sale values of the airports, as well as to ensure that airports had the ability to reach their maximum development potential in order to counter the natural cyclical nature of the aviation sector, and in common with airports internationally, the Commonwealth Government sold the airports with a comprehensive set of development rights.

In 1998 Canberra Airport Pty Limited, a Canberra-based family business, purchased the lease of the aviation facilities, land and infrastructure known as Canberra Airport, including development rights. In the same way as other bidders and stakeholders in the sale process, the company was highly conscious of the rights and obligations associated with ownership of the Airport, and accordingly, it has endeavoured to maximise both the aeronautical and commercial potential of the Airport in

Figure 1.2 Canberra Airport 1998

of the Airport in Figure 1.2 Canberra Airport 1998 accordance with its lease with the Commonwealth.

accordance with its lease with the Commonwealth. This scope of development activity underpinned bids to the Commonwealth and was confirmed with the approval of the 1999 Master Plan and the subsequent approval of the 2005 Master Plan. These Master Plans also included the rights to 24-hour non-curfew capability. Canberra Airport will use these rights to expand aviation opportunities and to meet its obligation and desire to use the Airport site as an airport.

The privatisation of the Airport in 1998 heralded a significantly increased investment in aeronautical infrastructure. This investment has included (but is not limited to:

the upgrade of the common-user central terminal for the 2000 Olympics;

major terminal apron expansion;

expansion of the General Aviation precinct;

6.5km of taxiway upgrades;

upgraded terminal facilities including cafés, new check-in desks, new security screening points, new baggage infrastructure and new car rental desks;

purchase and full redevelopment of the ex-Ansett

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terminal as a multi-user facility;

a new Qantas maintenance hangar;

new car rental maintenance and cleaning facilities;

an expansion to the width and the sealing of the Runway 17/35 shoulders;

a 600m runway extension to Runway 17/35

the strengthening of Runway 17/35 (with Commonwealth contribution) to cater for larger VIP operations;

the major upgrading of facilities at Fairbairn;

upgraded facilities for the Aero Club;

new RAAF SPA maintenance and reception facility;

a new fuel farm;

comprehensive security upgrades;

a new hangar and headquarters facility for Brindabella Airlines;

a new freight facility for Australian Air Express;

a new Non-Directional Beacon (NDB); and

a new catering facility building.

In addition to these aeronautical investments, the Airport has also made a major investment in commercial infrastructure including Brindabella Business Park, Majura Park (a mixed use zone incorporating a range of uses such as retail and offices), and Fairbairn.

1.5 Existing and future facilities

The Airport has two runways: the main runway (Runway 17/35) is 3,283 metres long after its extension in 2006 and is aligned approximately north-south, while the intersecting (or cross) runway (Runway 12/30) is 1,679 metres long. The cross runway is generally used by smaller aircraft.

The runways are supported by a taxiway system which provides access to each runway end and at intermediate points along the runways. The taxiway link to the northern end of the main runway is on the eastern side of the Airport and is less than the standard width for wide-

bodied aircraft. The taxiway link to the southern end of the main runway is on the western side of the Airport and meets the standards for large aircraft operations and will be extended to the northern end of the runway in the future. The currently limited number of wide-body aircraft operations at Canberra Airport can make a turn on the northern end of the main runway using the turning node.

The taxiway system includes a number of lower strength taxiways currently suitable for use by lighter aircraft. These taxiways are predominantly in the vicinity of the General Aviation apron area and Runway 12/30. These will be progressively upgraded for larger aircraft.

The RPT apron is a common user apron with all parking stands capable of being allocated to any airline by Canberra Airport. The apron currently accommodates up to twelve aircraft parked overnight, with an additional overnight parking bay provided west of the intersection of taxiways Bravo, Delta and Juliet. The existing apron area includes provision for the parking of some wide-body aircraft although the presence of such aircraft reduces the overall capacity of the apron area. Extensions to the RPT Apron are expected to commence shortly to respond to increased demand.

The General Aviation apron area currently provides parking and hangar access for light aircraft and smaller business jets and the Fairbairn apron area provides parking for military, freight, large commercial, General Aviation (GA), and other operations including some larger aircraft. In the event of multiple aircraft diversions from Sydney or Melbourne, the Fairbairn apron is used once parking positions on the RPT apron are exhausted.

The General Aviation area accommodates a range of facilities and businesses, including the new Airport fuel farm, a modern high-security underground facility that replaces the several above-ground facilities previously in use. The area is currently approaching capacity and with terminal and other associated facilities encroaching into this area, future General Aviation expansion will be accommodated in other precincts.

The current terminal building has a common user end, owned by Canberra Airport, with the northern end currently owned by Qantas on leased land. A new Southern Terminal Concourse is to be built on previous car parking areas south of the existing terminal, followed by the planned construction of a Western Terminal Concourse over the existing terminal building. The completed new

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

terminal will be a multi-level structure, with an elevated roadway arrangement and multi-level car parks. Please refer to Chapter 10 for further details on the terminal development.

The Airport access routes are currently undergoing major works to duplicate the roads between the Airport and the city, and to improve the road conditions through the Majura Valley. Access to and from the Terminal Precinct onto Pialligo Avenue includes a grade-separated intersection. During 2006 and 2007 the Airport access routes suffered congestion during peak hours due to higher levels of Queanbeyan commuter traffic and the four-fold increase in traffic down Majura Road due to the opening of Horse Park Drive (connection to Gungahlin). These issues are being solved with the upgrade to the road system. For further information and plans depicting current and future road systems around the Airport, please refer to Chapter 11.

Whilst the 1998 Very High Speed Train (VHST) proposal was eventually unsuccessful, it is expected that a high speed rail system linking Canberra Airport with Sydney and later Melbourne will eventually be constructed. A high-speed rail link, required for any alternative airport outside the Sydney basin would contribute greatly to Canberra Airport’s role in accommodating some of Sydney’s air transport needs as well as opening up further opportunities for Canberra Airport and the region more broadly.

Using current technologies, a high speed train could take less than 50 minutes from Sydney Railway Station via Sydney Airport and then non-stop via a new rail corridor to Canberra Airport.

Should a rail proposal proceed, Canberra Airport has been identified as the preferred location for the Canberra rail terminus and has been confirmed as such in the Canberra Spatial Plan as well as this Master Plan. It poses few construction problems for both the approach through the Majura Valley and for a station near the terminal building.

1.6 Master Plan statutory requirements

In accordance with the Airports Act, Canberra Airport Pty Limited is required to submit a draft Master Plan for the approval of the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, for a 20 year horizon.

The Airports Act section 71(2) requires a draft Master Plan

to specify:

a. the airport-lessee company’s development objectives for the airport; and

b. the airport-lessee company’s assessment of the future needs of civil aviation users of the airport, and other users of the airport, for services and facilities relating to the airport; and

c. the airport-lessee company’s intentions for land use and related development of the airport site, where the uses and developments embrace airside, landside, surface access and land planning/zoning aspects; and

d. an Australian Noise Exposure Forecast (ANEF) (in accordance with regulations, if any, made for the purpose of this paragraph) for the areas surrounding the airport; and

da. flight paths (in accordance with regulations, if any, made for the purpose of this paragraph) at the airport; and

e.

the airport-lessee company’s plans, developed following consultations with the airlines that use the airport and local government bodies in the vicinity of the airport, for managing aircraft noise intrusion in areas forecast to be subject to exposure above the significant ANEF levels; and

f.

the airport-lessee company’s assessment of environmental issues that might reasonably be expected to be associated with the implementation of the plan; and

g.

the airport-lessee company’s plans for dealing with the environmental issues mentioned in paragraph (f) (including plans for ameliorating or preventing environmental impacts); and

h.

if a draft environment strategy for the airport has been approved—the date of that approval; and

j.

such other matters (if any) as are specified in the regulations.

The Master Plan is not a development plan as such. It is noted that subject to the provisions of the Airports Act, Airports are required to submit separate major development plans for approval from the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Services and Local

17

Government. A Major Development Plan submitted to the Minister must set out a range of issues, including the Airport’s plans for dealing with the environmental impacts that might reasonably be expected to be associated with that development.

Since privatisation, Canberra Airport has completed Major Development Plans for the redevelopment of the passenger terminal, for a major upgrade and extension of the main runway and taxiways, for a shopping centre, and for various office and related buildings.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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19 CHAPTER TWO ECOnOMIC IMPACT AT CAnbERRA AIRPORT
19 CHAPTER TWO ECOnOMIC IMPACT AT CAnbERRA AIRPORT

CHAPTER TWO

ECOnOMIC IMPACT AT CAnbERRA AIRPORT

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009
Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009
Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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Chapter two | Economic impact at Canberra Airport

In just ten years of private ownership, Canberra Airport has been transformed from an aviation backwater into a modern and vibrant internationally-capable Airport.

During this time, more than $600 million has been invested in the redevelopment of the Airport’s terminal, runways, aircraft aprons, car parks, access road and commercial buildings. Almost half of this total, $250 million, was spent last year alone. No other capital city airport has so far matched this level of infrastructure investment.

This massive investment in essential infrastructure represents the Airport’s absolute and growing confidence in the robust future of Canberra and the region.

Since 1998, the number of Airport businesses has more than doubled from 70 to 180. At the same time, the Airport’s program of rolling works has led to the engagement of more than 100 local construction businesses and provided secure jobs for more than 500 construction workers.

provided secure jobs for more than 500 construction workers. The lengthening and strengthening of the Airport’s
provided secure jobs for more than 500 construction workers. The lengthening and strengthening of the Airport’s

The lengthening and strengthening of the Airport’s main runway during 2006 is a crowning achievement. At a cost of more than $50 million, it gives the region an Airport with true national and international passenger and freight capabilities and the subsequent economic benefits that flow from those capabilities. A $250 million integrated domestic/international terminal building will underpin an unprecedented level of investment in aviation infrastructure into the future.

terminal building will underpin an unprecedented level of investment in aviation infrastructure into the future.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Chapter two | Economic impact at Canberra Airport

2009 Chapter two | Economic impact at Canberra Airport As well as a key element in
2009 Chapter two | Economic impact at Canberra Airport As well as a key element in

As well as a key element in the Capital Region’s transport infrastructure, Canberra Airport is important to a number of allied sectors, from regional transport services and the major tourism attractions to support services such as catering, travel consultants and hotels. In addition, there have been significant positive economic impacts to the region from business, retail and commercial development at Canberra Airport.

Since its privatisation in 1998, Canberra Airport has undergone a massive transformation which has had a profound and positive impact on the ACT and regional economy.

In the ten years since privatisation, well in excess of $600 million has been spent on redeveloping the Airport into

a true gateway for our national capital. This investment

represents a very significant financial commitment to the long-term success of Canberra as a city and regional centre

of a region. This sum:

represents almost ten times the purchase price of the Airport. No other capital city airport has come close to investing such a large proportion in new capital investment activity;

is at least 100 times more investment than that which occurred at Canberra Airport over the five previous years under Commonwealth ownership.

The extension and strengthening of Runway 17/35 in 2006 was the largest major runway expansion in Australia since Sydney Airport’s third runway was opened 20 years ago. At a cost of more than $50 million it is critical to allow longer range flights and unrestricted VIP operations.

The upcoming new terminal project and associated infrastructure will constitute an investment of over $250 million and demonstrates Canberra Airport’s ongoing commitment to the region as a social and economic hub.

A recent study by independent consultants URS,

commissioned by Tourism Transport Forum (TTF), estimated that Canberra Airport’s then $500m investment in the Airport has direct benefits to 109 different industries and has resulted in over:

$1.75 billion in gross output;

$735 million in value added; and

$400 million in wage and salary incomes to Australian workers.

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This is a huge economic contribution to Canberra and the surrounding region.

2.1 Airport businesses

More than 180 businesses currently operate at Canberra Airport. These largely fall into seven main general activities:

Infrastructure: the Airport (owner and manager), Airservices Australia (provider of air traffic control and fire fighting services), Australian Federal Police, private security, terminal maintenance, terminal cleaning, telecommunications, runway sweepers and a mowing contractor;

Air transport: Qantas (including regional subsidiaries Sunstate and Eastern Australia Airlines), Virgin Blue, Tiger Airways, Brindabella Airlines, RAAF SPA Fleet, General Aviation and charter operators as well as airfreight (such as Australian Air Express) and courier companies;

Aviation support services: in-flight and terminal

catering suppliers, aircraft maintenance (such as Qantas Defence Services), and operators of aircraft hangars and fuel providers;

Retailing/Wholesaling: shopping centre, cafes,

supermarkets, bulky goods, wholesale, convenience, service stations and terminal franchises (and other major and minor retail operators);

Office: a range of public sector and private sector office tenants; and

Directly airport-related activities off-airport site: this

group of activities is more diverse, and includes the Airport components of bus and coach service businesses, freight and aircraft charter firms, the Airport business of Canberra Cabs and limousine companies, booking agencies of the major airlines and air crew transport and accommodation.

By 2029/30 it is expected that up to 25,000 people will be directly employed at Canberra Airport, up from the current 8,000 jobs currently located on-Airport.

In addition to permanent on-airport employment, over 100 local construction firms have been involved in the rebuilding of the Airport on an ongoing basis over the last nine years. In turn this has delivered ongoing employment

for over 500 construction workers onsite, with a further estimated 500-700 workers offsite.

2.2

Conclusion

While the future appears strong for Canberra Airport and the Capital Region as a whole over the next 20 years, success depends on the support of the community, business and Government, the competitiveness of Canberra as a destination and importantly, support from the entire Capital Region.

Canberra Airport can deliver jobs to the community across a broad range of sectors. The challenge is to ensure these jobs are delivered with the ongoing support of the community.

The ongoing development of the Airport over the next five years will see significant investment in additional aviation infrastructure (such as a new terminal, taxiway and navigational aid upgrades). Given the current economic conditions, this aviation development will be vital to the region’s economy and social well-being.

This Master Plan serves as a framework for this expansion aviation facilities and other development of the Airport.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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25 CHAPTER THREE COnSulTATIOn PROCESS
25 CHAPTER THREE COnSulTATIOn PROCESS

CHAPTER THREE

COnSulTATIOn PROCESS

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009
Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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Chapter three | Consultation process

Canberra Airport recognises that strong community ties are essential in ensuring the effective and sympathetic delivery of its future development plans. Since Canberra Airport commenced management of the Airport in 1998, the Airport has been engaged in ongoing consultation with the broader community.

Aircraft noise is one example of continual engagement with the community. Through specific noise consultations with community and industry, the Airport has been able to gain a better understanding of concerns and perspectives

and, in some cases, has been able to influence changes to flight paths and operations in response to those concerns.

Over and above community consultation, Canberra Airport is also actively engaged in a comprehensive ongoing series of consultations with local, state and Commonwealth governments and key industry groups.

Canberra Airport remains committed to meaningful consultation with all stakeholders.

governments and key industry groups. Canberra Airport remains committed to meaningful consultation with all stakeholders.
governments and key industry groups. Canberra Airport remains committed to meaningful consultation with all stakeholders.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Chapter three | Consultation process

Master Plan 2009 Chapter three | Consultation process Canberra Airport is a local family-owned business with
Master Plan 2009 Chapter three | Consultation process Canberra Airport is a local family-owned business with

Canberra Airport is a local family-owned business with a strong commitment to Canberra and the people of the Australian Capital Region.

The Airport is a critical driver in the local and regional economy, and local ownership provides a unique opportunity among major Australian airports to better integrate the Airport’s development and operation with local and regional priorities and community aspirations.

This Master Plan sets a strategic direction for Canberra Airport that is consistent with the needs of Airport users and regional priorities. The Master Plan reflects a comprehensive and ongoing consultation process with key stakeholder groups and recognition of local and regional views, including surrounding land owners and users. Canberra Airport welcomes initiatives by the Commonwealth in the Aviation Green Paper to strengthen the consultation process via the formation of community consultative groups.

Further consultation specific to the Master Plan is also undertaken to obtain further ideas and options from airport users and the public and to gauge reaction to the preliminary draft Master Plan before a final draft of the Master Plan is finalised. This consultation process, required under the Airports Act, is about ensuring that options for the Master Plan have been fully explored, concerns and impacts identified and alternatives considered.

3.1 Ongoing consultation

Specific consultation with respect to the Airport’s Master Plan is only a small component of Canberra Airport’s consultation program. Canberra Airport has an extensive ongoing consultation programme with major stakeholders, including governments, politicians, community groups and business groups in order to communicate the Airport’s plans to stakeholders and to gain a better understanding of stakeholders’ viewpoints and perspectives.

Targeted consultation is also undertaken for major projects, including under the Airports Act administered Major Development Plan process, as well as one-off key initiatives, such as the 2001 Regional Plan (which culminated in the High Noise Corridor, described at Chapter 14) and the development of Canberra Airport’s Ultimate Practical Capacity ANEF (endorsed in June 2008).

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3.1.1 Community consultation

Aside from the formal Master Planning public consultation process, Canberra Airport is committed to regularly consulting with the community at the ACT and surrounding region. This is manifested through regular presentations by Airport management to meetings of peak community organisations (such as the North Canberra Community Council and Tuggeranong Community Council) and other community and professional groups such as local Rotary and Lions Clubs and the Institute of Engineers.

Major Airport developments are also subject to a formal public consultation process under the Airports Act Major Development Plan provisions, as well as any minor variations to the Master Plan or any Major Development Plan.

Canberra Airport also recently voluntarily conducted a separate and broad public consultation process as part of the development of its endorsed Ultimate Practical Capacity ANEF, provided at Chapter 14. This had never been undertaken before by an airport nor by Airservices Australia, but was valuable in understanding community and other stakeholder perspectives on the aviation growth of Canberra Airport to its ultimate capacity.

Ongoing consultation with the community on all relevant airport-related issues (not simply aircraft noise) is conducted through the Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum, with meetings held three times a year. All peak community groups are represented, as well as a residents representative from neighbouring Pialligo. Community organisations represented at Forum meetings are as follows:

Pialligo Residents Association

Jerrabomberra Residents Association

Ridgeway Community Group

North Canberra Community Council

Gungahlin Community Council

Tuggeranong Community Council

Woden Valley Community Council

Weston Creek Community Council

3.1.2 Consultation with the Commonwealth

Canberra Airport consults regularly with various Commonwealth departments and agencies with respect to ongoing and future development and operations at and in the vicinity of Canberra Airport.

Consultation comprises specific meetings with Commonwealth politicians, and departmental representatives on key issues, as well as regular ongoing meetings. These include (but are not limited to:

Development Planning Liaison meetings, dealing with all building and planning issues at the Airport either approved or in planning, with representatives from the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, National Capital Authority and Airservices Australia;

Regular environment and heritage consultation meetings, dealing with environmental, development and planning issues at the Airport, with the Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts;

Low visibility procedures review group, dealing with proposed upgrades to instrument landing capabilities and associated aviation capability of the Airport, with representatives from Airservices Australia and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority;

Canberra Airport Safety Committee, dealing with on airport safety issues, with representatives from Airservices Australia, Australian Federal Police and Department of Defence;

Canberra Airport Bird and Wildlife Management Committee, dealing with bird and wildlife management on and in the vicinity of Canberra Airport, with representatives from Airservices Australia, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and Department of Defence;

Canberra Airport Emergency Committee, dealing with planning for and response to all types of emergency situations on or in the vicinity of Canberra Airport, with representatives from Airservices Australia, the Australian Federal Police, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, and Department of Defence;

Canberra Airport Security Consultative Group, dealing with security issues on and in the vicinity of the

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Airport, as well as in the community more generally, with representatives from Airservices Australia, the Australian Federal Police, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, and Department of Defence;

Industry Aircraft Movement Procedures Review Group, dealing with Aircraft noise, aviation development and regional planning issues, with representatives from the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Airservices Australia, Department of Defence and National Capital Authority; and

Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum, dealing with Aircraft noise, aviation development and regional planning issues, with representatives from the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Airservices Australia, Department of Defence and National Capital Authority.

Canberra Airport is also represented on the Regional Airspace Users Advisory Committee (RAPAC), dealing with airspace and aviation issues at and in the vicinity of Canberra Airport, chaired by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and also attended by representatives from the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Airservices Australia and the Department of Defence.

3.1.3 Consultation with the ACT Government

Canberra Airport recognises its key role to the ACT and region economy and the need to integrate into the Territory planning and development framework. The ACT Government equally recognises the Airport’s key role as an economic and transport hub for the region.

Canberra Airport and the ACT Government are in the final stages of negotiating a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) recognising the Airport’s key role in the Territory and the need to safeguard the ongoing development and operation of the Airport. The draft MoU also acknowledges that the ongoing growth of Canberra Airport must be well planned and managed in close consultation with the ACT Government and must take account any impacts on the ACT community. The draft MoU sets out a consultation framework and includes a dispute resolution process.

As outlined in Chapter 4, Canberra Airport is recognised by and operates within the context of the Canberra

Spatial Plan and Economic White Paper, as well as the Commonwealth administered National Capital Plan.

An example of the excellent level of consultation and cooperation with the ACT Government was the participation of the Airport in the ACT Government Roundtable on-Airport roads. This consultation forum led to a number of traffic studies being completed at the Airport’s cost and the commencement of substantial road works around the Airport, funded and constructed jointly between the Canberra Airport, the ACT Government and the Commonwealth. More details on this are provided at Chapter 11.

Regular Airport meetings with ACT Government representatives include:

Development Planning Liaison meetings, dealing with all building and planning issues at the Airport either approved or in planning, with representatives from the ACT Chief Ministers Department;

Regular liaison meetings with ACT Chief Minister’s department, dealing with all issues relating to Canberra Airport, including on- and off- airport development, infrastructure (including roads), environment, land-use planning and aircraft noise;

ACT Tourism Ministerial Advisory Council meeting, with representatives from ACT Tourism, Chief Minister’s Department and the Department of Territory and Municipal Services;

Canberra Airport Emergency Committee, dealing with planning for and response to all types of emergency situations on or in the vicinity of Canberra Airport, with representatives from ACT Ambulance, ACT Rural Fire Service, ACT Fire Brigade, ACT Emergency Services Authority, ACT Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services, ACT Department of Health and the ACT SES;

Industry Aircraft Movement Procedures Review Group, dealing with Aircraft noise, aviation development and regional planning issues, with representatives from the ACT Chief Ministers Department, Department of Territory and Municipal Services and ACT Planning and Land Authority;

Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum, dealing with Aircraft noise, aviation development and regional planning issues, with representatives from

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the ACT Chief Ministers Department, Department of Territory and Municipal Services and ACT Planning and Land Authority; and

Canberra Airport Roads Forum, dealing with regional road infrastructure and upgrades, with representatives from ACT Roads.

3.1.4 Consultation with the NSW Government

Whilst Canberra Airport is wholly located within the ACT, flight paths to and from Canberra Airport pass over NSW, including at low altitude. The issues of aircraft noise, airspace protection and maintaining a residential-free corridor to and from Canberra Airport within NSW are thus of critical importance to the ongoing unconstrained aviation operations of Canberra Airport and its ability to fulfil its role in the national network of Airports. Furthermore, surrounding areas of NSW are also critical for the provision of regional infrastructure including roads and public transport.

Consultation with the NSW Government includes regular meetings with the NSW Department of Planning and the Premiers Office. Officials from the NSW Department of Planning also attend Industry Aircraft Movement Procedures Review Group and the Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum. NSW Police and Queanbeyan SES also attend the Airport Emergency Committee meetings.

3.1.5 Consultation with the Queanbeyan City Council and other regional councils

Queanbeyan City Council in NSW is an important Airport stakeholder. Canberra Airport consults regularly with Queanbeyan City Council on a range of infrastructure and land-use planning issues, with particular emphasis on aircraft noise issues.

Canberra Airport has formally presented at Queanbeyan City Council meetings on various occasions, as well as regularly consulting directly with the Mayor, councillors, General Manager and Strategic Planning officials.

Representatives from Queanbeyan City Council, including the Mayor, attend Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum meetings. Representatives from the Palerang Shire Council and Yass Valley Council are also invited to attend the meetings and are included in all correspondence and meeting notes.

Canberra Airport’s Managing Director has also presented on a number of occasions to the ACT Chief Minister’s Regional Leaders Forum, which consists of representatives from the ACT and NSW Government and the Mayors of the fourteen City and Shire councils in the Capital Region.

3.1.6 Stakeholder consultation

Aside from consulting with the various levels of Government, Canberra Airport regularly meets with other key Airport stakeholders, including but not limited to airlines and aircraft operators, business and tourism groups, tenants both on Airport and in the surrounding area.

Regular consultative forums involving Airport stakeholders include (but are not limited to):

Low visibility procedures review group, dealing with proposed upgrades to instrument landing capabilities and associated aviation capability of the Airport;

Canberra Airport Safety Committee, dealing with on- Airport safety issues;

Canberra Airport Bird and Wildlife Management Committee, dealing with bird and wildlife management on and in the vicinity of Canberra Airport;

Canberra Airport Emergency Committee, dealing with planning for and response to all types of emergency situations on or in the vicinity of Canberra Airport

Canberra Airport Security Consultative Group, dealing with security issues on and in the vicinity of the Airport, as well as in the community more generally;

Industry Aircraft Movement Procedures Review Group, dealing with Aircraft noise, aviation development and regional planning issues; and

Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum, dealing with Aircraft noise, aviation development and regional planning issues.

Canberra Airport is also represented on the Regional Airspace Users Advisory Committee (RAPAC), dealing with airspace and aviation issues at and in the vicinity of Canberra Airport, chaired by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and also attended by representatives from the General Aviation community and the airlines.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport regularly consults with and presents to key business and industry organisations such as the Canberra Business Council, Queanbeyan Business Council and the ACT and Region Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Canberra Airport management have also at various times held chairmanships and directorships on the Australian Capital Tourism Commission, Tourism Industry Council, Tourism Task Force, Canberra Business Council, Property Council of Australia, Canberra Convention Bureau, Australian Airports Association, Tourism Task Force and other business and industry groups. Not only does this demonstrate a commitment to business, planning, tourism and development in the region as a whole, but also serves as an important consultation and information- dissemination point to a wide range of interests in the community at large.

3.1.7 Future community consultation processes

The December 2008 Aviation Green Paper outlined proposals for formal community consultation groups to “foster effective community engagement in airport planning and operations issues”. Canberra Airport strongly supports this initiative and believes that with certain changes, the current Canberra Airport Aircraft Noise Consultative Forum is well suited to fill this role. Already, Master Plans and Major Development Plans are all discussed by this committee as part of the consultation process. Canberra Airport looks forward to working with the Commonwealth to formalising a Canberra Airport community consultation group as a matter of priority.

3.2 Master Plan consultation

3.2.1 2008 draft Master Plan consultation

Specific pre-consultation meetings were undertaken with the Commonwealth, ACT and NSW Governments and the Queanbeyan City Council as well as key industry groups in the preparation of the 2008 preliminary draft Master Plan. The views of the groups that accepted the invitation for consultation were carefully considered and taken into account for the preparation of the 2008 preliminary draft Master Plan.

Further, a range of submissions were received as part of the official public consultation process for the 2008 preliminary draft Master Plan. These were analysed and

responded to as part of the final draft submitted to the Minister. Due regard was had to all of these submissions, including those received after the close of the official consultation period.

The pre-consultation meetings and all submissions to the draft 2008 Master Plan inform and have been considered in the preparation of the 2009 preliminary draft Master Plan, though it is noted that this does not prejudice any meetings held or submissions received as part of the official consultation process for the 2009 Master Plan.

3.2.2 2009 preliminary draft Master Plan consultation

Following the rejection of the draft 2008 Master Plan by the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Canberra Airport has held consultation meetings with the Department Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government with respect to the 2009 preliminary draft Master Plan.

Furthermore, prior to the release of the 2009 preliminary draft Master Plan for public consultation, Canberra Airport has written to all airline and airfreight users of Canberra Airport seeking specific input as to their needs as users of the Airport, and to gain a more comprehensive understanding of their current and future operations at Canberra Airport. Responses to this request for information will inform the 2009 draft Master Plan and will be annexed to the draft Master Plan for consideration by the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government.

Pre-consultation meetings have also been held with Airservices Australia, CASA, RAAF 34 Squadron, Queanbeyan Councillors, National Capital Authority and the ACT Government.

The Airports Act also requires that before submitting a draft Master Plan to the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government for approval, the company must undertake a public consultation period. Canberra Airport has advertised in local newspapers that a preliminary version of the Master Plan was available, and invited public comment within 60 business days of the newspaper notice. Canberra Airport has also placed a notice and a copy of the preliminary draft Master Plan on its website, which will be available for viewing and download free of charge throughout the

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60 business days public comment period.

As stipulated by the Airports Act, Canberra Airport will have due regard to all submissions received during the public consultation period before submitting a draft Master Plan to the Minister. This includes a detailed summary of key points raised in each individual submission, Canberra Airport’s response to those points, and changes (if any) made to the preliminary draft Master Plan in response to those points.

The full text of all submissions received, as well as Canberra Airport’s response to those points, and changes (if any) made to the preliminary draft Master Plan in response to the key points raised in the submissions will all be provided to the Minister alongside the final draft Master Plan in the form of a Consultation Report.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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35 CHAPTER FOUR InTEGRATIOn wITh lOCAl PlAnnInG STRATEGIES
35 CHAPTER FOUR InTEGRATIOn wITh lOCAl PlAnnInG STRATEGIES

CHAPTER FOUR

InTEGRATIOn wITh lOCAl PlAnnInG STRATEGIES

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009
Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

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Chapter four | Integration with local planning strategies

This chapter of the Master Plan provides an overview of how Canberra Airport integrates with the planning strategies of the region.

Canberra Airport works in close consultation with the ACT Government to ensure that the Airport plays a positive role in the overall growth and development of the ACT.

The ACT Government’s Economic White paper and Canberra Spatial Plan are two excellent examples of the Airport’s successful integration with local planning strategies. Similarly, the co-operation between the Airport, ACT and Commonwealth Governments to upgrade the roads through the Majura Valley has been very successful and productive.

The Economic White Paper acknowledges the Airport’s role as a major employment generator capable of achieving sustainable growth and development. It also recognises that the Airport has set new benchmarks for commercial investment in the ACT.

The Canberra Spatial Plan sets out the ACT Government’s strategic plan for the next 30 years and beyond. It too

recognises the critically important role the Airport plays in bringing new industries and new jobs to Canberra and denotes the Airport as an Activity Node capable of accommodating up to 5% to 10% of the ACT’s employment.

Similarly, the Airport has engaged with the National Capital Authority to actively integrate with the Authority’s vision for the Capital, and the Airport has been denoted in the National Capital Plan as a Designated Office Employment Centre.

Canberra Airport also maintains a regular dialogue with the Queanbeyan City, Yass Valley and Palerang Shire Councils and the NSW Government. Unfortunately, despite ongoing consultation, it is disappointing to note that the NSW Government and Queanbeyan City Council appear to be committed to developing land under Canberra Airport flight paths for residential development, potentially impacting on the future amenity of residents across the region.

Canberra Airport will continue to take an active role in all local planning strategies.

of residents across the region. Canberra Airport will continue to take an active role in all

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Chapter four | Integration with local planning strategies

Chapter four | Integration with local planning strategies Canberra Airport plays a pivotal role in the
Chapter four | Integration with local planning strategies Canberra Airport plays a pivotal role in the

Canberra Airport plays a pivotal role in the current and future success of Canberra and the region as a major social, tourism, business, government and trade gateway. Canberra Airport therefore recognises the importance of managing on-Airport development in unison with metropolitan and sub-regional planning strategies, and seeking, where possible, to have Canberra Airport recognised in these strategies as a critical economic and business gateway for the region that should be protected from inappropriate land-uses in the vicinity of the Airport.

This is confirmed by the December 2008 Aviation Green Paper which noted:

The Commonwealth will “work through the Council of Australian Governments and other appropriate forums to ensure a national land-use planning regime is put in place near airports and under flight paths to avoid noise- sensitive developments being located in these areas and to protect communities from excessive levels of aircraft

noise. Commonwealth Government Aviation Green Paper, December 2008.

4.1 National Capital Authority

Following an amendment to the Airports Act in 2007 to bring Canberra Airport into line with all other privatised Airports, the National Capital Plan no longer applies at Canberra Airport.

The National Capital Authority have agreed that an amendment to the National Capital Plan (NCP), although “cosmetic to ensure consistency with the Airports Act” would “correctly reference the Master Plan for the Airport and acknowledge that the relevant planning authority is the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government.” The amendment to the NCP is expected within the next 12-18 months.

While no longer applying, the National Capital Plan currently identifies Canberra Airport as part of the Central National Area, as a Defined Office Employment Centre and on the East-West Transport Corridor, as shown in Figure 4.1. The National Capital Plan states under the heading Policies

for the Location of Office Employment that:

• “Major office employment should be located within Defined Office Employment Centres located within the two transport corridors.”; and

• “Defined Office Employment Centres within the

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Figure 4.1 “Defined Office Employment Centres”, from the National Capital Plan

Office Employment Centres”, from the National Capital Plan Note Canberra Airport as a Defined Office Employment

Note Canberra Airport as a Defined Office Employment Centre and on the defined East-West Transport Corridor

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

East-West Corridor comprise Belconnen Town Centre, Bruce, Civic Centre, Russell and Canberra International Airport.”

Furthermore, Broadacre Areas surround Canberra Airport, which are recognised as becoming of “considerable economic importance to Canberra over time, and which offer a basis for the future economic development of the city.”

Current Airport development and proposals under this Master Plan are thus consistent with the National Capital Plan.

The land uses identified in this Master Plan are contained in Chapter 10. Where defined, these uses adopt the definitions in Appendix 1. Where not defined, these uses adopt the definition in the National Capital Plan.

4.2 ACT Government

“For us to continue to develop as a vibrant commercial and tourist destination, the face we present to the world is extremely important. Canberra International Airport is now a gateway to the region of which any city could be proud… Particularly outstanding was development of Brindabella Business Park and the widening of the

runway. ACT Chief Minister, Jon Stanhope, 12 November 2002 on the announcement of Canberra Airport being named the Major Australian Airport of the Year 2002.

Canberra Airport works closely with all relevant areas of the ACT Government to ensure that the Airport is strongly integrated into the ACT strategic and planning framework, although it is not a requirement of the Airports Act that this Master Plan or development at the Airport be consistent with this framework. Canberra Airport regularly and comprehensively consults with the ACT Government, as outlined in greater detail in Chapter 3 . Canberra Airport has also worked collaboratively with the ACT Government to deliver key infrastructure projects in the vicinity of Canberra Airport, such as the upgrade to Pialligo Avenue.

Canberra Airport has been recognised by the ACT Government as a critical piece of infrastructure to the ACT and the surrounding region, and the ACT Government has further acknowledged that the Airport and its ongoing growth must be encouraged as well as integrated into the urban form of the city.

4.2.1 Canberra Plan

Central to the ACT Government’s strategic planning is the formation of the Canberra Plan, outlining how the Government will achieve its goals in the next 30 years in a strategic manner. The most relevant components of the Canberra Plan for the Airport are the Economic White Paper and the Canberra Spatial Plan, which are addressed below in Sections 4.2.2 and Section 4.2.3. Both of these documents demonstrate the Airport’s importance to and integration with the city.

In August 2008, ACT Chief Minister Jon Stanhope launched a review of the Canberra Plan, The Canberra

Plan - Towards our Second Century. The Canberra Plan

acknowledges the importance of Canberra Airport in the region, and equally the importance of managing airport development in close consultation with the ACT Government.

“The Canberra International Airport is an important element of the ACT’s economy and the ACT Government will continue to support the planned expansion of both passenger and freight activity.

These developments complement our ongoing efforts to attract new migrants and businesses to the Territory, and also facilitate the diversification of the ACT economy by providing the opportunity for new economic activity.

It is imperative that the proposed airport expansion be well planned and managed in close consultation with the ACT Government.

Development at the Airport should take account of relevant ACT planning laws and policies in order to moderate significant impacts on metropolitan planning and local infrastructure provision.” The Canberra Plan -

Towards our Second Century (2008).

Development at the airport and the role of the Airport to the ACT’s economy is outlined in further detail in the Economic White Paper and Canberra Spatial Plan, described below.

4.2.2 Economic White Paper

“We should not fear strategies that pursue economic growth and development… Approvals and policies designed simply to maintain the status quo are more likely to be a recipe for stagnation.” ACT Economic White Paper

(2003).

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The ACT Government will:

“be unashamedly pro-business … and make the ACT the premier business friendly location in Australia”; and

“provide supportive planning and highly competitive infrastructure … to give Canberra the look and feel of a vibrant and dynamic 21st century city.” ACT Economic

White Paper (2003).

The Economic White Paper outlines the ACT Government’s economic and policy framework to achieve sustainable growth and development. Canberra Airport’s role as a major employment generator and as a regional hub is well recognised in the White Paper.

By providing a wide variety of services in a sustainable manner, Canberra Airport is helping the ACT Government reach its goal of creating the right environment to attract knowledge based creative workers. Workers in these industries demand high quality accommodation and amenities located close to major interstate transport links. The Airport is providing the right environment for these workers.

The Economic White Paper recognises that the Airport has set the benchmark for the ACT Government in providing the best commercial environment for investors and recommends that it be emulated in other locations. Further, the Paper recognises that economic activity at the Airport has increased markedly since the privatisation of the Airport in 1998. This growth in economic activity and the resultant growth in employment have only been possible because Canberra Airport has actively developed many aspects of the bundle of rights purchased with the Airport lease.

The Airport’s role as a regional and metropolitan hub, and as a major activity centre, is explicitly recognised by the Economic White Paper in the following terms:

“Great cities have excellent transport connections. Since the ownership of Canberra Airport was transferred to private ownership, investment in the Airport and general economic activity around the Airport has increased markedly. The Master Plan, which is the major planning tool for the Airport, outlines a vision for the development of Canberra International Airport as a major passenger, freight and business hub serving the ACT Region.

Therefore it is essential that the Spatial Plan recognises the Airport’s role as a generator of employment and a regional hub. In particular, transport and employment links between Civic and the Airport need to be given high priority.

Action 47 “The Government will recognise Canberra International Airport as a major activity centre and work with the Commonwealth Government and airport management to continue to upgrade connections to the Airport,

especially from Civic. Economic White Paper, 2003.

4.2.3 The Canberra Spatial Plan

“In order to protect the Airport as a significant transport asset for the region, its operations need to be unconstrained by the potential limiting effects of residential development where airport noise would impact on residents. Conversely, growth at the Airport must have regard to the need to protect significant biodiversity assets on and around the Airport.”

“The scale and nature of development at the Airport provides employment opportunities not available elsewhere in the ACT. Planning to ensure that the Airport continues to play a major role in this region as a regional transport hub, bringing new jobs to the region, is of fundamental importance. NSW areas are also affected by aircraft noise while the economic benefits of the Airport are also important to NSW.” Canberra Spatial Plan

(2004).

The Canberra Spatial Plan sets out the ACT Government’s strategic directions for the development of Canberra over the next 30 years and beyond. It is the ACT Government’s key strategic planning document for directing and managing urban growth and change, and is part of a comprehensive, integrated strategic plan for Canberra’s future.

The Spatial Plan confirms Canberra Airport’s central role in terms of employment growth by identifying the Airport at the intersection of two of Canberra’s three employment corridors. The Plan reveals that the three corridors will form the primary focus for employment in the ACT (See Figure 4.2).

The Airport is located on the main employment corridor between Belconnen through Civic, Barton, the Airport, to Queanbeyan. This corridor currently accommodates over

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Figure 4.2

CANBERRA ‘H PLAN’ EMPLOYMENT LOCATION STRATEGY

PROJECTED DOMESTIC AIR SERVICES FROM CANBERRA

GUNGAHLIN MITCHELL UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA DICKSON ANU CITY RUSSELL ADFA PARKES CANBERRA BARTON AIRPORT DEAKIN
GUNGAHLIN
MITCHELL
UNIVERSITY
OF CANBERRA
DICKSON
ANU
CITY
RUSSELL
ADFA
PARKES
CANBERRA
BARTON
AIRPORT
DEAKIN
FYSHWICK
WESTON
WODEN
HUME
TUGGERANONG

QUEANBEYAN

Legend

Town centre

Activity node

Universities

Industrial centre

Employment corridor
Employment corridor

BELCONNEN

Note Canberra Airport at the intersection of two major employment corridors and denoted as an activity node.

43

70% of Canberra’s employment and contains a number of uses, most notably key office employment locations in

Civic and in the Central National Area (of which the Airport

is a part).

In addition, the Airport is located on the north-south employment corridor running through the Majura Valley through the Airport and Fyshwick to Hume. This north- south corridor is identified by the ACT Government in the Spatial Plan for the growth of, or is suitable for, uses including:

industrial;

broadacre commercial;

tourism;

recreation;

transport related activities;

bulky goods retailing;

creative industries; and

high technology manufacturing.

This north-south corridor, and particularly the Majura Valley,

is developing into a key Defence and security hub. With

the Majura Military Training Area (MMTA), Royal Military College (RMC), the Australian Defence Force Academy

(ADFA) and the Campbell Park Offices in the Valley, and

the Australian Federal Police’s (AFP) increasing presence in the Valley and on the Airport, the Majura Valley is already

a key “security valley” for the Australian Government and

support services. In addition, most of the operations in the Valley are in very close proximity to the Russell Defence offices. The trend of increasing Defence, AFP and ancillary security operations within the Majura Valley is expected to continue and Canberra Airport anticipates playing an

increasing role as a major activity node in the Valley.

The National Capital Authority has supported the Canberra Spatial Plan in principle in terms of its employment

corridor notion for the Majura Valley, in which the Airport

is located.

Canberra Airport has also been identified in the Canberra Spatial Plan as a “Priority 1” employment area on this north-south employment corridor, to be developed in the short term. Further, the Spatial Plan integrates Canberra Airport into the planning framework of the city as the

Spatial Plan designates Canberra Airport as an Employment Activity Node (refer Figure 4.2).

Today, the development of business parks and other commercial property development are primary use activities at airports because they are associated with, are ancillary to and enhance the operation and the viability of the airport. The Spatial Plan also outlines the importance of a wide range of complementary services to support the Activity Nodes.

Although the Airport consults regularly with the ACT Government and although the Airport is not subject to the planning policy or requirements of the ACT Government or ACTPLA, Airport development has been undertaken consistent with the policy and planning intent of the Canberra Spatial Plan and Economic White Paper.

4.2.4 Territory Plan

The Territory Plan has been prepared and administered by the ACT Government in respect of all land in the ACT other than land classified as “Designated Area”. The Territory Plan is required by Commonwealth legislation to be consistent with the National Capital Plan. In the event and to the extent of any such inconsistency, the Territory Plan has no effect. The Territory Plan is silent on uses or planning at the Airport, and hence this Master Plan is not inconsistent with the Territory Plan.

In any event, the Territory Plan does not apply to Canberra Airport and it is not a requirement of the Airports Act that this Master Plan or land use activities at Canberra Airport be consistent with the Territory Plan.

The land uses and the development and activities permitted for each precinct at Canberra Airport are listed in land use tables in Chapter 10 of this Master Plan under the headings “Permitted and Intended Uses Include” and “Category”. These are defined by adopting the terminology of the National Capital Plan. In some cases the definitions in the Territory Plan may be different from the National Capital Plan, however where there is any inconsistency between the two plans, the Territory Plan has no effect.

4.3 NSW Government and Queanbeyan City Council

Whilst Canberra Airport does not lie within NSW, aircraft flying to and from Canberra Airport operate at low altitude

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

over areas of south-eastern NSW, particularly Queanbeyan. Furthermore, Canberra Airport is an economic and social gateway for not just the ACT, but the broader region, with further a potential growing role as a support to the increasingly constrained Sydney Airport.

This reality was acknowledged by the August 2006 Independent Panel of Inquiry into Queanbeyan land release. The Report of the Panel of Inquiry noted:

“It is the Panel’s considered opinion that Canberra International Airport is a significant strategic regional asset and that curfew free operations are important for its continuing contribution to the entire Queanbeyan/ ACT region. If it also succeeds in operating as an adjunct or overflow to the heavily constrained Sydney airports in the future then it could have strategic importance for NSW, beyond the immediate region.” Report of

the Independent Panel of Inquiry into land release in Queanbeyan (2006).

The 2008 Aviation Green Paper recognised the importance of achieving appropriate land use planning and other noise abatement outcomes for the community. This is to:

“enable the maintenance of a north-south and east- west network of non-curfew airports.”

“[…] this is crucial to maintaining access for airlines and airfreight services to major airports such as Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Melbourne and Perth.” Commonwealth

Government Aviation Green Paper, December 2008.

Therefore, the Green paper concludes that

“It does not make sense to allow new noise-sensitive developments to occur in areas where they will lead to public concerns that may affect the long-term viability of the airport. In particular, there is every reason to avoid noise sensitive development in green field sites near airport flight paths.” Commonwealth Government

Aviation Green Paper, December 2008.

This highlights the necessity that Canberra Airport be formally recognised as a key infrastructure asset for the region through the regional integration of planning strategies and that the Airport’s long-term prosperity and growth is protected via appropriate land use planning under Airport flight paths and the provision of appropriate infrastructure links such as roads.

Notwithstanding the above, despite many years of good

planning that have protected Canberra Airport’s flight paths from inappropriate development, Queanbeyan Council and Planning NSW have recently endorsed proposals for thousands of homes under Canberra Airport’s flight paths, which if successful, put at risk the ongoing unconstrained aviation growth of the Airport. Queanbeyan City Council also continues to call for a curfew on Canberra Airport that would cause very significant detriment to current and future airport operations.

4.3.1 Sydney-Canberra Corridor Strategy

In July 2008, the NSW Government released its Sydney-

Canberra Corridor strategy as a “25-year blueprint to guide growth, improve housing affordability and protect valuable natural resources along the regional corridor between Sydney and Canberra.” The Plan identifies the need for an additional 25,200 homes, including 10,000 for Queanbeyan (incorporating both urban infill and greenfields sites), for an expanded population of 46,350 by the year 2031.

The Strategy notes that:

“Canberra International Airport is a significant asset for the ACT and the Corridor. The Airport provides commercial flights to Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide. Regional services are also provided to Newcastle and Albury. The airport contributes to the local economy through movement of people, tourism, employment and freight cartage.” Sydney-Canberra

Corridor Strategy (2008).

Nevertheless, it is disappointing to note that the Strategy contains proposals, also contained within the 2031 Queanbeyan Residential and Economic Strategy (outlined below at Section 4.3.2) to locate thousands of homes in Queanbeyan under Canberra Airport flight paths. Such an outcome would severely hamper Canberra Airport’s ability to continue to grow and be the significant asset for the region as noted in the Strategy.

4.3.2 2031 Queanbeyan esidential and Economic Strategy

Planning NSW published its review of Queanbeyan’s 2031

Residential and Economic Strategy in April 2007 following

a submission from Queanbeyan City Council. Despite

acknowledging that “protection of the potential for future growth and development of Canberra Airport needs to be recognised and considered as it is an important piece of

45

regional infrastructure which will continue to contribute to the economic development of the region”, the Strategy appears to be inconsistent with the recognition of the importance of Canberra Airport as a significant regional asset by proposing to place thousands of homes in high aircraft noise areas under Canberra Airport’s flight paths. A revision to this 2031 Strategy, involving approximately 4,500 homes under flight paths, was approved by the NSW Planning Minister, the Hon Kristina Keneally, in December 2008.

Canberra Airport has consulted extensively with Queanbeyan City Council and Planning NSW regarding aircraft noise issues, and has worked with the community (especially Jerrabomberra) to minimise the effects of aircraft noise. Indeed, following a request by former NSW Planning Minister Frank Sartor, Canberra Airport engaged independent Planning Consultants Parsons Brinkerhoff to produce a draft report identifying up to 22,000 residential blocks outside high aircraft noise areas to allow for the ongoing growth of Queanbeyan.

Canberra Airport will continue to work with the NSW Government and Queanbeyan City Council to ensure inappropriate planning outcomes does not impact on the future growth of the airport and the prosperity of Canberra and the region as a whole.

4.3.3 Queanbeyan Structure Plan

The 2004 Queanbeyan Structure Plan sets out the land-use planning and development blueprint for the Queanbeyan City Council and identifies land directly under Canberra Airport’s flight paths as future residential development.

However it is important to note that it was not until 2001 that the Queanbeyan City Council contemplated moving away from its previous policy of restricting residential use under flight paths. The 1974 Queanbeyan Structure Plan states:

“It will be necessary to exercise care in the siting of development. Generally, residential areas should be grouped away from major traffic routes and away from the flight path of the approach to Canberra Airport.”

Queanbeyan Structure Plan, August 1974.

To avoid residential development under the flight paths, the Structure Plan proposed that that industrial and commercial land be located under aircraft flight paths:

“The flight path of the aircraft approaching Canberra Airport [will be] generally over the town centre and

industrial areas Queanbeyan Structure Plan, August

1974.

This policy remained and is reflected in the Queanbeyan Structure Plan 1994. The 1994 Structure Plan refers to the “Tralee Industrial Estate Option”, showing areas under the flight paths labeled as “Proposed Urban Industrial (subject to further investigation)”, indicating the Council’s preferred long-term planning for this land. The 1994 also reaffirms the aircraft noise zones of the 1974 plan.

Further, in July 2001, the Queanbeyan Council resolved “that the approval be given for the use of up to $30,000 of the $70,000 in the current Management Plan 2 for ‘Investigations for future development’ for a new project ‘Preliminary investigations into the future use of Tralee as industrial’” (Queanbeyan City Council Minutes 18 July

2001).

The motivation for the departure from the long-term policy of zoning this area under the flight paths as industrial and shifting to a policy of zoning it instead as residential is revealed in the Queanbeyan City 2004 Structure Plan:

“The 1994 Structure Plan identified the land known as Tralee near the Hume industrial estate as being suitable for urban or industrial purposes. In 2001, Council resolved to further investigate Tralee for future industrial purposes; however with a change in ownership of the land, Council has since resolved to commence rezoning the land for residential purposes. Development of this land for residential purposes would impact on Queanbeyan’s future good quality industrial land stock.”

Queanbeyan City 2004 Structure Plan.

As outlined above, and in greater detail in Chapter 14, Canberra Airport continues to vigorously oppose these plans for residential development under flight paths, and will continue to work with Queanbeyan City Council and Planning NSW to prevent inappropriate planning outcomes.

4.4 Cross-border land-use planning issues

Canberra Airport’s location near the ACT/NSW border has created certain land-use planning conflicts, especially in relation to proposed residential developments under Canberra Airport flight paths.

2 The Queanbeyan City Council had allocated $70,000 for the “Investigation for future development” for the entire City of Queanbeyan (Queanbeyan City Council Management Plan 2001/2002 to 2003/2004), of which $30,000 was allocated to the preliminary investigations into the use of Tralee as industrial.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Notwithstanding a Cross-border Settlement Strategy and Water Strategy agreed between the ACT, NSW and Commonwealth Governments, as outlined above the NSW Government continues to pursue land-use planning outcomes that will be detrimental to not only future residents in NSW but the entire region (including the ACT).

In relation to the proposed development of Tralee, the ACT Government has stated:

“[…] the ACT Government has no direct control over the development and rezoning process for Tralee [in NSW]. However, the ACT Government’s interest in this matter relates to achieving good planning outcomes for all of the population of the area, irrespective of whether they live in the ACT or NSW, whilst also protecting significant infrastructure assets such as Canberra International Airport and the Hume Industrial Estate from incompatible land uses.” Jon Stanhope MLA, ACT

Chief Minister, 24 December 2008.

The Commonwealth’s 2008 Aviation Green Paper also highlights the importance of regional integration to protect airports.

“it is important that state governments and local governments meet their responsibilities to establish zoning policies, in consultation with airports, that ensure development near airports and under flight paths is compatible with noise exposure.” Commonwealth

Government Aviation Green Paper, December 2008.

As indicated above, there continue to be issues involved with integrating NSW local planning strategies with the ongoing operations of Canberra Airport. However, Canberra Airport expects that in light of the above Commonwealth policy outcomes, the NSW Government will work with Canberra Airport, the ACT Government and the Commonwealth to resolve land-use planning policies in the vicinity of Canberra Airport. These discussions should commence during the statutory 60-day consultation period of this draft Master Plan.

47

CHAPTER FIVE

AIRlInE GROwTh

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009
Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

49

Chapter five | Airline growth

Passenger numbers continue to rise at Canberra Airport, with ongoing growth expected for the life of the Master Plan.

Close to 3 million passengers passed through the Airport during 2008 and this is expected to grow, at conservative mid-range expectations, to around 6.7 million passengers annually within the next 20 years. There are also higher range growth forecasts which would result in 7.5 million passengers annually, in 20 years time.

Canberra Airport currently has direct services to all of Australia’s mainland capital cities except Darwin. This equates to 910 airline flights a week. Over and above the capital city services, the Airport also provides direct links to

Newcastle and Albury. Flights to further new destinations are anticipated during 2009.

Canberra Airport has actively encouraged the introduction of new airlines to the national capital, believing that competition promotes lower fares, growth and flexibility. It will continue to do so.

Canberra Airport also continues to work for the introduction of international services. The Airport believes international services are a reality within the next five years as international terminal facilities are developed.

international services are a reality within the next five years as international terminal facilities are developed.
international services are a reality within the next five years as international terminal facilities are developed.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Chapter five | Airline growth

Draft Master Plan 2009 Chapter five | Airline growth The global aviation industry has been in
Draft Master Plan 2009 Chapter five | Airline growth The global aviation industry has been in

The global aviation industry has been in a period of constant change over the last decade. The Australian aviation market was severely affected by the collapse of Ansett and its regional subsidiaries, additional security requirements imposed as part of a focus on the risks of terrorism have added additional imposts on passenger travel and recent fluctuations in the oil price and the downturn in the global economy have challenged the airline industry worldwide. All of these factors have weakened potential growth opportunities at Canberra Airport.

Nevertheless, new airlines (including low-cost carriers), capacity and frequency increases, lower fares and new routes, as well as the robust growth of the ACT and region economy, has led to improved prospects for the growth of airline services at Canberra Airport. Much like the experience in the United States and in Europe, evidence suggests aviation is undergoing a structural change due to the impact of low airfares, with people travelling by air where they would otherwise have driven or not travelled at all.

5.1 Domestic and regional airlines growth

Over the past 10 years, the Australian domestic and regional aviation market has seen dramatic change. The two most significant changes to the aviation landscape in Australia have been the collapse of Ansett Australia and its affiliate airlines in September 2001 and the commencement of services by low-cost carriers. Prior to Airport privatisation, the 1989 pilot’s dispute also had a massive, but short-term, impact on the domestic aviation market.

At the time of the 1999 Master Plan, two full-service airlines and their associated regional subsidiaries carried almost every passenger in the domestic market, operating parallel schedules and achieving a high yield on the business and government dominated routes to and from Canberra.

When Impulse Airlines commenced low-cost services to Canberra in June 2000, followed by Virgin Blue in July 2001, heavily discounted seats became available on a regular basis in Canberra for the first time. However the collapse of Ansett in September 2001 caused a reduction in the supply of seats on Canberra routes.

These temporary but significant supply cuts were gradually

51

MILLIONS

offset by increased competition and the commencement of new routes into Canberra by both Virgin Blue and Qantas. More recently, the commencement of services by Tiger Airways has further stimulated the market with a range of very low fares. The prospect of further competition in the Canberra market by existing and future airlines in the short term is likely to further improve seat supply and air fare affordability.

Figure 5.1, shows that despite the ongoing fluctuations in the industry, the long term growth of domestic and regional passengers to/from Canberra Airport remains reasonably constant, with downturns followed by periods of strong growth. The 20-year historic compound annual growth rate for Canberra Airport is a strong 4.8%, notwithstanding the pilot’s dispute and the Ansett collapse. Growth in 2006/07 and 2007/08 were well above the 20-year average and the 4.2% Master Plan growth forecast, although growth may well slow in 2008/09 and 2009/10 due to the current global economic slowdown, bringing growth back towards the 4.2% growth trendline.

Figure 5.1 Canberra Airport historic domestic and regional passenger growth 1982-2006

3.0 2.5 2.0 September 11, Ansett collapse 1.5 1.0 Pilots dispute 0.5 1989/90 0.0 1984-85
3.0
2.5
2.0
September 11,
Ansett collapse
1.5
1.0
Pilots dispute
0.5
1989/90
0.0
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08

Source: Airbiz (2007)

YEAR

Whilst the availability of discount seats has increased substantially compared to when Qantas and Ansett were the dominant airlines, the lack of intensive low-cost carrier competition in the Canberra market, a shortage of domestic aircraft capacity more generally, and the increased focus by Virgin Blue on the corporate market saw fares increase again somewhat between 2005

and 2007. However, following a softening in the global economy, and the commencement of services by Tiger Airways in February 2008, (who offer a daily services on the Canberra-Melbourne route at ongoing fares as low as $29.95 one way), fares to and from Canberra have reduced substantially. Tiger Airways have announced services on the Canberra-Adelaide route from March 2009, and passenger growth on this route (that has seen slight reductions in capacity over the past 12 months) is expected to be strong.

Canberra Airport is also especially committed to attracting Jetstar who operate to 20 cities across Australia, including all other capital city airports and many major regional centres except Canberra.

In the past 24 months, most other Australian airports have seen domestic passenger numbers grow faster than Canberra, with much of this growth attributed to the growth of Jetstar and price competition between Jetstar and Virgin Blue (in some cases upwards of 10% p.a. growth). This led to a reduction in the potential tourism benefits to Canberra and the region that might otherwise have been stimulated by this additional capacity and low fares.

However, in the past six months this trend appears to be reversing. Airlines that are reducing or at least stabilising capacity elsewhere around Australia (especially low- yielding tourism destinations) are turning to Canberra to introduce additional capacity, given the lower realtive growth over the past 2-3 years and the higher-yield travel potential of Canberra. Levels of business and government travel are expected to remain strong to and from Canberra, whereas some softening may be expected elsewhere around Australia as companies cut travel budgets and the general population reduce discretionary spending (such as flying holidays).

5.1.1 Domestic and regional route network

Canberra Airport’s domestic and regional route network is dominated by two primary routes – Canberra-Sydney and Canberra-Melbourne. Until recently, the vast majority of flights to and from Canberra operated on these two key routes, with passengers travelling further afield transiting at Sydney or Melbourne. Peak period services also operated on the Canberra-Brisbane and Canberra-Adelaide routes.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Over the past ten years, significant additional capacity has been allocated to the Canberra-Brisbane and, to a lesser extent, Canberra-Adelaide routes, as shown in Table 5.3. Furthermore, since privatisation, two highly successful new routes from Canberra to Perth (Qantas) and the Gold Coast (Virgin Blue) have been commenced. Both of these routes now operate on a daily basis, with further growth in frequency expected. Local airline Brindabella Airlines also now operates services on the Canberra-Newcastle and Canberra-Albury routes in cooperation with Qantas.

Canberra Airport today has direct services to all mainland state capitals (Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth) and to two key regional centres (Newcastle and Albury) as well as the Gold Coast.

Following discussions with current operating airlines, Canberra Airport is also hopeful of attracting services to at least two further destinations during the next three years. Destinations expected to be serviced in the short term (5 year timeframe) include Darwin, Cairns, Hobart, the Sunshine Coast and Townsville.

A comprehensive regional hub is also expected in the

medium term (likely 5-10 year timeframe), as Sydney Airport is further impacted by capacity constraints and airlines seek alternatives to hubbing regional passengers through Sydney Airport. The regional hub is also likely to include more regional bus services to Canberra Airport facilitating greater access to affordable air services for residents of the broader region. Negotiations are currently

underway with the major regional bus operators to commence a regional bus interchange facility at Canberra Airport, as depicted at Figure 5.4.

Canberra Airport will continually target the expansion of routes servicing Canberra. Where appropriate, the Airport is able to provide the appropriate financial and other incentives to encourage start-up routes, such as the successful start up of direct flights on the Canberra- Newcastle, Albury, Gold Coast and Perth routes. Expected domestic and regional routes are illustrated in Figures 5.2 and 5.3. The expected timetable for these routes is also outlined in Table 5.1.

In response to the needs of Airport users (both airlines and

the travelling public), Canberra Airport’s long-term aim is to grow the Airport into an international, domestic and regional hub. Business and government travellers, tourists and residents are expected to increasingly demand direct flights to major cities throughout Australia as well as to

major regional centres in south-eastern Australia, enabling a comprehensive route network with increased flight frequencies to be developed over time. This will also allow Canberra to better accommodate significant overflow and bypass traffic from Sydney, which by this time, is expected to be at or near its ultimate capacity.

Table 5.1 Target regional and domestic routes, expected commencement timeframe

TIMEFRAME

REGIOnAl

DOMESTIC

Short Term

Darwin

5 years

Cairns

Hobart

Sunshine Coast

Townsville

Medium Term

Dubbo

Avalon

5-10 years

Bankstown

Launceston

Coffs Harbour

Traralgon

Wagga Wagga

Merimbula

Moorabbin

Moruya

Long Term

Armidale

Alice Springs

10-20 years

Tamworth

Ballina/Byron

Bay

Wollongong

5.1.2 Domestic and regional current and future passenger and aircraft movements

Since 2002, growth on all routes from Canberra has been strong, with the exception of the Canberra-Sydney route. The introduction of low-cost carrier services on the Canberra-Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide routes has been a catalyst for this growth. However, the Canberra- Sydney route, once by far Canberra’s largest route in terms of passengers and flight frequency, declined until late 2007 largely due to the lack of airline competition and consequent modal substitution to travel by road. Indeed in the eight years 1998/99-2006/07, passenger numbers on the Canberra-Sydney route fell, with the small level of growth shown identified in Table 5.3 only achieved over the past 12 months. The route saw shuttle-type services

53

Figure 5.2

PROJECTED DOMESTIC AIR SERVICES FROM CAnbERRA DARWIN CAIRNS TOWNSVILLE ALICE SPRINGS SUNSHINE COAST BRISBANE
PROJECTED DOMESTIC AIR SERVICES FROM CAnbERRA
DARWIN
CAIRNS
TOWNSVILLE
ALICE SPRINGS
SUNSHINE COAST
BRISBANE
AUSTRALIA
GOLD COAST
PERTH
Legend
SYDNEY
Existing air services
ADELAIDE
CANBERRA
Future services within 5 years
MELBOURNE
Future services within 20 years
AVALON
Note: This plan is indicative only - actual developments and
the timing and placement of those developments will be
subject to demand, detailed planning and the obtaining of
relevant approvals.
LAUNCESTON
HOBART

Figure 5.3

PROJECTED REGIOnAl AIR SERVICES FROM CAnbERRA

TAMWORTH COFFS HARBOUR ARMIDALE DUBBO NEWCASTLE SYDNEY BANKSTOWN WAGGA WAGGA CANBERRA WOLLONGONG Legend
TAMWORTH
COFFS HARBOUR
ARMIDALE
DUBBO
NEWCASTLE
SYDNEY
BANKSTOWN
WAGGA WAGGA
CANBERRA
WOLLONGONG
Legend
Existing regional routes
ALBURY
Existing major domestic routes
MORUYA
Future routes within 20 years
MERIMBULA
MELBOURNE
TRARALGON
Note: This plan is indicative only - actual developments and
the timing and placement of those developments will be
subject to demand, detailed planning and the obtaining of
relevant approvals.
AVALON
MOORABBIN

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Figure 5.4

REGIOnAl buS nETwORK FROM CAnbERRA AIRPORT

SYDNEY SYDNEY AIRPORT MITTAGONG BOWRAL WOLLONGONG MOSS GOULBURN KIAMA YASS VALE NOWRA WAGGA WAGGA CANBERRA
SYDNEY
SYDNEY
AIRPORT
MITTAGONG
BOWRAL
WOLLONGONG
MOSS
GOULBURN
KIAMA
YASS
VALE
NOWRA
WAGGA
WAGGA
CANBERRA
CIVIC
AIRPORT
QUEANBEYAN
ULLADULLA
BUGENDORE
GUNDAGAI
BRAIDWOOD
BATEMANS BAY
ALBURY
COOMA
Legend
MORUYA
Existing routes
SNOWY
MOUNTAINS
BEGA
In planning
(SKI RESORTS)
MERIMBULA
Future routes
EDEN

from three airlines in 2000, but by 2007 was down to a single operator. With the recommencement of services on this route by Virgin Blue with Embraer jet aircraft in February 2008, competition has been restored to this important business route, seeing lower fares, additional capacity and, consequently, increased passenger numbers.

over the last eight years are Canberra-Brisbane (258.1% growth) and Canberra-Adelaide (121.7% growth), driven by the increase in the number of seats available on direct services (thus bypassing Sydney and Melbourne as hubs) and the impact of low cost air fares. This has also meant more customers are choosing direct services to their destination rather than taking connecting services via Sydney and/or Melbourne. Passengers on the Canberra- Melbourne route have also grown steadily, despite the reduction in passengers transiting Melbourne to onward destinations such as Adelaide and Perth. Qantas have introduced wide-body Boeing 767 aircraft on some peak time Canberra-Melbourne services to cope with strong demand.

The 2008 National Visitors Survey shows the direct correlation between air and road transport on the Canberra-Sydney route and high level of modal substitution and clearly highlights the impact of cheap fares – the more cheap fares available, the more trips between Canberra and Sydney are taken by air rather than by road. BITRE statistics show that upwards of 80% of passenger traffic between the two cities travel by road (predominantly car), demonstrating that there is clearly significant opportunity for growth in air traffic if the right conditions exist. Table 5.2 shows year-on-year percentage change in air and road travel between Canberra and

Sydney – note the correlation between growth in air traffic Canberra-Newcastle and Canberra-Albury have also proven

and decline in road traffic (and vice-versa).

highly successful with services upgraded from 9-seat Piper Chieftans to 18-seat Metros and now 30-seat Jetstream 41 aircraft.

The routes that have seen the biggest percentage growth

The two new domestic routes Canberra-Perth (Qantas) and Canberra-Gold Coast (Virgin Blue) have rapidly grown to operate on a daily basis, with further growth in frequency expected. Local airline Brindabella Airlines’ services on

55

Figure 5.5 historical and forecast passenger travel between Canberra and Sydney by mode of transport

Canberra–Sydney

10 000 Estimate s Fo recast s Rai l 8 000 Coach Car 6 000
10 000
Estimate s
Fo recast s
Rai l
8
000
Coach
Car
6
000
Air
4
000
2
000
0
1970–71
1974–75
1978–79
1982–83
1986–87
1990–91
1994–95
1998–99
2002–03
2006–07
2010–11
2014–15
2018–19
2022–23
2026–27
2030–31
Canberra–Sydney 100 Estimates Fo recast s 80 Air 60 Car Coach 40 Rail 20 0
Canberra–Sydney
100
Estimates
Fo recast s
80
Air
60
Car
Coach
40
Rail
20
0
1970–71
1974–75
1978–79
1982–83
1986–87
1990–91
1994–95
1998–99
2002–03
2006–07
2010–11
2014–15
2018–19
2022–23
2026–27
2030–31

Source: BITRE Information Sheet 26 (December 2006)

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Table 5.2 Year-on-year percentage growth for air and road for Canberra-Sydney (year ending March)

YEAR

AIR

ROAD

2000-01

25%

-24%

2001-02

-12%

27%

2002-03

2%

-17%

2003-04

-2%

14%

2004-05

23%

-17%

2005-06

-19%

8%

2006-07

18%

-2%

2007-08

2%

-2%

Source: National Visitors Survey (2008)

Table 5.3 Canberra’s major routes – passenger growth since privatisation

 

1998/99

2007/08

GROwTh

Adelaide

93,155

206,529

121.7%

brisbane

184,582

619,837

258.1%

Melbourne

697,571

1,008,199

44.5%

Sydney

836,122

887,447

6.1%

Source: bITRE (2008)

A total of 894 flights per week or between 138 and 144 flights per weekday link Canberra to these destinations (effective November 2008). This is compared with a total of 754 flights per week in November 2003, as outlined in Table 5.4.

The size of aircraft operating passenger services to Canberra continues to increase. The average size of aircraft operating to Canberra in November 2008 was over 107 seats per aircraft, a significant increase on the average size that was seen during the Qantas/Ansett duopoly days. This is due to larger aircraft on the Canberra-Sydney route (such as new 72 seat Dash 8 Q400s and 78 seat Embraer 170’s) and the increase in higher capacity aircraft, such as 180 seat 737-800s operated by Virgin Blue and A320s operated by Tiger Airways. The average number of seats per aircraft is expected to remain high, especially as low-cost carriers such as Tiger Airways expand, and Jetstar potentially commences operations to Canberra.

5.1.3 Domestic and regional passenger projections

Over 2.85 million passengers passed through Canberra

Airport in 2007/08. This is projected to grow to almost

7.25 million passengers by 2029/30 based on the mid

range 4.2% forecast growth rate for domestic and regional passengers.

Passenger numbers at Canberra Airport grew 15.5% from 1.825 million in 1997/98 to 2.11 million in 2000/01, due in great part to the establishment of Canberra as a hub by

low-cost carrier Impulse Airlines and the associated airfare discounting by all airlines in the market. However, the collapse of Ansett and the consequent reduction in seat availability caused passenger numbers to fall sharply to

1.84 million in 2001/02.

Recovery was initially modest as capacity grew slowly, but accelerated throughout 2003 and 2004 through the commencement of services by Regional Express (Rex) and Brindabella Airlines and the rapid expansion of Virgin Blue and Qantas. This growth is expected to continue as international services commence, existing routes see added capacity through increased frequency and/or larger aircraft, and as Canberra Airport targets the commencement of further new routes by new and existing low-cost carriers.

Additional route and frequency announcements by airlines, introduction of larger aircraft and previously buoyant

57

Figure 5.6 Passenger numbers on the 4 major RPT routes to/from Canberra for the ten year period 1998/99-2007/08

1,100,000 LEGEND 1,000,000 900,000 Canberra - Melbourne Canberra - Sydney Brisbane - Canberra Adelaide -
1,100,000
LEGEND
1,000,000
900,000
Canberra - Melbourne
Canberra - Sydney
Brisbane - Canberra
Adelaide - Canberra
800,000
700,000
600,000
500,000
400,000
300,000
200,000
100,000
0
98/99
99/00
00/01
01/02
02/03
03/04
04/05
05/06
06/07
07/08
PASSENGERS

YEAR

Source: bITRE (2008)

economic conditions meant that passenger numbers exceeded 2.85 million in 2007/08, a 5.9% increase over 2006/07. The recent slowdown in the global economy is expected to slow growth over the next 12-24 months bringing growth back to the long-term 4.2% growth trendline, although growth is expected to remain positive.

Long-term domestic and regional passenger growth has been independently forecast by Airbiz & Canberra Airport to be 4.2% per year to 2029/30, which are the mid-range forecasts. This projection is based on historic passenger growth and expected aviation trends. On this basis, total domestic and regional passengers are projected to exceed 6.8 million per year by 2029/30. This mid-range forecast does not take into account passenger growth associated with relieving traffic at a potentially congested Sydney Airport. Current trends are significantly higher than these forecasts, with passenger numbers in 2007/08 growing by 5.9%. Similarly, the mid-range forecast does not take into account the significant capacity increases by both Virgin and Qantas on their Canberra routes from early 2008 and the commencement of services by Tiger Airways which led to growth significantly above the 4.2% growth trendline.

Additional upper and lower forecasts are also provided. The upper level forecast is based on a scenario where Canberra Airport attracts some overflow traffic from a

congested Sydney Airport, especially in the last eight years of the forecast period from 2021/22 to 2029/30. This scenario would see overall passenger traffic exceed 8.8 million per annum by 2029/30. The lower level forecast would see total passenger numbers climb to approximately 6.7 million in 2029/30.

worldwide aviation growth and Canberra Global aircraft manufacturer Boeing predicts 5.8% annual passenger growth in the Asia-Pacific for the next 20 years (excluding China, which pushes the number up even higher), with much growth attributed to the booming low-cost airline sector. Airbus predicts 6.2% overall annual growth for the region. Canberra Airport reflects the trend in the region, seeing growth of 5.9% in 2007/08 over the previous year.

Whilst Australia has already embraced the low-cost carrier concept, Canberra Airport has significant growth potential beyond that of many other Australian airports because it has not yet seen massive growth stimulated by low fares. The recent commencement by Tiger Airways as a true low-cost carrier service to Canberra is expected to be the first of many, and coupled with announcements by both Virgin and Qantas for large capacity increases, is expected to stimulate demand and herald a period of significant growth for the Airport.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Table 5.4 RPT services to and from Canberra Airport – 2003-2008

ROuTE

FlIGhTS PER wEEK nOV 2003

FlIGhTS PER wEEK nOV 2008

InCREASE

Canberra-Brisbane

92

138

50.0%

Canberra-Sydney

415

396

-4.5%

Canberra-Melbourne

170

243

42.9%

Canberra-Adelaide

33

37

12.1%

Canberra-Perth

0

14

N/A

Canberra-Albury

20

20

N/A

Canberra-Newcastle

22

32

45.5%

Canberra-Gold Coast

2

14

600%

Total RPT flights

754

894

18.5%

Figure 5.7 RPT aircraft movements on the 4 major RPT routes to/from Canberra for the ten year period 1998/99-

2007/08

35,000 LEGEND 30,000 Canberra - Melbourne Canberra - Sydney Canberra - Brisbane Canberra - Adelaide
35,000
LEGEND
30,000
Canberra - Melbourne
Canberra - Sydney
Canberra - Brisbane
Canberra - Adelaide
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
98/99
99/00
00/01
01/02
02/03
03/04
04/05
05/06
06/07
07/08
NO. FLIGHTS

Source: bITRE (2008)

YEAR

59

Figure 5.8 no of seats available on RPT aircraft services on the 4 major RPT routes to/from Canberra for the ten year period 1998/99-2007/08

1,600,000 LEGEND 1,400,000 Canberra - Melbourne Canberra - Sydney Canberra - Brisbane Canberra - Adelaide
1,600,000
LEGEND
1,400,000
Canberra - Melbourne
Canberra - Sydney
Canberra - Brisbane
Canberra - Adelaide
1,200,000
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
400,000
200,000
0
98/99
99/00
00/01
01/02
02/03
03/04
04/05
05/06
06/07
07/08
YEAR
Source: bITRE (2008)
NO. SEATS

Note that international growth forecasts are discussed at Section 5.2.

As part of their passenger forecast analysis, Airbiz conducted a benchmark study against other Australian Airports and global industry forecasts conducted by Boeing and Airbus. These show that Canberra Airport’s medium growth rate forecast of 4.2% is reasonable. Please refer to Figures 5.9 and 5.10.

5.1.4 Domestic and regional aircraft movement projections

In 2007/08, Canberra Airport saw 39,629 domestic and regional Regular Public Transport (RPT) aircraft movements, an increase of 7.5% over 2006/07. This reflects the significant increase in services commenced by the airlines in the past 12-18 months. Large increases in airline aircraft movements are also expected to be reflected in the 2008/09 figures.

Notwithstanding current movement growth figures, growth in domestic aircraft movements is generally expected to be below the growth rate for passengers, reflecting an increase in average aircraft size over time. Airbiz and Canberra Airport forecasts show a 3.4% per annum growth rate for domestic aircraft to 2029/30. This

is comparable to the 3.3% 20 year historical compound annual average growth rate for Canberra Airport.

These forecasts predict 88,864 domestic and regional RPT movements per annum in 2029/30 an average of almost 243 domestic flights per day compared to approximately 140 today.

These mid-range forecasts do not take into account any overflow of movements from Sydney Airport. In the eventuality that some traffic from Sydney is routed through Canberra, domestic, regional and international aircraft movements would exceed those reflected in current mid-range forecasts.

5.2 International growth opportunities

With the construction of a dedicated international processing facility as part of Canberra Airport’s new terminal building, and an ongoing focus by the Commonwealth Government on attracting international services to regional Australian Airports via an unrestricted access regime to foreign carriers, Canberra Airport expects to receive direct international services by mid-2010. Infrastructure requirements to support international passenger services are described at Chapter 9.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Table 5.5 Forecast passenger numbers at Canberra Airport to

2029/2030

 

2007/08

2011/12

2016/17

2021/22

2027/28

2029/30

(ACTuAl)

 

Domestic/Regional

2,850,016

3,215,348

3,893,191

4,713,933

5,930,301

6,401,885

lOw RAnGE

International

0

94,349

146,765

213,158

279,552

305,996

Total

2,850,016

3,309,697

4,039,956

4,927,092

6,209,853

6,707,881

 

Domestic/Regional

2,850,016

3,271,455

4,018,645

4,936,489

6,318,653

6,860,566

MID RAnGE

International

0

117, 936

183,456

266,448

349,440

382,495

Total

2,850,016

3,389,391

4,202,101

5,202,937

6,668,093

7,243,061

 

Domestic/Regional

2,850,016

3,386,120

4,280,641

5,411,469

7,461,566

8,304,910

hIGh RAnGE

International

0

153,317

238,493

346,382

454,272

497,244

Total

2,850,016

3,539,437

4,519,134

5,757,852

7,915,838

8,802,154

Source: Airbiz (2007), Canberra Airport (2009)

Figure 5.9 boeing and Airbus 20-year global forecast analysis compared with Canberra Airport projection

8 LEGEND 7 Historical Airbus 5.3% growth Boeing 4.8% growth Canberra 4.2% growth 6 5
8
LEGEND
7
Historical
Airbus 5.3% growth
Boeing 4.8% growth
Canberra 4.2% growth
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
MILLIONS
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

YEAR

Source: Airbiz (2007)

Significant numbers of passengers travelling to and from international destinations currently transit Sydney and Melbourne en route to and from Canberra and the surrounding region. Direct international services would reduce this reliance on transiting at another Australian Airport. Direct international services would also be

expected to stimulate the existing market via reduced fare levels and reduced travelling time to overseas destinations.

Direct international passenger flights are expected to initially include flights to New Zealand, followed by flights

61

Figure 5.10 Other Australian airports 20-year global forecast analysis compared with Canberra Airport projection

8 LEGEND 7 6 Historical Brisbane 5% growth Newcastle 4.9% growth Melbourne 4.5% growth Canberra
8
LEGEND
7
6
Historical
Brisbane 5% growth
Newcastle 4.9% growth
Melbourne 4.5% growth
Canberra 4.2% growth
Sydney 3.9% growth
Adelaide 3.5% growth
5
4
3
2
1
0
YEAR
Source: Airbiz (2007)
MILLIONS
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

to a major Asian hub (eg: Singapore, Hong Kong).

Passenger demand is expected to be a mix of business and government travel associated with Canberra’s function as the national capital, tourism traffic and people visiting friends and relatives (both inbound and outbound). The business/government component of the market is high- yield traffic, increasing the viability of services for airlines.

In the medium term, international flights would be expected to feed into a Canberra Airport regional hub for both regional flights and bus services, significantly increasing the catchment market for such services.

The commencement of direct flights from Canberra to New Zealand, the Pacific and Asia is expected over the period of this Master Plan. Airbiz & Canberra Airport forecast 2,493 international aircraft movements using a mix of narrow body (Boeing 737, Airbus A320) and medium wide-body aircraft (Boeing 767, Airbus A330) in 2029/30, an average of approximately seven international movements per day.

Flights to New Zealand are expected to initially operate three to five times per week with narrow-body aircraft (Boeing 737/Airbus A320) by mid-2010 and are expected to grow to daily. Services on the Canberra-Auckland route would allow for “one-stop” international flights to Los Angeles, San Francisco and other North and South

American cities via Auckland. Such services are likely to be operated by the Qantas Group, Air New Zealand or the Virgin Group. Prior to the recent financial crisis, detailed discussions were ongoing with several airlines regarding trans-Tasman passenger services.

ACT Tourism commissioned a study in 2005 that clearly identified demand for direct flights to a major Asian hub, most likely Singapore or Hong Kong, to provide connections throughout Asia, the Middle East and Europe 3 . Such flights would likely operate a three to four weekly schedule with a medium-size wide-body aircraft such as Boeing 787 or Airbus A330. Qantas would be well placed to operate such services, but it is seen likely that interest may also come from airlines such as Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific. The new breed of low-cost long-haul international airlines such as Air Asia X may also be attracted to Canberra as an alternative to the capacity- constrained Sydney Airport. Further opportunities to Asia may also exist via a narrow body aircraft (such as Airbus A320) service to Asia via a hub in Darwin.

In the medium term, further routes to Asian and Middle- Eastern hubs, such as Bangkok and Dubai, are likely, as well as to leisure destinations such as Fiji or Bali.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Table 5.6 Forecast annual aircraft movements at Canberra Airport to 2029/30

2007/08

 

(ACTuAl)

2011/12

2016/17

2021/22

2027/28

2029/30

 

Domestic/Regional

36,629

47,561

55,137

63,919

76,322

80,970

lOw RAnGE

International

0*

312

730

1,095

1,504

1,672

Other

48,947

48,591

53,912

56,662

58,383

58,968

Total

88,576

96,464

109,779

121,676

136,209

141,610

 

Domestic/Regional

36,629

48,681

57,538

68,008

83,116

88,864

International

0*

728

1,248

1,768

2,288

2,493

MID RAnGE

Other

48,947

49,740

57,383

60,310

64,021

65,308

Total

88,576

99,149

116,169

130,086

149,425

156,665

 

Domestic/Regional

36,629

50,985

62,629

76,934

98,474

106,919

International

0*

1,092

1,820

2,548

3,822

4,375

hIGh RAnGE

Other

48,947

53,017

64,503

71,217

78,255

80,752

Total

88,576

105,094

128,952

150,699

180,551

192,047

Source: Airbiz (2007), Canberra Airport (2007) * Note that a limited number of international VIP, charter and business jet flights operated to/from Canberra Airport in 2007/08.

The expected routes for international flights are shown at Figure 5.11. The expected timetable for the commencement of these routes is shown at Table 5.7. Note that these timeframes may alter subject to airlines’ commercial priorities and the availability of appropriate international passenger processing facilities.

The opportunities that currently exist for international services to Canberra can be compared with the success of Adelaide in attracting direct international services, much of which can be attributed to new terminal facilities. Whilst Adelaide is a city twice the size of Canberra’s population catchment, it is a far lower yield market (more leisure and visiting friends and relatives travel). Nonetheless, in late 2008 Adelaide Airport received ten weekly direct services to Singapore, daily services to Hong Kong and Auckland, as well as four weekly services to Kuala Lumpur and two weekly services to Bali (a total of 30 weekly international passenger departures).

As outlined earlier, while current airport facilities may accommodate some limited international flights in the current terminal, major upgrades to allow for departure and arrivals halls with full customs and immigration facilities will be needed to allow for larger capacity or more frequent international aircraft. The construction of the new multi-user domestic/ international terminal,

expected to be fully functional in 5 years is expected to be the catalyst for attracting international services.

5.3 Impact of Sydney Airport on passenger growth

The increasing capacity constraints at Sydney Airport in the absence of a second airport and Sydney’s curfew and movement cap further enhance Canberra Airport’s potential as a regional and international airport in the future. Key points include:

Sydney Airport is expected to be at or near capacity within 20 years, with significant capacity constraints already evident today. As Sydney approaches full capacity, Canberra Airport believes that there is likely to be increasing pressure upon Sydney Airport’s infrastructure, particularly during peak periods. Aviation delays in the Sydney basin are thus likely to become more common and there is likely to be pressure on passengers not commencing or terminating their journeys at Sydney to avoid Sydney airspace. Canberra is well positioned to become a hub for the significant number of passengers who currently have to transfer flights at Sydney;

3 The Potential Demand for Direct International Flights Between Canberra and Singapore, Access Economics, 29 November 2005.

63

Figure 5.11

PROJECTED InTERnATIOnAl AIR SERVICES FROM CAnbERRA

CONNECTIONS VANCOUVER TO CANADA TOKYO BEIJING SHANGHAI CONNECTIONS TO EUROPE/ MIDDLE EAST CONNECTIONS HAWAII
CONNECTIONS
VANCOUVER
TO CANADA
TOKYO
BEIJING
SHANGHAI
CONNECTIONS
TO EUROPE/
MIDDLE EAST
CONNECTIONS
HAWAII
HONG KONG
TO USA/CENTRAL
AMERICA
LOS ANGELES
BANGKOK
KUALA
LUMPUR
SINGAPORE
TO DUBAI
CONNECTIONS TO
BALI
PACIFIC/ NORTH
AMERICA
FIJI
AUSTRALIA
Legend
Future routes within 5 years
CANBERRA
CONNECTIONS TO
Future routes within 20 years
SOUTH AMERICA
AUCKLAND
Connecting to onward destination
WELLINGTON
CHRISTCHURCH

With Sydney Airport’s curfew, Canberra Airport is the only 24-hour Boeing 747 and Airbus A380 capable airport between Melbourne and Brisbane, making it a critical national infrastructure asset; and

With the upgraded highway to Sydney, a growing bus network linking Canberra Airport with the region and adequately priced and convenient parking arrangements at Canberra Airport, some residents of the Southern Highlands, South Coast and Western Sydney may use Canberra Airport as an alternative to Sydney. This will be further aided through the development in the short term of a regional bus interchange at Canberra Airport.

5.4 Second Sydney Airport

The 2008 Aviation Green Paper highlights the need for a second Sydney Airport to cater for the ongoing growth in aviation demand from the Sydney basin.

The Commonwealth has also indicated that a second

Sydney Airport will be located outside the Sydney basin. Whilst the definition of the Sydney basin remains unclear, it has been established that a high-speed rail link will be required to link Sydney with the new airport site.

Canberra Airport submits that the use of an existing major airport facility, such as Canberra Airport, will significantly mitigate the economic cost to the Commonwealth of this infrastructure. For example, the cost of developing a new (greenfields) international airport between Sydney and Canberra, with a dedicated high speed rail link to Sydney, would be substantially greater than extending a high speed rail line to Canberra and utilising existing airport facilities at Canberra Airport.

Furthermore, a high speed train link to serve a second Sydney Airport in Canberra would not simply serve the needs of the Airport site, as it would at a greenfields Airport site, but would also serve the significant population catchment in and around the ACT.

Canberra Airport | Preliminary Draft Master Plan 2009

Table 5.7 Target regional and domestic routes, expected commencement timeframe

TIMEFRAME

TARGETED InTERnATIOnAl ROuTES

Short Term

Singapore or Hong Kong Auckland Wellington

London and Europe (via Asia) India and Middle East (via Asia) Los Angeles (via Auckland) San Francisco (via Auckland) Santiago (via Auckland)

Medium Term

Hong Kong or Singapore Bangkok Christchurch Denpasar (Bali) Dubai (direct or via Asia) Beijing Shanghai Kuala Lumpur Nadi (Fiji)

Long Term

Hawaii (direct) Tokyo Los Angeles (direct)

65

CHAPTER SIX

FREIGhT OPERATIOnS