Sie sind auf Seite 1von 101

HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANUAL

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Table of Contents

1.0 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 4.0

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................ 7 RULES OF CONDUCT .............................................................................................................. 9 Major Violations Requiring Immediate Termination ........................................................... 9 Serious Violations Not Requiring Immediate Termination ................................................ 9 Other Violations ..................................................................................................................... 10 Safety Awards........................................................................................................................ 10 SAFETY DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS ..................................... 11 New Employee Orientation .................................................................................................. 11 New Employee Drug Testing .............................................................................................. 11 Safety Council Training ........................................................................................................ 12 General Safety Training ....................................................................................................... 12 Medical Records.................................................................................................................... 13 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS ....................................................................................................... 14

4.1 Job Hazard Assessment, Daily Safety Meeting, and Daily Equipment Checklist Form (Attachment 1) .................................................................................................................................. 14 4.2 4.3 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Work Permit (Attachment 2) ................................................................................................ 15 Additional Guidance.............................................................................................................. 15 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) ................................................................ 16 Commonly Used PPE ........................................................................................................... 16 Hearing Conservation Program .......................................................................................... 17 Fall Protection ........................................................................................................................ 17 Definitions ....................................................................................................................... 18 Rescue............................................................................................................................. 18 Competent Person ......................................................................................................... 18 Types of Respirators ..................................................................................................... 19 Medical Evaluation......................................................................................................... 19 Fit Testing ....................................................................................................................... 20 Face Seal Protection ..................................................................................................... 20

5.3.1 5.3.2 5.3.3 5.4 5.4.1 5.4.2 5.4.3 5.4.4

Respiratory Protection .......................................................................................................... 19

Attachment A Fit Testing Procedures ................................................................................... 26 Attachment B OSHA Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionnaire ................................ 21 6.0 6.1 6.2 EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS ..................................................................................................... 28 Ingersoll Rand HP 750 Air Compressors .......................................................................... 28 Air Dryers ................................................................................................................................ 28
2 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.10 6.11 6.12

Sand Hoppers and Sandpots .............................................................................................. 28 Clemtex CPF Charcoal Filtration System.......................................................................... 29 Coppus Air Blowers .............................................................................................................. 29 Generators and Lights .......................................................................................................... 29 Spiders .................................................................................................................................... 29 Scaffolding.............................................................................................................................. 30 Paint Equipment .................................................................................................................... 30 Dehumidifier ....................................................................................................................... 30 Tools .................................................................................................................................... 30 Ladders ............................................................................................................................... 31 Extension Ladders ..................................................................................................... 31 Step Ladders............................................................................................................... 31

6.12.1 6.12.2 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT (LOTO) ................................................................................................. 33 Energy Control Program ...................................................................................................... 34 Lockout/Tagout Procedures ................................................................................................ 35 Annual Inspection.................................................................................................................. 36

8.0 RIGGING, MOBIL CRANE, MATERIAL STORAGE AND HANDLING (CRAWLER, TRUCK OR LOCOMOTIVE CRANE) ............................................................................................... 37 8.1 8.2 8.3 Material Storage .................................................................................................................... 37 Material Handling .................................................................................................................. 37 Powered Industrial Lift Vehicles.......................................................................................... 37 All Industrial Vehicles .................................................................................................... 38 Aerial Lifts ....................................................................................................................... 39 Tractor ............................................................................................................................. 39 General Requirements .................................................................................................. 39 Training Program Content ............................................................................................ 39

8.3.1 8.3.2 8.3.3 8.4 8.4.1 8.4.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 10.0 10.1 10.2

Industrial Vehicle Operator Training .................................................................................. 39

SAFETY RULES FOR VEHICLES......................................................................................... 41 General Operating Standards and Driving Privileges ..................................................... 41 Loss of Driving Privileges .................................................................................................... 42 What to Do When You Are Involved In an Accident ........................................................ 42 CONFINED SPACE .............................................................................................................. 44 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 46 Hazardous Concentration ................................................................................................ 47
3

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

10.3 10.4

Risk Assessment ............................................................................................................... 47 Permit Required Confined Space Program ................................................................... 48 Permit ........................................................................................................................... 48 Training ........................................................................................................................ 48 Entry Supervisor ......................................................................................................... 48 Authorized Entrant ..................................................................................................... 49 Attendants ................................................................................................................... 49 Rescue and Emergency Services ........................................................................... 50 Alternate Entry Procedures ...................................................................................... 51 Procedures for Testing the Atmosphere................................................................. 52 Communication........................................................................................................... 52 Concluding Entry ........................................................................................................ 53 Annual Review ............................................................................................................ 53

10.4.1 10.4.2 10.4.3 10.4.4 10.4.5 10.4.6 10.4.7 10.4.8 10.4.9 10.4.10 10.4.11 11.0 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6

ELECTRICAL SAFETY ........................................................................................................ 54 WORKER LEAD PROTECTION PROGRAM ................................................................... 56 Action Level ........................................................................................................................ 56 Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) .................................................................................. 57 Competent Person ............................................................................................................ 57 Employee Information and Training ............................................................................... 57 Notification to Other Contractors ..................................................................................... 58 Medical Surveillance ......................................................................................................... 58 Blood Sampling and Analysis ................................................................................... 58 Respiratory Requirements ........................................................................................ 59

12.6.1 12.6.2 12.7 12.8 12.9 12.10 12.11 12.12 12.13 13.0 13.1

Warning Signs .................................................................................................................... 60 Containment ....................................................................................................................... 60 Exposure Monitoring ......................................................................................................... 61 Protective Clothing and Equipment ................................................................................ 61 Personal Hygiene Facilities and Practices .................................................................... 62 Housekeeping .................................................................................................................... 62 Project Specific Requirements ........................................................................................ 63 HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM ....................................................................... 64 Explanation of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) .................................................. 64 Section I Product Information ............................................................................... 64 Section II Component Data ................................................................................... 64
4

13.1.1 13.1.2

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

13.1.3 13.1.4 13.1.5 13.1.6 13.1.7 13.1.8 13.1.9 13.1.10 13.1.11 13.1.12 13.1.13 13.1.14 13.1.15 13.2 13.2.1 13.2.2 13.2.3 13.2.4 13.2.5 13.2.6 14.0 14.1

Section III Precautions for Safe Handling and Storage .................................... 65 Section IV Physical Data ....................................................................................... 65 Section V Personal Protective Equipment Requirements ................................ 65 Section VI Fire and Explosion Hazard Information ........................................... 65 Section VII Reactivity Information ........................................................................ 65 Section VIII First Aid ............................................................................................... 65 Section IX Toxicology and Health Information ................................................... 65 Section X Transportation Information .................................................................. 66 Section XI Spill and Leak Procedures ................................................................. 66 Section XII Waste Disposal ................................................................................... 66 Section XIII Additional Regulatory Status Information ...................................... 66 Section XIV Additional Information ...................................................................... 66 Section XV Major References............................................................................... 66 Inventory List of Hazardous Chemicals .................................................................. 67 Container Labeling ..................................................................................................... 67 Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) ....................................................................... 68 Employee Training ..................................................................................................... 68 Outside Contractors ................................................................................................... 68 Multi-Employer Sites .................................................................................................. 69

Forrest Services LLC Hazard Communication Program ............................................. 66

Hazard Communication Training Acknowledgement ............................................................. 70 ALCOHOL, CONTROLLED SUBSTAND AND CONTRABAND POLICY ................... 71 DOT PHMS/FMCSA Drug Policy .................................................................................... 72 Pre-Access/Pre-Employee........................................................................................ 73 Random Drug Testing ............................................................................................... 73 Post Incident Testing ................................................................................................. 74 Reasonable Suspicion............................................................................................... 74 Annual/Pre-Access .................................................................................................... 75 Random Testing ......................................................................................................... 75 Post-Incident Testing ................................................................................................. 75 Reasonable Suspicion Testing ................................................................................ 75 14.1.1 14.1.2 14.1.3 14.1.4 14.2 14.2.1 14.2.2 14.2.3 14.2.4 14.3 14.4

Non-DOT Drug Testing..................................................................................................... 74

Other Drug Testing ............................................................................................................ 76 Alcohol Testing (DOT and Non-DOT) ............................................................................ 76
5

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

14.5 14.6 14.7 15.0 15.1 15.2

Record Keeping (DOT) ..................................................................................................... 77 Reporting (DOT) ................................................................................................................ 77 Employee Assistance Program ....................................................................................... 77 EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN ............................................................................................ 78 Responsibility ..................................................................................................................... 78 Process Safety Management and Emergency Evacuation Procedures ................... 78 Handling Leaks and Spills ........................................................................................ 78 Fire Procedures .......................................................................................................... 79

15.2.1 15.2.2 15.3 15.4 16.0

First Aid/Medical Care ...................................................................................................... 80 Bloodborne Pathogens ..................................................................................................... 80 HOUSEKEEPING ................................................................................................................. 83

17.0 STANDARD FOR WORKERS EXPOSED TO HOT ENVIORNMENTS (HEAT STRESS) ............................................................................................................................................... 84 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 18.0 18.1 Heat Fatigue ....................................................................................................................... 84 Heat Cramps ...................................................................................................................... 84 Heat Exhaustion ................................................................................................................ 84 Heat Stroke......................................................................................................................... 84 Prevention........................................................................................................................... 85 ACCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATION........................................................... 86 Accident Reporting ............................................................................................................ 86 Non-Reportable Accidents ........................................................................................ 86 Reportable Accidents ................................................................................................ 86 Serious Accidents ...................................................................................................... 86 18.1.1 18.1.2 18.1.3 18.2 19.0 20.0

Accident Investigation ....................................................................................................... 87 QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURE ................................................................................. 88 FOREMANS GUIDE TO SAFE OPERATIONS .............................................................. 89

6 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

1.0

INTRODUCTION
Company Policy Safety is our primary concern in our company. Each of us has the responsibility to make our safety and the safety our co-workers a primary concern. This objective is fundamental to the well-being of our employees and to the efficient operations of our business. Our primary objective is to identify, evaluate, remove, or control workplace hazards in order to prevent or reduce injuries and illnesses of our employees. Secondarily, we must control the direct and hidden costs of accidents and lost time. Forrest Services may work in multiple states performing abrasive blasting, water pressure washing, coating (painting), and insulation of tanks, piping, etc. The work performed by Forrest Services is basically the same, which our HSE Manual and Foremans Guide to Safe Operations attempts to cover the work we normally do. By working in different facilities and in different states, safety hazards, state regulations, and safety procedures may vary. Chemicals, such as Benzene and Asbestos may be present, which would mean the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) may differ in order to protect our employees and may vary the scope of work. Therefore, senior management, being committed to creating a safe work environment, will require a Job Safety Hazard Analysis. Examples of Asbestos, Benzene, H2S (Hydrogen Sulfide), etc. awareness will provide whatever medical exam, PPE, and training required prior to commencing the work. Changes may occur from time-to-time, due to updates to this manual. This manual is only a safety guideline. There can be no substitute for a positive work attitude and individual awareness of the work environment. Management Responsibilities To formulate basic company safety policy and provide the means of enforcement. This HSE Manual has the complete endorsement of management. Management accomplishes this through: Informing the Safety Department of any safety issue Providing resources to meet safety requirements Discussing safety hazards and instituting safety rules accordingly Providing and adequate safety training program Maintaining training records Providing adequate safety equipment for employees Maintaining accident records Reviewing this HSE Manual annually to remain in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations
7

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Supervisor/Forman Responsibilities To carry out this safety policy through: Conducting daily safety meetings with their employees Ensuring all safety instructions are followed Maintaining continuous job site inspections Correcting unsafe work conditions Employee Responsibilities Cooperation with the Supervisors/Foremen who are charged with the implementation of this HSE Manual is critical because this program is aimed directly at benefiting the employee by preventing his/her own accident. Scope This HSE Manual does not stand by itself. It is designed to be used in conjunction with the applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. The rules in this HSE Manual have been developed in order to avoid and prevent health damages and injuries to all employees of Forrest Services and to any sub-contractors employed by the company. Subcontractors will submit their safety manual to Forrest Services for review prior to commencing work for the company. In the event there is a discrepancy between Forrest Services policies and the sub-contractors policies, the more stringent policy will be adopted. Direction The Safety Department, or a designated employee of Forrest Services, is authorized by senior management to direct all phases of this HSE Manual.

___________________________ Mark Lawrence, President & CEO

__________________ Date

___________________________ Robert Schlenk, COO

__________________ Date

8 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

2.0

RULES OF CONDUCT
Our rules of conduct are outlined in this HSE Manual to inform al employees of what is considered to be unacceptable conduct. Failure to abide by these standards will result in verbal and/or written warning, corrective action, and/or termination of employment. When an employee is terminated on the job site, the employee will turn-in their company issued equipment to the Supervisor or Foreman, then be escorted to the parking lot and directed to leave the premises. If the employee has been with Forrest Services for less than 90 days, the cost of their safety training and any company issued equipment not returned will be deducted from their final pay.

2.1

Major Violations Requiring Immediate Termination


Major violations require immediate termination. The termination may be made by the Foreman, Superintendent, Safety Department personnel, Vice President of Field Operations, Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, or the President and Chief Executive Officer of Forrest Services. Major violations include, but are not limited to: Possession, use, sale, or distribution of controlled substances, contraband, weapons, firearms, explosives, etc. on company or customer property (includes parking lots and vehicles) Theft or misappropriation of company, customer, or employee property Falsification of personal records or time sheets Willfully damaging company, customer, or employee property Safety violations that could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious injury to yourself and/or other employees, such as: o Smoking near flammable materials o Failure to use proper fall protection when working at heights (Section 5) o Physically fighting or hitting another employee Refusing to carry our work orders and instructions from the Supervisor or Foreman and/or being insubordinate Absences of two work days without notification to the Supervisor or Foreman

2.2

Serious Violations Not Requiring Immediate Termination


A serious violation will not require immediate termination. For the first violation, the employee will receive a written warning and/or suspension. For the second violation, the employee will be terminated. Serious violations include, but are not limited to: Sleeping (unless Confined Space Attendant), or excessive loafing on the job Neglecting or disregarding assigned duties Using threatening or abusive language toward others Ethnic or sexual harassment
9

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Disorderly, immoral, or indecent conduct Safety violations that could be reasonably be expected to cause minor to major injury to yourself and/or other employees Unauthorized use of company vehicles or equipment Reporting to work under the influence of alcohol (Section 14) Failing to report an on-the-job injury or damage to company/customer equipment/property in a timely manner Removing confidential information, records, or property without management authorization

2.3

Other Violations
Other violations are minor violations and will be dealt with as follows: First Offense: Second Offense: Third Offense: Fourth Offense: Verbal warning Written warning Written warning, suspension, and/or termination Termination

These minor violations include, but are not limited to: Excessive absences and/or tardiness Unsatisfactory or inefficient job performance Attending to personal business on company time Leaving job site early for meal breaks and/or at the end of work shift Safety violations that could not be reasonably be expected to cause minor injury or illness

2.4

Safety Awards
Forrest Services grants all hourly personnel a safety award of one week paid vacation. To receive the award, you must have worked a minimum of 2,080 hours in the previous calendar year WITHOUT: A Lost Time Accident (LTI) Any written violation of company policy/procedure Failure to report an accident or incident to your immediate supervisor Failure to complete an accident report within 24 hours This safety award (vacation days) will be subject to the terms listed below: You quit your job: Lose all 5 days If you are terminated: Lose all 5 days You receive written non-compliance notice for safety policies o First Violation: Lose 2 days o Second Violation: Lose 3 days

10 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

3.0

SAFETY DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS


3.1 New Employee Orientation
All new employees will be given the Newcomer Orientation. This training covers the following subjects and how they specifically apply to Forrest Services: Safety Policy Statement Rules of Conduct Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Fall Protection Tools and Equipment Ladders Scaffolding Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Material Storage and Handling Industrial Vehicles Company Vehicles Confined Space Electrical Safety Lead Abatement Hazard Communication Emergency Actions Fire Prevention First Aid/CPR/Bloodborne Pathogens Spills and Leaks Housekeeping Heat Stress Accident Reporting After the orientation, for those employees who will NOT be attending a Safety Council, a written test will be administered. Employees must score a 70% or better to pass. Subject areas that are missed will be discussed again with the employee. For those who did not achieve 70% or better, the material will be reviewed and the employee will be tested again. All of the new employees will sign the Newcomer Orientation Sign-In Sheet after completion.

3.2

New Employee Drug Testing


Forrest Services administers ALL new employees a drug test. Any prospective employee who tests POSITIVE for an illegal substance will NOT be hired. This test will be administered just after the identification is verified for the employment package. If the employee will go directly into a U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) safety sensitive position, then another drug test will be administered at a
11

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

medical clinic under DOT rules. Procedures for how to conduct the drug test are discussed in the Anti-Drug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention programs and Section 14 in this manual.

3.3

Safety Council Training


Most field employees will attend a local Safety Council basic safety course and additional courses are determined by the job assignment. These Safety Council courses require the employee to pass a test with a 70% or better. The Safety Council courses expire, so refresher training is required annually. The basic safety course covers the following subjects: Hazard Communication (HazCom) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Respiratory Protection Hearing Conservation Electrical Safe Work Practices Elevated Work Process Safety Management (PSM) Confined Space Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)

3.4

General Safety Training


The Safety Department will ensure safety training is conducted in all of the following areas. This training will be administered initially when an employee is assigned a task that requires it, recurring when required, or when an employee indicates (verbally or through improper action) that they are unaware of the proper procedures. Training records will consist of the employees name, date, subject of training, instructors name, and pass/fail (pass is 70% or better), and will be retained for at least the length of employment. The following list details General Safety Training administered by the Safety Department: Respirator Fit Test Annual Fall Protection Competent Person Annual Scaffolding Competent Person Annual Spider Competent Person Annual Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Competent Person Annual Aerial Lift Operator 3 Years Tractor Operator 3 Years Lead Protection Competent Person As Needed First Aid 3 Years Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Annual Bloodborne Pathogens Annual
12

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

3.5

Medical Records
Forrest Services, the employee, or OSHA may require certain medical tests, evaluations, or treatment for job-related activities or injuries and illnesses. These medical records are private communications between the employee, the medical provider, and Forrest Services. In addition, these medical records are kept confidential and cannot be disclosed or reported without an employees express written consent to any person within or outside the workplace, except as required by law, and will be kept for the length of employment plus thirty (30) years, and are available to the employee or their designated representative upon proper written request. Every employee has the right to access their exposure and medical records. Any employee desiring to see their records must fill out the Medical Record Request Form and submit it to the Safety Department. The Safety Department has five (5) workdays to notify the employee that their copy is ready for pick-up. The employee, or their designated representative must pick up the records in person, or the records will be mailed/faxed to the designated representative as specified in the Medical Record Request Form. A copy of the medical records is provided to the employee free of charge. However, if that employee has already requested the records, or a portion of the records, they will be charged 10 cents per page (covers copying costs). X-rays are dealt with separately, as agreed upon between the employee and Forrest Services, since they cannot be photocopied. All employees will be informed of their right to access their records upon initial hire and a notice will be constantly posted on bulletin boards. When Forrest Services ceases to operate, all exposure and medical records will be turned over to the new company (if acquired). If Forrest Services is not acquired, but merely goes out of business, the company shall notify all affected current employees of their right to access their records at least three (3) months prior to closing. Medical records required to be kept for thirty (30) years will be transferred to the Director of National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). If and when Forrest Services had conducted business for more than thirty (30) years, NIOSH will also be notified at least three (3) months in advance of destroying any medical records (this should be done on an annual basis, rather than throughout the year).

13 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

4.0

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS


The key to preventing accidents and injuries is to understand the hazards that are present with any job task. To assist the Foremen, the Safety Department has prepared a Job Hazard Assessment, Daily Safety Meeting, and Daily Equipment Checklist form. Additionally, the Foreman must be issued a Work Permit prior to commencing the days tasks. The Foreman also has a copy of the Formans Guide to Safe Operations manual, and when necessary, additional guidance available to help them determine which hazards are present, or likely to be present during their days activities and help them put proper preventative measures in place.

4.1

Job Hazard Assessment, Daily Safety Meeting, and Daily Equipment Checklist Form (Attachment 1)
The Foreman records data on this form each day and turns it into the Safety Department weekly. The items covered in the Job Hazard Assessment and Daily Equipment Checklist may provide the Foreman with their topic for the Daily Safety Meeting. The Job Hazard Assessment lists eighteen (18) potential hazards. The Forman indicates YES if that hazard is expected to be present during that days task (this may already be marked from the previous day). The Foreman will not indicate NO until the last day of the week for any given hazard. For each of the eighteen (18) potential hazards, the source, the assessment, and the appropriate PPE for that hazard are identified by the Foreman. The Daily Safety Meeting has space for the Foreman to list the subject of the days tailgate meeting and space for the employee(s) to sign. The Daily Equipment Checklist lists the most common equipment used at the job sites, and then identifies many of the items that need to be inspected on the equipment. On the front of the form, the employee uses a slash (/) to identify the inspected item as satisfactory or an X to identify the inspected item as needing repair/replacement. On the back of the form, the employee that conducted the inspection of a particular piece of equipment will initial for the corresponding piece of equipment and day of the week that they conducted the inspection. Included on this form is a section for the Foreman to indicate that the employees have inspected their PPE daily. Additionally, there is a place for the Foreman, or designated employee, to record the inventory of the first aid supplies and CPR pocket mask. Finally, there are a few blank lines at the bottom for the Foreman to make comments to the Safety Department.
14

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

4.2

Work Permit (Attachment 2)


A majority of the customers that Forrest Services work for require a Work Permit to be issued by their safety personnel that identifies specific criteria that must be met before work may commence: Location of work (tank number, area, etc.) Type of work to be performed (hot work, confined space, abrasive blasting, etc.) Safety requirements (atmospheric test, lockout/tagout, fire prevention, etc.) Signatures of issuer and contractor Forrest Services also requires its Foreman to complete a permit as well as the customers permit. This additional permit is required so that the Safety Department may review the permits on a regular basis and ensure that the Foremen and taking proper precautions. Should there be an emergency that requires shutdown of a job or evacuation of an area, the ALL work permits are immediately cancelled. A new work permit must be issued before work can resume.

4.3

Additional Guidance
There will be times when Forrest Services will conduct work of an unusual nature. When the Superintendent is evaluating a job site with the customer, they will notify the Safety Department if there appears to be any required work that has not already been addressed concerning how to perform that task safely. In those cases, the Safety Department will work with the Superintendent and the customer to determine which safety measures and procedures will be put in place for that work. The Superintendent will ensure safety measures and procedures are explained to the Foreman.

15 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

5.0

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)


Personal protection equipment are items worn by employees to protect themselves from hazards that could not be eliminated or controlled. Forrest Services will provide (at no cost to the employee) appropriate PPE to each employee as they need it. An employee may provide their own PPE, provided it has been approved by the Safety Department. The Safety Department will ensure all PPE provided by Forrest Services meets the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. The Safety Department will train new employees during the New Employee Orientation and re-train employees when changes in the workplace or PPE occur or employees indicate they are unaware of how to wear/use the PPE on the following topics: Types of PPE used at Forrest Services When the PPE is necessary Proper wear and fitting of the PPE Limitations of the PPE Proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the PPE The Supervisor is responsible for ensuring the employees maintain their PPE in a sanitary and reliable condition. All employees will inspect their PPE before each use and replace it when damaged or worn out.

5.1

Commonly Used PPE


Note: There may be additional requirements for special jobs. Head Protection o Hard Hats Worn by all employees on the job site o Blasting Hood Worn by the Blasters Eye Protection o Safety Glasses Worn by employees on the job site o Chemical Splash Goggles or Splash Shield Worn by the Paint Mixer while mixing paints o Full-Face Respirators Worn by Painters when spraying objects at or above eye level (protects against overspray) Foot Protection o Leather Steel Toed Boots Worn by all employees at all times Hand Protection o Heavy Duty Gloves Worn by Blasters o Neoprene Rubber Gloves Worn by Paint Mixers, as well as Painters during hand rolling or brushing. Also worn while cleaning paining equipment. Hearing Protection o Disposable earplugs
16

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Fall Protection o Body Harness/Lanyard o Lifeline/Rope Grab Respiratory Protection o Full-Face Respirator o Half-Face Respirator o Blasting Hood

5.2

Hearing Conservation Program


Each employee will be made aware of the Hearing Conservation Program through the New Employee Orientation. The Safety Department has determined (through sound level meter readings) that hearing protection will be worn by all employees assigned to the job site whenever sandblasting is occurring (inside or outside of the tank or blast booth). Additionally, earplugs will be work by the employees engaged in the following: Spray painting inside the tank Cleaning with compressed air (inside or outside the tank) Working near a compressor, air dryer, dehumidifier, paint pump, or any other equipment that is too loud (over 85dba general rule of thumb is if you have to raise your voice to be heard by another person 2-3 feet away) Following the successful completion of a new hires probationary period of ninety (90) days, Blasters will undergo audiometric testing to establish a baseline audiogram for the employee. The employee will be required to take an annual audiometric test thereafter. Testing will be conducted and evaluated by medical personnel at the companys expense, and the results will be disclosed to the employee and Forrest Services. In the event there has been a significant Standard Threshold Shift, that employee will be notified within twenty-one (21) days, given medical evaluation, and be reassigned within Forrest Services to a work area that is below 85dba. Audiometric testing cannot take place until the employee has had at least fourteen (14) hours without exposure to workplace noise or any other high level noises. Audiometric testing results will be maintained for the duration of the employees employment. Noise exposure measurement records shall be retained for two (2) years.

5.3

Fall Protection
Each employee on a walking/working surface (horizontal or vertical surfaces) with an unprotected side or edge with is six (6) feet or more above a lower level shall be protected from falling only by the use of conventional fall protection (personal fall arrest systems or PFAS). Note: There will not be a controlled access zone or safety monitoring system. Specific Fall Protection Plans may be put in place for special jobs.
17

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

5.3.1 Definitions Anchorage A secure point of attachment for lifelines, lanyards, or deceleration devices Body Harness Straps secured about the employee in a manner that will distribute the fall arrest forces over at least the thighs, pelvis, waist, chest, and shoulders with means for attaching it to other components of a personal fall arrest system Lanyard Flexible line of rope, wire rope, or strap which generally has a connector at each end for connecting the body harness to a deceleration device, lifeline, or anchorage Lifeline Flexible line for connection to an anchorage(s) and allows connection of deceleration devices o Vertical Lifeline Supports only one employee and is capable of supporting 5,000 pounds o Horizontal Lifeline May support multiple employees and must be capable of supporting 5,000 pounds per employee attached Rope Grab Deceleration device which travels on a lifeline and automatically, by friction, engages the lifeline and locks so as to arrest the fall of an employee Tie-Off Have a fall arrest system fully connected 5.3.2 Rescue The Supervisor or Foreman will initiate immediate rescue of any employee that falls. This will be accomplished by either contacting the host facilitys Emergency Response Team, Forrest Services Emergency Response Team, or sub-contracted Emergency Response Team depending on the situation. If the host facilitys Emergency Response Team is contacted, Forrest Services will make all of their equipment and tools available to the team and only assist if directed. 5.3.3 Competent Person Each Foreman has been trained as a Competent Person for Fall Protection, having received instruction and passing a written test (70% or better). The Foreman will conduct fall protection equipment inspections annually for their employees. A different Competent Person will perform the annual inspection of the Formans fall protection equipment. These inspections will be documented and retained by the Safety Department. A body harness and lanyard CANNOT be reused after arresting an employees fall WITHOUT and inspection and authorization from a Competent Person.

18 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

5.4

Respiratory Protection
Respirators will be worn by the employees whenever there is a known or suspected breathable hazard (vapors, gases, or particulates). 5.4.1 Types of Respirators There are two types of respirators: air supplied and air purifying Air-supplied respirators have their own breathing source for the employees (air compressor or air bottle/tank) and allow the employee to work in more hazardous atmospheres o Blasting Hood Provides constant breathable oxygen directly (from air compressors through filters) to the employees hood using positive pressure to prevent hazardous air from entering the hood o Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) Full-face respirator where the employee carries an air bottle/tank and an escape bottle Air-purifying respirators use filters/cartridges to remove harmful materials from the ambient air o Half-Face Covers the nose and mouth o Full-Face Covers the eyes, nose, and mouth o Cartridges Disposable to allow employee to change as the environment changes or as the cartridges reach the end of their useful life; color-coded for easy identification of protection level: White Acid gases: Sulfur Dioxide (SO2), Chlorine Gas (CI2) and Hydrochloric Acid (HCl) Black Organic vapors: pesticides, paints, thinners Green Ammonia gas Yellow Acid Gases (White) and organic vapors (Black) Purple Highly Toxic Particulate Filter (HEPA) o Pre-Filter Cloth-like filter that captures dust particles and paint overspray to extend the life of the cartridge

5.4.2 Medical Evaluation Every employee must be medically evaluated prior to fit testing an initial use of a respirator. This is done to ensure that wearing a respirator wont affect the employees health. The Safety Department will give the employee an OSHA respirator medical evaluation questionnaire (Attachment A) and upon completion by the employee, will review the document. If the employee answered YES to any of the medical questions (Part A, Sections 2 or 3), then the employee will be sent to a medical clinic (at no cost to the employee) for evaluation.
19 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Medical re-evaluation will be provided: (1) if an employee reports symptoms that are relevant to their ability to use a respirator; (2) when a physician, supervisor, or the Safety Department informs the management that an employee needs to be re-evaluated; (3) when information from the respirator program, including observations made during fit testing or program evaluation indicates a need for employee reevaluation; or (4) if a change in workplace conditions occurs that may result in substantial increase in the physiological stress that respirator use places on the employee. An annual medical evaluation (questionnaire or physician evaluation) is required for each employee who continues to require the use of a respirator. 5.4.3 Fit Testing After the medical evaluation, each employee must be fit tested for each particular type/brand/size of respirator they may be required to wear. The respirator must fit properly in order to provide adequate protection to the employee. The Safety Department administers the qualitative fit testing method (Bitter) for all employees who indicated they had no medical problems on their questionnaire. Instructions on how to complete this fit test are included in Attachment B. For those employees who indicated a medical concern, the medical clinic will administer a quantitative fit test, if they determine the employee is qualified to wear a respirator. An annual fit test is required for each employee and each respirator they continue to use. 5.4.4 Face Seal Protection Employees are not permitted to wear a respirator if they have: Facial hair that comes between the sealing surface of the face piece and the face or that interferes with valve function Any condition that interferes with face piece seal or valve Corrective glasses/goggles or other protective equipment that interferes with the seal of the face piece to the face of the user Not performed a user seal check each time they put on their respirator

20 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Attachment A OSHA Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionnaire


This questionnaire will be used by the Forrest Services Safety Department to determine if you need a medical examination by a health care professional, at no cost to the employee, prior to being fitted for a respirator. This questionnaire should be completed during normal working hours, at a time/place convenient to the employee. Part A, Section 1 To be completed by every employee who has been selected to use any type of respirator (PLEASE PRINT): 1. Todays Date: ____/____/______ 2. Name: __________________________________ 3. Age: ______ 4. Sex (circle one): Male Female

5. Height: ______ ft. ______ in.

6. Weight: _______lbs.

7. Job Title: __________________________ 8. Phone Number:________________________ 9. Type of Respirator you will use: a. ______ N, R, or P disposable respirator (filter-mask, non-cartridge type only) b. ______ Other type (half- or full-face piece, powered air purifying, supplied air, SCBA) 10. Have you worn a respirator before (circle one): Yes No

Part A, Section 2 Medical questions to be completed by every employee who has been selected to use any type of respirator (PLEASE PRINT): 1. Do you currently smoke tobacco, or have you smoked tobacco in the last month? Yes 2. Have you EVER had ANY of the following conditions? a. Seizures (fits): Yes No b. Diabetes (sugar disease): Yes No c. Allergic reactions that interfere with breathing: Yes No d. Claustrophobia (fear of closed-in spaces): Yes No e. Trouble smelling odors: Yes No 3. Have you EVER had ANY of the following pulmonary or lung problems? a. Asbestosis: Yes No b. Asthma: Yes No c. Chronic Bronchitis: Yes No d. Emphysema: Yes No e. Pneumonia: Yes No f. Tuberculosis: Yes No g. Silicosis: Yes No h. Pneumothorax (collapsed lung): Yes No i. Lung Cancer: Yes No j. Broken Ribs: Yes No k. Any chest injuries or surgeries: Yes No l. Any other lung problem that you have been told about: Yes No
21 Revised April 1, 2011

No

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

4. Do you currently have ANY of the following symptoms of pulmonary or lung illness? a. Shortness of breath: 1. When walking fast on level ground, or walking up a slight hill or incline: Yes No 2. When walking with other people at an ordinary pace on level ground: Yes No 3. Have to stop for breath when walking at your own pace on level ground: Yes No 4. When washing or dressing yourself: Yes No 5. That interferes with your job: Yes No b. Coughing: 1. That causes phlegm (thick sputum): Yes No 2. That wakes you early in the morning: Yes No 3. That occurs mostly when lying down: Yes No 4. Cough up blood in the past month: Yes No c. Wheezing: Yes No d. Chest pains when you breathe deeply: Yes No e. Any other symptoms you think may be related to lung problems: Yes No 5. Have you EVER had ANY of the following cardiovascular or heart problems? a. Heart Attack: Yes No b. Stroke: Yes No c. Angina: Yes No d. Heart Failure: Yes No e. Swellings in legs/feet (not caused by walking): Yes No f. Heart arrhythmia (irregular heart beat): Yes No g. High Blood Pressure: Yes No h. Frequent pain or tightness in the chest: 1. During physical activity: Yes No 2. That interferes with your job: Yes No i. In the PAST TWO YEARS, have you noticed your heart skipping or missing a beat: Yes No j. Heartburn or indigestion that is NOT related to eating: Yes No k. Any other heart problem you have been told about: Yes No l. Any other circulation problem you have been told about: Yes No 6. Do you currently take medication for any of the following problems: a. Breathing or lung problems: Yes No b. Heart trouble: Yes No c. Blood pressure: Yes No d. Seizures (fits): Yes No 7. If you have used a respirator before, have you EVER had ANY of the following problems? a. Eye irritation: Yes No b. Skin allergies/rashes: Yes No c. Anxiety: Yes No d. General weakness or fatigues: Yes No e. Any other problem that interferes with your use of a respirator: Yes No 8. Would you like to talk with a health care professional about this questionnaire: Yes No

Part A, Section 3 To be completed by employees selected to use either a full-face piece respirator or an SCBA 1. Have you EVER lost vision in either eye (temporarily or permanent): Yes No
22 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

2. Do you currently have ANY of the following vision problems: a. Wear contact lenses: Yes No b. Wear glasses: Yes No c. Color blindness: Yes No 3. Have you EVER had an injury to your ears, including a broken ear drum: Yes 4. Do you currently have ANY of the following hearing problems: a. Difficulty hearing: Yes No b. Hearing Aid: Yes No c. Any other hearing problem: Yes No 5. Have you EVER had a back injury: Yes No No

6. Do you currently have ANY of the following musculoskeletal problems? a. Weakness in arms, hands, legs or feet: Yes No b. Back pain: Yes No c. Difficulty fully moving arms/legs: Yes No d. Pain or stiffness when leaning forward/backward at the waist: Yes No e. Difficulty fully moving head up/down: Yes No f. Difficulty fully moving head side-to-side: Yes No g. Difficulty bending at the knees: Yes No h. Difficulty squatting to the ground: Yes No i. Climbing a flight of stairs or a ladder carrying more than 25 lbs: Yes No j. Any other muscle or skeletal problem that interferes with using a respirator: Yes Part B To be completed if health care professional will conduct the respirator fit test

No

1. In your present job, are you working at high altitudes (over 5,000 ft), or in a place that has lower than normal amounts of oxygen: Yes No If Yes, do you have feelings of dizziness, shortness of breath, pounding in your chest, or other symptoms when you are working under these conditions: Yes No 2. At work, or at home, have you EVER been exposed to hazardous solvents, hazardous airborne chemicals (e.g. gases, fumes, or dust), or have you come into skin contact with hazardous chemicals: Yes No If Yes, name the chemicals, if known: ___________________ _______________________ ____________________ _____________________ ________________________ 3. Have you EVER worked with ANY of the materials, or under ANY of the conditions listed below: a. Asbestos: Yes No b. Silica (e.g. sandblasting): Yes No c. Tungsten/cobalt (e.g. grinding/welding): Yes No d. Beryllium: Yes No e. Aluminum: Yes No f. Coal: Yes No g. Iron: Yes No h. Tin: Yes No i. Dusty environments: Yes No
23 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

j.

Any other hazardous exposure: Yes No If Yes, describe: ___________________________________________________________

4. List any second/side jobs/businesses you have: ________________________________________________________________________________ 5. List your previous occupations: ________________________________________________________________________________ 6. List your current and previous hobbies: ________________________________________________________________________________ 7. Have you been in the military: Yes No If Yes, were you exposed to biological/chemical agents (training or combat): Yes 8. Have you worked on a HAZMAT team: Yes No

No

9. Other than medications previously listed (question 6, Section 1), are you taking any other medications for any reason (including over-the-counter medications): Yes No If Yes, list them: __________________ __________________ _______________________ ___________________ ______________________ _____________________ 10. Will you be using any of the following items with your respirator(s)? a. HEPA filters: Yes No b. Cartridges: Yes No 11. How often are you expected to use the respirator (circle Yes or No for ALL answers that apply)? a. Escape only (no rescue): Yes No b. Emergency rescue: Yes No c. Less than 5 hours per week: Yes No d. Less than 2 hours per day: Yes No e. 2 4 hours per day: Yes No f. Over 4 hours per day: Yes No 12. During the period you are using the respirator(s), is your work effort: a. Light (less than 200 kcal per hour office work, light assembly work, standing while operating small machinery): Yes No If Yes, what is your average shift: ______ hrs, ______ min b. Moderate (200 350 kcal per hour nailing, drilling, driving, assembly work, lifting less than 35 lbs, walking on level surfaces, bushing wheelbarrow on level surface): Yes No If Yes, what is your average shift: ______ hrs, ______ min c. Heavy (over 350 kcal per hour heavy lifting, shoveling, bricklaying, chipping castings, walking on uneven surfaces, climbing stairs with load): Yes No If Yes, what is your average shift: ______ hrs, ______ min 13. Will you be wearing protective clothing/equipment (other than respirator) when wearing respirator: Yes No If Yes describe clothing/equipment:________________________________________________ 14. Will you be working under hot conditions (above 77F): Yes
24 Revised April 1, 2011

No

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

15. Will you be working under humid conditions: Yes

No

16. Describe work you will be doing while wearing respirator: _______________________________ 17. Describe special/hazardous conditions you might encounter while wearing respirator: ________ ________________________________________________________________________________ 18. Provide the following information for each toxic substance you will be exposed to while using respirator: Name of substance: ___________________________________________ Estimated maximum exposure level per shift: __________________ Duration of exposure per shift: ______ hr ______ min Name of substance: ___________________________________________ Estimated maximum exposure level per shift: __________________ Duration of exposure per shift: ______ hr ______ min Name of substance: ___________________________________________ Estimated maximum exposure level per shift: __________________ Duration of exposure per shift: ______ hr ______ min Name of substance: ___________________________________________ Estimated maximum exposure level per shift: __________________ Duration of exposure per shift: ______ hr ______ min 19. Describe any special responsibilities you have while wearing respirator that may affect the safety and well-being of others (e.g. rescue, security): ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

25 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Attachment B Fit Testing Procedures The Safety Department will conduct fit testing before the employee will use a respirator. The following procedure for fit testing is required: 1. Prior to the respirator selection process, demonstrate to the employee how to put on a respirator, how the respirator should be positioned on the face, how to set strap tension, and how to determine an acceptable fit. 2. If the employee is new to wearing respirators, have them don the mask several times, adjusting the straps each time to become familiar with the process. 3. Assess the comfort and adequacy of the respirator fit with the employee using the following criteria: Position of the mask on the nose and chin No hair growth between the skin and the face piece sealing surface Room for eye protection and/or prescription glasses Room to talk Proper strap tension, not overly tight Tendency of respirator to slip 4. Instruct the employee to conduct the following user seal checks: Positive Pressure Check Close off the exhalation valve and exhale gently into the face piece. The face fit is considered satisfactory if a slight positive pressure can be built up inside the face piece without any evidence of outward leakage of air and the seal (May require removal of exhalation valve cover). Negative Pressure Check Close off the inlet opening of the cartridge(s) by covering with the palm of the hand(s) and gently inhaling so that the face piece collapses slightly and holding the breath for ten (10) seconds. The design of the inlet opening of some cartridges cannot be effectively covered with the palm of the hand, so use plastic to cover them. If the face piece remains in its slightly collapsed condition and no inward leakage of air is detected, the tightness of the respirator is considered satisfactory. 5. Conduct the Qualitative Fit Test (QLFT) using the procedures detailed in the Fit Test Instruction included in the Fit Test Kit. 6. Forrest Services will not hire a new employee if they cannot pass a fit test for the type of respirator used.

26 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Respirator Training Acknowledgement This is to certify that ______________________________ ID #: ______________________ k k k k k Has been trained in the use, limitation, and maintenance of respirators. Brand of respirator: _______________________________________________ Type of respirator: Half Face Has passed the Sensitivity Test Could not be Fit Tested due to: ______________________________________ Full Face SCBA

Employee: ______________________________
(Printed Name)

Date: __________________________

Employee: ______________________________
(Signature)

Instructor: ______________________________
(Printed Name)

Instructor: ______________________________
(Signature)

27 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

6.0

EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS


Employees must be thoroughly trained before using any of these tools or equipment. All equipment and tools must be inspected prior to use each day. These inspections should focus on damaged parts, loose fittings, tears in hoses or lines, and guards in place. If any repairs are to be made, follow the Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) procedures (Section 7). Hearing protection may be required when working around much of this equipment (Section 6). Forrest Services routinely utilizes the following equipment when blasting and painting:

6.1

Ingersoll Rand HP 750 Air Compressors


The air compressors are used to provide Grade D air to the blasting hoods, to move the abrasive product through the blasting hoses, paint trough the paint lines, and to power the Spiders, Coppus air blowers, and paint pumps. The air compressor will have a grounding cable connected to a metal rod stuck into the ground. The air compressor will push the air through bull hoses to the air dryer only. The bull hoses will be connected using wire through the eyelets on the crows foot connectors and further secured with steel, spring-loaded whipcheck safety cables at both ends. Bull hoses are NOT connected to each other to increase their lengths. The air compressor, air dryer, and sandpot are placed within the bull hoses length.

6.2

Air Dryers
The air dryer removes water and oil from the air supplied by the air compressor. The dry air may then exit through a bull hose to the blast machine, through a air hose to the filtration system, or through a air hose to power additional equipment. The fan blades on the air dryer will be in a metal enclosure that does not have openings larger than . The air hoses are connected using wire through the eyelets on the crows foot connectors. At the air dryer connection, they will be further secured with a steel, spring-loaded whipcheck safety cable. Whipchecks are not required on the individual pieces of equipment the hoses are connected to.

6.3

Sand Hoppers and Sandpots


A sand hopper will be located in a stable, flat area that allows access for the semi-truck that delivers the blasting media and the loading of the sandpots. An extension ladder will be placed against the hopper and securely tied to the hoppers lowest permanent ladder rung. Confined Space procedures (Section 10) must be followed if an employee is to enter the hopper for any reason. An employee climbing up the hopper must follow fall protection procedures (Section 5.3) as well.
28

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

A blast machine or sandpot will be connected to the air dryer with a bull hose (using whipchecks). Blasting hose are connected to the sandpot and held securely by guillotine valves at the base of the blast machine. Blasting hoses connect to the blast nozzle or to each other to increase their lengths will be secured with wire through the eyelets on each crows foot connector. Blast nozzles have deadman valves that utilize two (2) small air hoses (red and green) that run along the blasting hoses from an air tank on the side of the sandpot to the blast nozzle. When the deadman valve is squeezed, air pressure pushes the guillotine valve up enabling the blast media to be pushed through the blast hose. When the blast nozzle deadman valve is released, the air pressure pushes the guillotine valve down against the blast hose to prevent any additional blast media from going through the blast hose. Under NO circumstances will employees do anything to disable or keep the deadman valve in an open position. Whenever the Blaster lays down the blast nozzle, the Blaster will unscrew either of the air hoses that operate the deadman valve to prevent an accidental release of blasting media.

6.4

Clemtex CPF Charcoal Filtration System


The filtration system receives Grade D air from the air dryer and filters out additional contaminants. It then allows multiple breathing airlines to be connected, so that more than one Blaster may be operating at a time. The charcoal filters are changed every three (3) months and indicated on the card attached to the filter canister.

6.5

Coppus Air Blowers


Coppus air blowers are powered by air hoses from the air dryer. Multiple hoses may be connected together to obtain a sufficient length. The hose are connected to each other with wire through the eyelets on the crows foot connectors. The air blowers are usually placed in a manway opposite the manway used for the confined space entry. The purpose is to increase ventilation through the tank. Filters are placed over the blower on the exterior of the tank to capture the particulates.

6.6

Generators and Lights


The generators are diesel powered and provide 110-volt power to explosionproof lights. All generators are equipped with ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI). The generator will have a grounding cable connected to a rod stuck into the ground.

6.7

Spiders
Spiders are secured to the tops of the tanks with steel cables. For internal floating roof tanks without wind girders, the cables are connected to the anchor
29

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

at the center of the top of the tank and use pin-style top-rollers (1,500 lb. load capacity) with tieback and shackle, which overhand the edge of the tank and enable the Spider to be easily moved around the tank. For external floating roof tanks with wind girders, the Spiders are suspended from ring girder rollers (1,000 lb. load capacity). Spiders may also be attached to the stairs by wrapping the cable around a minimum of two (2) steps and securing the cable to itself with a shackle.

6.8

Scaffolding
Scaffolding is occasionally required when Forrest Services has to paint the entire interior wall of a tank. The scaffolding will need to be moved around the inside of the tank as each drop is completed. When this happens, the Foreman is the Competent Person. Our employees will not assemble, move, or alter the scaffolding without the Foremans supervision. The Foreman will utilize a tag to indicate that a daily inspection has been conducted and the status of the scaffold. Should scaffolding be required around the outside of the tank, the scaffolding equipment and assembly will be contracted out to a qualified scaffolding company that meets OSHA and local requirements. Forrest Services Competent Person will conduct the daily inspections and update the tag on the scaffolding at the beginning of each work day.

6.9

Paint Equipment
The airless spray pump utilizes an air hose from the compressor through the dryer for its power. The spray gun and power roller hoses utilize threaded connectors. Multiple hoses may be connected to increase the length. The spray guns have a safety lock that the Painter must engage anytime they lay the gun down. With this lock in place, the gun cannot spray.

6.10 Dehumidifier
Forrest Services rents dehumidifiers each time they paint or apply linings to the interior of tanks. The size of dehumidifier is determined by the size of the tank. The rental company is given the dimensions of the tank and the interior height of the roof where the work will be occurring. The dehumidifier is required to turn the air inside the tank three (3) times per hour. The dehumidifier hose is placed in a manway opposite the Coppus blower.

6.11 Tools
Field employees will also use paint scrapers, screwdrivers, channel-lock pliers and crescent wrenches to make adjustments to the equipment. These tools should only be used for their intended purposes and should NOT be used
30 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

beyond their capacity.

6.12 Ladders
Follow these rules when using any ladder: Always inspect ladders before using (rungs evenly spaced and not loose) Follow Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) procedures if the ladder has defects Do not use ladders as a skid, brace, or for any other purpose than climbing If necessary to place a ladder in/over a doorway, barricade the door and post warning signs While ascending/descending a ladder, do not carry anything that will prevent holding on with both hands. Use a hand line or other means Keep both feet on the ladder rungs Do not reach out too far or place one foot on a line or piece of equipment Change the position of the ladder as often as necessary A safety harness is required when working in elevated areas higher than six (6) feet Ladders are not to be used as scaffolding Ladders must not be overloaded (person and equipment weight) 6.12.1 Extension Ladders Follow these rules when using extension ladders: When using an extension ladder, the pitch will be such that the horizontal distance from the top support is approximately of the length of the ladder Ladder must be equipped with a tie-off rope and non-skid safety feet Ladder must be adequately tied-off The top of the ladder must extend three (3) feet beyond the supporting object Extension ladders must be overlapped a minimum of three (3) rungs Never use metal ladders when working near or under power lines 6.12.2 Step Ladders Follow these rules when using a step ladder: Always set level on all feet and lock spreader in place Never stand on the top step of a step ladder Always tie-off the ladder

31 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

32 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

7.0

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT (LOTO)
Definitions Affected Employee An employee whose job requires him/her to operate/use a machine or piece of equipment on which servicing or maintenance is being performed under LOTO or whose job requires him/her to work in an area in which such servicing or maintenance is being performed. Capable of Being Locked-Out An energy isolating device is cable of being locked-out if it has a hasp or other means of attachment to which or through, or through which, a lock can be affixed, or it has a locking mechanism built into it. Other energy isolating devices are capable of being locked-out, if lockout can be achieved without the need to dismantle, rebuild, or replace the energy isolating device or permanently alter its energy control capability. Energized Connected to an energy source or containing residual or stored energy. Energy Isolating Device A mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy, including but not limited to the following: a manually operated electrical circuit breaker, a disconnect switch, a manually operated switch by which the conductors of a circuit can be disconnected from all ungrounded supply conductors and, in addition, no pole can be operated independently, a live valve, a block, and any similar device used to block or isolate energy. Push buttons, selector switches and other control circuit type devices are not energy isolating devices. Energy Source Any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other energy. Hot Tap A procedure used in the repair, maintenance, and services activities which involves welding on a piece of equipment (pipelines, vessels, or tanks) under pressure, in order to install connections or appurtenances. It is commonly used to replace or add sections of pipeline without interruption of service for air, gas, water, steam, and petrochemical distribution systems. Lockout The placement of a lockout device AND a tagout device on an energy isolating device, in accordance with an established procedure, ensuring that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed. Lockout Device A device that utilizes a green key lock to hold an energy isolating device in a safe position and prevent the energizing of a machine or equipment. Included are blank flanges and bolted slip blinds.
33

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Normal Production Operation The utilization of a machine or equipment to perform its intended production function. Servicing and/or Maintenance Workplace activities, such as constructing, installing, setting up, adjusting, inspecting, modifying, and maintaining and/or servicing machines or equipment. These activities include lubrication, cleaning, or un-jamming of machines or equipment and making adjustments or tool changes, where the employee may be exposed to the unexpected energization or start-up of the equipment or release of hazardous energy. Setting Up Any work performed to prepare a machine or equipment to perform its normal production operation. Tagout The placement of a tagout device on an energy isolating device, in accordance with an established procedure, to indicate that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled may not be operated until the tagout device is removed. Tagout Device A prominent warning device, such as a tag and a means of attachment, which can be securely fastened to an energy isolating device in accordance with an established procedure, to indicate that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled may not be operated until the tagout device is removed. The tagout device used by Forrest Services has red and white stripes and clearly states DANGER and LOCKED OUT DO NOT REMOVE on one side, with DATE, AUTHORIZED SIGNATURE, EQUIPMENT TAGGED OUT, and authorized employees to work on that piece of equipment while it is tagged out. The tagout device also has a hole in it to allow the employee to attach it to the energy source.

7.1

Energy Control Program


Forrest Services has established a program consisting of energy control procedures, employee training and periodic inspections to ensure that before any employee performs any servicing or maintenance on a machine or equipment where the unexpected energizing, start-up or release of stored energy could occur and cause energy, the machine or equipment shall be isolated from the energy source, and rendered inoperative. The following individuals are responsible to place a LOTO device on a piece of equipment or machine: an employee who sees that a piece of equipment or machine is not safe to operate, AND all the mechanics repairing/replacing the equipment/machine. Normal production operations are not covered by this section. Servicing and/or maintenance, which takes place during normal production operations is covered by this section only if:

34 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

An employee is required to remove or bypass a guard or other safety device; or An employee is required to place any part of his/her body into an area on a machine or piece of equipment where work is actually performed upon the material being processed (point of operation) or where an associated danger zone exists during a machine operating cycle.

EXCEPTION: Minor tool changes or adjustments and other minor servicing activities, which takes place during normal production operations, are not covered by this section if they are routine, repetitive, and integral to the use of the equipment for production provided that the work is performed using alternative measures which provide effective protection. This section does NOT apply to work on cord and plug connected electric equipment for which exposure to the hazards or unexpected energization or start-up of the equipment is controlled by the unplugging of the equipment from the energy source and by the plug being exclusive control of the employee performing the service or maintenance.

7.2

Lockout/Tagout Procedures
The following procedures should be followed: The person doing the work is responsible for LOTO all items that could release potential energy The person doing the work is responsible for keeping the key in their possession until their work is completed The person locking out/tagging out the item is responsible for completing their entries in the LOTO logbook No one can remove a lock or tag other than the person that installed it See the Safety Department should the person locking out/tagging out equipment unavailable for proper handling of removing a lock or tag The established procedures for the application of energy control must be don in the following sequence: 1. Preparation for Shutdown Authorized employee must have knowledge of type of magnitude of energy and methods to control it 2. Machine or Equipment Shutdown Follow manufacturers shutdown process 3. Machine or Equipment Isolation Physically isolate the energy source 4. Lockout/Tagout Apply the LOTO 5. Release Any Stored Energy Open valves, etc.; May need to be repeated if energy can re-accumulate 6. Verification of Isolation Test to ensure there is no stored energy If you have to temporarily remove a LOTO to test or reposition the machine, follow the following procedures:
35

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Clear the machine/equipment Remove tools and materials Clear other employees Remove LOTO Energize and proceed with testing and positioning De-energize and reapply control measures (LOTO)

If more than one person, or group of people will be working on the machine/equipment, use a multiple lock lockout device and require all people/group to place their own lock on the device being locked out. All people/group must remove their own locks before the device can be returned to service, preventing any one person/group from energizing the device while another person/group is still working on the device. If a group is working on the device, it is the Supervisors responsibility to ensure each person in their group is finished and clear before removing their lockout. Employees who fail to comply with Forrest Services LOTO procedures will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

7.3

Annual Inspection
A periodic inspection of the energy control procedure must be completed at least annually. The inspection shall be performed by the competent person with each authorized employee on their responsibilities. The Safety Department shall certify that the inspection occurred by identifying: Machine or equipment utilized Date Employees included Person performing inspection

36 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

8.0

RIGGING, MOBIL CRANE, MATERIAL STORAGE AND HANDLING (CRAWLER, TRUCK OR LOCOMOTIVE CRANE)
8.1 Material Storage
Materials and equipment shall not be stored in such a way as to block emergency shut-off switches, first aid kits, emergency eyewash/shower facilities, fire extinguishing posts, valves, or roadways. Storage shall not create a hazard by being stacked on unstable or sloping ground, or by poor stacking, or by any other way that the material may easily fall over. Any materials that could lead and contaminate the ground must be stored in contained areas (Section 13, Hazard Communication Program).

8.2

Material Handling
Employees must use caution when handling materials. Many materials are heavy to lift (5-gallon paint cans, bags of sand, etc.), and must be lifted in a manner that will not cause back injury. When lifting heavy materials, remember to squat, not bend over, bring the item close to your torso, and then lift up by using your legs and keeping your back straight. When putting the materials down, follow the same steps in reverse order lower yourself by squatting, then set the material on the ground/floor. Additionally, do not twist your body while you are carrying heavy materials. Instead, with the lifted material close to your torso, turn your entire body so that your feet are facing the direction you intend before lifting or setting down the material. If materials are too heavy for one person to lift, get someone else to help you or use mechanical equipment to assist in the move.

8.3

Powered Industrial Lift Vehicles


Powered industrial vehicles are mobile, power-driven vehicles used to lift personnel into a safe position to work on other objects or to move equipment or materials to the areas where they will be installed or utilized. Operators must follow the manufacturers specifications and limitations and rated load capacities. To be most effective, training must address the unique characteristics of the type of vehicle(s) the employee is being trained to operate. A certified operated is considered a Competent Person capable of identifying deficiencies and responsible for reporting these deficiencies to their supervisors. Forrest Services will only operate aerial lifts and tractors on job sites. However, because of work locations, employees may be working around cranes and forklifts as well. Therefore, employees will be informed of the hazards associated with the rigging of material for crane and forklift movement:
37

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Crane work is sub-contracted out to Maxim Crane, or other qualified contractors. Said contractors will be required to answer YES to all questions in mobile crane on shore and rigging/material handling who, in turn, is responsible for ensuring that their equipment and operators conform to federal, state, and local regulations. Never walk under anything being lifted Do not ride on cranes or forklifts Beware that you may need hearing protection depending on the noise level of the vehicle Watch for vehicles when walking or driving Leave plenty of room for the tag line workers to move around Hand signals should comply with ANSI standards for the type of crane in use 8.3.1 All Industrial Vehicles There are some general rules of operation that apply to all of the powered industrial vehicles. These are: Rigging equipment for material handling shall be inspected prior to use on each shift and as necessary during its use to ensure that it is safe defective equipment must be locked out/tagged out and removed from service Shall not be loaded beyond its recommended safe working load (crane capacity/slings, rigging material and spreader bar) Prior to lifting, inspection of hooks throat opening (safety latches) Secure unstable loads Unbalanced or odd-shaped loads Ensure plenty of clearance (minimum 10 for power lines) Never lift a load over anyone Beware of tip over Do not jump from the vehicle if it does tip over Compliance with manufactures and clients rated load capacities and visible to the operator while he/she is at their control station Beware of workplace hazards, such as rough, sloped or uneven surfaces and hazardous areas, such as blind spots, intersections, etc. Remove vehicle from work area when not in use An accessible fire extinguisher of 5BC rating or higher, shall be available at all operator stations or cabs of equipment For any reason, the employer without the manufactures written approval shall make no modifications or additions that can affect the safe operation of the equipment All crawler, truck, or locomotive cranes in use shall meet the applicable requirements for design, inspection, construction, testing, and maintenance and operation as prescribed in the ANSI B30.5-1968 Prior to use, the sub-contactor/owner is responsible for producing and maintaining annual inspection documents made by a Competent Person,
38 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

or by a government or private agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Labor. Hazardous work permit will be issued if and when a potential for unsafe considerations of toxic gasses or oxygen deficient atmospheres. then proper air quality monitoring will be done. 8.3.2 Aerial Lifts Specific rules of operation for aerial lifts are as follows: Test lift and extension from the tractor unit before climbing onto the platform Drive to the work location in the stowed position (full-down) Fall protection must be worn as soon as employee accesses lift Never stand on railings Never climb to another structure 8.3.3 Tractor Specific rules of operation of tractors are as follows: Wear safety belt when operating Do not permit others to ride Operate smoothly No jerky turns, starts, or stops Hitch equipment only to the drawbar and recommended by the manufacturer Set brake when leaving tractor

hitch

points

8.4

Industrial Vehicle Operator Training


8.4.1 General Requirements Industrial vehicle operators must be fully trained and certified (valid for 3 years) prior to operating the vehicle, except for trainees who have completed the formal instruction (lecture, multi-media, and written tests) administered by the Safety Department and are receiving hands-on training under the direct supervision of a certified operator. 8.4.2 Training Program Content In addition to the initial training and industrial vehicle operator receives, refresher training and re-certification will occur whenever: The operator has been observed to operate the vehicle in an unsafe manner The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss accident The operator is assigned to drive a different type of vehicle The condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect the safe operation of the vehicle The operator certification has expired (3 years)
39

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Training will cover the following topics as they relate to the specific vehicle and workplace the employee will operate in: Operating instructions, warnings, and precautions regarding the type of vehicle Difference between the industrial vehicle and the automobile Vehicle controls and instrumentation: Where they are located, what they indicate, and how they work Engine or motor operation Steering and maneuvering Visibility (including restrictions due to loading) Attachment adaptations, operation, and limitation Vehicle capacity Vehicle stability Inspection and maintenance required to perform Refueling and/or recharging of batteries Operating limitations Surface conditions where the vehicle will be operated Composition of loads and load stability Traffic or other working employees in work area Restricted movement areas to operate in Hazardous locations where vehicle will be operated (closed environment with insufficient ventilation or other unique or potentially hazardous environmental conditions)

40 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

9.0

SAFETY RULES FOR VEHICLES


Forrest Services intends that all of its company vehicles are operate by a safe, defensive driver who operates and maintains all vehicles in compliance with federal, state, local and insurance regulations.

9.1

General Operating Standards and Driving Privileges


Each employee operating a Forrest Services vehicle shall have a valid and appropriate drivers license issued from the state of Texas Each driver will be given a 30-45 minute check ride to evaluate defensive driving skills and habits. Unsafe driver will not be allowed to operate company vehicles The driver and ALL occupants must wear safety belts at all time when the vehicle is in motion Company vehicles are NOT to be used for personal reasons. Passengers (family, hitchhikers, friends, former employees) are forbidden to be in company vehicles. This means if you have an accident while using a company vehicle for personal reasons, or are transporting any passenger other than a current company employee, you will be held personally responsible for any/all expenses. The driver is responsible for securing all cargo All company vehicles will be locked when out of sight of the employee, EXCEPT WHERE PROHIBITED BY THE JOBSITE Quarterly vehicle inspections by a mechanic Reckless driving is forbidden The following items are prohibited from company vehicles: firearms, animals, radar detectors, alcohol, and illegal drugs/paraphernalia No duplicate keys shall ever be made, except by Management Never fuel a vehicle with the motor running Never use a cellular phone with the motor running Any problems with vehicles, regardless of severity or cause, shall be reported to the drivers supervisor immediately No more than three (3) employees are allowed to ride on one seat of a vehicle Employees riding in the back of a truck must be seated and arms, legs, and heads must NEVER be outside of the bed of the truck while it is in motion Use flagman when backing up in the vehicle whenever possible The use of prescription during which may affect the drivers abilities, alcoholic beverages, or any illegal substances are strictly prohibited Before leaving the vehicle, turn off the engine and set the parking brake If employees must use cellular phones while driving a company vehicle, the following rules must be followed: o If you have a hands-free device, you may take an incoming call
41

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

o If you have a hands-free device, you may initiate a call, if you dont have to look up, or type in the number to be called. In other words, if you have it on speed dial, you may make the call o In all other cases, pull of the road to a safe location before making/receiving a phone call

9.2

Loss of Driving Privileges


A driver shall not be allowed to drive a company vehicle if any of the following conditions are true. Attendance of a defensive driving course can be required, at the discretion of Management: The employees drivers license has been suspended or revoked An employee has been convicted of, or forfeited bond or collateral for, any of the following charges: o Felony involving a motor vehicle o Operating a company vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs o Crime involving the knowing transportation, possession, or unlawful use of controlled or restricted drugs o Leaving the scene of a vehicular accident which resulted in personal injury or death Forrest Services has determined through investigation or driving record that the employee has displayed a lack of concern for the safety toward the general public or fellow employees while operating a company vehicle

9.3

What to Do When You Are Involved In an Accident


Stop your vehicle at the nearest, SAFE location. If you have already come to a stop as a result of the accident, leave your vehicle there provi ded it isnt in a dangerous position or it doesnt obstruct the flow of traffic (Texas requires that motor vehicles involved in accidents be moved to the side of the road, if possible). Turn on flashers and set out orange triangular warning devices far enough away from the accident/vehicle to ensure other drivers can make safe adjustment to avoid the vehicle Check yourself and all occupants for injuries; provide care if needed Notify authorities; Let them know what response is needed (police, ambulance and/or fire) Make sure your cargo is secure, if carrying/pulling any Make reasonable efforts to direct traffic, if necessary Get information from law enforcement agency that responds: o Agency name (sheriff, city, county, state) o Investigating officers name o Copy of accident report or case number if you have to obtain the report later
42

Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Do NOT give statements or sign anything EXCEPT for your insurance adjuster or the law enforcement investigating officer Courtesy to all involved parties will be in your best interest If law enforcement requires a drug/alcohol test from you, DO NOT REFUSE Complete Forrest Services Auto Accident Report (If you have a camera, take pictures) as soon as it is safe and injuries have been tended to as much as possible

43 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

10.0 CONFINED SPACE


Definitions Acceptable Entry Condition The conditions that must exist in a permit space to allow entry and to assure that employees involved with a permit required confined space entry can safely enter into and work within a space. Attendant Individual stationed outside one or more permit spaces monitoring the authorized entrants and who performs the duties assigned in the employers permit space program. Authorized Entrant Employee who is authorized by the employer to enter a permit required confined space. Blanking or Blinding The absolute closure of a pipe, line, or duct by the fastening of a solid plate (such as a spectacle blind or a skillet blind) that completely covers the bore and that is capable of withstanding the maximum pressure of the pipe, line, or duct with no leakage beyond the plate. Confined Space A large enough area so configured that an employee can bodily enter and performed assigned work; has limited or restricted means of entry and exit; and is not designed for continuous employee occupancy. Double Block and Bleed the closure of a pipe, line, or duct by closing and locking/tagging two in-line valves and by opening and locking/tagging a drain or vent valve in the line between closed valves. Emergency An occurrence (including any failure of hazard control or monitoring equipment) or event internal or external to the permit space that could endanger entrants. Engulfment The surrounding and effective capture of a person by a liquid or finely divided (flowable) solid substance that can be aspirated to cause death by filling or plugging the respiratory system or that can exert enough force on the body to cause death by strangulation, constriction, or crushing. Entry Action by which a person passes through an opening into a permit required confined space. Entry includes ensuing work activities in that space and is considered to have occurred as soon as any part of the entrants body breaks the plane of an opening into the confined space. Entry Permit The written or printed document provided by the employer to allow and control entry into a permit required space. Entry Supervisor Supervisor or designated employee for determining if acceptable
44 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

entry conditions are present at a permit space where entry is planned; for authorizing entry and overseeing entry operations; and for terminating entry by this standard. NOTE: Entry supervisor may also serve as an attendant or as an authorized entrant as long as that person is trained and equipped as required by this standard for each role he/she fulfils. Also, the duties of entry supervisor may be passed to another person during the course of an entry operation. Hazardous Atmosphere An atmosphere that may expose employees to the risk of death, incapacitation, impairment of ability to self rescue (escape without help), or acute illness from one or more of the following: flammable gas, vapor, mist in excess of 10% of its lower flammable limit (LFL), dust at a concentration that meets or exceeds its LFL, oxygen concentration below 19.5% or above 23.5%, or any other atmospheric condition that is immediately dangerous to life and health. Hot Work Permit Written authorization to operations (i.e. welding, etc.) in a condition capable of providing a source of ignition. IDLH Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health; any condition that poses an immediate or delayed threat of life or that would cause irreversible adverse effects that would interfere with an individuals ability to escape without help from a permit space. Inerting The displacement of the atmosphere in a permit space by a noncombustible gas to such and extent that the resulting atmosphere is non-combustible. Isolation The process by which a permit space is removed from service and completely protected against the release of energy and material into the space by such means as blanketing or blinding, etc. Line Breaking The intentional opening of a pipe, line, or duct that is, or has been, carrying flammable, corrosive, or toxic materials, and inert gas, or any fluid at a volume, pressure, or temperature capable of causing injury. Non-Permit Confined Space A confined space that does not contain, or have the potential to contain, any hazard capable of causing death or serious physical harm Oxygen Deficient Atmosphere An atmosphere containing less than 19.5% oxygen by volume. Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) are required. When the oxygen level drops below 12.7% rapid breathing and an accelerated heartbeat occurs. As the oxygen level continues dropping, poor muscular coordination, fatigue, and nausea occur, leading to loss of consciousness and death if the oxygen level reaches 6% or less. Oxygen Enriched Atmosphere An atmosphere containing greater than 23.5% oxygen by volume. This causes flammable materials to burn violently when ignited. Permit Required Confined Space A confined space that contains, or has the
45 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

potential to contain, a hazardous atmosphere; contains a material that has the potential for engulfment; has an internal configuration that might cause an entrant to be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor that slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross section, and/or contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard(s). Permit Required Confined Space Program Overall program for controlling and where appropriate, for protecting employees from permit space hazards; for regulating employee entry into permit spaces. Permit System Employees written procedures for preparing and issuing permits for entry and for returning the permit space to service following termination of entry. Prohibited Condition Any condition in a permit space that is not allowed by the permit when entry is allowed. Rescue Service The personnel designated and trained to rescue employees from permit spaces in the case of an emergency. Retrieval System The equipment (including a retrieval line and/or full body harness, if appropriate) and a lifting device or anchor used for non-entry rescue of employees from a permit space. Testing The process by which the hazards that may confront entrants of a permit required space are identified and evaluated. Testing includes specifying the tests that are to be conducted in the permit space. Toxic Gases Liquids, vapors, gases, mists, solid materials, and dusts should be considered hazardous in a confined space. The product in the confined space may be toxic, there may be biological or chemical processes occurring in the confined space, or the operation performed in the space may release toxic gas. Toxicants produced in the work area can migrate to and accumulate in the confined space. Toxic gases have been reported to cause death to workers in confined spaces.

10.1 Introduction
A confined space can be deceptive. Often, the space does not appear too dangerous; it may have been entered on many occasions without incident and exhibit no apparent signs of danger. Routine entries in this situation can create a false sense of security that may result in slacking off on required safety procedures. Sometimes, the distinct signs warning of danger are apparent: toxic odor, irritating fume, arcing electrical equipment, spinning augers or blades, converging walls, and flowing grain or sand. However, sometimes there is no danger that you can hear, smell, see, or taste prior to being overcome by the danger.
46 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

It is prudent to treat an unknown space and its interior as a permit required confined space, taking all the necessary precautions, until an analysis proves otherwise.

10.2 Hazardous Concentration


By nature, confined spaces concentrate hazards. In these spaces, atmospheric hazards occur when certain gases displace breathable air, allow toxic, flammable, or combustible substances to accumulate. Because of limited workspace, it can be difficult for workers to avoid contact with physical hazards such as electrical conduits and the moving mechanical components of machinery. Other physical conditions of the space can contribute to drowning, falling, or entrapment due to the interior configuration. Recognizing these spaces for their inherent capacity to retain hazardous conditions is essential. When you are able to understand and appreciate the hazards of confined spaces, you will be able to minimize these entry dangers through appropriate safe work practices.

10.3 Risk Assessment


Before any confined space entries are carried out, Forrest Services will conduct a workplace risk assessment. Forrest Services will try to eliminate the hazards of the space as a precaution; but if this cannot be done entirely, the company will reduce and/or control the existing hazards through careful planning to provide a safe work area for the entrants. The assessment will identify all energy sources, equipment, and pipe inlets in the space that must be lockedout/tagged-out, disconnected, blocked or bled. The type of work to be performed in the space will be considered as well as the space size, shape, and physical restraints. Hazards that are identified will be categorized according to the type. Most hazards fall into the following basic categories: Atmosphere Such as combustible, flammable, explosive, oxygen deficient/enriched, or toxic gases or vapors Physical Such as grinders, agitators, steam, mulchers, falling, tripping, or entrapment from walls that converge inward Corrosive Chemicals and infectious agents Psychological Such as working alone in a confined area where it may be cramped, damp, and dark Hazardous Energy Releases such as electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, or chemical Unexpected Such as rodents and insects, wind, changing weather conditions, and poor visibility

47 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

10.4 Permit Required Confined Space Program


10.4.1 Permit Forrest Services has developed its own permit form, if the host company does not have one. One of these permits MUST be completed prior to entry into a confined space. This form requires the Entry Supervisor to indicate what project is being worked on, date and times of permit, who will be the Attendant and Fire Watch, the type of work to be performed, what PPE is required, to identify the potential hazards, identify what heave equipment will be used, verification on the conditions for the confined space, gas test results, excavation work to be done (if applicable), LOTO, and the Attendant to record employee entry and exit of the confined space. Of course, any jobsite specific permits will also be used as required. It is possible for a non-permit space to become a permit required confined space if a workplace change occurs that affects the confined space. Factors that could alter the conditions include: Configuration change that alters the entrance or interior structure Equipment within the space increasing or decreasing the oxygen volume in the space A new process that creates its own hazards Temperature, humidity, or air pressure that may affect worker performance

10.4.2 Training All employees involved in permit required confined space entries must be trained, based on their assigned job responsibilities, prior to entry. Initial training is required before an employee is allowed to work in a permit space. Refresher training is required whenever an employees duties change, hazards in the confined space change, or an evaluation of the confined space program identifies inadequacies in the employees knowledge of the program. Forrest Services utilizes the Houston Area Safety Council (HASC) Confined Spaces training for its employees. HASC issues each employee an identification card verifying completion of the course and the expiration date for that course. In addition, the Foreman conduct confined space training for their team members for each specific project. 10.4.3 Entry Supervisor The Entry Supervisor is considered to be the most knowledgeable employee in the permit system. They are responsible for issuing the
48 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

permit and must be aware of the hazards of the space, the signs and symptoms that entrants would exhibit if exposure occurred, and the duties of all workers involved with the entry procedure. An Entry Supervisor is also responsible for the following: Verifying all tests have been conducted and all procedures and equipment are in place before endorsing the permit Ensuring outside contractors comply with the Forrest Services permit space procedures Terminating entry if hazardous conditions develop Canceling permits Verifying rescue services are available and will respond rapidly

In addition, Entry Supervisors have the authority to remove unauthorized persons who enter or attempt to enter the confined space. They must determine when shifts and attendants will change and that acceptable entry conditions specified in the permit are maintained. Entry Supervisors will also coordinate with any other employers needing access to the same confined space to ensure that all employees will be safe and capable of completing their tasks. 10.4.4 Authorized Entrant Authorized entrants of a permit required confined space must know the hazards they may encounter, be able to recognize signs or symptoms of exposure, and understand the consequences of exposure to hazards. Authorized entrants must know how to use any necessary equipment and communicate with attendants. They must be aware of the emergency plan, how to warn other entrants of the existence of a hazardous condition, and summon help if someone is in distress. Authorized entrants must be familiar with the tasks they are expected to perform in the confined space. They should have additional training in procedures that are not routine, as well as any potential hazards and how to control them. Authorized entrants have the right to request additional monitoring at any time and cannot be denied the results of any monitoring/tests. 10.4.5 Attendants At least one attendant must be assigned to monitor the space while entrants are working inside. This attendant must know the hazards of the confined space and be aware of the warning signs and physical symptoms these hazards could have on the entrants being monitored. If
49 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

an attendant is authorized to attempt a rescue, they have to ensure that another attendant is available to replace the attendant entering the space. A single attendant may monitor multiple confined spaces, PROVIDED THEY CAN: Visibly see entry/exit point of all ports simultaneously Respond to an emergency in one space without compromising their duties with the other space Attendant duties include: Remain stationed outside the space until relieved Maintain continuous count and identification of authorized entrants Prevent unauthorized persons from entering the space Communicate with entrants to monitor their status Ensure air intake source (if used) does not draw carbon monoxide into the space Monitor activities inside (atmospheric conditions) and outside the space in the event of weather conditions or other IDLH (Immediate Danger to Life and Health) that may harm or order emergency exit if required Summon rescuers and begin performing non-entry rescue if it can be done safely On multiple employer job sites, Forrest Services will provide coverage for Forrest Service employees ONLY. Other contractors must provide their own coverage, unless prior written approval has been granted by Forrest Services management and provided the other contract ors work will not interfere with the safety of Forrest Services employees. 10.4.6 Rescue and Emergency Services An emergency and rescue plan must be an integral part of the permit required confined space program. This plan shows every worker what to do if an incident occurs. Incidents could be a result of toxic or oxygen deficient air, heat, exhaustion, or some type of injury. Rescue services shall be provided by either an on-site or off-site team. Most of our customers have their own rescue services, complete with all the necessary equipment (Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus, harnesses, lights, etc.) Should a confined space entry be required at a facility that does not have their own rescue services, Forrest Services Safety Department will either provide our own rescue service or contract with an off-site team,
50 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

ensure the team is trained, has the proper equipment available, and the ability to respond in a timely manner. They must be made aware of the location and the work to be performed. Some of the permit required confined spaces Forrest Services works in may be IDLH atmospheres. In those cases, the rescue service will be required to be standing by, capable of immediate action to rescue the employees. A rescue and emergency plan must be developed for each confined space entry. This plan must include the following: Identification of the confined space (description, location within facility, special or unusual features, possible including drawings) Communication plan Potential hazard assessment chart List and location of equipment that could be used for emergencies (closest telephone, cutting equipment, first aid kit, emergency shower, fire extinguisher or hose) Forrest Services employees, with the exception of our own Emergency Response Team, are NOT trained to perform rescue operations. If an employee is overcome, the Confined Space Attendant will notify the customers Emergency Response Team via the radio. All remaining employees will be evacuated from the confined space. Forrest Services employees will only provide assistance to the Emergency Response Team as directed by the ERT. All equipment will be made available to the ERT when requested. 10.4.7 Alternate Entry Procedures OSHA allows for less stringent procedures when it can be determined that the only actual or potential hazard of a space is atmospheric and that forced air ventilation alone can control the hazard. This requires the following procedures: 1. Ensure it is safe to remove the cover 2. Barricade the entrance 3. Determine ventilation alone is sufficient to maintain the permit space; that the work to be performed does not introduce additional hazards 4. Gather monitoring and inspection data to support items 1 and 3 (use full permit required procedures, if entry is needed) 5. Document the determination and supporting data and make them available to the Supervisor and employees This simplified confined space entry eliminates the need for an attendant during entry, a written permit, and emergency rescue provisions.
51 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

10.4.8 Procedures for Testing the Atmosphere It is very important to understand that the density of gases or vapors causes them to either be heavier than air and settle to the bottom, or lighter than air and rise to the top of a confined space. Therefore, it is necessary to test all levels (top, middle, and bottom), as well as any pocket areas, with a properly calibrated testing instrument (use a nonsparking probe when combustible/flammable gasses could be present). Assess as many space conditions as possible from the outside, through weep holes, or other small entry ports leading into the space. Do not open the main entry into the confined space unless it is the only access. Sudden changes in atmospheric composition (the opening of hatches/doors) within the space could cause violent reactions or dilute the contaminants, giving a false low initial gas concentration. Be sure to allow enough time for the instruments to respond to full scale. Ventilation (which dilutes and displaces air contaminants) by a blower or fan may be necessary to remove harmful gasses and vapors from confined space. Take at least three sets of readings: (1) before ventilation; (2) after ventilation; and (3) initial entry into the space. The tests should be conducted in the following order: 1. Oxygen Because most combustible gas meters are oxygendependent. Too little oxygen may cause a low combustible gas meter to explode if gases and vapors are present in ignitable quantities. 2. Flammable and Explosive Gases Because the risk posed by fire or explosion is more immediate and life threatening than exposure to toxic gases and vapors 3. Toxic Gases and Vapors Because sensor requires that the specific toxic substance be identified in advance, each substance has a specific sensor that must be used All entrants must be permitted to review or observe the testing before they enter the space. The results of the atmospheric testing will have a direct impact on the PPE necessary for the job and will need to be recorded on the permit. 10.4.9 Communication Effective communication among entrants, attendants, and supervisors is essential and must occur continuously to be effective. Communication can take many forms, such as the following: Voice When distance and noise level permit Hand Signals When visual contact can be maintained Radio Must be intrinsically safe, especially in flammable atmospheres Rope Rope pull signals are NOT recommended because of
52 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

normal movement and incapacitation 10.4.10 Concluding Entry When the work has finished for the day, the permit must be cancelled and the entry space closed off. The completed permit form must be turned in to the issuing authority (usually the company we are working for). 10.4.11 Annual Review Forrest Services Safety Department will meet with each host facility annually to review the permit required confined space program. Forrest Services will also secure invitations to the host facilitys rescue and emergency services exercises.

53 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

11.0 ELECTRICAL SAFETY


Consider ALL wires LIVE and DANGEROUS. Do not permit any object being handled to come in contact with electrical wires. None of the Forrest Services employees are considered Qualified electricians. All electrical installation and repair work will be accomplished by an independent contractor. GCFI test will be conducted every calendar quarter on the mobile generators and lights used when blasting or paining/lining inside the tanks. These items will be tagged to show when and who conducts these tests. As Non-Qualified persons, apply the following rules to electrical safety (any potential hazards identified below must be brought to the attention of the host facility for correction before field services work can commence): Only certified electricians should attempt to determine if a wire is energized Extension cords should be checked for bad insulation, broken grounds, or broken protection globes. The extension cord should not be used if it has any defects When using electric cords, do not stand in water All electrical equipment should be properly grounded All circuit breakers should be properly identified All work areas shall be kept free of any exposed electrical wires or wires with deteriorated insulation, or exposed parts Before work is started, electrical lines should be identified and precautions taken to avoid contact (notify electric company to implement protective measures) Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) procedures will be used BEFORE commencing work on electrical equipment Electrical cables in work areas shall be covered or elevated to prevent hazards Metal ladders will NOT be used when working with electrical circuits Only approved low-voltage (6-12 volts) current (lights) shall be used in boiler drums, pressure vessels, and tanks May NOT operate (includes in transit) near overhead lines closer than (includes the longest conductive object): o For voltages to ground 50kV or below 10 feet o For voltages to ground over 50kV 10 feet plus 4 inches for every 10kV over the 50kV o Must cordon off (place cones) to prevent any employee from touching or standing within 5 feet of the lift vehicles while operating near power lines Employees will NOT enter spaces, or reach blindly into areas, containing exposed energized parts all parts must be de-energized first For jobsites, electrical equipment used will be plugged (3-prong plug) into the portable generator (GFCI), which itself serves as the grounding electrode and all electrical
54 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

equipment will be explosion proof. Static Electricity to prevent the accidental discharge of static electricity, the following steps should be taken: When climbing stairs to top of tank, keep hand on hand rail When entering tanks (permit required confined space), maintain contact with the shell When fueling vehicles or containers, attach the ground cable Do not use plastic to cover flammable materials

55 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

12.0 WORKER LEAD PROTECTION PROGRAM


Definitions Competent Person One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable lead hazards in work areas or working conditions and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them HEPA High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter than removed 99.97% of all particulate of 0.3 microns or greater in diameter Lead A heavy metal at room temperature and pressure and is a basic chemical element. IT can combine with various other substances to form lead compounds Lead-Based Paint Generally accepted to be dry paint that contains 0.06% (600 ppm) or greater lead by weight. A more restrictive limit for lead-based paint may be defined for specific project by the project sponsor/owner, or federal, state, or local regulations NIOSH/MSHA National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health; Mine Safety and Health Administration u/g/m3 Micrograms per cubic meter Common unit for reporting airborne concentration of lead ug/100g Microgram per 100 grams Common unit for reporting concentration of lead in blood samples. Also reported as ug/dl (per deciliter) 8-Hour TWA Concentration An 8-hour Time Weighted Average concentration of airborne contaminants. Common units for reporting daily airborne lead exposure for 8 hours at a steady state concentration

12.1 Action Level


Employee exposure, without regard to the use of respirators, to an airborne concentration of lead of 30 ug/m3, calculated as an 8-hour TWA. Whenever employees airborne lead exposure exceeds, or is expected to exceed the action level, the following will be implemented for the work project: Competent person Employee information and training Employee medical surveillance Airborne lead exposure monitoring Record keeping The action level may be exceeded where lead-containing coatings or paint are
56 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

present and the following activities are performed: abrasive blasting, clean-up of expendable abrasives, containment movement and removal, spray painting with lead paint, manual scraping, manual sanding, power tool cleaning (with and without dust collection systems), and head gun applications.

12.2 Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL)


The PEL for airborne exposure is 50 ug/m 3 at an 8-hour TWA concentration of lead that an employee may be exposed to during each workday. No employee will be exposed to airborne lead above the PEL without proper PPE. The following methods will be used, as feasible and effective, for maintaining airborne lead exposures below the PEL: Engineering controls such as general area ventilation for contaminants, local exhaust ventilation for spot removal, vacuum blasting for contaminants will be used and manometers and/or velometers will be used to evaluate the mechanical performance of the ventilation system Warning signs Hygienic facilities Protective work clothing and equipment Respiratory protection Housekeeping During the period that respirators are worn, the protective factor of the specific respirator may be used to determine employees exposure to airborne lead and to achieve compliance with the PEL. For example, if the measured airborne lead contamination level for the worker is 300 ug/m3 for an 8-hour TWA, and the protection factor of the respirator is 10, then the employees daily exposure level is 30 ug/m3.

12.3 Competent Person


The Competent Person will be a Forrest Services Supervisor or Foreman trained and experienced in conducting jobs involving lead exposure. They will have the capability of identifying hazard and the authority to take immediate action to eliminate them, and will be involved in the planning and performance stages of the job. The Competent Person will be at the work site at all times while lead exposure activities are in progress. They may have other job duties in addition, but must be able to monitor the lead work continuously for hazards or deficiencies.

12.4 Employee Information and Training


All employees who work on projects where airborne lead exposures are expected will be provided information and training on the hazards of lead and the measures for controlling these hazards to protect their health. This training will be repeated annually as a refresher course. The content of this training shall include at least the following:
57 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Nature of activities that may result in airborne lead exposure Health effects and risks of lead exposure OSHA standards and guidelines for lead exposure Engineering controls, including containment and ventilation systems Work practices for controlling lead exposure Respiratory protection for controlling lead exposure Monitoring airborne lead concentrations and exposures Medical surveillance program, including medical removal Instructions to ensure cheating agents are not used to remove lead from employees bodies

12.5 Notification to Other Contractors


When conducting lead exposure activities on a multi-employer worksite, Forrest Services will notify other employers of the nature of the lead exposure systems in effect, and the potential need to take measures to protect their employees. Notification to other employers will be with signs around the work area.

12.6 Medical Surveillance


All employees who may be exposed to lead above the Action Level will: Be provided with initial and periodic biological monitoring in the form of blood sampling and analysis for lead and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) Be required to wear a respirator Complete a Pulmonary Function Test Complete a new Respirator Fit Test Record of medical examination/tests are confidential medical records. Access to these records by employees, their designated representatives, or other parities will be according to 29 CFR 1919.20, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records. 12.6.1 Blood Sampling and Analysis All blood sampling and analysis will be conducted by the medical provider contracted by Forrest Services and will be conducted at a reasonable time and place for the employee. The medical provider contracted by Forrest Services will be provided with: Copy of OSHA Construction Lead Standard, 29 CFR 1926.62, including all Appendixes Description of the employees duties as they relate to lead exposure Anticipated exposure level to lead and other toxic substances Description of PPE and respirators used
58 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Past blood test results and all prior written medical opinions concerning the employee that Forrest Services has in its possession or control

Medical examinations provided by other employers or groups, may be accepted by Forrest Services, providing the following conditions are met: Employee agrees to release all medical records of examinations and tests to Forrest Services or its contracted medical provider All medical examinations/tests specified in this program were performed Physicians medical opinion is reviewed by Forrest Services medical provider Blood sampling and analysis shall be conducted periodically as follows: For employees exposed during lead-paint removal project: every two (2) months for the first six (6) months For employees with a blood lead level above 40 ug/dl, but below 50 ug/dl: every two (2) months until two (2) consecutive blood lead level tests are below 40 ug/dl For employees identified with a blood lead level at or above 50 ug/dl: within two (2) weeks. If blood lead level remains above 50 ug/dl, then once a month until two (2) consecutive blood lead level tests are lower than 40 ug/dl Employees will be informed in writing of their blood lead level tests results within five (5) days of Forrest Services receiving them. If test results are above 50 ug/dl, the employee will be temporarily removed from that project and assigned elsewhere until two (2) consecutive blood lead level tests show results below 40 ug/dl. Employees, as determined by the medical provider, to be at an increased risk of health impairment from exposure to lead will also be temporarily removed from that project and assigned elsewhere, until medically cleared. 12.6.2 Respiratory Requirements Respirators will be provided whenever an employees exposure to lead exceeds the PEL in work situations where engineering controls and work practices are not sufficient to reduce exposure to/below the PEL and whenever an employee requests a respirator. Employees required to wear a negative pressure half-face respirator will be fit tested every six (6) months during the lead-paint project. Full-face piece negative pressure respirators will be quantitatively fit tested accordingly. Requirements for respirator users working a lead-based paint project will
59 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

undergo a Pulmonary Function Test (PFT) or forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV), tests for blood pressure and resting heart and other examinations/tests deemed necessary by the medical provider. These tests will be provided annually.

12.7 Warning Signs


Warning signs will be posted in the work area around activities where lead exposure may exceed the PEL. The work area can be demarcated by ropes, tape, walls, or containment. The signs must be posted at every accessible side of the work area and be easily visible from a distance so that employees can take precautions before entering the hazardous area. The signs will read as follows:

The Competent Person will control the access of persons into the work area. All persons entering the work area will wear protective clothing and respirators. NO DRINKING, SMOKING, OR CHEWING is allowed inside the work area.

12.8 Containment
The project sponsor, or owner, will construct and use containment as required. While the proper containment can help protect the public and the environment, they generally cause a significant increase in airborne lead concentration in the work area inside the containment. This may increase the potential for higher employee lead exposures. Therefore, the use of well designed exhaust ventilation and the use of more protective respirators may be necessary to properly protect workers. Containment may include any of the following: Rigid or flexible barriers or sheets surrounding the work area Complete unventilated enclosures build around the area Complete enclosures maintained under negative pressure by exhaust ventilation with exhaust air filtration Containment may not be required throughout the lead abatement project. If a sandblasting material is used that safely encapsulates the lead particles, and exposure monitoring confirms this, then the containment may be removed.

60 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

12.9 Exposure Monitoring


For each lead abatement project, personal air samples will be collected to determine airborne lead exposures to employees performing the work. Full shift (minimum 7 hours per shift) air samples will be collected for each job classification in each work area. The air samples will be taken for the shift with the highest expected exposure level. Forrest Services will implement employee protective measures until results of the employee exposure assessment are received. The Competent Person will be responsible to ensure that exposure monitoring is performed. Where initial monitoring indicates that lead exposure is below the Action Level, and where work activities and conditions will remain the same as at the time of initial sampling, additional monitoring need not be repeated for the work project. The Competent Person will be responsible to ensure that exposure monitoring is performed. Where initial monitoring indicates lead exposure is at or above the Action Level, but not at or above the PEL, additional representative exposure monitoring will be conducted at least every six (6) months for that work project. Where initial monitoring indicates lead exposures are above the PEL, additional representative exposure monitoring will be conducted at least every three (3) months. Representative monitoring should be conducted during the beginning of each different phase of the project, or when changes occur, such as an increase in the number of blasters in the area, to determine a range of exposures for lead removal and clean-up activities. All air samples will be collected and analyzed according to OSHs ID 12 1 method, or equivalent. All samples will be analyzed by laboratories which are AIHA accredited for metal analysis. All exposed employees will be notified in writing of the monitoring results within five (5) days after receiving these results. Initial exposure monitoring may not be required when previously collected sampling data has conclusively determined that current job condition exposure levels will be less than the Action Level.

12.10 Protective Clothing and Equipment


Protective clothing and equipment will be worn/used by all employees whose airborne lead exposure may exceed the PEL and will be provided at no cost to the employee. The protective clothing and equipment will consist of the following: Washable or disposable full body coveralls
61 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Face shields Hard hats Gloves Steel toed shoes or disposable shoe covers Eye protection Hearing protection, if appropriate

Disposable clothing will be used for no more than one work day and will be disposed of as hazardous waste. Washable clothing will be collected at the end of each work day in closed containers, marked as hazardous waste. Contaminated clothing will be cleaned by authorized laundries according to regulations and containers will be labeled as follows: Caution: Clothing contaminated with lead. Clothing will be laundered at least weekly and clean coveralls provided daily to employees whose exposure levels without regard to a respirator are over 200 ug/m3 of lead as an 8-hour TWA.

12.11 Personal Hygiene Facilities and Practices


Clean change areas will be provided for all projects where employees airborne lead exposure may exceed the PEL. These clean change areas will be equipped with storage facilities for street clothes and a separate area for removal and storage of lead contaminated clothing and equipment designed to prevent cross-contamination. Airborne lead exposures in the change area will be maintained below the Action Level. Shower facilities will be provided for all projects where feasible when employee lead exposure exceeds the PEL. The shower facilities will comply with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.141, Sanitation. All employees whose airborne lead exposures may exceed the PEL will shower, or at a minimum, wash their hands and face before lunch break, and at the end of each work shift. Employees required to shower will not leave the workplace wearing any clothing worn while performing lead exposure activities. Clean lunch areas will be provided for projects where employees airborne lead exposure may exceed the PEL. Employees will remove or clean their protective clothing and wash their hands and face before eating, drinking, or smoking. Airborne lead exposures in the lunch area will be maintained below the Action Level. An adequate number of clean lavatory and hand washing facilities will be provided, in compliance with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.141, Sanitation.

12.12 Housekeeping
Accumulations of lead-containing dust and debris will be removed and cleaned daily, using HEPA-filtered vacuum cleaners, where feasible. The dust and
62 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

debris will be collected into sealed containers and tested to determine if it will be disposed of as hazardous or non-hazardous waste. No blowing or shaking of clothing, equipment, or containment material will be permitted, to prevent dispersing lead into the air. All persons involved in clean-up will be trained in performing lead activities, respirator qualified, participate in the medical surveillance program, and wear the protective clothing and equipment, unless exposure monitoring proves otherwise.

12.13 Project Specific Requirements


The specific worker lead protection requirements for each lead removal project will be determined by Forrest Services, the project sponsor and owner. The job specific requirements will be placed in Appendix A and will be forwarded to the project sponsor and owner. Enough details will be provided as to accurately outline the job, medical surveillance, containment, exposure monitoring, protective clothing and equipment, personal hygiene, and housekeeping requirements. The compliance program will be available at the work site for examination by effected employees or authorized persons/agencies. This program will be updated and revised at least every six (6) months.

63 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

13.0 HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM


13.1 Explanation of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
The following information in the Material Dada Sheet (MSDS) is organized into 15 sections as follows: I. Product Identification II. Component Data III. Precautions for Safe Handling and Storage IV. Physical Data V. Personal Protective Equipment Requirements VI. Fire and Explosion Hazard Information VII. Reactivity Information VIII. First Aid IX. Toxicology and Health Information X. Transportation Information XI. Spill and Leak Procedures XII. Waste Disposal XIII. Additional Regulatory Status Information XIV. Additional Information XV. Major References 13.1.1 Section I Product Information The product name and product code is used to identify the product. The file number and revision number identify the MSDS itself. The chemical family or name and synonyms are given with the formula where applicable. A brief use description of the product is presented along with the OSHA hazard classifications. 13.1.2 Section II Component Data According to OSHA, a hazardous chemical refers to any chemical that presents a physical or health hazard. A chemical may be a physical hazard if it is combustible, flammable, pyrophoric, chemically unstable, water reactive, or explosive, a compressed gas, and organic peroxide, or other oxidizer. A chemical may present a health hazard if exposure could result in acute or chronic adverse health effects. If it has been determined the product is a health hazard, then all components that present a health hazard and that comprise 1% or more of the material are listed in this section. Also, any component that is a carcinogen is listed if it comprises 0.1% or more of the product. If it has been determined that the product is a physical hazard, then any component that presents a physical hazard is listed. Normally, the chemical name and CAS numbers are used to identify a component. Where the identity
64 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

of a component is a trade secret, a descriptive name is used instead of the chemical name and a trade secret access number is used. Exposure limits are given for each component where these have been established. 13.1.3 Section III Precautions for Safe Handling and Storage This section provides vital information for handling and storing a product. It is important that all recommendations be followed. 13.1.4 Section IV Physical Data Knowledge of the physical properties of a substance is necessary for all safety and industrial hygiene decisions and are listed in this section. 13.1.5 Section V Personal Protective Equipment Requirements The proper use of personal protective equipment is of the utmost importance and the guideline presented in this section must be closely followed. Descriptions of specific equipment required for routine use are given. Use of additional protective equipment required for fire fighting and for spill/leak clean-up is outlined in Section XI. 13.1.6 Section VI Fire and Explosion Hazard Information The recommended extinguishing media to be used in the extent of a fire are given, together with any unusual fire and explosion hazards. 13.1.7 Section VII Reactivity Information A substance is said to be reactive if it reactive if it readily enters into chemical reaction and undergoes chemical change. For MSDS purposes, the reactions can be grouped into three broad categories: Decomposition, Polymerization, and Reactions with other chemicals. 13.1.8 Section VIII First Aid First aid procedures are described for each of the normal routes of exposure. IT is important that first aid be administered as soon as possible after exposure has occurred. If there is any doubt about the victims condition, contact a physician. 13.1.9 Section IX Toxicology and Health Information The consequences of exposure, if any, by inhalation, skin or eye contact, or ingestion are outlined in this section. The signs, symptoms and effects that the exposure could produce are described so that any exposure would be recognized as quickly as possible and the appropriate action taken. The effect and damage that exposure could
65 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

produce on target organs are given together with the symptoms. 13.1.10 Section X Transportation Information In the event the material is regulated as hazardous by DOT, the Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR) are outlined in this section. 13.1.11 Section XI Spill and Leak Procedures During clean-up of spills and leaks, it may be necessary to use the extra personal protective equipment listed here. Procedural recommendations relative to air, land, and water are described as well. 13.1.12 Section XII Waste Disposal This section gives guidelines for disposing of a product if it becomes a waste. Recommendations are based upon the physical state and hazardous properties of the material. If the material is designated as hazardous by 40 CFR 261, it must be disposed of in a permitted hazardous waste treatment storage of disposal facility in accordance with local, state, and federal regulations. If the material is nonhazardous, recommendations for disposal are made depending on the physical state and known characteristics of the material. 13.1.13 Section XIII Additional Regulatory Status Information This section contains information relevant to compliance with other federal and/or state laws. 13.1.14 Section XIV Additional Information Any relevant additional information is given in this section. 13.1.15 Section XV Major References This section lists some of the major references that have been considered in preparing the MSDS.

13.2 Forrest Services LLC Hazard Communication Program


In order to comply with OSHA and 29 CFR 1910.1200, this written Hazard Communication Plan (HCP) is to be implemented for all personnel of Forrest Services. All employees have the Right to Know, meaning they are entitled to know the hazards in their work area. Therefore, all employees will be given access to this HCP upon request and shall be trained in hazard communication prior to starting their job. Foreman will translate for those employees who do not read or speak English.

66 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

The Safety Department of Forrest Services will be responsible for ensuring the program is current, enforced, and available to any federal, state, or local official who has proper authority upon request. This program shall be updated when new chemicals or hazards are introduced into the working environment and shall be reviewed annually. The purchasing manager will make sure a statement requesting an MSDS appears on the purchase requisition. This program shall provide complete information to all employees on the following areas: Listing of all hazardous chemicals, and their corresponding MSDS, on the property Appropriate labeling on all containers of hazardous chemicals Foreman and Supervisor methods to inform employees of hazards of non-routine tasks Employee training to recognize hazards and understand MSDS 13.2.1 Inventory List of Hazardous Chemicals A list of all hazardous chemicals used by Forrest Services is established and maintained by the Supervisor in the main office. A copy of this list will be in the plant at all times. This inventory list is indexed by numerically and is corresponding with the assigned number of each MSDS. A list of the hazardous chemicals will be attached to this HCP. 13.2.2 Container Labeling The Supervisor, or a designated employee on location, shall be responsible for monitoring all containers of hazardous chemicals entering the workplace to assure that all containers are labeled. The container labels of hazardous chemicals shall identify: Chemical name of the substance Hazard warning Protective equipment to be used Name and address of the manufacturer and emergency phone number If the chemical is to be transferred to another permanent container, the Supervisor shall ensure that the new container is properly labeled, e.g. that all secondary containers are labeled with an extra copy of the original or with a generic label that has a block for identity and blocks for hazard warning. The Safety Department shall review the labeling system annually as required by 29 CFR 1910.2100, Hazard Communication Standard.
67 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

13.2.3 Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) The Safety Department will be responsible for obtaining and maintaining the MSDS. They will review incoming MSDS for new and significant health and safety information and will ensure that any new information is given to the effected employees. MSDS have to be check and updated annually. The MSDS system shall include: Index by number corresponding to the index numbers on the hazardous chemical list Identification used on MSDS matches container labels Compilation of personal protection equipment required during normal uses Comparison of MSDS to determine compatibility of adjacent storage of chemical materials Compilation of material needed for clean-up of spills and leaks and additional personal protection equipment required Each Foreman will maintain a copy of the HCP for their job site in their vehicle. 13.2.4 Employee Training The Safety Department will go over the HCP and each MSDS applicable to each new employee, prior to starting work. Before a new chemical is used, all employees shall be informed of its use, instructed on its safe use, and trained on hazards associated with the new chemical. The training shall include, but not limited to: Overview of the requirements contained in 29 CFR 1910.2100 All chemicals present in their workplace Location and availability of the written HCP Location of MSDS and the chemical inventory list Physical and health effects of the hazardous chemicals Methods and observation techniques used to determine the presence or release of hazardous chemicals in the workplace How to lessen or prevent exposure to hazardous chemicals using proper procedures and appropriate PPE Emergency procedures to follow if exposed to any hazardous chemicals After the training is finished, complete the Hazard Communication Training Acknowledgement form. 13.2.5 Outside Contractors Any company contracted by Forrest Services to provide specialized services will provide the Safety Department with a list of chemicals and
68 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

the appropriate MSDS for the materials they may use. The Forrest Services Safety Department will determine if a contractors materials will present any additional hazard(s) to Forrest Services employees and make appropriate recommendations to eliminate or reduce these hazards. 13.2.6 Multi-Employer Sites At job sites where employees from either the host company or other employers will be working around our blasting and painting operation, Forrest Services Foreman will advise their Foreman that we have paints and thinners, and that our Hazard Communication Plan is available for them to review if they desire.

69 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Hazard Communication Training Acknowledgement This is to certify ____________________________________ has successfully completed the Hazard Communication Training in accordance with the Safety and Health Manual of Forrest Services LLC. It is understood that compliance with the Hazard Communication Program is a condition of employment of Forrest Services LLC and that disciplinary action will be taken in case of violation. Employee Name: _____________________________ ID #: _____________________

Employee Signature: ____________________________ Instructors Name: _____________________________ Instructors Signature: ____________________________ Date: ____________________

Esto es para certificar que ____________________________________ a completado el entrenamiento de la Comunicacin del Peligro que Entrena de acuerdo con el Manual de la Seguridad y la Salud de Forrest Services LLC. Es entendido que la conformidad con el Programa del Comunicacin del Peligro es una condicin del empleo con Forrest Services LLC. Y accin disciplinaran ser aceptada en caso de una infraccin.

70 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

14.0 ALCOHOL, CONTROLLED SUBSTAND AND CONTRABAND POLICY


Forrest Services has adopted an alcohol, controlled substance, and contraband policy to ensure the safety and well-being of all employees. Users of illicit drugs, mixtures, compounds, or alcohol present a serious danger not only to themselves, but also to all other employees with whom they work or come in contact. Lack of mental alertness, slow reactions, and other effects of alcohol and drugs lead to poor judgment and errors that place the safety of our employees and facility in grave danger. Company policy forbids the following: Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages or any controlled substances Possession or use of contraband while on company and/or customer properties (facilities, buildings, vehicles, equipment, products, or land), or while on company business Misuse or abuse of prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications Definitions Possession Concealing, distributing, manufacturing, possessing, selling, or transporting Consumption Drinking, eating, inhaling, snorting, injection, or applying to the skin Controlled Substance Any drug, narcotic, hallucinogen, barbiturate, amphetamine, mixture, inhalant, or compound not prescribed by a licensed physician for the legitimate treatment of a specific employees medical condition Contraband Paraphernalia or equipment commonly used to produce or help a person consume a controlled substance, or any firearm, ammunition, explosive, or weapon, etc. Violation of any of the following rules will result in immediate termination: No alcoholic beverages may be brought onto, or consumed, on company and/or customer property, or while on company business No illicit drug, mixture, or compound may be brought onto, or used, on company and/or customer property, or while on company business All legitimate prescription drugs prescribed for a specific employee by a licensed physician for a specific illness or medical need will require a doctors statement indicating the name of the drug, the duration of the treatment, and that the drug will not interfere with the employees ability to work safely. The employee must register the prescription drug with the Safety Department and the Supervisor immediately upon reporting to work on the first day of use of the drug Any employee taking a prescription drug as noted above will immediately
71 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

inform their Supervisor of any adverse side effects occurring from the use of the drug, as soon as such adverse side effects become evident to the employee No employee may give, sell, or otherwise transfer any drug, mixture, or compound to any other employee. To do this is in violation of federal law, and the employees involved will be reported to law enforcement authorities immediately for possible criminal charges Refusal to supply, or to attempt to switch or adulterate a urine, blood, or other sample used for testing Possession or use of contraband

Forrest Services employees and subcontractors will sign a consent form acknowledging these policies and agreeing to abide by them. (Attachment A) Forrest Services utilizes several drug testing procedures to enforce its alcohol and controlled substance policy. The first procedures is for the Department of Transportation (DOT) / Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration (PHMSA), as mandated by 49 CFR 199 (Federal Pipeline Drug Testing Regulation), as a contractor performing Covered Function; and DOT/Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) as mandated by 49 CFR 40 (Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug Testing programs). The second procedure is for the Forrest Services employees, or subcontractors, working for a customer that requires Non-DOT drug/alcohol testing. The third procedure is for those Forrest Services employees not subject to either the first or second testing procedure. The employee will be informed of their results. In addition, the Chief Operating Officer will be notified of any POSITIVE tests for disciplinary action. There are four reasons for conducting drug tests: 1) Pre-Access; 2) Random; 3) PostIncident; and 4) Reasonable Suspicion

14.1 DOT PHMS/FMCSA Drug Policy


The tests will determine if the employee has used any of the following illegal drugs: marijuana; cocaine; opiates; amphetamines; and phencyclidine (PCP). All laboratory drug tests will be by a DOT-approved testing facility: One Source Toxicology 1213 Genoa Red Bluff Road Pasadena, Texas 77504 Phone: (713) 920-2559 Forrest Services uses two medical facilities for its drug programs and medical assistance: San Augustine Industrial Clinic (SAIC) 321 W. San Augustine
72 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Deer Park, Texas 77536 Phone: (281) 476-4627 Occupational Medicine of La Porte (OMLP) 410 E. Fairmont Parkway, Suite A La Porte, Texas 77571 Phone: (281) 842-1200 For on-the-job injuries, we use SAIC because they are part of the Texas Star Network (required by our Workers Compensation insurance company). For non-injury assistance, we use OMLP. SAIC will conduct the DOT drug tests due to an incident/accident. OMLP will do the pre-access and random drug tests. Both of these clinics send their urine samples to One Source Toxicology. Additionally, both clinics have Medical Review Officers (MRO). For its Substance Abuse Professional, Forrest Services will use: Worklife Institute 1900 St. James Place Houston, Texas 77056 Phone: (281) 615-2061 No employee who tested positive can be returned to a DOT facility until the MRO and Substance Abuse Professional have determined the employee has successfully completed the required education and treatment, and not failed another drug test since entering the program. This employee will also be subject to the follow-up testing. 14.1.1 Pre-Access/Pre-Employee Each employee of Forrest Services who is placed on the DOT list (expected to work on a DOT Covered Task may be commencement of a particular job for an employee who has not previously been on the DOT list, or upon employment with Forrest Services) will be given a drug test not earlier than one (1) month prior to commencement of the job/commencement of the employment. 14.1.2 Random Drug Testing DOTs random drug testing rate is 50% of the employees in the DOT drug pool per calendar year (can be lowered to 25% by the DOT Administrator, however, Forrest Services will stay with the 50% ratio). The Safety Department will ensure they have an accurate, and up-todate roster of Forrest Services employees. They will use a computer program (www.randomizer.org) to randomly select the numbers. These numbers will be matched against a file of names arranged alphabetically
73 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

(DOT names will be separate from the remainder of Forrest Services employees). With the list of names, the Safety Department will notify the Supervisor of the requirement for each named employee to report to the OMLP for DOT test. The Supervisor, or someone from the Safety Department, may escort the employee to ensure they do not take anything that may alter their urine in an attempt to cover up the use of a controlled substance. 14.1.3 Post Incident Testing Upon notification of an accident, our provider clinic will conduct a drug test as soon as practicable, but no later than thirty-six (36) hours for each employee involved in the accident, if their performance contributed, or may have contributed to the accident. If the employee is taken to the hospital or doctor, the medical facility will be asked to conduct the drug test and provide the results to the Forrest Services Safety Department. 14.1.4 Reasonable Suspicion When a Supervisor, the Safety Department, or Forrest Services management suspects that an employee is under the influence of controlled substances, they may request a drug test. If a Supervisor requests this, either management or the Safety Department will visually observe the employee. If management or the Safety Department suspects the employee, they will confer with the other. If in agreement, then the employee will be escorted to our provider clinic for a drug test.

14.2 Non-DOT Drug Testing


Some of our customers require Non-DOT drug testing. DOT drug tests take priority over Non-DOT drug tests. Therefore, should an employee meet the criteria for a DOT drug test and a Non-DOT drug test, only the DOT drug test needs to be taken. Employees expected to work on a Non-DOT facility will be placed on a NonDOT list (either upon expectation of working a particular job or upon employment with Forrest Services). Non-DOT drug tests will be conducted at either OMLP or SAIC, as stipulated in paragraph 14.1, using the comprehensive drug test (Profile #251220 for OMLP or #95131 for SAIC). Any employee who has tested positive, or refused testing, for a Non-DOT customer in any employee related test is prohibited from working for a NonDOT customer.
74 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

14.2.1 Annual/Pre-Access Personnel requiring pre-access testing must have received a negative result on a comprehensive drug test within the twelve (12) months preceding that persons first access to the customer property. In addition, personnel requiring pre-access testing must have received a negative result on a comprehensive drug test in any calendar year in which the employee performs work on customer property. 14.2.2 Random Testing Personnel requiring random testing will be subject to unannounced and continuous random selection (using www.randomizer.org against the Non-DOT list of employees arranged alphabetically) for controlled substances while performing work for the customers. The random selection will test at least 50% of the employee in the pool each calendar year. 14.2.3 Post-Incident Testing If Forrest Services or its customer determines from the best information available immediately after a work-related incident that performance of one or more of our personnel contributed to the incident, or cannot be completely discounted as a contributing factor to the incident, Forrest Services shall remove that/those individual(s) from the property and surrender their site credentials to our clients. For purposes of this part, incident means an incident that caused personal injury requiring medical treatment beyond first aid administered at the work site, or property damage of more than $1,000 or and incident that carried the potential for serious personal injury or significant property damage or at the request of the customer. An individual so removed will be allowed to return to work on the customers property only after Forrest Services has had drug and alcohol tests performed on the individual as soon as possible, and Forrest Services certifies in writing the test identification number, individuals Social Security number, test date/time, and a negative test result. On that written certification, Forrest Services will include a consent signed by the individual permitting disclosure to our customer of the test result. 14.2.4 Reasonable Suspicion Testing Upon reasonable suspicion of Forrest Services or our customer, and employee under the influence of a controlled substance while on company property shall be removed from the property and surrender their credentials to the customer.

75 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

An employee removed from customer property for reasonable suspicion will be allowed to return to work on customer property only after Forrest Services conducts alcohol and drug testing on the employee as soon as possible following the employees removal from the site, and when Forrest Services certifies in writing the test identification number, individuals Social Security number, test date/time, and a negative test result. On that written certification, Forrest Services will include a consent signed by the individual permitting disclosure to our client of the test result.

14.3 Other Drug Testing


For Forrest Services employees who will not be on the DOT or Non-DOT lists, the Safety Department will conduct drug screening using a split specimen collection system and tested on-the-spot. The employee will write their name on the form authorizing Forrest Services to conduct the drug test, then sign and date the form. The Safety Department will mark the reason for the test, verify and prescribed medications (there should not be any prescribed medications that have not already been provided to the Safety Department, except for new employees), and complete the rest of the form as appropriate. Should an individual record a POSITIVE for one or more of the categories of illegal drug use, the employee has a right to have a certified laboratory or physician conduct another drug test. The Safety Department will escort the employee directly to Forrest Services contracted provider within the hour. The clinic will take their own specimen and test it accordingly.

14.4 Alcohol Testing (DOT and Non-DOT)


There are two reasons for conducting alcohol tests: 1) Post Incident; and 2) Reasonable Suspicion. Alcohol testing will be conducted following an accident (within 2 hours) or when suspected through direct observation by at least two of the following three: Supervisor, Safety Department, or the management of Forrest Services. Alcohol testing will be conducted by Forrest Services contracted medical provider. Having an alcohol content level above 0.04 will prohibit the employee from remaining on duty. An employee who failed the alcohol test must pass (alcohol content below 0.02) a second test, or wait until the next work period, (provided at least 8 hours has transpired between the observation time and the next work period) before they will be allowed to return to work, and they will be subject to follow-up testing. The employee who tested 0.04 or above must also meet with Substance Abuse Professional, and follow any recommended provision in the evaluation/treatment in order to be considered eligible to return-to-duty. The
76 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

employee shall undergo at least six (6) unannounced alcohol tests during the first twelve (12) months following the return-to-duty. Follow-up testing occurs over the next sixty (60) months, unless the Substance Abuse Professional terminates the program sometime after the initial six (6) tests have been done. The employee who tests 0.02 or greater and less than 0.04 must not return-toduty until their alcohol level is below 0.02, the start of the next regularly scheduled work period, or eight (8) hours have transpired since the initial alcohol test.

14.5 Record Keeping (DOT)


Forrest Services will keep drug test records as follows: Positive test results: 5 years Recommendations of Substance Abuse Professional 5 years NCMS reporting 5 years Collection process 3 years Supervisor and employee training 3 years Negative test results 1 year Forrest Services will keep alcohol test records as follows: Test results with alcohol concentration above 0.02 5 years Documentation of refusal 5 years Employee evaluation and referrals 5 years NCMS reporting 5 years Collection process 2 years Training 2 years Test results with alcohol concentration below 0.02 1 year

14.6 Reporting (DOT)


Forrest Services must report statistics to the National Compliance Management System (www.nationalcompliance.com) on a semi-annual basis (January and July)

14.7 Employee Assistance Program


Under the Employee Assistance Program, the Safety Department personnel must have been trained in the detection of possible symptoms of drug and alcohol use. In addition, we will display and distribute informational material, community service hot-line telephone number, and Forrest Services policy on illegal drug and alcohol use.

77 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

15.0 EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN


15.1 Responsibility
The Safety Department of Forrest Services will be fully responsible for the implementation of this emergency action plan. They will be authorized to make necessary decisions in case of fire or other emergency. They will also be responsible for training employees in the use of the emergency procedures, the use of an evacuation plan, the use of fire extinguishers, and any other training required by this program to ensure employee safety from fire or other emergencies. Drills to test the employees and first responders will be conducted as deemed appropriate by the Safety Department and company management. Only, Steve Valerius is authorized to set up a press conference or make statements to the public or media. IF you are questioned, answer: No Comment.

15.2 Process Safety Management and Emergency Evacuation Procedures


The purpose of Process Safety Management (PSM) is to prevent or minimize the consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive chemicals that could result in toxic, fire, or explosion hazards. Our employees complete site-specific training courses provided by the customer. In addition, our employees complete the Pipeline Operator Qualification Abnormal Operating Conditions course. Our employees will follow the procedures discussed in these courses whenever there is an emergency at the jobsite. For Forrest Services, PSM only applies in two (2) ways: 1. An employee causes damage to equipment (tank, pipe, valve, etc.) that could, or does cause a release 2. An employee discovers a release 15.2.1 Handling Leaks and Spills If a Forrest Services employee discovers, or causes a leak or spill from our customers equipment (tanks, pipes, valves, etc.), IMMEDIATELY initiate the following steps: Notify the Foreman Radio the information to the customers Emergency Response Team Shut down all equipment, including vehicles Notify any other workers in the area of the incident Walk away, upwind, or crosswind of the leak/spill Rally at the designated point and determine if anyone is missing and report to the customer
78 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Follow additional directions from the customer

If a Forrest Services employee discovers, or causes a leak or spill from our own products (paint, thinners, etc.), IMMEDIATELY initiate the following steps: Notify the Foreman Attempt to stop the leak/spill, only if safe to do so o Place empty container under the leak o Put leaking container inside a recovery container o Rotate or shift the leaking container into a position that stops the leak Prevent leak/spill from spreading, if possible Report information to customer and evacuate the area, if necessary Provide first aid/CPR, if necessary Clean up spill, if safe to do so (Shovel split material or sweep absorbent non-flammable material over area and place in buckets and close) 15.2.2 Fire Procedures Unless you have had Fire Extinguisher training, DO NOT ATTEMPT to put a fire out. First responders who have had Fire Extinguisher training will gather their fire extinguishers and attempt to extinguish the fire, PROVIDED IT IS SAFE TO DO SO. Never attack the fire without ample equipment. Always have a second person with an extinguisher to protect your exit should the fire become too large to control. Fire Extinguisher training will be conducted each calendar year. This training will cover operation of the extinguisher and techniques to fight a fire. The BEST way to fight a fire is to never have a fire. All employees must follow these guidelines to help prevent fires in the workplace: Smoke in designated areas only Avoid using plastic containers for explosive fluids Keep the work areas clean and orderly Avoid paints and primers near flames or other ignition sources Properly ground and position portable generators to alleviate potential hazards from fumes or ignition sources Use proper fueling techniques; engines must be shut off and the vehicle or apparatus grounded to prevent static discharge Fire extinguishers are place in every company truck, lift vehicle, air compressor, and throughout the work areas. All extinguishers furnished by Forrest Services are type A/B/C so they can be used on any fire.
79 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Fire extinguishers are inspected by the Safety Department monthly and inspected semi-annually by an outside fire extinguisher company.

15.3 First Aid/Medical Care


The following Forrest Services personnel should be trained and remain current in First Aid (valid for 3 years from date of training) and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) (valid for 1 year from date of training): General Superintendent Field Superintendent Shop Superintendent Foreman Lead Mechanic Safety Department Personnel CPR and First Aid training will be conducted by a certified American Red Cross instructor and documented with an ARC card for those completing the courses. First Aid kits (a weather proof container with individual sealed medical items and latex gloves) and CPR pocket masks are Forrest Services and maintained in each company truck. Department will ensure first aid kit inventories are conducted replenish as needed. packages of provided by The Safety weekly and

Before administering first aid, if the victim is conscious, ask them if they want you to provide first aid to them. They have the right to refuse. IF they refuse and the injury is serious, contact the Emergency Response Team anywaythey may be able to convince the injured employee to allow treatment. If the injured employee subsequently loses consciousness, which implies consent and medical care can then be provided. Foreman must contact the host facility when starting a project to determine procedures for obtaining first aid/emergency medical treatment at their site. All current and new employees are made aware of the location of the medical clinic that Forrest Services uses for non-emergency work-related injuries. Should a job site location be in an area that does not have 911) service, the phone number of local physicians/hospital/ambulance shall be conspicuously posted.

15.4 Bloodborne Pathogens


Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease, such as HIV or Hepatitis B. Since it is impossible to visually distinguish infected fluids from non-infected fluids, you must consider every
80 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

fluid as potentially infected. Forrest Services has established an Exposure Control Plan. The first part of this plan is the Exposure Determination (made without regard to the use of personal protective equipment), which is as follows: 1. List of all job classifications in which all employees in those job classifications have occupational exposure Safety 2. List of job classifications in which some employees have occupational exposure Foreman 3. List of all tasks and procedures in which occupational exposure occurs Administering first aid and CPR Compliance with the plan shall be as follows: Engineering and work practice controls - safety procedures to prevent/minimize injuries (CPR training annually; first aid training: every 3 years); PPE for first aid/CPR are the latex gloves and the CPR pocket mask gloves will be disposed of after each use and CPR pocket masks will be cleaned with appropriate disinfectant after each use Hand washing facilities may not be available at the work sites; antiseptic towlettes are available in the first aid kits Needles and sharps are NOT used by Forrest Services employees While administering first aid/CPR, there will be NO smoking, eating, drinking, handling contact lenses, or applying cosmetics or lip balm While administering first aid/CPR, make certain not to splash, spray, or spatter blood or other bodily fluids Bloody gloves, bandages, or clothes will be placed in red biohazard bags (if outside of the bag gets contaminated, place that bag inside another bag) for proper disposal Safety Department will evaluate and develop a written site-specific plan at the time of exposure to decontaminate the worksite and equipment Post-exposure evaluation and follow-up is for any employee who may have been exposed to infectious blood or bodily fluids. A medical treatment facility within the Texas Star Network (Forrest Services workers compensation network) will conduct the medical evaluation and provide any treatment necessary (to include the Hepatitis B vaccine) at no cost to the employee. Training will be conducted when the employee is trained in administering first aid and CPR (training for CPR is and annual requirement) on the following topics: Copy and explanation of 29 CFR 1910.1030 and the Exposure Control Plan Epidemiology and symptoms Modes of transmission Methods for recognizing hazardous activities Use and limitations of engineering and work control practices
81 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

PPE types, selection, use, removal, handling, decontamination and disposal Information on Hepatitis B vaccine Actions to take if contacting infected fluids Reporting of contact Post-exposure evaluation and follow-up Signs and labels

82 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

16.0 HOUSEKEEPING
Many accidents and unsafe conditions on the job site are directly related to poor housekeeping practices. A great deal of this is carelessness and lack of attention to the daily routine. The following practices are required to eliminate this problem: Keep First Aid Kits Current First aid kits must be up-to-date and in their proper location Keep Work Area Orderly Clean and put away tools, dispose of waste and scrap, and check the equipment and site for proper condition and order Close Whatever is Open Close doors, cans, containers, and drawers when you leave the work area Clean Up Clean up spills/leaks immediately Pick Up Pick up things you lay down and do not use any longer Return Equipment Return equipment and other tools to their proper place when you are finished using them Turn Things Off Turn off electrical items, motors, generators, etc. before leaving the workplace if they do not need to be left on Store Unused Equipment Store tools and equipment when not in use Mark Tripping/Slipping/Fall Hazards Use barricades, tapes, and/or cones to identify potential hazard areas Properly Store Paints and Other Flammables Store all paints and flammable materials in their proper place Hygiene Facilities Keep break areas and restrooms clean and neat

83 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

17.0 STANDARD FOR WORKERS EXPOSED TO HOT ENVIORNMENTS (HEAT STRESS)


Work doesnt stop when the heat goes up. Rising temperatures can raise health and safety risks. Heat stress can cause serious, sometimes even fatal, illness. Your body responds by bringing more blood to the skin, and producing sweat, which cools the skin as it evaporates.

17.1 Heat Fatigue


Heat fatigue is an important early warning sign of heat stress. You feel too tired and weak to concentrate on doing your job well. Take a break!

17.2 Heat Cramps


Heat cramps develop when you sweat out more salt than your body takes in and your muscles cramps. For relief, drink water. Dont take salt or electrolyte drinks if you have a heart condition or are on a low-sodium diet.

17.3 Heat Exhaustion


Heat exhaustion is more serious. Its symptoms include: Pale or flushed appearance Weakness Sweating Headache Moist, clammy skin Dizziness Sometimes nausea or a slight fever If you or a co-worker shows these symptoms, follow these steps: Notify your Supervisor immediately Move to a cool place Loosen clothing Drink fluids slowly Apply cool compresses to the body Elevate feet 8 to 12 inches

17.4 Heat Stroke


Heat stroke is the MOST SERIOUS form of heat stress. The body stops sweating and cant cool itself, so temperature rises quickly. It can lead to delirium, convulsions, or unconsciousness even death if the body isnt cooled down. It is important to recognize the symptoms: Chills Confusion
84 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Dry, hot, reddish skin Strong and rapid pulse

Heat stroke is very dangerous! Call a doctor immediately. While you wait, cool the person as much as possible. Hose down or soak the clothing with water and fan the body and monitor the ABCs airway, breathing, and circulation. Dont give an unconscious victim fluid.

17.5 Prevention
To prevent heat stress, follow as many of these steps as possible: Wear light-colored clothing to reflect the suns light Drink plenty of water. Drink at least 16 ounces about an hour before work and then 5-7 ounces every 15-20 minutes during work Adapt to the high heat slowly; it may take a week to fully adjust Stay in good physical condition; eat regular, balanced meals Drink less alcohol and caffeine; they dehydrate you Take frequent breaks; look for cool, well-ventilated places Work at a steady pace and reduce extra motions Be alert to the symptoms and seek immediate relief

85 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

18.0 ACCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATION


It is very important for Forrest Services employees to report ALL accidents/incidents to the Safety Department, whether anyone was injured or not. The primary purpose for reporting accidents is to determine what caused them and then to learn how to prevent those same types of accidents from occurring in the future. The intent of the program is not to get employees in trouble, but to help them work safely.

18.1 Accident Reporting


All accident and injury reports and investigation records will remain on file and available for a period of at least five (5) years. In addition to Forrest Services reports, the Safety Department may be required to complete the job sites accident reports, co-investigate with the job site, and/or provide them copies of Forrest Services reports. Effective January 1, 2002, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires all medical treatment to be reported via OSHA 300 logs first aid only does not need to be reported. OSHAs definitions of first aid are as follows (it does not matter how many different first aid measures are used): Administered where it occurred Generally consists of one-time or short-term treatment Usually simple and require little or no technology Can be administered to prevent the condition from worsening while awaiting medical treatment Cleaning, flushing, or soaking wounds on the surface of the skin Using hot or cold therapy Using any temporary immobilization devices while transporting a victim Using finger guards Use of massage to relieve cramps or muscle aches Drinking fluids for relief of heat stress 18.1.1 Non-Reportable Accidents If the accident did not injure anyone or damage any property, the Safety Department will investigate and prepare a Forrest Services Accident Investigation Report for in-house filing. 18.1.2 Reportable Accidents If the accident did injure someone, but did not result in a fatality or hospitalization of two or more persons, the Safety Department will investigate and prepare a Forrest Services Accident Investigation Report and a SWBC First Report of Injury or Illness for inclusion in Forrest Services OSHA 300 log. 18.1.3 Serious Accidents
86 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

If the accident resulted in a fatality, the hospitalization of two or more persons, or the accident resulted in property damage, public liability, or news media coverage, the Safety Department will investigate and prepare a Forrest Services Accident Investigation Report, a SWBC First Report of Injury or Illness, and prepare the required reports for the insurance company that will handle the claim (auto and/or facility). OSHA MUST BE CONTACED IMMEDIATELY.

18.2 Accident Investigation


Upon notification, the Safety Department will conduct an investigation for all accidents and injuries. The investigation will take place at the scene, if at all possible, and as quickly as possible, but no later than twenty-four (24) hours. Use the Forrest Services Incident Investigation Worksheet/Report to determine the following: Who was involved Where did the incident occur take pictures if allowed When did the incident occur How did the incident occur include ALL details Why did the incident occur include ALL factors Who witnessed the incident get names, phone numbers, and addresses (if not Forrest Services employees) What aid was rendered to the victim, if any What actions can be implemented to prevent this type of accident in the future

87 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

19.0 QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURE


The following employees in addition to their regular duties are responsible for Quality Control: Jorge Grimaldo Hilario Tavira Jos Olmos Raymon Vera Luis Ramos Juan Villegas Pedro Garcia Wandy Martnez Erasmo Alejos Juan Garcia Marco Rubio Enrique Zuniga

Safety: Jorge Grimaldo, Jr. In addition to Forrest Services personnel, our customers may use their employees or a third party inspection company for quality control. The paint manufacture may use their inspectors should a quality control issue arise. Our customers furnish Forrest Services with the specifications they need for blasting and the millage to apply for each individual coating. Some instruments used for Quality Control are as follows: Humidity Detector Wet Mil Gauge Dry Mil Gauge Dehumidifier Air Dryers Pin Hole Leak Detector (Jeep) Record keeping consists of the following: Third party inspection reports, in some cases The original quote identifying the specifications Job acceptance by the customer

88 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

20.0 FOREMANS GUIDE TO SAFE OPERATIONS

89 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Foremans Guide To Safe Operations

Safety Procedures to Be Complied With Creating a Safe Work Environment, In Accordance With Job Hazard Analysis
90 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

INTRODUCTION Forrest Services provides abrasive blasting, coatings (painting) and insulation services to the industrial and commercial markets. The company is based in La Porte, Texas and provides services throughout the United States and abroad. This Foremans Guide to Safe Operations manual is designed to supplement Forrest Services Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Manual by breaking down specific equipment that is used on the job site and provides critical information to Foremen overseeing projects for our customers. In addition, each Foreman MUST complete the Job Hazard Assessment, Daily Safety Meetings, and Daily Equipment Checklist form, which will aid in determining the hazards that are present in the work activities on a daily basis. EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS Employees must be thoroughly trained on the equipment and tools used on our job sites. Each day, equipment and tools must be inspected by the Foreman prior to use. This inspection should focus on damaged parts, loose fittings, deterioration or tears in hoses or line, as well as ensure guards are in place. If any repairs or maintenance is required, follow the Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) procedures. Hearing protection may be required when working around much of this equipment. Forrest Services routinely utilizes the following equipment when providing our services: Hoses The bull hoses will be connected together via crows foot connection and will be secured through the eyelets using wire. In addition, each connection will be secured with a steel, spring-loaded whip-check safety cable at both ends. Bull hoses are NOT connected to each other to increase their length. The air compressor, air dryer and sand pot are placed within the length of the bull hoses. Ingersoll Rand Air Compressors Air compressors are used to on the job site to provide breathing air to the blast hoods, to move abrasives through the blasting hoses, to move coatings through the paint lines, to power the Spiders, Coppus air blowers, paint pumps, and tools. The air compressors MUST have a grounding cable connected to a metal rod stuck into the ground. The air compressor will push the air through the bull hoses to the air dryer only. Air Dryers The air dryer removes oil and water from the air supplied by the air compressor. The dry air may then exit through a bull hose to the sand pot and inch air hoses to the filtration system and additional equipment (spiders, paint pumps, etc.).

91 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

The air dryers fan blades will be in a metal enclosure that does not have openings larger than inch. Sand Hoppers Sand hoppers will be located in a stable, flat area that allows safe access for the tractor that delivers the blasting media, as well as the loading of the sand pots. An extension ladder will be placed against the sand hopper and securely tied to the sand hoppers lowest permanent ladder rung. Confined Space procedures (Section 10.0) must be followed if an employee is to enter the sand hoper for any reason. In addition, any employee climbing the extension ladder against the sand hopper must follow the Fall Protection procedures (Section 5.3) Sand Pots and Equipment A sand pot or blast machine will be connected to the air dryer with a bull hose using whip-checks. Blasting hoses are connected to the sand pot and held securely by guillotine valves at the base of the blast machine. Blasting hoses connected to the blast nozzle, or to each other to increase their length, will be secured with wire through the eyelets on each crows foot connection. If blasting in a confined space, all blast hose connections will be wrapped in a thick rubber sleeve and will be held in place by tie-wire or hose clamps. This is done to prevent damage tank floor plate if couplings or hose gaskets fail. The Foreman is responsible to inspect the hose connections (rubber sleeves) on an hourly basis during confined space blasting operations. The blast nozzles have deadman valves that utilize two (2) small air hoses (one red; one green) that run along the blasting hose from an air tank on the side of the sand pot to the blast nozzle. When the deadman valve is squeezed, air pressure pushes the guillotine valve open, enabling the blast media to be pushed through the blast hose. When the blast nozzle deadman valve is released, the air pressure closes the guillotine valve to prevent additional blast media exit the sand pot. Under NO circumstances will an employee do anything to disable or keep the deadman valve in an open position. Whenever the Blaster lays down the blast nozzle, they MUST unscrew the air hoses that operate the deadman valve to prevent an accidental release of the blasting media. Generators and Lights The generators are diesel powered and provide 110-volt power to explosion-proof lights. All generators are equipped with ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI). The generator will have a grounding cable connected to a grounding rod stuck into the ground. Spiders Spiders are secured to the top of the tank with steel cables. For internal floating
92 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

roof tanks without wind girders, the cables are connected to the anchor at the center of the top of the tank and use pin-style top-rollers (1,500 lb load capacity) with tieback and shackle, which overhang the edge of the tank and enable the spider to be easily moved around the tank. For external floating roof tanks with wind girders, the spiders are suspended from wind girder rollers (1,000 lb load capacity). Spiders may also be attached to the stairs, by wrapping the cable around the stair and securing the cable to itself with a shackle. At a minimum, the cable should wrap around two steps. Spiders may also be supported with weighted counter-balance A-frame systems when working on other types of structures. These systems must support four (4) times the total amount of anticipated weight of the Spiders and/or platform, workers, and tools. The wheels will be locked or chocked so that they cannot roll while workers are on the Spiders/platform. One person should never move a stage alone. A stage must be secured on level ground prior to moving an anchor point. Two (2) Spiders may be made into one platform by attaching an aluminum plank between the two (2) Spiders. The aluminum plank has a mid-rail and top-rail on each side. The rails on the side adjacent to the structure will be lowered to allow working access. In some cases, Spiders and/or platforms are rented from MaxAccess, who services, inspects, and certifies the equipment for each job. Forrest Services Foremen will also be designated and trained as a Competent Person by MaxAccess. Scaffolding Scaffolding is occasionally required when Forrest Services has to paint the entire interior wall of a tank. The scaffolding will need to be moved around the inside of the tank as each drop is completed. When this happens, the Foreman is the Competent Person. Forrest Services Field Superintendents are responsible for training each Foreman for this duty. The employees will not assemble, move, or alter the scaffolding without the Foremans supervision. The Foreman will utilize tags to indicate that a daily inspection has been conducted and the status of the scaffold. Should scaffolding be required around the outside of the tank, the scaffolding equipment and assembly will be contracted out to a qualified scaffolding company that meets OSHA and local regulations. Forrest Services Competent Person will conduct the daily inspections and update the tags on the scaffolding at the beginning of each work day. Paint Equipment The airless spray pump utilizes an air hose from the air compressor through the air dryer for its power. The spray gun and power roller hoses utilize threaded
93 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

connectors. The paint lines utilize threaded connectors and may be connected to each other to increase the length. The spray guns have a safety lock that the Painter must engage anytime they lay the gun down. With this lock in place, the gun cannot spray. Begin the flushing process prior to completing the painting. Knowing how many square feet of surface remain to be painted and the length of the paint lines, you can determine how much paint is left in the hose. When there is enough paint left in the lines to finish the painting, move the hose to the cleaner to start the flushing process. This will reduce the amount of paint that is wasted and shorten the amount of time needed to clean the equipment. When the paint lines are being cleaned, caution must be used to prevent splashing the cleaner (Methyl Ethyl Ketone - MEK or thinner). To accomplish this, turn off the pump and then SLOWLY release the handle of the spray gun with the nozzle angled to the side of the bucket so that the paint/cleaner will swirl around the bucket. When all of the pressure has been released, then continue holding the handle of the spray gun while someone else turns on the pump. As the cleaner fills the bucket, immerse the tip of the spray gun to reduce further splashing. Continue running cleaner through the lines until there is no more paint mixed in with the cleaner. Spray guns are mostly cleaned while cleaning the paint lines. After you are through with the paint lines, have another employee turn the pump off while you continue to press the spray gun handle to eliminate the pressure. Then disassemble the gun, wash the components in the cleaner, dry, and reassemble. Paint rollers are mostly cleaned while clearing the paint lines. After you are through with the paint lines, have another employee turn the pump off while you continue to press the power roller handle to eliminate the pressure. Then, disassemble the power roller and wash the components in the cleaner, dry, and reassemble. Dehumidifier Forrest Services rents dehumidifiers each time they paint the interior of tanks. The size of dehumidifier is determined by the size of the tank. The rental company is given the dimensions of the tank and interior height of the roof. The dehumidifier is required to turn the air inside the tank three (3) times per hour. The dehumidifier hose is placed in a manway on the opposite side of the Coppus blower. Tools Blasters, Painters, and Helpers will use paint scrapers, screwdrivers, channel-lock pliers and crescent wrenches to make adjustments to their equipment.
94 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

For applying the insulation to tanks, a seamer will be used. This tool is pneumatic and will be connected to a rope (secured at top and bottom) running up the side of the tank. The seamer will self-propel up the tank insulation wall. Should the seamer come off the tank insulation, the seamer will only be able to slide down the rope, thereby preventing the seamer from falling. The insulators will also use shears (either manual or pneumatic powered) to cut the insulation to fit around accouterments. Pneumatic tools may also be used from time to time. Maximum operating pressure (as specified by the manufacturer) will NOT be exceeded for air tools. The trigger will not be altered in any way that would allow the tool to operate without the employee holding the trigger down. All guards must remain in place. Employees will be trained by the Foreman on the proper use of the tool. Pressure Washers Pressure washers are used to clean surfaces of contaminants and operate at a maximum pressure of 5,000 PSI. The employee(s) performing the pressure washing are required to wear a rain suit, safety glasses with a face shield, and rubber steel toe boots or water protective equipment. Never point the wand at anyone. These tools should only be used for their intended purposes and should NOT be used beyond their capacity. All tools are to be inspected before each days use and Locked Out/Tagged Out (LOTO), or disposed of, if defective. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) All safety equipment is purchased from safety suppliers to meet the appropriate standards. In many cases, the Foremen have extra PPE items in their company truck. Should the Foreman need additional PPE, they will notify either the Field Superintendent or the Safety Department of their request. Each day and prior to use, employees must inspect all of their PPE for damage, signs of structural weakness, tears, or rips. Defective items must be repaired or replaced immediately. Blasting Helmet and Cape Blasters will wear a blasting helmet and cape that is NIOSH approved as a Type C or CE Continuous Flow Class Respirator. The helmet provides top impact and penetration protection. The helmet and cape help protect the workers entire head, face, and upper body from abrasive rebound, airborne contaminants, and overspray.

95 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Respirators Half-face or full-face air-purifying respirators will be worn by all employees when blasting, dust removal, or painting occurs inside a tank (except the blaster who wears the blasting helmet and cape). Full-face air-purifying respirators will be worn by the Painters when painting the underside of the roof or the walls above their shoulder height to prevent overspray from getting into their eyes. Employees will have a current fit-test card in their possession. Respirators will be inspected before each days use for wear and tear or rips that would prevent a proper seal. Forrest Services uses Black (organic vapor), Yellow (acid gases and organic vapor), or Purple (particulates) cartridges and they will be replaced each day or sooner if the employee suspects any odor or change in the atmosphere they are breathing. Self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) respiratory protection will be rented by a qualified safety company and should specific conditions warrant their use. Hard Hats Hard hats will be worn by all employees, unless they are wearing a blasting helmet. Eye Protection Each employee will be issued a pair of dark and a pair of clear safety glasses. Safety glasses will be worn any time there is a hazard to the eyes, such as flying debris or objects, unless more specific eye protection is worn. A face shield that attaches to the hard hat, or chemical-resistant splash goggles will be available at each job site and will be worn by the employee mixing the paints, or when cleaning the painting equipment. Foot Protection All employees will wear steel-toe boots. Hearing Protection All employees will wear earplugs while blasting operations are ongoing. When blasting operations are not being conducted, earplugs are optional depending upon how much noise is in the vicinity of the employee. Employees should use the general guideline of: If you have to raise your voice to talk with the person next to you, then you need to wear earplugs. Forrest Services uses disposable earplugs and recommends each employee change earplugs daily.
96 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Hand Protection Blasters will wear heavy-duty gloves while conducting blasting operations or heavy work. Chemical resistant gloves will be worn by the employee mixing the paints and by all employees while cleaning their paint equipment. Employees must wear protective gloves while hand-painting and doing general light work. Fall Protection The safety line will be inspected daily before use for any cuts, frays, or any other damage that could weaken the rope. The rope grab will be tested to ensure it locks when force is applied in a downward motion. The rope grab must remain at shoulder-to-head height on the safety rope as the employee moves up/down with the Spiders. The body harness buckles across the chest and around each thigh. The double lanyards attach to a ring in the upper back of the harness which allows the employee to be tied off at all times by keeping one secured while they move the second. Life Vest Life vests will be U.S. Coast Guard approved and will have a hole in the back to allow lanyards to attach to the body harness D-ring when fall protection is also required. Life vests will be worn over the harness. Life jackets must be buckled at all times while working over water. SAFETY PROCEDURES Competent Person/Foreman The Foreman is the designated Competent Person for Fall Protection, Scaffolding, Spiders, Lockout/Tagout (LOTO), Lead Protection program, as well as the Confined Space Entry Supervisor. The Foreman will ensure each employee inspects their PPE and the equipment they will be using daily before use (the Foreman will designate which employee will inspect the common use equipment). These inspections will be recorded on the Job Hazard Assessment, Daily Safety Meetings, and Daily Equipment Checklist each day and the Foreman will turn the form into the Field Superintendent weekly. A copy of the form will be attached to this document. Fall Protection Any employee working on the exterior roof of the tanks or from the Spiders will
97 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

wear a body harness and have the lanyards attached to a safety line using a rope grab. There will be a Helper assigned to monitor the Painters. The Helpers duties are to move the hose line and life lines and keep them untangled. They are also responsible to maintain verbal and visual contact with the Painters and warn them when the Painter is too close to the edge. The lifeline will reach approximately six (6) feet away from the edge or to the point where the lifeline jerks the Painter back before reaching the edge. An extra lifeline will be placed on the roof as needed for an extra person or if an employees lifeline is entangled. The Painter may use the extra lifeline until the Helper untangles the original lifeline. Employees working from the Spiders will attach their lanyards to the rope grab prior to getting onto the Spider and stay attached until they are safely off of the Spiders. Employees will only enter/exit the Spiders when the Spiders are safely on the ground. The Spider must be secured and not fall or tip when anchor point is removed. This is accomplished by laying Spider flat on the ground or securing to another anchor point to prevent it from tipping over. Always secure Spider on level ground. Any employee not following the 100% tie-off rule will be terminated and escorted out the facility. When working on the top side of piping that is more than six (6) feet above ground, the employee will wear a body harness and secure the lanyards to an adjacent pipe if available or around the piping they are working on. If working on a pipe rack with no overhead pipe to anchor, then a steel cable anchoring system must be run across the pipe rack and secured at anchor points to allow employee to attach his lanyard to cable. Personnel working within two (2) feet of the water side of a pier will require fall protection as well life-vest. Ladders will be tied off whenever possible. If the ladder cannot be tied off, it will be held by another employee anytime an employee is on the ladder. When working in pits, scaffolding planks and ladders will be tied off whenever possible, or held by another employee when in use. Harness and lanyards will be secured to piping or structural supports. When working from or driving aerial lifts, employees will wear a harness and attach the lanyards to the basket. Any work being performed greater then 6ft is required to wear a chinstrap. A chinstrap prevents the employees hard-hat to come off when working at high altitude. When filling a sand pot, it is not required to wear fall protection as long as you are not above six (6) feet. Anytime the employee climbs the sand pot using the
98 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

attached ladder and must use both hands to work on the sand pot, the employee must wear a harness. Confined Space Procedures In our industry, there are many forms of confined spaces. A confined space is typically difficult to access and egress and is not intended for continual occupancy. The most common confined space we encounter is the interior of a shore tank. Since many of the shore tanks we work in are new construction, the atmosphere is not hazardous and a permit is not required. On the other hand, a permit is required for shore tanks that have been in prior service and are considered a confined space. Prior to Forrest Services commencing work on these shore tanks, they must be thoroughly cleaned, tested, blinded (LOTO), and permitted for access. Forrest Services utilizes Coppus blowers to keep the air circulating through the shore tank, which reduces the hazardous atmosphere. In addition, if Forrest Services is blasting and/or coating (painting) the interior, a dehumidifier will also be used to ventilate the shore tank. Forrest Services will provide a Confined Space Attendant to conduct constant monitoring of employees working in the shore tank. All employees working inside a shore tank will be required to wear respiratory protection during blasting, dust removal, and coatings (painting) operations. The Foreman is the Entry Supervisor and considered to be the most knowledgeable employee involved in the permit system. They are responsible for issuing the permit and must be aware of the hazards of the space, the signs and symptoms that entrants would exhibit if exposure occurred, and the duties of all workers involved with the entry procedure. An Entry Supervisor is also responsible for: Verifying all tests have been conducted and all procedures and equipment are in place before endorsing the clients permit Ensuring outside contractors comply with the Forrest Services permit space procedures Terminating entry if hazardous conditions develop Canceling permits Verifying rescue services are available and will respond rapidly The Confined Space Attendant will record the gas monitor readings on the permit form every other hour and the monitor will be running constantly as long as employees are inside the shore tank. If the monitor alarms, the Confined Space Attendant will remove all the employees from the tank (by sounding the air horn or by turning off the blasting/paint hoses). The Confined Space Attendant will remove the monitor wand from the inside of the tank to clean air so the monitor returns to zero for the alarming gas or within the 19.5-23.5% range for oxygen. If the monitor fails to return to zeros in clean air, the Foreman will notify the Forrest Services Safety Department and a different monitor will be used at the work site. The Entry
99 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Supervisor will then reevaluate the surrounding area and the inside of the confined space prior to permitting entrants to reenter the confined space. The Confined Space Attendant will also initiate evacuation of the confined space should an emergency occur in the area that poses a risk to the entrants. Rescue Forrest Services personnel, with the exception of our own Emergency Response Team, are NOT trained for any rescue operations. Typically, the customer will provide the rescue services. For all work that may require rescuing, the permit writer will notify the customers Emergency Response Team and provide details of the confined space work. If a Forrest Services employee needs rescuing, they will notify the customer (via the radio) of the emergency condition. Forrest Services will make their Spiders and any other equipment available to the rescue team. For water rescue operations, Forrest Services will have a life ring attached to ninety (90) feet of rope on the shore. The employee closest to the life ring will secure the end of the rope around his hand/wrist, then toss the life ring as close to the victim in the water as possible. The employee may have to retrieve the life ring and toss it again, if the victim is unable to reach it. Once the victim has a grasp of the life ring, they will pull the victim to safety. Working From a Floating Vessel Employees working from a floating vessel will wear life vests (buckled at all times). The vessel will be secured to the bulkhead wherever possible or held in place with anchors and rope. If there is a possibility of falling more than six (6) feet, then fall protection procedures must also be followed. An employee must be present on shore with a life ring to assist in the recovery of personnel. Hazard Communication Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) is the right to know what chemicals an employee is working around. Forrest Services Foremen have Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for each paint product, thinner, blasting media, and diesel fuel used for the equipment and any other material at the jobsite that may require one. These are available for the employees to review at any time. Forrest Services employees also have the right to know what chemicals the customer has at the jobsite. If a Forrest Services employee wants to see the MSDS for the customers products, the Forrest Services Foreman will notify the customer, who has a reasonable amount of time to provide a copy of the requested MSDS. Housekeeping
100 Revised April 1, 2011

Forrest Services LLC Health, Safety & Environmental Manual

Forrest Services employees will maintain the job site in as clean and neat a manner as possible. Hoses will be organized neatly, trying to minimize tripping hazards as much as possible. Rags used for cleaning painting equipment and the paints and thinners will be kept away from any heat sources to avoid potential fires. Emergencies When an emergency happens, the Foreman will notify the customers Emergency Response Team via the radio providing the location and general nature of the emergency. The ERT will be the Incident Command and determine what actions are to be taken. Forrest Services employees will have current Houston Area Contractor Safety Council (HACSC) cards showing they completed the Basic Awareness, Confined Space, and customer specific courses. Additionally, the Foreman will instruct the employees on where the evacuation meeting (muster or rally) point is, considering the location of the specific job site. The Foreman will account for all Forrest Services employees and report the results via radio to the client. Accidents Accidents will be reported using the customers Contractor Incident Report form and the Forrest Services Accident Report of Injury form. All accidents, injuries, or near misses (an accident that could have caused injury, b ut didnt) MUST be reported IMMEDIATELY to their Foreman. For non-emergency injuries, medical care will be provided by a Forrest Services Workers Compensation insurance network provider (San Augustine Industrial Clinic [phone: 281-476-4616] in Deer Park or as determined for other job sites). The injured employee(s) will be driven to the clinic and will be tested for drugs/alcohol by the clinic. The Foreman will notify the Forrest Services Safety Department of all accidents, injuries, and near misses promptly. An incident/accident investigation team will conduct an investigation to determine the cause and recommend solutions to prevent a recurrence. Fueling of Equipment Forrest Services uses diesel compressors and generators. This equipment requires refueling every day. The Foreman has a diesel tank in their pickup truck with either a 12 or 24-volt pump. The compressors and generators are already connected to a grounding cable. Smoking is strictly prohibited and the equipment must be turned off during fueling operations.

101 Revised April 1, 2011