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THE TEMPLE OF KING SETHOS I

AT ABYDOS
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THE TEMPLE OF KING
SETHOS I AT ABYDOS
COPIED BY AMICE M. CALVERLEY, WITH
THE ASSISTANCE OF MYRTLE F. BROOME
AND EDITED BY ALAN H. GARDINER
VOLUME
THE CHAPELS OF OSIRIS, ISIS AND HORUS
JOINT PUBLICATION OF THE EGYPT EXPLORATION SOCIETY (ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY)
AND OF THE ORIENTAL INSTITUTE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
LONDON: THE EGYPT EXPLORATION SOCIETY
CHICAGO: THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
PRESS
MCMXXXIII
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Internet publication of this work was made possible with the
generous support of Misty and Lewis Gruber

PRINTED AND BOUND IN GREAT BRITAIN
BY THE CHISWICK PRESS, LONDON, N.I I
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CONTENTS
PAGE
INTRODUCTION . " "* " "* " vii
I. HISTORY OF THE PROJECT. . . .
2. METHODS EMPLOYED . . .
3. CONTENTS OF THE PRESENT VOLUME . .Viii
4. NOTES ON THE TEXTS ix
LIST OF PLATES .xi
PLATES .xiii
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INTRODUCTION
1. HISTORY OF THE PROJECT
In the season of I9 25-6 the Egypt Exploration Society, after
excavating for some years exclusively at El-Amarna, decided to transfer
its activities to Abydos, where the uncovering of the Osireion, interrupted
by the war, urgently demanded completion. For this task the Committee
engaged the services of Mr. Herbert Felton, who to many years' experi-
ence as a practical engineer added the further qualification of being a
photographer of high standing. The presence of Mr. Felton at Abydos
afforded a welcome opportunity for recording the admirable sculptures
of the temple of Sethos I, and his negatives provided the nucleus of what
was at that time intended to become merely a photographic survey.
Between this first season and the next, however, thoughts of a complete
publication crystallized, and Mr. R. O. Faulkner was sent out to begin
a systematic collation of the inscriptions. The store of negatives was
largely increased in the winter of i926-7, and Mr. Felton installed an
electric plant which enabled him to photograph at night, thus escaping
the deep shadows cast upon the walls and columns in the daytime.
It soon became apparent that a purely photographic publication of
the temple was not practicable, and a modified plan was now conceived,
whereby line-plates of a schematic character should be prepared at home
on the basis of the photographs. It was thought that by this means an
inexpensive, but fairly adequate, edition of all the scenes and inscriptions
could be obtained, and Dr. A. M. Blackman, who had contributed
several valuable memoirs to our Society's Archaeological Survey, kindly
promised his assistance and, with the help of Miss Calverley, started
upon the preparation of experimental Plates. In January I928 Miss
Calverley, who had been working under Dr. Blackman's direction since
the previous August, was sent to Abydos to collate the drawings on the
spot, as well as to supplement the photographs made by Mr. Felton.
Meanwhile doubts had arisen as to the adequacy of the plan that
had been adopted. The high standard of draughtsmanship attained by
Miss Galverley in rendering the sculptures suggested that the addition of
the hieroglyphic inscriptions in purely schematic form would give a very
incongruous effect, and little by little the project evolved into the far
more ambitious scheme of which the first-fruits are offered in the present
volume. The development of a technique of reproduction such as is now
being used must obviously be a long affair, and progress was hampered
by the doubts felt by all concerned as to whether our resources would
permit us to carry through a task of this magnitude. By now, however,
we were definitely committed to the work in one form or another, and
it had been decided that the volumes should be incorporated in the
Archaeological Survey, of which Professor Griffith was the founder and
general Editor. As special editor for the Abydos publication Dr. Alan
Gardiner had long since been selected. In the winter of i928-9 Miss
Calverley returned to Abydos, and was continuing the work, both drawing
and photography, single-handed, when the visit of Mr. John D.
Rockefeller, Junior, in the company of Professor Breasted, led to that
munificent grant which has completely transformed our enterprise.
Deeply impressed by the beauty of the painted reliefs, as well as by
the excellence of Miss Calverley's results, Mr. Rockefeller evinced the
desire to see included in our volumes as many coloured Plates as possible,
and made it evident that, under stated conditions, he would be ready to
finance the undertaking. Professor Breasted carried on the negotiations
with Dr. Gardiner, who chanced to be in Egypt at the time, and before
the latter returned to England he was able to announce to the
Committee that funds would be forthcoming to publish the entire temple
in the most magnificent form. It was decided that the work should be a
joint-undertaking of the Egypt Exploration Society and the Oriental
Institute of the University of Chicago, and Miss Calverley remained, as
hitherto, in direction of the work. We were now fortunate enough to
secure the additional services of Miss Broome, whose artistic skill is not
inferior even to that of Miss Calverley, and henceforth these two ladies
have borne practically the whole brunt of the work, though valuable
assistance has been afforded by others, by Mr. H.. S. Calverley, Mr.
C. M. Beazley, and Mr. Charles Little in 1928-9, by Miss Linda Holey, a
talented photographer from Vienna, in 1930-3 i, and by Mr. Little again
in 1932-3, when Mr. R. S. Layers, the architect assisting in the work
of the Egypt Exploration Society at El-Amarna, paid the camp a month's
visit to make the plan and sections published in the present volume.
It is unnecessary to dwell at length upon the difficulties that have
been encountered. On various occasions the work has been retarded by
illness, the most serious occurrence of the kind being the severe attack
of typhoid from which Mr. Little has just recovered, and which as nearly
as possible cost him his life. Our staff has been small at all times, but
outside help of one kind and another has been liberally given. Dr. A.
de Buck was granted leave of absence by the Oriental Institute to visit
Abydos in two successive seasons for the purpose of collating the
inscriptions, on the first occasion in company with Dr. Gardiner.
Professor Junker has also assisted in the same task. Mr. A. Lucas
investigated methods of cleaning the coloured reliefs, his advice proving
of great value. M. Baraize, of the Service des Antiquite's, who for a
considerable part of the time covered by our work at Abydos was engaged
in restoring the temple, contributed greatly to the amenity of our
workers' task by kindly co-operation and neighbourly hospitality.
M. Lacau, Director of the Service, has shewn deep interest throughout,
and has granted all facilities that have been required of him. For the
safety of the camp our thanks are due to the Egyptian Government, in
particular to Mr. R. M. Graves of the Public Security Department and
to the Mttdir of Girga Province. Dr. Nelson, Director of the work of the
Chicago Oriental Institute at Thebes, has kindly placed the resources of
his photographic laboratory at Miss Calverley's disposal, and the photo-
graphic enlargements employed for the published plates were made there.
Reviewing the work as a whole, the Editor in charge of this
Introduction feels that four names stand forth pre-eminent. Without
Mr. John D. Rockefeller Junior's enlightened generosity and continued
encouragement, the enterprise could never have been carried out on so
sumptuous a plan. Again, Professor Breasted's mediation and surveillance
from the business side have been indispensable. Of Miss Calverley it must
be said that her skill in draughtsmanship and photography, resourcefulness
in inventing new methods, and tireless energy in running the camp and
indeed the whole undertaking, have been the life and soul of the work,
even making the Editor's control very nearly superfluous. No higher
praise can be given to Miss Broome than to state that as an artist she has
proved a most able second to Miss Calverley. In the last place the
acknowledgements of the Egypt Exploration Society and of the Oriental
Institute of the University of Chicago are due to the Chiswick Press,
which has been responsible for the material production of this volume
from start to finish, Plates, letterpress, and binding.
2. METHODS EMPLOYED
The methods used in the production of the Plates are described by
Miss Calverley as follows :-" The photographs prepared by Mr. Felton
during the first two seasons' work have naturally influenced the technique
finally adopted by ourselves. In those early negatives the problem of
lighting under difficult conditions and in constricted spaces had not been
dealt with adequately, and much of the delicate detail of the sculptures
was lost. It was mainly for this reason that pencil drawings were decided
upon. The photographs were first enlarged to scale, and were then
traced by hand over a specially constructed tracing-board, which
consisted of a box furnished with a ground-glass top and containing
powerful electric lamps. The use of such a tracing-board has a double
advantage over the bleaching-out method often employed, inasmuch as
the enlargements could be preserved for future reference, and also fine
drawing paper could be used. The tracings were subsequently taken to
Egypt, where the drawing was finished in front of the originals. Finally
experts were called in to check the inscriptions. A convention had to
be adopted for dealing with places where the surface had been damaged
by natural action or by human destructiveness. All definite lacunain
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the inscriptions are outlined, and indistinct areas are hatched. As regards
the sculptures, a different plan has been followed. Here broken outlines
are merely discontinued so that the flow of the drawing is interrupted as
little as possible. No reconstruction has been attempted.
"4In order to exhibit the character and fine quality of the reliefs the
line-drawings have been supplemented by photographs and coloured
plates. As basis for the latter yellow sensitive negatives were employed.
These rendered in soft tones all colour values except red, which was held
back by retouching the negative with a red solution. Enlargements were
then prepared, a monochrome collotype print being made on hot-pressed
Whatman paper. The ink used was of a pale golden-brown tone which
worked in with the various colours. In this way much time was saved, no
preparatory drawings being necessary and accuracy of line being assured.
Other advantages were that the unpleasant quality of painted photographs
was avoided, and we did not have the oily muddy-toned gelatine surface
of photographic prints to contend-with. This method enabled us to
reproduce the brilliancy of colour and soft patina of the originals.
"4For the false doors and the thicknesses of the entrances line-
drawings appeared insufficient, as they failed to give an adequate idea
of the constructional peculiarities and the fine details of the hieroglyphs
in low relief. To meet such requirements a process of drawing on
photographs was evolved, whereby the advantages of both techniques
were retained. It is proposed to employ this method much more
extensively in the third and subsequent volumes.
" Where curved surfaces had to be dealt with, as in ceilings and
columns, rubbings were made on fine tissue paper with soft red carbons.
The rubbings were then photographically reduced and drawings made
from them.
C'"It will be seen from the above account that every possible use was
made of mechanical aids by which accuracy could be automatically
guaranteed. It remains to mention the benefit resulting from the
facilities granted to us for cleaning the sculptures. In justice to the
different workers, the plates prepared by them have been marked with
their initials in the list following this Introduction."
3. CONTENTS OF THE PRESENT VOLUME
For reasons the cogency of which no one will dispute, it was decided
to start this work with the seven chapels which jointly constitute the
innermost sanctuary-the very heart of the temple. Of these Mariette
had published the scenes and inscriptions only in cursory fashion, and
though many have been reproduced elsewhere and though the whole
ritual which they commemorate has been treated in detail in a volume
by M. Alexandre Moret,I an exhaustive and systematic publication
seemed demanded alike by the importance of the subject-matter and by
the beauty of the execution. Hesitation was at first felt as to whether the
more purely decorative parts of the chapels, e.g. the false doors and the
ceilings, should be included or deferred for a later volume dealing with
constructional details. As the work proceeded, however, it became
evident that the wiser course would be to treat these subsidiary parts
simultaneously with the main scenes. Not only are the decorative motifs
employed and the allusions in the inscriptions significantly designed to
glorify the particular deity to whom each chapel is dedicated, but also
the simultaneous mode of treatment clearly gives to each volume a
topographical completeness which would otherwise be absent. It cannot
be denied that in order to group together all the inscriptions and scenes
which belong together in idea we should have had to include much that
belongs to the two hypostyle halls leading up to the chapels. For example,
the inscriptions on the outer faces of the doors to the chapels refer to
their several divinities, and the like holds good of the whole approach
through the above mentioned halls.
To have brought together in our Plates all those representations
and texts which belong to the gods of the seven chapels would have
resulted in the greater disadvantage of separating subjects which are
topographically united. Accordingly, the procedure which we have
adopted is obviously the most sensible, since it combines the maximum
of' material, with the maximum of topographical, unity.
The world of Egyptian art and religion being so remote from our own,
1 Lvt rita!l dia t#Itt diuixjetruikr is l~~t in .Isxaln dx meik Cseiwt, Paris, 1 902.
it would be folly to pretend that the Plates could explain themselves
without commentary. Nevertheless, the unhandiness of an explanatory
text in the present format and bound up together with the Plates gave
adequate ground for confining this Introduction to generalities. Whether
a text volume will be added later as crown to the work cannot yet be
foreseen. For the moment the visible record is all that matters.
The admirable plan and sectional drawings by Mr. R. S. Layers
(Pls. I A, i B) are likewise left to explain themselves. In order to
orientate the student with regard to the contents of each volume their
Introductions will contain an excerpt of the plan showing the position
in the Plates of the different scenes and legends. In the present instal-
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O~S~IS ISIS 1-IORUS
ment only the three easternmost of the seven chapels could be treated,
those of Osiris, Isis and Horus. The chapels of Amen-Rer, Rer-Harakhti,
Ptah, and King Sethos will follow shortly as Volume II.
Although, as explained above, the temptation to adjoin a complete
commentary has been deliberately abjured, a brief statement with regard
to the subject-matter of the scenes may be given here as a temporary
makeshift. The gods of the seven chapels are the divinities to whom the
temple is dedicated, and the chapel of each is his own particular innermost
sanctuary where the cult-image was kept and tended. Here, too, the
sacred bark was housed. The seven deities consist of the Osirian triad,
the great gods of Thebes, Heliopolis and Memphis respectively, and lastly
King Sethos I himself, who is conceived of as already dead and
dependent upon the pious attentions of a son and successor described as
'Iwn-mwt-f, "the Pillar-of-his-Mother." The scenes and legends in all
the chapels except the last are closely parallel with one another, variations
occurring only in so far as they are demanded by the nature of the deity,
by the exigencies of the space, and (to a very limited extent) by the caprice
of the designing artist. The theme is the daily ritual performed in these
self-same chapels, consisting of a number of episodes recording the
approach to the shrine, the purification and fumigation of the deity, and
lastly his adornment with clean apparel and the appropriate insignia. That
the actual rites were performed by the local high-priest, or by one of the
priests of Abydos, and were accompanied by recitations on the part of a
lector priest (I J), is not open to doubt. But by a very natural fiction
the place of these professional officiants is taken in the sculptures by repre-
sentation of the Pharaoh on whose behalf they acted. The underlying
thought of the spells is to treat the divinity, whatever his actual name and
characteristics, as Osiris, and to regard the worshipping Pharaoh as Horus,
the avenger of his father. This uniform conception accounts for the
identity of the inscriptions throughout the six chapels; the seventh, that
of King Sethos, has peculiarities of its own which do not concern us for
the moment.
In Mariette's publication of the 2pe the six chapels are treated
a A. Mariette, ibydos, description des/suits. Tome Premier : Ville antique.--Temple cle Sdti, Paris, I 869. The
chief other books on the temple are : A. St. G. caulfield, Tfc Tmple of the Kings at .dhydos (Sety I). Memoir of the
Egyptian Research Account, London, s 902 ; J. capart, Abydos. Le Temple de Siti Ier., Brussels, 191 z; E. Zippert, Der
Geddchtnistempel ethos' I zu Abydos, Berlin, 193 I. A detailed bibliography will be found in the forthcoming fourth
volume of the Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic texts, reliefs, and paintings, by B. Porter and
R. L. B. Moss.
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together, the texts being given in parallel columns. In the temple itself
the scenes are arranged in two rows running round the four walls,
interrupted only by the doors and false doors. The various episodes of
the ritual were considered by Mariette to begin in the lower scene on the
north side of the entrance wall, thence to continue along the lower part
of north, east, and south walls to the south side of the entrance, and
then to proceed in the upper row back to above the initial scene. Thus
the scenes would succeed one another from left to right twice round each
chapel, beginning in the lower row just north of the entrance door. Such
was the opinion of Mariette, and it is accepted by Moret in the book
quoted above. A different view is taken, however, by Dr. Blackman,
whose important article, printed in a journal not as accessible as it ought
to be, takes account not only of the logical sequence of the rites, but also
of the parallel rituals belonging to the funerary cult and to the temple of
Amen-Rer at Karnak./ Dr. Blackman arrives at the result that the scenes
start on the same wall as Mariette supposed, not, however, in the lower
row, but in the upper one. Thence they continue round the walls to
the corresponding point just south of the door (episodes x-I7), after
which they double back in the lower row to the west end of the south
wall (episodes 19-2 z, 23-27). Episodes 18, 22, and the final one, namely
episode No. 28, are, however, out of place according to this theory. The
twenty-eighth episode or scene representing the King removing the
footprints with a broom of leaves, is a rite de sortie and for that reason
was placed by the sculptor in immediate proximity to the door (south side
of entrance wall, lower row). There it displaced episode i 8, which found
an appropriate position immediately next the false door to the north in
the lower row. In the corresponding position to the south of the false
door was placed episode 22. It remains to account for Mariette's scenes
Nos. z-9, which start in the lower row on the north side of the entrance
wall and thence follow one another to the western end of the north
wall. These, according to Dr. Blackman, represent alternative versions
of the sequence of scenes immediately above them, and he numbers them
with Roman figures as episodes I-IX.
Dr. Blackman's account of the matter has seemed sufficiently
important and plausible to warrant a rather full risumi here, but it must
be left to others to adjudicate upon it.
4. NOTES ON THE TEXTS
The hieroglyphic legends accompanying the scenes show many
inaccuracies, a particularly common error being the transformation of
c into r,=t or vice versa. It must be supposed that in this case the
draughtsman had indicated the right sign, but that it was subsequently
changed into the wrong one by the sculptor. The following notes,
derived from the collations by Dr. de Buck and Dr. Gardiner, deal with
points where the present publication might possibly be suspected.
Wherever possible, the passages in question have been checked once
again with the photographic enlargements.
I A. M. Blackman, The Sequence of the Episodes in the Egyptian daily Temple Liturgy, in Journal afte Manctester
Egyptian and Oriental Society, 19 18-i9, pp. 26-5 3.
P1.
PI.
3.
4"
Top left, over king. In . the sign fjis forTO
Bottom, middle scene, near head of Osiris. ir.A(w)
with w for z
Pl. 5. Bottom right, below the censer. 'I for 9
P1. to. Bottom middle, 1. i of the spell. The sculptor had
both times ; the painter has wrongly altered the sign.
PI. 13. Top right, over Thoth, 1. i, bottom. 'cr for c
Top left, last 1. but one. St(y).s for .
Bottom left, speech of Osiris, 1. 2. One expects 9 ,
but the facsimile is exact.
P1. 17. Bottom left, legend of Isis. No a in her name, only a hole.
In the spell, 1. 3 } ' without ; 1. 7 = without the
cross-bars, and followed by a space.
P1. 18. Bottom right, first scene. L. 3 of the spell, 'cz for w;
1.I i h't.kwith vZ for w
Second scene from right, note the omission of the
guiding lines.
Second scene from left. Spell, 1.2, c for
First scene from left. Note that ( has sometimes hori-
zontal, and sometimes oblique, markings.
P1. I 9. Top middle, vertical col. beside the pedestal of the bark.
1 00 : Sic.
Bottom right, last col. above Isis. wrongly
for '- Z of the preceding cols.
P1. 2o. Top left, last line. The broken on a flinty place in
the stone.
P1. 22. Bottom, second scene from right, the vert. col. before the
body of Isis. a for o of o
P1. 23. Top, second scene from right, last line. R6 for pZ.
Second scene from left, 1. r. 4- for 4.
First scene from left, 1. 3. , without ..
Bottom, second scene from night. First signs of the
spell, as facsimile ; 1. i i, is without the tie.
P1. 25. Bottom left, 1. i. = for .. twice ; 1.3, ... twice unfinished.
Bottom right, last line but two. ' sic.
P1. 26. Bottom right, 1. i of spell. Short o= for a, I.
P1. 27. Top right, last line. Sty with ay instead of j.
Bottom, second scene from right, 1.7 of spell. De Buck
apparently saw trace of the eye of >- ).
P1. 28. Top right, 1.4q from end.j for J le. ; last line,
note the strange form of m and the omission of -~
of1n
P. 33. Top, second scene from left. In I. r note the eccentric
form ofoinJl; 1.3. cfor czof%,.
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LIST OF PLATES
The names of the authors of the plates are indicated by initials as follows: M.F.B., Miss M. F. Broome; A.M.C., Miss A. M. Calverley; H.S.C., Mr. H. S. Calv
L.H., Miss Linda Holey; RS.L., Mr. R. S. Layers.
1. SETHOS OPENS THE DOOR FOR OSIRIS. (Frontispiece) Detail from Plate 4 (M.F.B.) Co
la. PLAN OF THE .TEMPLE (R.S.L.)
6lb. SECTIONS
2. VIEW FROM THE ENTRANCE OF THE OSIRIS CHAPEL, LOOKING WESTWARD (L..) Potog
3. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, EAST WALL (A.M.C.)
4. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, NORTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION (A.M.C.)
5. SETHOS WORSHIPS AND GAZES UPON OSIRIS. Detail from Plate 4 (M.F.B.) Co
6. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, NORTH WALL, WESTERN SECTION (A.M.c.)
7. SETHOS OFFERS INCENSE AND LIBATIONS TO THE SACRED BARK OF OSIRIS. Detail
Plate 6 (A.M.C.) Co
8. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, WEST WALL (A.M.C. and M.F.B.)
9. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, DOOR IN WEST WALL (A.M.C.) Retouched Potog
10. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, SOUTH WALL, WESTERN SECTION (A.M.c.)
11. SETHOS OFFERS INCENSE TO THE SACRED EMBLEM OF OSIRIS. Detail from Plate 10 (A.M.c.) Co/
12. SETHOS OFFERS ORNAMENTS AND INSIGNIA TO OSIRIS. Detail from Plate 10 (M.F.B.) Colc
13. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, SOUTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION (A.M.c.)
14. SETHOS WORSHIPS AND OFFERS NATRON TO OSIRIS. Detail from Plate 13 (A.M.C.) Cole
15. SETHOS BURNS INCENSE BEFORE OSIRIS. Detail from Plate 13 (A.M.c.) Coc
16. SETHOS OFFERS A PECTORAL AND A COLLAR TO OSIRIS. Detail from Plate 13 (M.F.B.) Coh
17. CHAPEL OF ISIS, EAST WALL (M.F.B.)
18. CHAPEL OF ISIS, NORTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
19. CHAPEL OF ISIS, NORTH WALL, WESTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
20. CHAPEL OF ISIS, WEST WALL (M.F.B.)
21. CHAPEL OF ISIS, FALSE DOOR IN WEST WALL (M.F.B. and A.M.C.) Retouched Photog
22. CHAPEL OF ISIS, SOUTH WALL, WESTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
23. CHAPEL OF ISIS, SOUTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
24. INTERIOR OF THE HORUS CHAPEL, LOOKING EASTWARD (L.H.) Phot
25. CHAPEL OF HORUS, EAST WALL (M.F.B.)
26. CHAPEL OF HORUS, NORTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
27. CHAPEL OF HORUS, NORTH WALL, WESTERN SECTION (A.M.c.)
28. CHAPEL OF HORUS, WEST WALL (A.M.C. and M.F.B.)
29. CHAPEL OF HORUS, FALSE DOOR IN WEST WALL (A.M.C. and H.S.C.) Retouched Photo
30. CHAPEL OF HORUS, SOUTH WALL, WESTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
31. THE BARK OF HORUS. Detail from Plate 30 (L.H.) Phoo
32. DETAILS FROM THE CHAPEL OF HORUS. a. The king presenting cloth; see Plate 33, lower register.
i. The god Horus; see Plate 30, lower register. (L.H.) Photog
33. CHAPEL OF HORUS, SOUTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION (M.F.B.)
34. DETAILS FROM THE CHAPELS OF OSIRIS, ISIS, AND HORUS. a. Chapel of Horus, lunte of east
h. Chapel of Isis, lunette of east wall. c. Chapel of Osiris, lunette of east wall. d. Chapel of Horus, u
lintel of door in east wall (A.M.C. and M.F.B.) Retouched Photog
35. PILASTERS IN THE CENTRE OF THE LONGER WALLS (M.F.B.)
36. THICKNESSES OF THE ENTRANCE DOORS (A.M.C. and M.F.B.) Retouched Photog
37. CHAPEL OF OSIRIS. PLAN AND DETAILS OF FRIEZE AND VAULTED CEILING (A.M.c. and M
38. CHAPEL OF ISIS. PLAN AND DETAILS OF FRIEZE AND VAULTED CEILING (A.M.C. and M.F.
39. CHAPEL OF HORUS. PLAN AND DETAILS OF FRIEZE AND VAULTED CEILING (A.M.C. and iv
40. CHAPELS OF OSIR(1s, ISIS, AND HORUs. CEILING INSCRIPTIONS (A.M.C. and M..B.)
xi
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PLATE 3
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South side
CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, EAST WALL
North side
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SETHOS WORSHIPS AND GAZES UPON OSIRIS
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SETHOS OFFERS INCENSE AND LIBATIONS TO THE SACRED BARK OF OSIRIS
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SETHOS OFFERS INCENSE AND LIBATIONS TO THE SACRED BARK OF OSIRIS
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PLATE 8
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CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, WEST WALL
South side
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PLATE 9
South thickness
CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, DOOR IN WEST WALL
South jamb North jamb
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SETHOS OFFERS INCENSE TO THE SACRED EMBLEM OF OSIRIS
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SETHOS OFFERS INCENSE TO THE SACRED EMBLEM OF OSIRIS
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SETHOS OFFERS ORNAMENTS AND INSIGNIA TO OSIRIS
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CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, SOUTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION
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CHAPEL OF OSIRIS, SOUTH WALL, EASTERN SECTION
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SETHOS WORSHIPS AND OFFERS NATRON TO OSIRIS
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SETHOS WORSHIPS AND OFFERS NATRON TO OSIRIS
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PLATE 15
14
SETHOS BURNS INCENSE BEFORE OSIRIS
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PLATE 16
SETHOS OFFERS A PECTORAL AND A COLLAR TO OSIRIS
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CHAPEL OF ISIS, EAST WALL
PLATE 17
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PLATE
20
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CHAPEL OF ISIS, WEST WALL
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PLATE 21
CHAPEL OF ISIS, FALSE DOOR IN WEST WALL
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PLATE 24
AL
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1;-/ I
INTERIOR OF THE HORUS CHAPEL, LOOKING EASTWARD
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PLATE 25w
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CHAPEL OF HORUS, EAST WALL
North side
South side
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PLATE 28
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CHAPEL OF HORUS, WEST WALL
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PLATE 29
CHAPEL OF HORUS, FALSE DOOR IN WEST WALL
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THE BARK OF HORUS
Detail from Plate 30
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DETAILS FROM THE CHAPEL OF HORUS
The king presenting cloth. See Plate 33, lower register
The god Horus. See Plate 30, lower register
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PLATE 34
7
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3//f-
- - - -
C
d
DETAILS FROM THE CHAPELS OF OSIRIS, ISIS, AND HORUS
a. Chapel of Horus, lunette of east wall
b. Chapel of Isis, lunette of east wall
Chapel of Osiris, lunette of east wall
Chapel of Horus, under-lintel of door in east wall
oi.uchicago.edu
PLATE 35
Chapel of Osiris Chapel of Isis Chapel of Horus
PILASTERS IN THE CENTRE OF THE LONGER WALLS
North South North South North South
4=-
a
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III
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CHAPEL OF OSIRIS CHAPEL OF ISIS
THICKNESSES OF THE ENTRANCE DOORS
-- - - --
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i t
South side
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CHAPE
:
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CHAPEL OF HORUS
CHAPEL OF OSIRIS
CHAPEL OF ISIS
THICKNESSES OF THE ENTRANCE DOORS
) rt
South side
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South side
North side
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PLATE 37
THE CEILING PATTERN
The hieroglyphs face the central band of inscrzttion, and the cartouches lie with their
bases to the east
IIIII1II1IIII1T117~~17 11 tL......LLL...L~hEIIILLILLEII1IILIILII1IIIIEI2LLL 111 I~~11 11 11 1I~L1Wu11I~7T1 I1m
>{ ---1---------------- I -- 1I ii II* II ii il li ii li iii TifiTiffi l fiii liii lilt
i~~~~~~~~ l 1 t1# 1 I IIII I!I IIIL LIII Li 1 11II iIL -L 1 l1 1irl.1 II. A l LJI I L
~L i U i \\ ('J.) it I h' 'VU L -A w U'
I I-I
Lt-j1 - -- i -W -hXI7E[MLW-LS-L -b--I~ m
THE FRIEZ
The hieroglyphs facetohews
Aill !I it fll MTi-i111 .1 li-111M ? 111"= 11.1117"Irt!J1L.J
FRIEZE
>1.
ifN
hil 'Nill 1 = 1 11 1 !l 1 i Jll i 'll !i 77 111 lr 71I
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IT -- - - -- II II J1,1 M 11 il l 11LIT! J im it 1: [l
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t f
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af
FRI EZE
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _: -f-lrr 1111
N
THE PLAN
CHAPEL OF OSIRIS. PLAN AND DETAILS OF FRIEZE AND VAULTED CEILINGrt
eb nso ncrpinsePae4
w
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< < l
[III [lii 111 _J1M- 'L {Ll LLiI IIfl flU IIILJIILIIIILL W I
i
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= !Ill.- Illf im HII 111i = 7.111! 1HI Ull Im 1117 1111 11.11 fill, lilt
oi.uchicago.edu
PLATE 38
II--
_a~
THE CEILING PATTERN
The znlures lie with their heads to the west
1
ri
Nc D >
T
HEF IE Z
E RIThe hierog/yphs face totees
111IM111tl r777-l -11Jl 11 1111 1,1fl il ~)JL~ll il11111 11 t1I1 ly111 S11--fluti
II
FRIEZE
ti------C
t
t
air
shaft k
11 1 fl4f l 1 1 1 11 111;- -T f l i l i l 1 1 1 1 1 H II - 1 1 f l -1 i t- 1 11 f l 7 1 f l i l 1 1 i l IIII -TTI f l
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4
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till111 fil II] 11]111 WE .111 II= !iflil ___ tll ill121 111 ___ 111 111_________fil fil 111 111 111 ______Jil il
wrMn=
air
-shaft
FRIEZE
/
1
111 -il 1 1 rr Ht l 11 il 11 il 11 lt 1 1 11 1 1 I T~l g.WwiI il 11 if - il im 111 Ilf- HI 111 111 tll fll fl
N
THE PLAN
CHAPEL OF ISIS . PLAN AND DETAILS OF FRIEZE AND VAULTED CEILING
For the bands of inscription see Plate 40
l
z
r
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4
t
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tit till
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11 I 1 T r Ii l -l -Mm! 1 i! i I T l I l
hs
I
I- Lill.- 1111 -- till iiii im- itfrzmi -55, Zln3:= I'll I'll 111L.-Ml- 11 Fit mr -5-irr-m 7I_:7LT T DIE== -- r,7T--TrFi- -TrTT -I t 7 _
1111 iii JiL JJLLIIIJLL ILLI.L Li1.Itw .JIL..JuIL.aa.J1u {IiIifiTflT I1 iiJfT1tT
r--nil., . 1!11. lilt -MI IM lin lit] 1111 1111 ull mr '111! 1111 1111 Ilil 1111 [Ill fill IM7 jill 1111 Till
M-1.1 I ...
fill lilt
-- , -
I
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PLATE 39
THE CEILING PATTERN
The kierog/yphs face the central band of inscri>ption, and the cantouches lie with their
bases to the east
. . ,---. . . . .~T1 . . . .'I fill' , t , I I - 1 11I I f1ill 11 11 fi1ll tillI 111 11 I ~ III I iIII EVT1fillliii1111[1TT 111 111 lii II~Jib ii 1 1Ti {
THE FRIEZE
The hierogyphs face to thdws
S
-~ - -F:
ti
K,
pir--in iu zj IL 111 11 . ui i - m r- ~ j m i , lrl 117 -a ! il - il- 111 171 il-J- M;77 _____________I T'T 1111 J r. .. * 'I
n n
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- - - ' 1 - n
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q
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FRIEZE
E
N
THE PLAN
CHAPEL OF HORUS. PLAN AND DETAILS OF FRIEZE AND VAULTED CEILIN
For the bands of inscription see Plate 40
FRIEZE
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ID
CHAPELS OF OSIRIS, ISIS, AND HORUS. CEILING INSCRIPTIONS
a to f Chapel of Osiris
g to k Chapel of Isis
I to q Chapel of Horus
The long bands read froma west to east, and the short bands, with bases eastwards, read towards the centre of the ceiling
i
0A
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______------------ ~ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ __ __ __ __ __ _ _ __ __ __ __ _ __----~ ~L
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CHAPELS OF OSIRIS, ISIS, AND HORUS. CEILING INSCRIPTIONS
a to f Chapel of Osiris g to k Chapel of Isis I to q Chapel of Horus
The long bands readfromn west to east, and the short bands, with bases eastwards, read towards the centre of the ceiling
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