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COMPARISON OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION BENEFITS AND REHABILITATION SERVICES IN CANADA 2013

KEY BENEFITS INFORMATION

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

2013 KEY BENEFITS INFORMATION The following table identifies some of the key benefits information for the current year, including: maximum compensation earnings; percentage of earnings benefits are based on; whether there is a waiting period; whether employer is required to pay worker for day of injury and/or period after injury. Jurisdiction Max. Comp. Earnings Percentage of earnings benefits are based on Waiting Period Employer required to pay worker for Day of Injury Yes No 3 Yes 6 Employer required to pay worker for Period after Injury

Alberta British Columbia Manitoba

$92,600 $75,700 1 No Maximum 4 $59,500

90% net 90% net 2 90% net 5

No No No

No No No 7

New Brunswick

85% loss of earnings 8 80% net

3/5ths of weekly benefits 9 No

No

No

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

$54,155

Yes

No

$84,200

90% net

No

No

No

$54,400

75% net 1st 26 wks then 85% net 85% net 80% net 1st 38 wks then 85% net 90% net 90% net (for injuries on or after September 1985) 75% gross 12

2/5ths of wkly benefits No 3/5ths of wkly benefits No No

No

No

Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan

$83,200 $50,000

Yes 10 No

No No

$67,500 $55,000

Yes No

14 days 11 No

Yukon

$82,105

No

Yes

No

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Please note, the following benefits-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community: Benefit Costs Benefit Payments Total Benefit Liabilities Proportion of Claims Awarded Impairment Benefits Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days Benefit Liabilities Expressed as a Multiple of Benefit Payments made in the Year

1 2 3 4

Section 33, RSCM Vol II #69.00. Section 29 and section 30. There is no requirement in the Workers Compensation Act for an employer to pay worker for Day of Injury. While there is no limit on insurable earnings used for calculation of a worker's benefits, there is a limit on assessable earnings per worker used in the calculation of an employer's assessment. In 2013, the maximum assessable earnings are $111,000. Business owners may purchase personal coverage. In 2013, the coverage limit is $439,740. Where optional coverage is sold to a business in a non-mandatory industry, injured workers in this business are also subject to this coverage limit. 5 Where the workers average earnings are $21,320 or less, wage loss benefits are based on 100% of net. 6 Where the workers time-loss or no time-loss claim is accepted by the WCB. 7 Under the current Act, a regulation may be passed that requires certain employers to advance injured workers 90% of their net salary for up to 14 days. To date, no regulation has been passed. 8 Loss of earnings is defined as average net earnings, less net estimated capable earnings. 9 If the worker is disabled for a period extending beyond 20 working days WorkSafeNB pays the worker for the three working days following the injury. If the worker is admitted as an inpatient to a hospital as a result of the injury, the waiting period is waived. See Workers Compensation: A Guide for New Brunswick Workers or Policy No. 21-211: Three-day Waiting Period. 10 Where a worker is entitled to compensation for loss of earnings because of a work-related accident. 11 The amount is then reimbursed to the employer by the CSST. 12 Unless the worker earns equal to or less than the minimum compensation amount (25% of the maximum wage rate), in which case the worker receives 100% of gross.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MAXIMUM EARNINGS COVERED

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Earnings Covered and Methods of Adjustment Summary 2013 The following table lists the maximum annual earnings covered for each jurisdiction. This amount is used when determining the amount of wageloss compensation a worker receives. Note: The amount of compensation also depends on a workers earnings. This table also describes the method of adjustment used by the WCBs to determine these maximums. Maximum Annual Earnings Alberta $92,600 Effective Date Method of Adjustment Legislation Policy (if any)

Jan. 1, 2013

By order of the Board of Directors per section 56(4), the "method N/A of adjustment" was changed by Board Order on May 29, 2007. The WCB now applies "a formula-based approach of setting the WCB maximum insurable earnings to cover the full earnings of 90 percent of claimants", beginning in 2008, with annual increases capped at 6 percent to allow a gradual transition to the new benchmark. Sections 33(7), 33(8), 33(9) and 33(10). Annual average wage for the prior calendar year is taken from Statistics Canada figures for BC and compared to the average for 1984 (base year). Maximum wage for coming year is determined by applying that relationship to $40,000. Workers Compensation Act (section 33(6)

N/A

British Columbia

$75,700

Jan. 1, 2013

RSCM Vol II #69.00

Manitoba

No Maximum 1

Jan. 1, 2006

Effective January 1, 2006, there is no limit on insurable earnings. N/A Prior to this, benefits were based on workers earnings up to a maximum amount. Policy 35.10.120, Terms and Conditions of Optional and Personal Coverage, states the maximum optional/personal coverage level which can be purchased. In 2013, the optional/personal coverage limit is $439,740 per worker or self-employed person.

Policy 35.10.120, Terms and Conditions of Optional and Personal Coverage

While there is no limit on insurable earnings used for calculation of a worker's benefits, there is a limit on assessable earnings per worker used in the calculation of an employer's assessment. For 2013, the maximum assessable earnings level is $111,000.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Annual Earnings New Brunswick $59,500

Effective Date

Method of Adjustment

Legislation

Policy (if any)

Jan. 1, 2013

Section 38.1(3). The maximum annual earnings are set at oneand-a-half times the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings (NBIAE). The NBIAE is set under section 38.1(1) at $27,323 for 1993 and increased annually by the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for Canada for all items for the twelve-month period ending the thirtieth day of June in each year. The increase is set on January 1 of each year under section 37.01.

Workers' Compensation Act (sections 38.1(3), 37.01)

N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

$54,155

Jan. 1, 2013

Section 80(8) of the Act and Section 21 of the Regulations. Section 21 of the regulations states that when the annual Industrial Aggregate Wage Index for the province multiplied by 150% equals or exceeds $45,500 in annual gross wages, the Commission shall then review the maximum compensable and assessable earnings amount annually and the Consumer Price Index for Canada as published by Statistics Canada shall be applied and the amount adjusted accordingly.

Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 80(8)) Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Regulations (section 21)

N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

$84,200

Jan 1, 2013

Governance Council must make annual recommendations to the Workers Minister, and Regulations must be amended to change the level Compensation Act (section of maximum earnings. 83(2)(f))

Policy 00.04, Years Maximum Insurable Remuneration

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Annual Earnings Nova Scotia $54,400

Effective Date

Method of Adjustment

Legislation

Policy (if any)

Jan. 1, 2013

Section 41 of the Act and Section 22 of the General Regulations. Equal to 135.7% of the 'average weekly earnings, for all employees, industrial aggregate, Nova Scotia' for the 12-month period ending March 31 in the preceding calendar year (rounded to nearest $100).

Workers Compensation Act (section 41) Workers Compensation General Regulations (section 22) Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (sections. 49-52.1, 54) O. Reg. 454/09 Prescribed Temporary Indexing Factor

N/A

Ontario

$83,200

Jan. 1, 2013 for accidents on or after Jan. 1, 2013

Effective on the first day of January of each year beginning January 1, 1992, the maximum earnings covered for accidents occurring in each year will be 175% of the Average Industrial Wage for Ontario, determined in accordance with section 54. The calculation will be based on the most recent published material available on July 1 of the preceding year, with respect to the estimated average weekly earnings industrial aggregate for Ontario from Statistics Canada. Two indexing factors, as provided by sections 49 and 50, are used to increase the previous year's maximums. The first is CPI (alternate indexing factor) - based on all items for the 12-month period ending October 31 of the previous year, as published by Statistics Canada. The second is the Modified Friedland indexing formula (general indexing factor), which is calculated as (1/2 X CPI) - 1. Effective January 1, 1998, all benefits are Modified Friedland indexed, except 100% pensions, 100% future economic loss, 100% LOE, and survivors, which are subject to full CPI. On January 1, 2010, Ontario Regulation 454/09 came into force, providing a temporary indexing factor of 0.5% for the years 2010-2014 for the amounts that would otherwise have been adjusted by the general indexing factor.

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Annual Earnings Prince Edward $50,000 Island

Effective Date

Method of Adjustment

Legislation

Policy (if any)

Jan. 1, 2013

Section 47(1). Effective January 1, 1995, the maximum annual Workers earnings shall be equal to the Average Weekly Earnings Compensation Industrial Aggregate for all employees in P.E.I. at June 30, 1994, Act (section 47) multiplied by 52 as published by Statistics Canada, multiplied by 1.5 and rounded to the nearest $1,000. Section 47(2). The maximum annual earnings established under subsection (1) shall be adjusted on January 1, 1996 and on January 1 of each year thereafter by the percentage increase in the consumer price index for all items for the 12 month period ending on the June 30 previous as determined by the Board in August of each year on the basis of monthly reports published by Statistics Canada. Section 66. Each year, the 1985 maximum ($33,000) is multiplied by the ratio between the average of the Industrial Composite figures for each of the 12 months preceding July 1st of the preceding year and the same average for the 12 months ending July 1, 1984, rounded to the next highest $500 and effective for the new calendar year.

N/A

Quebec

$67,500

Jan. 1, 2013

Act respecting N/A Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (section 66) N/A

Saskatchewan

$55,000 (for claims on or after Sept. 1, 1985)

Jan. 1, 2005

Legislative amendment, per Sections 38 & 38.1, and Section Workers 137(2). Compensation Act, Adjustment to maximum wage rate (Section 38): 1979 (sections Review earnings of injured workers compensated within the 38, 38.1 and 137(2)) 12 months preceding Sept. 30 If 10% or more of these workers earn more than the current maximum wage rate, then the Board will increase the maximum wage rate in increments of $1,000 until fewer than 10% of those workers' wages would be in excess of the new maximum This new maximum wage rate will apply for injuries occurring on/after January 1 of the next calendar year

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Annual Earnings Yukon 2 $82,105

Effective Date

Method of Adjustment

Legislation

Policy (if any)

Jan. 1, 2013

Workers Compensation a) $74,100 as of January 1, 2008, and Act (section b) commencing January 1, 2009, and in each year thereafter, 3(1)) the amount resulting from adjusting the previous years maximum wage rate by i) the percent change in the Consumer Price Index for Whitehorse, calculated by using the percent change between the average index for the twelve month period ending October 31st of the previous year and the same time period one year earlier; however, ii) despite clause A, if the percent change is greater than four percent, the percent change to be used will be four percent; and, if the percent change is less than zero percent, the percent change to be used will be zero percent.

Subsection 3(1). Maximum wage rate for a year means:

N/A

You may also be interested in: Maximum Annual Earnings Covered History (1987-2013) Maximum & Minimum Compensation Rates vs Jurisdictional Average Wages

Please note, the following benefits-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community:
2

Benefit Costs Benefit Payments Total Benefit Liabilities Proportion of Claims Awarded Impairment Benefits Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days Benefit Liabilities Expressed as a Multiple of Benefit Payments made in the Year

Applies to injuries caused after December 31, 1992.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Annual Earnings Covered History (1987 2013) The following table lists the maximum annual earnings covered used in each jurisdiction since 1987. This maximum amount is used when determining the amount of wage-loss compensation a worker receives. Note: The amount of compensation also depends on a workers earnings. AB 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $42,000 BC $41,100 $41,300 $42,200 $43,400 $45,800 $48,000 MB 1 $32,000 $33,000 $34,000 $36,000 $38,000 $45,500 NB $31,900 $32,900 $34,000 $35,400 $37,300 $39,200 NL $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 NT/NU $36,800 $36,800 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $47,500 1993 1994 1995 1996 $42,000 $42,000 $43,000 $44,000 $50,600 $51,300 $52,400 $54,200 $47,000 $47,640 $48,160 $48,610 $41,000 $41,700 $42,100 $42,600 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500
3

NS $28,000 $28,000 $29,000 $29,000 $36,000 $36,000

ON 2 $33,600 $35,100 $36,600 $38,500 $42,0002 $50,8002

PE $20,000 $22,000 $23,000 $23,000 $25,000 $27,000

QC $35,500 $36,500 $38,000 $40,000 $42,000 $44,500

SK $48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000

YT $33,000 $36,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000

$47,500 $47,500 $47,500 $47,500 $49,000 5

$36,000 $36,000 $38,000 $38,600

$52,5002 $53,9002 $55,4002 $55,6002

$27,000 $27,000 $35,000 $35,100

$46,500 $48,000 $48,000 $48,500

$48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000

$50,000 4 $50,0004 $51,9004 $51,4004

1997
1 2 3 4 5

$44,700

$55,800

$49,530

$43,300

$45,500

$49,000

$38,600

$56,1002

$35,900

$49,000

$48,000

$54,2004

The figures represent the maximum annual insurable earnings level by accident year. Represents maximum annual earnings in the year of the accident. The maximum will change where accidents occur in prior years. If the accident occurred in a prior year, contact the WSIB at www.wsib.on.ca. Effective July 1, 1992. Amounts shown are for disabilities after Dec. 31, 1992. Accidents before January 1, 1993 are as follows: 1993-$40,000, 1994-$40,000, 1995-$41,000, 1996$43,000; 1997 to 2004 -$45,000; 2005-2006 - $50,000; 2007-2009 - $56,000; 2010 - $56,560. Effective July 1, 1996.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

AB 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
6

BC $56,900 $57,500 $58,000 $58,500 $59,600 $60,100 $60,700 $61,300 $62,400 $64,400 $66,500 $68,500 $71,200 $71,700 $73,700 $75,700

MB 1 $50,380 $51,460 $52,720 $53,510 $54,590 $55,620 $56,310 $58,260 No Max 6 No Max6 No Max6 No Max6 No Max6 No Max6 No Max6 No Max6

NB $44,100 $44,600 $45,100 $46,200 $47,600 $48,400 $50,000 $50,900 $51,900 $53,200 $54,200 $55,400 $56,300 $56,700 $58,100 $59,500

NL $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45,500 $45.500 $45,500 $46,275 $47,245 $48,425 $49,295 $50,379 $51,235 $51,595 $52,885 $54,155

NT/NU $52,000 $60,000 $60,000 $63,350 $63,350 $64,500 $66,500 $66,500 $67,500 $69,200 $70,600 $72,100 $75,200 $82,720 $82,720 $84,200

NS $39,300 $39,700 $40,500 $41,100 $41,100 $41,800 $43,200 $43,800 $45,100 $46,700 $48,400 $49,400 $50,800 $52,000 $53,900 $54,400

ON 2 $58,2002 $59,2002 $59,3002 $60,6002 $64,6002 $65,6002 $66,8002 $67,7002 $69,4002 $71,8002 $73,300 $74,600 $77,600 $79,600 $81,700 $83,200

PE $36,200 $36,200 $36,600 $38,100 $39,300 $40,000 $41,200 $42,300 $43,300 $44,700 $45,400 $47,500 $47,500 $47,800 $49,300 $50,000

QC $50,000 $50,500 $50,500 $51,500 $52,500 $53,500 $55,000 $56,000 $57,000 $59,000 $60,500 $62,000 $62,500 $64,000 $66,000 $67,500

SK $48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000 $51,900 $53,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000

YT $54,2004 $57,5004 $60,0004 $62,4004 $65,1004 $66,2004 $65,8004 $67,0004 $69,5004 $72,3004 $74,1004 $76,8424 $77.6104 $77,9204 $80,024 $82,105

$45,600 $45,600 $48,600 $50,100 $58,000 $58,800 $61,200 $62,600 $63,300 $64,600 $68,500 $72,600 $77,000 $82,800 $86,700 $92,600

While there is no limit on insurable earnings used for calculation of a worker's benefits, there is a limit on assessable earnings per worker used in the calculation of an employer's assessment. In 2013, assessable earnings cap is $111,000. Policy 35.10.120, Terms and Conditions of Optional and Personal Coverage, states the maximum optional/personal coverage level which can be purchased. In 2013, the optional/personal coverage limit is $439,740 per worker or self-employed person.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

* The figures shown in this table represent maximum annual earnings in the year of the accident. Actual maximums may vary depending on date of injury (i.e. if injury occurred in a prior year). You may also be interested in: Maximum Earnings Covered and Methods of Adjustment Maximum & Minimum Compensation Rates vs Jurisdictional Average Wages

Please note, the following benefits-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community: Benefit Costs Benefit Payments Total Benefit Liabilities Proportion of Claims Awarded Impairment Benefits Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days Benefit Liabilities Expressed as a Multiple of Benefit Payments made in the Year

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum & Minimum Compensation Rates vs. Jurisdictional Average Wages The table below shows the weekly benefit maximums and minimums in effect as of December 31, 2012, for each jurisdiction as percentages of its average wage. The average weekly earnings listed below are from Statistics Canada. 2012 Avg. Wkly Earnings $ 1 Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia Ontario Prince Edward Island $1,072.98 $866.31 $829.50 $809.35 $927.47 2012 Max. Wkly Comp. Rate $* Max. Wkly Comp. as% of Wage 101.19% 112.46% 144.18% 5 90.87% 68.64% 2012 Min. Wkly Comp. Rate $* $312.44 $374.56 2 $384.703,6 None None Min. Wkly Comp. As % of Wage 28.97% 42.02% 40.80% N/A N/A

$1,085.72 $974.21 $1,195.98 3,4 $735.48 Married claiming spouse 7 $636.66 Married claiming spouse 8 $1,209.39

$1,290.33 (NT) $961.72 (NU) $789.71 $908.00 $742.10

93.73% 125.75%

$520.80 (or 100% net if less) None $327.742 N/A

40.36% 54.15% N/A 35.92% N/A

$636.38 9 $1,234.29 10,11 $590.519 after 38 weeks $555.77 for first 38 weeks

80.58% 135.94% 79.57%

Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon *

$822.68 $918.95 $981.95

$870.01 $793.63 $1,154.19

105.75% 86.36% 117.54%

$283.29 $428.80 N/A

34.44% 46.03% N/A

The maximum and minimum weekly comp. rates in this table are for the year 2012. For 2013 rates, click here.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

You may also be interested in: Maximum Earnings Covered and Methods of Adjustment Maximum Annual Earnings Covered History (1987-2013)

Please note, the following benefits-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community:
1

Benefit Costs Benefit Payments Total Benefit Liabilities Proportion of Claims Awarded Impairment Benefits Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days Benefit Liabilities Expressed as a Multiple of Benefit Payments made in the Year

See Statistics Canada. Earnings, average weekly, by province and territory. Source: Statistics Canada. Table 281-0027 - Average weekly earnings (SEPH), by type of employee for selected industries classified using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (current dollars), CANSIM (database). 2 Or 100% of net earnings if less. In BC, it is 100% of earnings if less. 3 Based on a worker with a dependent spouse and two children. 4 The benefit figure is based on $104,000. Effective January 1, 2006, the ceiling on insurable earnings was removed. While there is no limit on insurable earnings used for calculation of a worker's benefits, there is a limit on assessable earnings per worker used in the calculation of an employer's assessment. In 2012, the maximum assessable earnings level was $104,000. Policy 35.10.120, Terms and Conditions of Optional and Personal Coverage, states the maximum optional/personal coverage level which can be purchased. In 2012, the optional/personal coverage limit was $431,440 per worker or self-employed person. 5 This figure may be artificially high given that Manitoba has no limit on insurable earnings. 6 Effective January 1, 2006, workers earning less than or equal to the minimum annual earnings would receive wage loss benefits based on 100% of net income. As at December 31, 2012, the minimum annual earnings level was $21,320. This benefit figure is based on this earnings level. 7 Max. for 2011 is $681.00 for single workers. 8 Based on 80% of net earnings. 2011 maximum rate for single worker is $603.04. 9 Based on 85% of net. NS is based on a worker with a TDI code of 1; PEI is based on a single worker with no dependents. 10 Based on 85% of net average earnings. Based on a worker with a TDI code of X. 11 On January 1, 2010, Ontario Regulation 454/09 came into force, providing a temporary indexing factor of 0.5% for the years 2010-2014 for the amounts that would otherwise have been adjusted by the Modified Friedland indexing factor (general indexing factor). 100% pensions, 100% future economic loss, 100% LOE, and survivors benefits are subject to full CPI.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

WAITING PERIODS

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Waiting Periods Summary 2013 The following table describes the waiting periods in each jurisdiction. The waiting period is the amount of time or the amount of remuneration that a worker is not compensated for following an injury. The waiting period may not apply in all instances. Waiting Period Employer required to pay worker for Day of injury Yes Employer required to pay worker for Period after injury No Employer reimbursed for Day of injury Employer reimbursed for Period after injury WCB pays compensation for day of injury WCB pays compensation following day of injury Yes Links to additional Information (if any)

Alberta

No

No

Yes

No

Workers' Compensation Act (section 25(1)) N/A N/A Policy No. 21-211: Three Day Waiting Period Policy No. 21-116: Firefighters Compensation Act

British Columbia Manitoba


4

No No

No 2 Yes No
5

No No
6

No No No

Yes1 Yes1 No

No No
7

Yes 3 Yes Yes, following three-day waiting period 10

New Brunswick

3/5th of work week 9

No

Yes, following three-day waiting period

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut

No

Yes

No

No

Yes1

No

Yes

N/A

No

No

No

No

Yes1

No

Yes

Policy 03.02, Entitlement

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Waiting Period

Employer required to pay worker for Day of injury No

Employer required to pay worker for Period after injury No

Employer reimbursed for Day of injury

Employer reimbursed for Period after injury

WCB pays compensation for day of injury

WCB pays compensation following day of injury After 2/5th of work week 12

Links to additional Information (if any)

Nova Scotia

11

2/5th of work week

No

Yes11

No

Waiting period is 2/5th of the workers net weekly compensation per section 37(4) of the Act N/A

Ontario

13

No Yes15 3/5ths of the weekly wage loss benefits payable to the worker No No No

Yes No

No No

No No

Yes

14

No No

Yes

Prince Edward 15 Island

No

Yes, Benefit Waiting following the Period: POL-84 waiting Waiting Period 15 period

Quebec

16

Yes No Yes

14 days16 No No

No No No

Yes16 Yes 17 Yes 18

No No No

Yes Yes Yes

N/A N/A N/A

Saskatchewan Yukon

Note: Waiting periods do not affect the worker's right to medical aid from the date of injury.

1 2 3

If employer continues to pay a worker, the employer is reimbursed at the compensation rate. In NL, employer cannot pay worker an amount in excess of compensation rate. There is no requirement in the Workers Compensation Act for an employer to pay worker for Day of Injury. Health care is paid on the day of injury. Loss of earnings benefits commence effective the first scheduled shift lost as a result of the work injury or disease. (section 5(2), RSCM Vol. II #34.30)
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16

17

18

The WCB reimburses the worker for any medical aid expenses incurred on or after the accident date. Also see Manitoba's policy with respect to a worker's serious and wilful misconduct at Serious and Wilful Misconduct Policy. Where the workers time-loss or no time-loss claim is accepted by the WCB. Under the current Act, a regulation may be passed that requires specified employers to pay compensation to workers for up to 14 days following the accident. To date, no regulation has been passed. In exceptional circumstances, the WCB will pay the worker the gross wages he or she is due. The employer is required to pay the WCB back this amount. See policy 22.70.30.10, Employer Obligation to Pay Worker for the Day of Accident. See detailed information on New Brunswick's policy regarding its waiting period at Policy No. 21-211: Three-day Waiting Period. As of December 18, 2009, exceptions to waiting period are made for police and firefighters: Workers Compensation Act, 38.11 (8.1). Claims adjudicated under the Firefighters Compensation Act for workers injured on or after December 19, 2009 are not subject to the three-day waiting period. If the worker is disabled for a period extending beyond 20 working days WorkSafeNB pays the worker for the three working days following the injury. If the worker is admitted to a hospital as an inpatient as a result of the injury, the waiting period is waived. See Policy No. 21-211: Three-day Waiting Period for other exceptions. If employer has continued to pay salary to a worker, the employer is reimbursed at the compensation rate provided the worker's loss of earnings lasts beyond the waiting period. If the worker is unable to work for a period extending beyond 5 calendar weeks, the worker will be reimbursed for the waiting period. See Policy 18-01-10, Wages and Employment Benefits for Day of Injury. If Schedule 1 employer has continued to pay salary to worker, employer will be reimbursed at the comp. rate. Effective April 1, 2002, the worker is compensated after a waiting period equivalent to 60% of weekly compensation. If the worker is off work for more than four consecutive weeks following the accident, the benefits withheld due to the waiting period are re-paid. See policy: POL-84 Waiting Period. The employer is required to pay the worker 90% of his net income for each subsequent day or part of a day the worker would normally have worked had he not been incapacitated, for fourteen full days following the beginning of incapacity, providing the worker has the required medical certificate (Section 199). The 90% of net income to which the worker is entitled for 14 full days following the commencement of incapacity, constitutes an income replacement indemnity, and the CSST shall reimburse the amount thereof to the employer within 14 days of receipt of the claim, failing which it shall pay interest (per Section 323) from the first day it is late. If the CSST subsequently decides that the worker is not entitled to the whole or part of the indemnity, the Commission shall claim reimbursement from the worker in accordance with division 1 of Chapter XIII of the Act. In accordance with Saskatchewans Act (s. 100(1) and 100(2)), Saskatchewan WCB will pay earnings loss benefits to employers in situations where they continue to pay a workers salary following a work-related injury. The amount paid to the employer cannot exceed the compensation amount to which the worker is entitled under the Act. If a worker receives earnings in respect of a period of disability, then the Board may pay to the worker's employer an amount equal to the compensation to which the worker would have otherwise been entitled.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

CPP / QPP OFFSET

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

CPP/QPP Offset by WCBs for All Benefit Types 2013 The following table identifies whether WCB benefits are impacted if the worker is also collecting CPP or QPP disability benefits. Earnings Loss Benefits Perm. Dis. Award Benefits Dependency Benefits Supplementary Allowances/ Benefits Disabled Contributors' Child's Benefit and Orphan's Benefit excluded when calculating WCB benefits N/A
3

Disabled Contributors' Child's Benefit and Orphan's Benefit included when calculating WCB benefits N/A
3

Links to additional information (if any)

Alberta

No

No

Yes, in some cases1 -

N/A

British Columbia Manitoba

No

Yes (section 34(2)) 2 No

Yes (section 17) No

N/A

Yes, after Dec. 31, 1991 4

Yes (pre-1992)

Yes

No

Fact Sheet - CPP Disability Benefits Fact Sheet Collateral Benefits

New Brunswick

Yes

No 5

No 6

No

Yes

No

Policy No. 21-230 Deduction of CPP Disability Benefits From Loss of Earning and Income Tax Reimbursement

1 2 3 4

5 6

Earnings Loss Supplements paid for periods before June 1, 1996, and supplements paid under s. 65 for pre-existing conditions, are offset by some CPP benefits. See policy item #36.20 37.10, RS&CM Volume II. Depends whether worker is alive or deceased. See policy items #36.10 37.10 and section 17 of Act. For accidents from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2005, CPP disability benefits are considered when calculating a worker's wage loss benefits only when CPP disability benefits plus wage loss benefits exceed 90% of the worker's net actual loss of earning capacity. For accidents after December 31, 2005, CPP disability benefits are considered when calculating a worker's wage loss benefits only when CPP disability benefits plus wage loss benefits exceed 100% of the worker's net actual loss of earning capacity. See detailed information on New Brunswicks policy regarding Permanent Physical Impairment, Policy No. 21-250 Permanent Physical Impairment. Depends on whether dependant is a child (No), or a surviving spouse, post-January, 1982 (Yes).
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Earnings Loss Benefits

Perm. Dis. Award Benefits

Dependency Benefits

Supplementary Allowances/ Benefits

Disabled Contributors' Child's Benefit and Orphan's Benefit excluded when calculating WCB benefits Yes

Disabled Contributors' Child's Benefit and Orphan's Benefit included when calculating WCB benefits No

Links to additional information (if any)

Newfoundland and Labrador

Yes

Yes, CPP survivor benefits

Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 81) Policy EL-03R, EL-03

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

No

No

No

No

Yes

N/A

Yes 8

CPP is not deducted from survivor benefits. Yes

Indirectly 9

No

No

N/A

Ontario
7

Yes 10

No

Yes 11

Yes

No

N/A

From May 1, 1986 to Dec. 31, 1992 an offset for CPP benefits may be applied against gross earnings. Effective Jan. 1, 1993, CPP benefits are considered as wages that the worker is capable of earning in calculating the loss of earning capacity compensation. Effective Sept. 1, 1998, 75% of net CPP benefits is offset. 8 Where a loss of earnings (LOE) results from an injury, an earnings-replacement benefit is payable to the worker. The amount of any earnings-replacement benefit payable is the difference between: (a) an amount equal to 75% (for 26 weeks, then 85%) of the workers net loss of earnings (LOE), and (b) the amount of any permanent impairment benefit payable. The LOE is the difference between: (a) the workers net average weekly earnings before the loss of earnings commences; and (b) the net average weekly amount that the Board determines the worker is earning, capable of earning in suitable and reasonably available employment, and is receiving, or entitled to receive as a periodic benefit pursuant to the Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, in which case, the Board shall include fifty percent of the benefit, after the loss of earnings commences. (Policy 7.3.9). 9 The benefit is income tested and CPP is counted as income. 10 The WSIB offsets 100% of the CPP disability benefits paid in relation to the work-related injury/disease. 11 The WSIB offsets CPP benefits from permanent disability benefit supplements. CPP benefits are not offset from future economic loss benefit supplements.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Earnings Loss Benefits

Perm. Dis. Award Benefits

Dependency Benefits

Supplementary Allowances/ Benefits

Disabled Contributors' Child's Benefit and Orphan's Benefit excluded when calculating WCB benefits Yes

Disabled Contributors' Child's Benefit and Orphan's Benefit included when calculating WCB benefits No

Links to additional information (if any)

Prince Edward Island

Yes 12

Yes, CPP survivor benefits12

Policy: POL 41 Collateral Benefits POL 12 Survivor Benefits

No 13 Yes

Quebec Saskatchewan
14

Yes

Spouse Yes Child - No

No

N/A Yes

N/A No

N/A www.wcbsask.com: Policy & Legislation: POL 01/2012

Yukon 15

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

Note: - = Not applicable or none deducted, Yes = Less CPP benefits.

12 Effective April 1, 2002 collateral benefits paid to a worker from the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability or Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) disability on April 1, 2002 or later for a period of wage loss will reduce the wage loss benefits paid by the Workers Compensation Board by 50% of the collateral benefits. 13 The Commission deducts solely from the full earnings replacement benefits paid to the worker the amounts of the disability pension or of the retirement benefit which he has received from the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) when the said QPP has made the payments in lieu of the Commission (i.e. for the same period of time when the right to the earnings replacement benefits has been recognized). The Commission refunds the Quebec Pension Plan all the monies paid. No disability pension, or retirement benefit, from the Quebec Pension Plan is payable to a beneficiary who already receives a full benefit from the Commission. However, the beneficiary may receive both a retirement benefit and full earnings replacement benefits if the retirement benefit has become payable to him/her prior to such earnings replacement benefits. 14 After 12 months of loss of earning capacity, 50% of any benefits paid under CPP are treated as earnings, which reduce the compensation payable by 45% (90% of 50%) of the CPP benefits. Deducted from long-term earnings loss, but not from lump sum functional awards. The offset does not apply: (1) to minimum benefits; (2) to supplements made due to undue hardship on a retired workers pension; and (3) to payments made under the former Act. 15 If a worker is eligible for earnings loss benefits and the worker is also receiving or eligible to receive CPP/QPP disability benefits, the YWCHSB shall subtract 50% of the gross disability CPP/QPP benefits from the workers average weekly earnings, as required by sec. 24 of the Act.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

TEMPORARY DISABILITY BENEFITS

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Weekly Benefits for Temporary Disability Summary 2013 The following table identifies the percentage of the workers earnings that wage-loss compensation is based on. The table also lists the maximum and minimum weekly compensation payments a worker may receive. This table only applies to temporary disability benefits. Percentage of earnings 90% of net earnings 1 Accidents on or after April 1, 2003 Accidents on or before March 31, 2003 $1,126.91 $1,140.92 $999.68 3
4, 5, 6

Maximum weekly payments

Minimum weekly payments

Additional Info at (Click link):

Alberta

$319.09 or 100% of net earnings if less $319.09 or 100% of net earnings if less $378.90 or 100% of earnings if less $384.70 4, 5, 6, 7

Temporary Benefits Policy

British Columbia

90% of net earnings 2 90% of net average earnings1

Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual (#34.20) Calculation of Wage Loss Benefits Benefits Guide Manitoba Regulation 146/2012, Adjustment in Compensation Regulation Manitoba Regulation 201/2009, Minimum Annual Earnings Regulation Policy No. 21-210 Calculation of Benefits Directive No. 37-110.01 New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings A Guide for New Brunswick Workers

Manitoba

$1,260.91

New Brunswick

85% of loss of earnings 8

Single $713.37 Married $752.29

None

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Percentage of earnings

Maximum weekly payments Single $617.10 Equivalent to spouse $651.45 9

Minimum weekly payments

Additional Info at (Click link):

Newfoundland and Labrador

80% of net earnings

None

'Handbook - Injured Workers' at 'Publications' 'Earnings Loss Policy EL-01' at 'Client Services Policies and Procedures'

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

90% of net earnings1

$1,237.99

$544.52 or 100% of net earnings if less

Calculation of Temporary Compensation Policy

75% of net earnings for the first 26 weeks 85% of net earnings thereafter

$566.33 (TD5) $641.84 (TD5) $1,068.13 10 $1,068.13


10

None None $329.3810 $417.89


10

Temporary Earnings-Replacement Benefits

Ontario

85% of net average earnings

Benefit for Loss of Earnings (LOE) Policy: 18-01-02 Benefit Dollar Amounts Accidents from 1998 O. Reg. 454/09 Prescribed Temporary Indexing Factor

Prince Edward Island

After April 1, 2002: 80% of net for first 38 weeks 85% of net after 38 weeks After Jan. 1, 1995: As above, but 39 weeks Before Jan. 1, 1995: 75% of average gross earnings to ceiling in effect $563.16 (80%) 11 $598.36 (85%)
11

None

Workers See 'Wage Loss Benefits Policy (POL-86)'

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Percentage of earnings

Maximum weekly payments $913.77 in 2013

Minimum weekly payments

Additional Info at (Click link):

Quebec

90% of weighted net income (gross wages less Federal and Provincial Income Tax based on the worker's family exemptions, and contributions to Employment Insurance, the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan and the Quebec Pension Plan). The sum payable depends on the workers family situation at the time the occupational injury occurred. On or After Sept 1, 1985: 90% of net (with max. wage base of $55,000 effective January 1, 2005)

$303.59 in 2013

www.csst.qc.ca

Saskatchewan

$796.64

$457.54 or 100% gross earnings if less

www.wcbsask.com: Worker Services: Information for Workers Policy & Legislation: POL 28/2010 PRO 59/2012 PRO 55/2012

Yukon

75% of gross earnings 12

$1,154.19

$394.73 or 100% of gross if less. If earnings are more than the minimum, then workers are entitled to no less than 75% of gross earnings or the minimum, whichever is greater. Permanently totally disabled workers are eligible to receive no less than the minimum. Minimum compensation is based on 25% of the maximum wage rate.

Worker Information - Benefits Maximum Wage Rate and Maximum Assessable Earnings Policy EL-02 Minimum Compensation

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

90% of net earnings arrived at after deductions for E.I., CPP (QPP in Quebec) and Income Tax. Section 29 and section 30. This figure is a result of 90% net of the maximum wage rate ($75,700), including probable income tax, CPP and EI deductions. For a worker with a dependent spouse and two children. Effective January 1, 2006, the ceiling on insurable earnings was removed. The benefit level is based on $111,000. While there is no limit on insurable earnings used for calculation of a worker's benefits, there is a limit on assessable earnings per worker used in the calculation of an employer's assessment. In 2013, the maximum assessable earnings level is $111,000. Policy 35.10.120, Terms and Conditions of Optional and Personal Coverage, states the maximum optional/personal coverage level which can be purchased. In 2013, the optional/personal coverage limit is $439,740 per worker or self-employed person. 6 The benefit level assumes that the worker does not have probable tax deductions for support payments and child care expenses. 7 Effective January 1, 2006, workers earning less than or equal to the minimum annual earnings would receive wage loss benefits based on 100% of net average earnings. Effective January 1, 2013, the minimum annual earnings level is $21,320. The benefit level is based on this earnings level. 8 Loss of earnings is defined as average net earnings less net estimated capable earnings. 9 For a worker with a spouse. 10 On January 1, 2010, Ontario Regulation 454/09 came into force, providing a temporary indexing factor of 0.5% for the years 2010-2014 for the amounts that would otherwise have been adjusted by the Modified Friedland indexing factor (general indexing factor). 100% pensions, 100% future economic loss, 100% LOE, and survivors benefits are subject to full CPI. 11 For a worker with a TD1 code of "1" 12 100% of gross if annual earnings are less than 25% of the Maximum Wage Rate. See Board Policy EL-02 Minimum Compensation.

1 2 3 4 5

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment Earnings Considered When Establishing the Compensation Rate Summary 2013 The following table describes the workers earnings that are taken into account when determining the amount of wage-loss compensation a worker receives. Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Alberta Legislation; Policy; Links

Prior to accident that fairly represents earnings at the time of the accident. In practice, rates Legislation: N/A for permanently employed workers are usually based on earnings at the time of the accident, with adjustments made for consistent patterns of overtime, shift differentials, etc. For both Policy: 04-01, Part II, Application permanent and non-permanent workers, the WCB can use earnings from a different period of 1 time if it appears reasonable to do so. Each claim is dealt with on a case-by-case basis. Workers whose jobs are subject to seasonal or work shortage lay-offs are considered to be Links: N/A non-permanent workers. The WCB sets a short-term rate, using earnings from the seasonal employment, and continues to pay compensation based on this rate until the end of the season (or the time the job was expected to end). The WCB then adjusts the rate to a permanent rate that is usually based on a minimum of 12 months earnings before the date of accident. The annual earnings of a similarly employed worker are used when there is no employment/earnings history. If a worker has a subsequent lay-off, the earnings base may change provided the worker meets the criteria for a recurrence of disability that begins more than 12 months following the date of accident. If the worker meets the criteria and the workers earnings at the time of recurrence are higher than at the time of the accident, the higher earnings are used for calculating benefits based on actual earnings loss. The new, higher, rate does not apply to benefits such as the pre-1995 lifetime pensions that were based on the degree of clinical impairment.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate

Legislation; Policy; Links

British Columbia General rule for initial wage rate (first 10 weeks): time of injury earnings (section 33.1(1)). Legislation: Workers Compensation Act (sections Exceptions to the general rule include: 33.1, 33.2, 33.3, 33.4, 33.5, (a) casual workers (wage rate is based on the 12 month period immediately preceding the 33.6, 33.7) date of injury and the rate is not reviewed after 10 weeks of short-term disability) (section 33.5); Policy: Rehabilitation and (b) non-earners (the Board has discretion to determine the average earnings of nonServices and Claims Manual earners) (section 33.7); and (Policy items #67.30 67.31, (c) those who purchased personal optional protection (wage rate is the amount of #67.60) coverage purchased with the 90% compensation factor applied) (section 33.6). General rule for long term wage rate: average earnings are based on the worker's gross earnings for the 12 month period immediately preceding the date of injury (section 33.1(2)). Exceptions to the general rule include: (a) casual workers (section 33.5), (b) apprentice/learner (section 33.2), (c) volunteers (policy item #67.30 67.31), (d) those who purchase personal optional protection (section 33.6); (e) those employed less than 12 months (long term wage rate is based on the earnings in the 12-month period immediately prior to the date of injury of a person of similar status employed in the same type and classification of employment by the same employer) (section 33.3); and (f) where the 12-month figure is inequitable (section 33.4). In the event that the application of the general rule is inequitable due to a worker's exceptional circumstances, there are specific guidelines for determining the worker's long- term wage rate. Examples of exceptional circumstances include significant atypical absences and diminished future career options for students and young workers. See policy item #67.60.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Links: N/A

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Manitoba

Legislation; Policy; Links

Initial benefits for the first 12 weeks are based on pre-accident regular earnings or average Legislation: Workers yearly earnings. Thereafter, benefits are based on average yearly earnings or probable Compensation Act (section 45) yearly earning capacity. Policy: Policy 44.80.10.10, Policy 44.80.10.10, Average Earnings, is designed to determine a worker's average earnings Average Earnings at the time of a compensable injury. Three formulas, Regular earnings, Average yearly earnings, and Probable yearly earning capacity, are used to set the average earnings level. Links: Fact Sheet - Average The formula that best represents the worker's loss of earnings will be selected. Earnings In calculating a workers pre-accident earnings, the WCB will first determine into which category a worker fits: (a) permanent full-time; (b) part-time or seasonal, or workers with irregular earnings patterns; (c) workers with irregular earnings patterns and significant changes in earnings from a previous year. A permanent full-time worker would receive benefits based on the regular earnings at the time of the accident or the average yearly earnings. If the worker is initially paid on the basis of regular earnings, he or she may request an average earnings review be conducted to pay benefits on the basis of average yearly earnings. Initial benefit payments to workers in categories (b) or (c) are based on regular earnings. The WCB will conduct a review of the average earnings of these workers prior to the thirteenth week of benefit payments. From this point, benefits will be based on average yearly earnings and probable yearly earning capacity for workers in categories (b) and (c), respectively.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate New Brunswick Section 38.1(1) of the WC Act identifies that:

Legislation; Policy; Links Legislation: Workers Compensation Act (section 38.1)

average earnings means the daily, weekly, monthly, or regular remuneration that the worker was receiving at the time of the injury or recurrence of the injury, or receiving Policy: Policy No. 21-210 previously, or at the time of the loss of earnings, or at the time of death, as may appear Calculation of Benefits to the Commission best to represent the earnings of the worker, unless the worker was at the date of the accident under twenty-one years of age and it is established to the satisfaction of the Commission that under normal conditions the earnings would Links: N/A probably increase, in which case this fact should be considered in determining the workers average earnings and in no case shall average earnings exceed the maximum annual earnings; WorkSafeNB reviews the initial determination of loss of earnings (based on Form 67) by: (a) re-evaluating the initial determination; (b) assessing whether there are changes in the claim or earnings; and (c) determining whether there is any new information that may affect the claim. This review allows WorkSafeNB to determine what best represents an injured worker's longterm earning pattern. This is especially important regarding injured workers employed in temporary, contract or seasonal industries where earnings may fluctuate throughout the year. WorkSafeNB reviews the initial determination of loss of earnings within the first 12 weeks using a period of up to 36 months pre-accident, when appropriate, and obtains earnings information from injured workers, employers, and/or the government department responsible for taxation. Depending upon the employment situation, remuneration may have been earned from: (a) the accident employer; (b) other employers (when injured workers are disabled from that employment as well); (c) employment insurance benefits; or (d) other sources of employment-related remuneration. If the 12-month period does not best represent injured workers loss of earnings, WorkSafeNB may use a period of time up to 36 months to determine loss of earnings.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Newfoundland and Labrador Initial benefits for first 13 weeks based on the average weekly earnings for the four pay periods immediately preceding the injury, then average annual earnings used for up to 24 months earnings history. The adjustment of compensation after benefits have been paid for 13 consecutive weeks is to be applied where the earnings initially used are not representative of the workers regular remuneration and an equitable compensation rate is needed.

Legislation; Policy; Links Legislation: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 80) Policy: Policy EL-01 Links: N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Full-time indeterminate positions or terms greater than one year: the annual Legislation: Workers remuneration is based on what the worker would have earned had the incident not happened, Compensation Act (sections 57, up to YMIR. 58, 59, 60, 61) Personal Optional Coverage: the annual remuneration is based on the amount of coverage Policies: that was purchased. Policy 03.07, Calculation of Non-permanent of less than one year (term or seasonal employment): Temporary Compensation Initial rate calculation: The annual remuneration is the same rate as was being paid at the Policy 06.03, Calculation of Permanent Compensation time of injury and continues until the end of the incident employment or contract. The rate can be extended of the worker had a longer period of employment in same or similar employment in the prior three years. Links: N/A Long term calculation: a. If the worker had no other earnings in the injury year, the workers annual remuneration will be adjusted to reflect what he would have earned throughout the contract or term. b. If the worker had no other earnings in the injury year but previous calendar year or years indicate a pattern of employment which could be applied to the injury year, those earnings are used in addition to total current year earnings with the contract or term. If the worker has, no other earnings in the injury year but can demonstrate realistic or confirmable prospects for the balance of the year; we can consider this prospective remuneration in addition to the total current year earnings with the contract or term.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Nova Scotia Initial benefits for the first 26 weeks are based on the worker's 'normal' gross weekly earnings, less earnings-related expenses. Normal weekly earnings means the worker's normal rate of pay prior to the injury, as calculated over the worker's normal pay period (i.e. can be hourly, weekly, monthly). Normal weekly earnings include the following: (a) regular overtime; (b) commissions; (c) bonuses; (d) vacation pay; (e) a profit sharing arrangement with the worker's employer; (f) tips and gratuities; (g) taxable benefits, if reportable on a worker's T4 slip (only for injuries occurring on or after Jan 1, 2000); and (h) other types of employment income allowable on the "Employment Income" and "Other employment Income" lines of an individual tax return may be considered. As earning loss benefits are based on net earnings, net average earnings are calculated by deducting the following from the workers gross earnings: 1) probable income tax payable by the worker; 2) the probable CPP premiums or QPP; and the probable EI premiums payable by the worker. After 26 weeks, the long term earning profile will be calculated over a period up to three years immediately preceding the workers loss of earnings. The Board may choose any period that best represent the actual loss of earnings.

Legislation; Policy; Links Legislation: Workers Compensation Act (section 3747) Policy: Policy 3.1.1R2 Calculation of Gross Earnings Links: N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Ontario

Legislation; Policy; Links

General policy rule: Short Term Earnings Basis (first 12 weeks) FROM ALL CURRENT Legislation: Workplace Safety JOBS: Base rate (hourly, daily or weekly); Shift differentials; Regular overtime; Regular and Insurance Act, 1997 (sections 53, 55) production bonuses or commissions; tips. Policies: General policy rule: Long Term Earnings Basis (week 13+): Same as for Short term, plus: 18-02-02 Determining ShortIrregular or sporadic overtime and bonus; EI benefits. term Average Earnings If it is unfair to continue paying benefits using the worker's short-term average earnings 18-02-03 Determining Longterm Average Earnings: beyond the 12-week mark, the general policy rule is that the worker's earnings are Workers in Permanent recalculated, using earnings for the 12-24 month period before the injury. These recalculated Employment earnings are known as the long-term average earnings. The recalculation period used is subject to any breaks in the worker's employment pattern and any non-earnings periods that 18-02-04 Determining Longterm Average Earnings: are not normally factored into the recalculation. The general policy rule does not apply to the Workers in Non-permanent following type of workers: workers with optional insurance; volunteers (the amount selected Employment by the employer); emergency workers (actual earnings, or average industrial wage if the worker had no actual earnings at the time of injury); and apprentices, students and learners. Links: N/A

Prince Edward Island

Earnings include: Salary, wages, commissions, gratuities, earnings for overtime, piecework, Legislation: N/A contract work, bonuses, allowances, board and lodging capable of being estimated [Section 1(j)] in terms of money, credits and any substitutes for money provided wholly at the expense Policy: POL-86 Wage Loss Benefits of the employer. Employment Insurance payments are included as earnings. The Board calculates a workers Links: N/A average earnings on such income from employment and employment insurance benefits, and over such period of time, as the Board considers fair and just, but the amount of average earnings shall not exceed the maximum annual earnings.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Quebec

Legislation; Policy; Links

From the fifteenth day of a worker's incapacity his gross revenue is determined on the basis Legislation: N/A of earning capacity. The general rule for the determination of the gross income refers to the gross income provided by the employment contract or, if it is more profitable for the worker, Policy: Policy 2.02 the gross income of the 12 months preceding the beginning of his invalidity. The worker must then prove he has drawn a higher gross income from: (a) the employment for the employer at whose service he was in when the injury occurred; or (b) from the same kind of employment Links: N/A for different employers during the 12 months preceding the beginning of his disability, including employment insurance benefits and the Quebec parental insurance plan. Special provisions apply in the following cases: seasonal or on-call worker; unemployed worker; worker suffering a relapse or an aggravation; worker occupying more than one job; independent worker considered as a worker; worker suffering a new injury while receiving an income replacement indemnity; worker occupying a job of a particular nature; and, worker unable to occupy his job for more than two years who can prove that he could have occupied a better paying job. Finally, the gross revenue of a person registered with Commission (independent worker, domestic, employer who is an officer or a director a of legal entity) is equal to the amount for which he is registered.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Saskatchewan

Legislation; Policy; Links

The calculation of loss of earnings is based on the workers average weekly earnings, less Legislation: The Workers any earnings the worker receives from employment during the time of earnings loss due to Compensation Act, 1979 (sections 68(1), 70(1), 70(4)) the injury. The average weekly earnings are the greater of: One fifty-second of the workers gross earnings for the 12 months immediately Policy: www.wcbsask.com: preceding the time of earnings loss due to the injury; or Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 28/2010, PRO 02/2003, The rate of daily / weekly / monthly / other regular gross earnings that the worker was PRO 54/2012 receiving at the start of the time of earnings loss due to the injury. The average weekly earnings do not include any money given to the worker to cover special Links: www.wcbsask.com: Policy expenses that are part of the nature of employment. and Procedure Manual For workers whose pre-injury employment status was permanent full-time, the compensation rate is set by calculating 90% net of the average earnings over a 12 month period prior to the accident date. Net earnings are calculated by subtracting the estimated income tax payable, Canada Pension Plan premiums and Employment Insurance premiums from the gross average employment earnings. In determining net earnings, the SK WCB uses the information on the Canada Revenue Agency TD1 on file with the worker's employer. For those workers of alternate employment status (for example part-time, casual, seasonal), different methods of calculating the compensation rate can apply.

Yukon

Policy EL-01 Loss of Earnings Benefits, effective July 1, 2008

Legislation: N/A

The Yukon Workers Compensation Health and Safety Board (YWCHSB) calculates average weekly earnings upon such sources of earnings over such periods of time as the YWCHSB Policy: EL-01 Loss of Earnings considers fair and just. Benefits for earnings loss are based on the workers weekly loss of Benefit earnings. The weekly loss of earnings is the difference between: the workers average weekly earnings before the work-related injury arose; and the estimated average weekly earnings that the worker could, in the YWSHSBs opinion, earn from time to time, in a suitable occupation after the injury arose. Links: N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Short-term benefits. Payable for the first 90 days of earnings loss, and based on regular earnings, which means the documented amount of earnings received by a worker in their occupation(s) during the period of time immediately before the work-related injury arose. The period of time shall be determined based on the hourly, daily, weekly, or other interval, not exceeding a month that is most beneficial to the worker. Short-term Extension. seasonal worker. Short-term benefits may be extended for up to 180 days for a

Legislation; Policy; Links

Provisional Benefits. When it is difficult to obtain earnings documentation, the YWCHSB may determine a provisional rate of benefits based on the workers terms and conditions of employment. The YWCHSB may pay provisional benefits for up to four weeks from the date of injury. Within these four weeks, the worker and the workers employer shall provide the YWCHSB with documentation confirming the workers earnings. If the documentation indicates the rate should be adjusted up or down, the YWCHSB shall adjust the rate. Long-term benefits. Where the loss of earnings benefits continue past the short-term period or the short-term extension, for seasonal workers only, the long-term benefit shall apply. The long-term benefit shall be based on the worker's earnings from all employment over the two complete calendar years immediately prior to the date of injury. If the calculation for the short or long term benefit does not provide a reasonable representation of a workers earnings, the board shall use the average earning of workers in a similar Yukon occupation, or if a Yukon comparison cannot be made then in a similar occupation within Canada. Average weekly earnings for workers employed on a casual basis (outside the purposes of the employer's industry), persons acting in a religious function and volunteers (except those working on behalf of the Government of Yukon) who have optional coverage, are based on the greater of half the maximum wage rate and their actual proven earnings. The same rule applies to mine rescue workers, volunteers working on behalf of the Government of Yukon, emergency services workers, members of volunteer fire or ambulance brigades, auxiliary police, search and rescue workers, persons summoned to assist with a fire, etc.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Employment earnings considered when establishing the compensation rate Average weekly earnings for employers, sole proprietors, elected officials of municipalities, and elected and appointed officials of First Nations who have purchased optional coverage are based on the lesser of the weekly equivalent of the amount of personal coverage in effect at the time of the disability and their actual proven earnings. When directors of corporations do not draw a wage, the YWCHSB determines the directors value of service in computing average weekly earnings.

Legislation; Policy; Links

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PERMANENT DISABILITY AWARDS

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Permanent Disability Awards and Escalation Benefits Summary 2013 The following table identifies permanent disability benefits available at each WCB. These are benefits workers may receive if they are found to have a permanent impairment due to a work injury. This table also includes information on lump sum payments and maximum and minimum monthly payments. This table refers to permanent disability benefits only. Components of Permanent Disability Benefits Alberta Non-Economic - NonEconomic Loss Payments (NELPs) to recognize permanent clinical impairment. Economic - Economic Loss Payments (ELPs) to recognize disability or the impact a work-related injury/illness may have on a worker's capacity to earn wages. British Columbia Economic: Permanent Total Disability (PTD): Board must pay 90% of average net earnings. (section 22) Permanent Partial Disability (PPD): Board must estimate loss of earning capacity, and pay 90% of the estimated lost net earnings. (section 23) $4,264.96 2 PTD: $1,642.13 (section 22(2)) PPD: Weekly minimum payments are equal to the percentage of the partial disability multiplied by either $374.56 per week, or 100% of average earnings, if less than $374.56. (section 23(4) and 29(2)) Lump Sum Payments Maximum monthly payments PTD (Permanent Total Disability) $4,896.70 Minimum monthly payments $1,386.54 Additional Info at:

Accidents after Dec. 31, 1994 1 Max. $85,629.74 Min. $1,712.59

Permanent disability compensation and pensions Permanent Disability Policy

Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Components of Permanent Disability Benefits Manitoba 3 Non-Economic - Award for degree of impairment. E.g. Permanent Partial Impairment Award (PPI) Economic - Loss of Earning Capacity

Lump Sum Payments

Maximum monthly payments Wage Loss Benefits $5,463.52


4

Minimum monthly payments Wage Loss Benefits $1,666.91


5

Additional Info at:

Impairment Award $1,250 for each full percentage less than 30% and $37,500 plus $1,500 for each full percentage over 30%.

Benefits Policies Fact Sheet Permanent Partial Impairment Award Manitoba Regulation 146/2012, Adjustment in Compensation Regulation Manitoba Regulation 201/2009, Minimum Annual Earnings Regulation Policy No. 21210: Calculation of Benefits Policy No. 21250: Permanent Physical Impairment A Guide for New Brunswick Workers (Workers' Guide)

New Brunswick3

Non-Economic Permanent Physical Impairment Award (PPI) Economic Long-Term Disability (LTD) benefits

PPI - Maximum $59,500 in 2013 as a lump sum payment for 100% Permanent Physical Impairment. Minimum $500.

2013: Single - $713.37/ weekly Married - $752.29/ weekly

No minimum.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Components of Permanent Disability Benefits Newfoundland and Labrador3 Non-Economic Permanent Functional Impairment (PFI) Economic Extended Earnings Loss (EEL)

Lump Sum Payments

Maximum monthly payments Injuries 1984 and later Maximum Extended Earnings Loss $2,822.93 based on 80% net earnings 6

Minimum monthly payments Injuries 1984 and later Some minimum rules apply.

Additional Info at:

Injuries 1984 and later Max. $54,155 lump sum for impairment. Min. $1,000 lump sum for impairment.

Policy Manual: EN-01 Permanent Functional Impairment PFI Rating Schedule 'Handbook Injured Workers' at 'Publications'

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Economic Permanent Partial Disability (PPD) or Permanent Total Disability (PTD) Non-Economic Permanent Impairment Benefit (for permanent loss of physical ability) Economic Extended Earnings Replacement Benefit (EERB) for loss of earnings if the workers' financial loss is greater than their PIB

Choice where total PPD is less than 10%.

$5,960.67 7

No minimum.

Policy 06.03 Calculation of Permanent Compensation

Nova Scotia

Permanent Impairment Benefit (PIB) paid as a lump sum if Permanent Medical Impairment (PMI) rating is 30% or less.

No set maximum. See additional information for calculation of PIB and EERB.

No minimum.

Long-Term Benefits Section 3.3 and 3.4 of Nova Scotia's Policy Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Components of Permanent Disability Benefits Ontario3 After Jan 1. 1990: NonEconomic NonEconomic Loss Awards (NEL) Pre-1990: Permanent Total Disability; or Permanent Partial Disability

Lump Sum Payments

Maximum monthly payments For NEL benefits: No set maximum, calculated using an actuarial table, based on workers age at time of maximum medical recovery and level of impairment

Minimum monthly payments

Additional Info at:

The NEL award is calculated by multiplying the percentage of impairment by the adjusted base amount. The adjusted base amount is $57,641.20, plus $1,281.38 for each year under age 45, up to a max. of $83,258.99, and minus $1,281.38 for each year over age 45, with a min. of $32,023.39. For 2013, the benefit is paid as a lump sum if it is $12,808.90 or less. Accidents as of January 1, 1995 Max. earnings ceiling in effect on date of accident for 100% impairment. Min. $500.

For NEL benefits: No set minimum, calculated using an actuarial table, based on workers age at time of maximum medical recovery, and level of impairment.

Benefits for noneconomic loss Calculating NEL Benefits Policy Pre-1990 Pensions Facts and Figures 2013

Prince Edward Island

Non-Economic Impairment award for measurable loss of body function Economic Extended Wage Loss Benefits

Lump sum award

No absolute minimum monthly payment.

Impairment Policy (POL-89) Workers Compensation Act, section 49 (Impairment Award)

Quebec

Non-Economic - Lump sum indemnity amount for bodily injury Economic -No

Max. $101,052 in 2013 at age 18 or less and $50,528 in 2013 at age 65 for a permanent 100% disability. Min. $1,010 in 2013 paid as lump sum.

NIL

Lump sum amount only.

www.csst.qc.ca

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Components of Permanent Disability Benefits Saskatchewan Non-Economic Permanent Functional Impairment (PFI) and Independence Allowance Economic lost earnings capacity

Lump Sum Payments

Maximum monthly payments On or after September 1, 1985: Max. $3,452.12 per month. If receiving compensation for 2 years or more, 10% of awards are set aside for an annuity payable at age 65. Accidents after Dec. 31, 1992 Earnings Loss Benefits: The maximum monthly earnings loss benefit for 2013 is $5,131.56.

Minimum monthly payments Min. $ 1,982.67 as earnings loss to age 65. If receiving compensation for 2 years or more, 10% of awards are set aside for an annuity payable at age 65.

Additional Info at:

Effective January 1, 2003 For impairment:


www.wcbsask.com: Policy & Legislation: POL 23/2010 PRO 59/2012 PRO 55/2012

Maximum $45,200 Minimum $2,200

Yukon3

Non-Economic Permanent Impairment Economic Wage Loss Benefit

Accidents after Dec. 31, 1992 Lump sum awards for permanent impairment: The percentage of permanent impairment x 125% of the Maximum Wage Rate in effect during the year of injury.

For Disabilities occurring after December 31, 1992 Dual Award System for earnings loss benefits only: 25% of the maximum wage rate in effect for the year of entitlement.

YWCHSB: Permanent Impairment (EN12) YWCHSB: Minimum Compensation (EL-02)

All awards for 100% PTD except where stated otherwise. You may also be interested in: Weekly Benefits for Temporary Disability (for information on the percentage of the workers earnings that wage-loss compensation is based on and maximum and minimum weekly compensation payments a worker may receive). Dependency / Survivor Benefits (for information on benefits for dependants of fatally injured workers.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

1 2 3 4

6 7

Dual Award System for accidents after Dec. 31, 1994; lump sum for impairment & wage loss to age 65, at which time the wage loss amount is adjusted by a formula similar to a retirement pension; the adjusted wage loss amount is then paid for the remainder of the worker's lifetime. This amount represents maximum wage earnings with basic tax deductions. Dual award system - lump sum for impairment and earnings loss to age 65. In Manitoba, older workers may receive wage loss benefits for up to 48 months. Effective January 1, 2006, there is no limit on insurable earnings. The benefit level is based on a worker earning $111,000. The worker has a dependent spouse and two children. Other earning levels and dependency statuses will result in a different benefit figure. While there is no limit on insurable earnings used for calculation of a worker's benefits, there is a limit on assessable earnings per worker used in the calculation of an employer's assessment. Policy 35.10.120, Terms and Conditions of Optional and Personal Coverage, states the maximum optional/personal coverage level which can be purchased. In 2013, the optional/personal coverage limit is $439,740 per worker or self-employed person. Effective January 1, 2006, workers earning less than or equal to the minimum annual earnings would receive wage loss benefits based on 100% of net average earnings. Effective January 1, 2013, the minimum annual earnings level is $21,320. The benefit level is based on this earnings level. This worker also has a dependent spouse and two children. Earning levels below this amount and other dependency statuses would result in a different benefit figure. For a worker with a dependent spouse. For a worker who is a northern resident.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY AND FATAL BENEFITS

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Fatal Benefits Other Than Pensions 2013 The following table identifies benefits related to workplace fatalities such as immediate lump sum payments, funeral costs; transportation of body and lump sums payable on remarriage. This table does not include information on pensions received in a workplace fatality. For information on benefits for dependants of fatally injured workers, see Dependency / Survivor Benefits. Immediate Lump Sum Alberta $2,053.43 Funeral Cost $12,700 maximum effective March 1, 2013 Transportation of Body Reasonable and actual expenses to transport the body Lump Sum Payable on Remarriage For pre-1982 cases only. Term pension concept introduced in 1982. Under the Special Payment Act, spouses whose pensions are terminated because of remarriage may also receive a one-time payment of $80,000 in addition to the lump sum payable under the Workers Compensation Act. Benefits continue after remarriage. 3

British Columbia Manitoba

$2,555.58 (section 17) 1 $73,330 4,5

$8,652.70 (section 17) 2 $11,2904

$1,367.06 (section 17)2

Necessary costs

Monthly payments continue after remarriage, or entry into a common-law relationship. Surviving Spouse Pension Benefits: if a spouse remarries, a family income test may apply and the surviving spouses pension benefits could be reduced. Other benefits relating to the fatality (such as burial) would be paid regardless of surviving spouse's remarriage.

New Brunswick

an amount equal to 50% of the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings 2013: $19,832

an amount equal to 40% of the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings to assist with necessary expenses of death such as burial 2013: $15,865.60

Additional expenses may be covered when the body is transferred a considerable distance for burial

1 2 3 4 5

Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #55.00. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #54.00. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #56.00. For accidents on or after January 1, 2006, the date of death, not the accident date, will be used to determine benefit levels provided to the deceased workers estate or dependants. The surviving spouse or common-law partner may elect to receive this lump sum as an annuity.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Immediate Lump Sum Newfoundland and Labrador Equal to 26 times the workers average weekly net earnings at the time of the injury, or $15,000, whichever is the greater. $25,260 30% of YMIR 6

Funeral Cost $5,000 max.

Transportation of Body Necessary costs.

Lump Sum Payable on Remarriage Benefits continue after remarriage.

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

$10,946 13% of YMIR

Expense of transporting body to place of last usual residence within Canada, if death occurs away from that place.

Benefits continue after remarriage.

Nova Scotia

A sum not less than $15,000 (section 59(a) of Act) (date of death on or after Feb. 1, 1996)

$5,000 max. (per General Regulations) (date of death on or after Feb. 1, 1996)

Actual expenses for out Pension continues after remarriage. of province. $500 max. within province.

Ontario

$38,268.54 (min.) to $114,805.68 (max.).

$2,870.14 min. no max.

Necessary costs.

Pension continues after remarriage.

Prince Edward Island

$10,000 (section 37(1)(a))

$4,000

Necessary costs.

Remarriage has no impact.

Yearly Maximum Insurable Remuneration.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Immediate Lump Sum Quebec Saskatchewan $2,021 in 2013 Nil

Funeral Cost $4,913 in 2013 $12,314 effective January 1, 2013

Transportation of Body Actual costs. Actual costs in Canada.

Lump Sum Payable on Remarriage Not applicable. For injuries occurring on or after Sept. 1, 1985: Benefits continue irrespective of remarriage for a period of 5 years. Compensation for spouse continues after remarriage and is for life

Yukon

Dependents may apply for lump sum if in financial distress

Actual to $8,413. Additional expenses incurred to max. $4,206.

Reasonable and actual costs within Canada 7.

Costs of transporting the body to the deceased's residence within Canada.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Dependency Benefits Survivor Benefits - Summary 2013 The following table describes benefits for dependants of fatally injured workers. Also see: Fatal Benefits other than pensions (for immediate lump sums, funeral costs, transportation of body and lump sum payable on remarriage) Summary of Rehabilitation Services by Jurisdiction (for rehabilitation for dependants) DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Alberta After Jan. 1, 1982: General: The minimum rate for a dependent spouse, or dependent adult interdependent partner, and children, effective January 1, 2013, is $1,386.54 per month. For accidents prior to January 1, 1974, this applies to spouses only. The maximum rate for a spouse, or dependent adult interdependent partner, and children, effective January 1, 2013, is $4,896.70 per month for accidents on or after April 1, 2003, or $4,776.95 per month for accidents on or before March 31, 2003. Effective January 1, 2013, a 2.13% increase was applied to pensions where the minimums are not applicable. The new amounts are not to exceed the maximum monthly rate in effect. A dependent child, not residing with the dependent spouse or dependent adult interdependent partner, receives $257.49 per month, effective January 1, 2013. The Board may pay additional amounts to dependent spouses, dependent adult interdependent partners, or children under necessitous circumstances because of illness. Other dependants may be paid amounts proportionate to the loss. Aggregate payments to all dependants shall not exceed the maximum compensation rate for total disability, applicable to the particular case.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 70-77) Policy (if any): Fatalities, 04-08 Parts I & II Additional info at: Work-related fatalities (Benefits for dependents)

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Accidents After December 31, 1982 A dependent spouse or dependent adult interdependent partner with dependent children under 18 years of age receives the amount which would have been payable to the worker for permanent total disability using the 90% of net income calculation method until the youngest dependent child reaches 18. If a dependent spouse (which includes a dependent adult interdependent partner) has no dependent children under 18, or once the youngest dependent child reaches 18 years of age, the spouse is entitled to a 5 year reducing pension if the spouse is gainfully employed or refuses to seek gainful employment. If the spouse is capable of becoming gainfully employed with the assistance of the Vocational Rehabilitation Department, he or she is entitled to up to 60 months of the full pension while actively involved in a rehabilitation program. Once the spouse becomes gainfully employed, or upon the expiration of the 60 months, whichever occurs first, he or she would receive the five-year reducing term pension. Term pensions are paid at the rate of 100% for the first 12 months and then reduced by 20% each year thereafter until all benefits have been paid at the end of the fifth year. If a dependent spouse or dependent adult interdependent partner without dependent children is incapable of employment due to age, invalidity, etc., a pension is payable for as long as the incapability exists. When there are dependent children but no dependent spouse (which also includes a dependent adult interdependent partner), payments in the same amount as a dependent spouse would have received are made in trust to the guardian of the child's estate for the maintenance and education of the child. If there is more than one dependent child, the pension is divided equally and paid into separate trusts. Payments continue until the youngest child reaches the age of 18, when the reducing pension previously described is payable and divided among the surviving children. Guardianship refers to situations where the worker was supporting children at the time of the fatal accident.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info:

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE British Columbia On or after June 30, 2002: Compensation for a dependent surviving spouse is payable for life. 1 Surviving spouse 50 and over - 60% of compensation wage rate that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability, less 50% CPP (not less than $1,060.84 per month). Surviving spouse under 50 - the product of the percentage determined by subtracting 1% from 60% for each year that the age of the widow/widower is under 50 years at the date of the workers death, to a minimum of 30%, and the compensation wage rate that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability; less 50% CPP (not less than $1,073.13 per month). Surviving spouse and one child 85% of compensation wage rate that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability, less 50% CPP (minimum average used is $35,777.02). Surviving spouse and two children 100% of compensation wage rate that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability, less 50% CPP (minimum average used is $35,777.02). Surviving spouse and more than 2 children same as with two children, plus $332.09 (less 50% CPP) for each additional child over two in number. Dependent children where there is no dependent widow/widower: for one dependent child, 40% of the compensation that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability, less 50% of the CPP benefits payable. for two children, 50% of the compensation that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability, less 50% of the CPP benefits payable.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 16, 17, 18, 19, 19.1, 20, 23.3) Policy (if any): Chapter 8, Compensation on the Death of a Worker, Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual, Vol. II; C8-52.00 C863.00 Additional info at: Permanent disability and death Benefits

Section 17 and RSCM Vol. II #C8-52.00 to #C8-62.00.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE for three or more children, 60% of the compensation that would have been paid to the deceased worker for permanent total disability, plus $332.09 per month for each child over three in number.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info:

Other dependants maximum of $587.75 depending on pecuniary loss, payable for life or for a lesser period, as determined by the WCB Separated surviving spouse - an amount equal to the monthly payments under a separation agreement or court order, regardless of the deceased workers past compliance with the agreement or order. Benefits cannot exceed the compensation that would have been payable under the Workers Compensation Act if the spouse had not been separated from the worker at the date of the workers death. Common-law spouse: if there is no dependent surviving spouse, an amount equal to the amount a dependent widow/widower would have been entitled; or if there is a dependent surviving spouse from whom the worker was living separate and apart, and there is a difference in the amount of compensation payable to the surviving spouse by reason of the separation, up to the amount of that difference.

Foster parent where the worker leaves dependent children but no surviving spouse, and the WCB considers it desirable to continue the existing household, the same benefits may be payable to the foster parent and children as would have been payable to a surviving spouse and children.

Note: less 50% CPP means only 50% of CPP benefits payable as a result of a workers death (i.e., excludes a spousal retirement benefit).

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Manitoba The spouse or common-law partner is entitled to monthly payments based on 90% of the deceased workers actual net average earnings. These monthly payments are payable for 60 months or until the youngest child reaches 18 or the spouse or common-law partner turns 71. If the spouse or common-law partner is 61 years of age or older, monthly payments are paid for 48 months. Benefits paid to surviving children and other dependants are subtracted from the periodic payments paid to the spouse or common-law partner. Dependent children under 18 are entitled to a monthly payment of $400. The monthly limit for children is $1,610. Where the child is 18 years of age or older and is continuing his or her education, the child receives $400 per month. Where the dependent child is an orphan, the monthly payment increases to $810 but the monthly limit still remains the same. Other dependants of the deceased worker are entitled to the same benefit levels as children are. ($400/$1,610) The limit monthly limit for children and other dependants is $3,220. A spouse or common-law partner with no dependants may elect to convert the monthly payments into a lump sum. In cases of hardship where the spouse or common-law partner is over 49 years of age, or an invalid, the spouse or common-law partner may elect not to receive the fatal lump sum payment and instead receive monthly payments until age 65. After two years, the benefit levels of surviving dependants are adjusted annually to reflect changes in the provincial average wage. The indexing factor reflects the percentage change from one twelve month period to the previous twelve month period. The twelve month period ends in June.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 28, 29 to 35, 36) Manitoba Regulation 146/2012, Adjustment in Compensation Regulation

Policy (if any): N/A Additional info at: Fact Sheet Benefits for Dependants of Fatally Injured Workers

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE New Brunswick After January 1, 1998 First year following death: 80% of the deceased workers average net earnings less CPP. Spouse then elects (a) or (b): (a) 85% of deceased worker's average net earnings less CPP to age 65 and 5% setaside for annuity at age 65 (When a spouse remarries, the monthly benefits are subject to a family means test. When the benefits paid to the surviving spouse combined with the net earnings of the new spouse exceed 85% of the deceased workers average net earnings plus the net earnings of the new spouse, the monthly benefits are reduced.). (b) lump sum payment of 60% net annual income of deceased worker; benefits of 60% of deceased worker's net average earnings, less CPP to age 65, 8% set-aside for annuity at age 65. Under this plan, monthly amounts are also paid in respect of each child that was dependent on the deceased worker. The children are paid a percentage of the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings (NBAIE). The monthly amounts for 2013 are as follows: 0- 6 yrs: 10.0% ($330.53) 7-13 yrs: 12.5% ($413.17) 14-17 yrs: 15.0% ($495.80)

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 38.22, 38.5, 38.51, 38.52, 38.53, 38.54, 38.6, 38.7, 38.8) Policy (if any): Policy No. 21-515: Benefits for Survivors Policy No. 21-513 Who is a Survivor

Additional info at: Workers Compensation A Guide for New Brunswick Workers

Age 17 to (including) age 21 & in school: $495.80 Where a child is 18-21 years old and in school full-time, the parent or the child is paid 15% of the NBIAE and such other supplements as the Commission may award.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Newfoundland and Labrador After June 30, 1996: Dependent spouse: (a) Lump sum payment equal to 26 times the workers average weekly net earnings at the time of the injury, or $15,000, whichever is greater; AND (b) compensation in an amount equal to 80% of the workers average weekly net earnings at the time of the injury less a survivors pension payable to the surviving spouse under CPP; payable periodically until the date that the worker would have reached 65 years of age. If survived only by dependent children - lump sum amount equal to 26 times the workers average weekly net earnings at the time of injury, or $15,000, whichever is the greater, shared equally if more than one child, paid as above for dependent spouse. Guardian of dependent children - compensation equal to 80% of the workers average weekly net earnings. Northwest Territories and Nunavut Spouse - A spouses pension is based on the calculation of 3.08% of YMIR in the year of the workers death. Additional benefits are available for circumstances because of illness. Child - To age 19 or until receipt of first school degree or Voc. Certificate - A childs pension is based on the calculation of 0.625% of YMIR in the year of the workers death. For invalid children, there is no age limit for payment of benefits. Additional benefits are available at the discretion of the Commission. For other dependents (where there is no spouse or children), payment is made on the basis of pecuniary loss as determined by the Commission.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (sections 65-72 and 90 - 91) Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Regulations (sections 17-17.2)

Policy (if any): EN-09 - Child Dependency Benefits Additional info at: WHSCC - Policies and procedures

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 7, 11, 48, 50, 51) Policy (if any): Policy 06.01 - Pension Entitlement Additional info at: Workers Compensation Acts

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Nova Scotia Applies when death occurred on or after Feb 1, 1996 85% of net average earnings before the accident. Payable until either the spouse reaches 65 years of age or the worker would have reached 65 years of age whichever is later (unless injury is before February 1, 1996, in which case it is payable for life).

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 59-68) Policy (if any): Survivor Benefits Policies Policy 6.2.1R Survivor Pension; 6.2.3 Dependent Child Benefit; 6.2.4 Discretionary Benefits to Surviving Dependants; 6.2.7R Duration of Payments to Dependants

Spouse 2013 - $641.84 weekly maximum (TD1 code 5). No minimum. Child/Orphan $196.00 per month is the base rate. Indexed, the 2013 rate is $230.95 per month To age 18, or end of the school year in which the child attains the age of 25 years of age if attending an approved educational facility.

Additional info at: Survivor Benefits Ontario For Deaths on or After April 1, 1985: Lump Sum to Spouse: Death benefits on or after Jan 1. 2013 $76,537.17 increased by $1,913.43 for every year under 40 years of age or reduced by $1,913.43 for every year over age 40. $38,268.54 (min) - $114,805.68 (max). Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (section 48) Policy (if any): See Survivors chapter in Operational Policy Manual Additional info at: Occupational Disease and Survivor Benefits Program 40% net average earnings - add 1% for every year past 40 years of age, or subtract 1% for every year under 40. Range 20% - 60% of net average earnings.

Monthly Pensions: Spouse - no children:

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Spouse with 1 or more children January 1, 1998 85% of net average earnings at time of injury payable until oldest child reaches age 19. Pre-1998 90% of net average earnings at time of injury payable until youngest child reaches age 19. A spouse is entitled to a life pension, at a percentage, based on his/her age on the day following the youngest child reaching age 19. Where the Board is satisfied that it is advisable for a child or children over age 19 to continue education, the Board will pay for each child 10% of the net average earnings of the worker, but the total benefits to the spouse and children shall not exceed 85% (90% pre-1998) of the net average earnings of the worker. Spousal benefits are payable for life regardless of remarriage (as of April 1, 1985). Children - no spouse Other dependants 1 child, 30% net average earnings; 2 or more children, 30% net average earnings plus 10% each additional child after the first; maximum 85% net average earnings (Jan. 1, 1998) maximum 90% net average earnings (pre-1998); $76,537.17 lump sum (median) payment also applies to such children as a group; no age limit for children who are incapable of earning wages. Where there is no dependent spouse or children, benefits are based on loss as determined by the Board, the maximum being 50% of net average earnings. Minimum $2,870.14 (statute); No statutory maximum.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info:

Burial Expenses

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Prince Edward Island After Jan. 1, 1995 Spouse - $10,000 lump sum + where the accident occurred after December 31, 1991, a monthly payment based on 70% of the wage loss benefits that would have been payable to the worker under the Act.. Where the accident occurred before January 1, 1992, the amount of $650 per month is payable for life. Child - For accidents that occurred after December 31, 1991, a monthly payment of up to 10% of deceased workers net earnings calculated on the 12 month period immediately prior to accident. Payable up to 18, or 22 if going to school. Total payment for dependent children shall not exceed 30 % of wage loss benefits that would have been payable to the worker. For accidents that occurred before January 1, 1992, the amount of $250 per month payable until the child reaches age 18; or until the child reaches age 22, if the child continues to be enrolled full time in an educational institution recognized by the Board. Orphan - A $10,000 lump sum is paid into a fund under management of WCB for the purpose of post-secondary education of each orphaned child. Other Dependants - For the monthly payment to other dependants, where there is no payment made under other clauses of the Act, an amount proportionate to the pecuniary loss to the dependants but not to exceed $250 per month for any dependant or $500 per month in total for all dependants.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 37, 38, 39) Policy (if any): POL-12 Survivor Benefits Additional info at: Survivor Benefits

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Quebec Spouse Lump sum depending on the age of the surviving spouse at the time of death and the gross annual employment income of the deceased worker from $101,052 to $202,500 in 2013 2. Monthly benefit equal to 55% of the income replacement indemnity the deceased worker was or would have been entitled to during a period of 1 to 3 years (maximum monthly amount of $2,183.80 in 2013. $507/month in 2013 paid to every minor child; lump sum of $118,194 in 2013 to every major child attending school at the time of death. A minor disabled child who becomes major and remains disabled is entitled to a lump sum of $101,052 in 2013 if he does not receive an indemnity from other sources or $18,194 in 2013 if he does. Since June 18, 2009, a new lump sum is payable to children of a worker deceased without a spouse. It is added to the death benefits already provided (sections 102 to 105 ARIAOD). This lump sum amounts to between $101,052 and $202,500 in 2013, and it is equally shared between minor children, major children under 25 who are fulltime students, and major children for whom the worker met more than 50 % of their needs at the time of his death. For persons other than spouse and children: (a) If needs were provided for by the worker in excess of 50% and the dependant was less than 35 years old, there is entitlement to a lump sum of $12,129 in 2013. (b) If needs were provided for by the worker in excess of 50% and the dependant was more than 35 years old, there is entitlement to a lump sum of 75% of gross annual income of the worker, to a maximum of $50,625 in 2013. (c) If invalid, a lump sum of $101,052 in 2013 to a dependant age 18 or less, ranging downwards on the basis of age to $50,428 in 2013 at age 65 or over, if the person is not receiving benefits from other sources; if the dependant is receiving such other benefits, paragraphs (a) and (b) apply. For any other person not previously mentioned whose needs were provided for by the worker: - from 25% to 50%, entitlement to a lump sum of $12,129 in 2013. - from 10% to 25%, entitlement to a lump sum of $6,064 in 2013. The father and mother of a worker who died without dependants or the estate if the parents are dead are entitled to a lump sum of $26,273 in 2013 each. The share of a deceased parent or of a parent deprived of parental authority is paid to the other parent.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (sections 92-111) Policy (if any): Politique 2.07 (Policy 2.07) Additional info at: www.csst.qc.ca

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEPENDENCY BENEFITS - CURRENT PRACTICE Saskatchewan Deaths On or after Jan. 1, 1980: Payment to dependent spouse - Equivalent of permanent total disability. If there are dependent children, then compensation will be extended until the youngest school child is 18, or (if no child is attending school) the youngest child is 16. Maximum $3,452.12 / month based on a spouse with 2 dependent children. Minimum $1,982.67 / month. Amounts are payable to a dependent spouse for a period of 5 years (may be extended if there is undue hardship). Full rehabilitation services are available to the spouse to promote independence. Payments to dependent children only The monthly amount is $399.58 per dependent child under the age of 18 years. If the child is between 18 and 25 years, and is in a secondary or post-secondary institution, then there is a monthly payment of $376.61. This is payable for a maximum of 3 years, and will cease if the child leaves school or turns 25. Other Dependents - Awards in recognition of pecuniary loss are payable as determined by the Board. Benefits are subject to annual review based on CPI changes. Yukon Spouse - 2013 - $2,565.78/month. Represents 3.125% of maximum wage rate. The pension is payable for life. Child/Orphan - 2013 - To age 19 or until 21 if in school - $1,026,31/month. Represents 1.25% of maximum wage rate. In exceptional circumstances, the board may extend the period of payment beyond 21 years of age, but not beyond 25 years of age. There are discretionary allowances for spouse or child, as the board determines. For other dependants, where there are no regular dependants, payment for pecuniary loss is determined by the Board.

Legislation, Policy and Additional Info: Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, 1979 (sections 82(1) to section 98) Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy & Legislation: Policy Manual: Section 5.0 (Benefits to Dependents) PRO 59/2012 PRO 55/2012

Additional info at: N/A

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49) Policy (if any): N/A Additional info at: Benefits Workers Compensation Health and Safety Board Order 2008/24

Note: Due to the variety of dependent benefits, only the basic payments are shown. For further information go to the Board/Commission website or contact the Board/Commission at 'Links to Workers' Compensation Boards/Commissions'.
2 The disabled surviving spouse receives between $101,052 and $202,500 in 2013.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

EXPENSE RATES

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

2013 Expense Rates Information The following tables identify the expense rates at each WCB for: independent living allowance, personal care allowance, clothing allowance; escorts; burial expenses; guide and support dog allowances; meal allowance; room and board; transportation; witness fees; and childcare expenses. Click the link below to go directly to: Independent Living Allowance Personal Care Allowance Clothing Allowance Escorts Burial Expenses Guide and Support Dog Allowances Meal Allowance Room and Board Transportation Witness Fees (for hearings) Child Care Expenses

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for independent living allowances. Independent Living Allowance Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia Ontario Level 1 Home Maintenance Allowance. Max. $215.14 per month $262.79 (January 1, 2013 December 31, 2013) RSCM Vol. II #81.00

$274 per month. Effective October 1, 2012 Seriously injured workers with a 60% or greater PPI may qualify for a quality of life grant of up to $2,000 and then up to $1,000 every five years. N/A

$240 per month. This allowance is called the Home Maintenance and Independent Living Allowance

N/A $3,800.41 per year

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Independent Living Allowance Prince Edward No fixed amount. Island Quebec Maximum of $3,030 per in 2013 year for maintenance work

Saskatchewan For home (routine property maintenance) or travel (hiring of transport services) costs. Paid annually, reviewed annually. It will continue during the lifetime of the injured worker, so long as the qualifying criteria are met. Given a maximum Personal Functional Impairment (PFI) = $45,200 annually: If PFI is 40% or greater: o Maximum independence living allowance = 5% of $45,200 = $2,260

If PFI is greater than minimum PFI and up to 39% (inclusive): o Maximum independence living allowance = $2,260 x (Actual PFI % 40%)

Yukon Back to top

$250 per month.

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for personal care allowances. Personal Care Allowance Alberta Personal allowances are determined by the degree of personal care required, based on the policies of the Board of Directors. See Policy 04-07, Part II, Application 4. From $497.12 to $2,001.84 per month (January 1, 2013 December 31, 2013). Five categories. RSCM Vol. II #80.20 Level of attendant services depends on the reasonable level of care required. If the attendant care is provided by a family member, he or she will be paid $10.93/hr. Effective October 1, 2012. From $77.06 to $1,754.00 per month based on 7 levels, indexed annually. Based on assessed need and includes, for example, activities of daily living, home maintenance, and physical care needs. Coverage is based on the individual needs of the injured worker and paid based on provincial rates for professional and personal care fees. Effective July 1, 2012 provincial Respite/homemaker/attendant care-base rate is $12.25/hour; for Agencies the rate is $17.63/hour. Attendants allowance from $1,000 to $4,000 per month. Three categories. Commission pays fee necessary to provide adequate care. Provision for purchase of special equipment over $250.

British Columbia Manitoba

New Brunswick

Newfoundland and Labrador

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Personal Care Allowance Nova Scotia Section 103 of the Act Where an injury renders a worker incapable of performing necessary personal care, the Board may (a) provide a monthly allowance to the worker for the workers necessary personal care; or (b) provide necessary personal care. See Policy 2.1.6. $9.61 per hour up to a maximum of $2,402.50 per month Note: The hourly rate and monthly maximum are effective September 1, 2012. These will be indexed annually at 50% of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) starting January 2013. Ontario General Attendant: $10.73 per hour 1; Personal Attendant Rate: $14.03 per hour; Skilled Attendant Rate: $20.57 per hour; Bookkeeping Fee: $720.00 annually.

Prince Edward No fixed amount. Island Quebec From $70 to $1,617 per month in 2013 depending on severity.

Saskatchewan Four levels of Personal Care Allowance, paid monthly, adjusted for CPI annually. Effective January, 2012: Level 1: $420 per month ($5,040 per year) Level 2: $844 per month ($10,128 per year) Level 3: $1,680 per month ($20,160 per year) Level 4: $2,110 per month ($25,320 per year) Yukon Back to top The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for clothing allowances. Clothing Allowance Alberta Effective January 1, 2013: $752.79 (male), $1,498.24 (female) for upper limb; $498.99 (male), $1,286.33 (female) for lower limb; $1,230.07 (male), $2,085.65 (female) for wheelchair set by the Board of Directors. Single, upper limb $325.65 per annum; bilateral upper limbs $652.89; lower limb or requires leg brace $652.89; upper and lower limbs $967.43 (January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013). RSCM Vol. II #79.00 Effective October 1, 2012: Upper body $300 per year. Lower body $599 per year. Upper & lower body $901 per year. Wheelchair users $901 per year. As appropriate-authorization required

British Columbia

Manitoba

set at minimum wage


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Clothing Allowance New Brunswick Allowances provided to offset costs of clothing; specialized clothing (indexed annually). Allowance of $386.58, up to a max of $773.16 when wearing prosthetics (indexed annually). Provided for. Max. $300 per year.

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

Max. $500 per year for pensioners with prostheses. $1,000 per year for pensioners confined to a wheelchair.

Section 102 of Act (Medical Aid); and Policy 2.1.5R2. Upper body $350; lower body $400; to a combined maximum of $750 per year. Minor damage $295.20 maximum; Major damage $590.40 maximum

Ontario

Prince Edward $225 for single prosthesis or brace; $450 for double prosthesis or wheelchair user. Island Quebec Max. $608 per annum in 2013 by regulation for damage to clothes caused by a prosthesis or orthosis which is necessary because of a professional injury.

Saskatchewan Three categories of Clothing Allowance, paid monthly, adjusted for CPI annually: Upper limb: $23.43 per month ($281.18 per year) Lower limb: $51.72 per month ($620.67 per year) Both limbs: $75.14 per month ($901.73 per year Eye glasses frames expense: $202.00. Yukon Back to top The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for escorts. Escorts Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Expenses as required Certain subsistence payments or reimbursement may be made for traveling companions in accordance with policy. RSCM Vol. II #83.11 Eligible for the same allowances as a claimant. 2010 rates: Upper prosthesis $237 per annum; Lower prosthesis $509 per annum. 2

Amounts adjusted annually for inflation.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Escorts New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia May authorize attendants to accompany injured worker, accommodation costs paid for.

Eligible for the same allowances as a claimant. Requires advance authorization.

Escorts receive same subsistence payments as claimant.

Policy 2.1.1R7. Expenses related to escorts may be paid. Each claim is reviewed on individual merit. $82.00 per day

Ontario

Prince Edward No fixed amount. Attendant fees will be paid only when the attendant is a health Island professional and the services of a health professional are medically required to accompany the worker to the medical appointment. Quebec If the workers physical condition so requires, the person who must accompany him is entitled to the reimbursement of the travel et accommodation costs incurred, based on the same criteria and amounts as for the worker.

Saskatchewan The WCB may pre-approve travel and sustenance for attendants other than qualified medical personnel when it is considered essential because of the workers injury, and confirmed by the treating physician and/or WCB medical consultant. The attendant will be reimbursed on the basis of actual salary loss: Only for the period of time that such attendance was necessary; and At a rate not to exceed the maximum compensation rate.

No salary loss will be paid if the worker receives a personal care allowance. If a worker requires a translator to be present at medical appointments, then the translators transportation and sustenance will be reimbursed at government (PSC) rates. Yukon Travel Expenses as required. Honorium of 100 dollars a day; no earnings loss as per policy EN-11, effective January 1, 2013.

Back to top

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for burial expenses. Also see: Fatal Benefits Other Than Pension for information on: lump sums; funeral costs; transportation of body; and lump sums payable on remarriage. Burial Expenses Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick $12,700, effective March 1, 2013. Cost associated with death $2,053.43. Funeral Expenses $8,652.70 (maximum); Transportation $1,367.06 (maximum) (January 1, 2013 December 31, 2013). RSCM Vol. II #54.00 $11,290 3 an amount equal to 40% of the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings to assist with necessary expenses of death such as burial ($15,865.60 for 2013) and an amount equal to 50% of the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings 2013: $19,832 Additional monies may be paid if the body is transferred a considerable distance for burial. Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia $5,000 maximum

$10,946 maximum

Section 24 of General Regulations - $5,000 maximum, provided: (a) application has been made for burial expenses payable pursuant to CPP; and (b) payment for burial expenses under the Canada Pension Plan has been made or refused. $2,870.14 minimum. No maximum amount specified.

Ontario

Prince Edward Maximum $4,000 Island Quebec $4,913 maximum in 2013

Saskatchewan Lump sum: $12,314 Yukon Back to top $8,413

Where the accident occurred on or after January 1, 2006, the deceased workers dependants or estate will be awarded survivors benefits based on the amounts in effect on the date of death, not the accident date.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for guide and support dog allowances. Guide and Support Dog Allowance Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia All associated costs. May be purchased with the Personal Care Allowance. RSCM Vol. II #80.10

Necessary Expenses N/A

N/A

Necessary Expenses

102 (1) The Board may provide for any worker entitled to compensation pursuant to this Part, or any worker who would have been entitled to compensation had the worker suffered a loss of earnings equivalent to the amount determined pursuant to subsection 37(4), any medical aid the Board considers necessary or expedient as a result of the injury. $968.24 annually

Ontario

Prince Edward No fixed amount. Island Quebec Payable if least costly appropriate solution.

Saskatchewan N/A Yukon Back to top Necessary Expenses

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for meal allowances. Meal Allowance Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Effective March 1, 2011: $44.00/day. Breakfast: $9.00; Lunch: $13.00; Dinner: $22.00 Breakfast: $12.30; Lunch: $15.17; Dinner: $26.10; Per Day: $53.57 (January 1, 2013 December 31, 2013) RSCM Vol. II #83.20 Breakfast: $9.35 4; Lunch: $12.75; Dinner: $24.85 In province - $37.50/day or Breakfast: $7.50; Lunch: $10.50; Dinner: $19.50 Out of province - $46.00/day or Breakfast: $10.00; Lunch: $12.00; Dinner $24.00 Breakfast: $6; Lunch: $8; Dinner: $11

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia Ontario

Breakfast: $21.50; Lunch: $22.10; Dinner: $51.70 effective Jan 1, 2013 5 (NWT) Breakfast: $20.90; Lunch: $29.55; Dinner: $69.65 Policy 2.1.1R8 - Breakfast: $6.00; Lunch: $12.00; Dinner: $20.00 Breakfast: $10.00; Lunch: $16.00; Dinner: $23.00

Prince Edward Breakfast: $7.50; Lunch: $8.50; Dinner: $19.50 Island Quebec Breakfast: $10.40; Lunch: $14.30; Dinner: $21.55

Saskatchewan In accordance with Saskatchewan PSC rates, January 1, 2005; includes GST, gratuities and an overnight allowance: Breakfast: $8.00 (in province); $11.00 (out of province) Lunch (called Dinner in procedure): $14.00 (in province); $16.00 (out of province) Dinner (called Supper in procedure): $19.00 (in province); $24.00 (out of province) Yukon Travel Expense and Accommodation Rates Effective April 1, 2012 (Rates are based on Government of Yukon rates, which are not updated until their new fiscal year begins on April 1, 2013).

Back to top
4 5

Meal Allowance Rates are adjusted every six months. These rates are effective January 1, 2013. Meal rates are adjusted every year, effective January 1.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for room and board. Room and Board (as accommodation) Alberta $123 per night (more under special circumstances, eg. wheel chair) effective March 1, 2013 A discretionary subsistence allowance may be made when a worker is undergoing treatment at a place other than the place of residence. RSCM Vol. II #83.20 If the worker makes his or her own accommodation arrangements, the WCB pays $100 per night. If the worker stays at a private residence, the worker is reimbursed $50 per night. If the WCB makes the accommodation arrangements for the worker, the WCB will pay the "provincial or government rate". The rate is about $120 a night. New Brunswick WorkSafeNB negotiates accommodation rates with hotels throughout New Brunswick for claim-related travel. Injured workers are expected to use these hotels for authorized travel and are reimbursed for the accommodation up to the negotiated rate. When injured workers do not submit receipts for accommodations, WorkSafeNB pays a daily allowance of $40. Coverage for commercial establishments decided on a case by case basis according to reasonable rates based on location and availability; $25.00 per night in a private residence. Determined on a case by case basis when commercial accommodation. $50 for overnight non-commercial accommodation. Policy 4.2.4R9 - A living allowance may be paid where it is determined appropriate for a worker to relocate and maintain a second residence for the duration of his/her Vocational Rehabilitation. Up to $1,500/month. When necessary, may be provided with overnight accommodations, pre-authorized by the Board. Where possible, costs charged directly to the Board, otherwise reimbursements based on receipts. Where private overnight accommodations, will reimburse $40.00 per night. Public and private overnight accommodations are reimbursed for Vocational Rehabilitation at a rate of $40.00 per night. Ontario The WSIB pays accommodation expenses while a worker is in a Work Transition (WT) plan, where the distance between the workers home and the training facility is such that a secondary residence on a temporary basis is required.

British Columbia Manitoba

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

Prince Edward Maximum $120 per night. Accommodations in a private residence $10 per night. Island

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Room and Board (as accommodation) Quebec Hotel accommodation with CSST approval and presentation of receipts: maximum between $83 and $126 per night according to the region. Allowance paid for each day of travel involving a night in a hotel: $5.85 Lodging in a private home: $22.25 per night. As part of a rehabilitation program, if it lasts more than two weeks and forces the worker to travel more than 50 km away from his domicile, a maximum weekly allowance of $450 may be paid. Saskatchewan Hotel rates: Reasonable and actual reimbursement of accommodation will be authorized when supported by receipts. Private accommodation rate = $35.00 per night. Yukon Back to top The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for transportation. Transportation Alberta British Columbia $0.49/km effective March 1, 2010 The cost of public transport is paid. The cost of taxi will be paid when public transportation is unavailable or unacceptable. If other means of transport are not cost effective, a kilometer allowance is paid at $0.38/km for the worker to travel by car. RSCM Vol. II #82.10, #82.11, & #82.20 $0.39/km 6 $0.39/km 7 As per prior authorization

Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut

$0.30/km

$0.58/km for NWT workers; $0.58/km for Nunavut workers

6 7

The Kilometre Rate is adjusted four times a year. This rate is effective January 1, 2013. The Commission does not pay transportation expenses for the exclusion zone defined to be the first 22 kilometers.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Transportation Nova Scotia Policy 2.1.1R8 Travel in Local Areas - A client may use his/her own vehicle for transportation purposes to access services necessitated by the compensable injury, if this use has been pre-authorized by the Board. Authorized vehicle use will be reimbursed at the rate of 42.87 /km. $0.38/km

Ontario

Prince Edward Transportation costs are reimbursed at the same rate per kilometre as Workers Island Compensation Board employees when transportation is approved. Quebec $0.145/km; $0.43/km if a physician confirms that the worker is unable to use public transportation.

Saskatchewan In accordance with Saskatchewan PSC rates, November 1, 2012: Private vehicle: $0.41 / km (south of 54th parallel); $0.44 / km (north of 54th parallel) - subject to a minimum allowance of $5.00/day, prorated for shorter periods at $1.50/hour, to a maximum of $6.00/day or $ 0.41/km, whichever is greater. Parking receipts (if not a normal employment expense). Public transportation: Actual costs, including return taxi from terminal to treatment. Vocational rehabilitation if treatment is within a 75 km radius of the home community: Private vehicle: the PSC mileage rates apply up to a maximum of $190 / week; or Public transportation: actual costs as above. Vocational rehabilitation if treatment is beyond a 75 km radius of the home community: Monthly allowance (to cover travel, room and board) up to a maximum of $927.00 / month if the worker chooses to commute; or Relocation expenses (to cover travel, room and board) up to a maximum of $927.00 / month, plus one return trip home a month (PSC mileage rates or actual public transport costs) if the worker chooses to relocate to the place of treatment. Special individual circumstances may be reimbursed at the discretion of the board. Yukon Back to top 60 cents per kilometer/ minimum daily rate for mileage $2.35

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for witness fees for hearings. Witness Fees (for hearings) Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Meals, accommodation, & wage loss as necessary for workers. Where expenses of a witness are payable, the amount will be the same as for a worker. RSCM Vol. II #100.30 Appeals 8 Subpoenaed witnesses lost wages; Expert witness fee structure set by professional association or reasonable equivalent. Medical Review Panels (MRP) 9 Specialist Consultants - $655; General Consultants /Invited Guests - $493 New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia N/A

N/A

The Review Committee does not pay witness fees. The Appeals Tribunal may pay the going rate if they call on the witness or agree to reimburse an appellant.

The Board or the Appeals Tribunal may provide reasonable traveling and living expense to any person summoned as a witness pursuant to Sections 178 and 179. Non-Professional Witness Attendance Fee $110.96/full day $55.48/half day; Professional Witness Attendance Fee $600/full day, $300/half day Appeals System - Practice & Procedures

Ontario

Prince Edward No fixed amount. Island Quebec Not provided for.

See Policy 21.10.40 Expenses for Attendance at Appeal Hearings. To receive reimbursement, witnesses must appear at the request of the Chief Appeal Commissioner or an appeal panel. The WCB negotiates remuneration for MRP.panel members, consultants and guests. These rates are effective April 1, 2009.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Witness Fees (for hearings) Saskatchewan Expenses incurred for WCB requested appeal hearings or other special appointments and examinations, other than for treatment or vocational programming, are normally reimbursed in full. Yukon Back to top The following table identifies the expense rates at each WCB for child care expenses. Child Care Expenses Alberta If costs were incurred for child care prior to the injury, the WCB will not pay child care as there are no additional costs that resulted specifically due to the injury. However, in special circumstances, and if the injury or treatment program results in costs not normally incurred by the worker, payment of child care expenses may be considered. In limited circumstances, a homemaker allowance is provided to single parent or two parent families. RSCM Vol. II #84A.00 The WCB reimburses claimants for costs over and above the usual pre-accident child care costs. Applies to child and dependent care. $3.75 Hourly (if eight hours or less); $32.00 Daily (if over 8 hours); $22.00 Overnight; and $54 for 24 hour care. Receipts required. Rates are based on period of service regardless of the number of children/dependents in care. Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia Coverage for only additional cost compared to pre-injury costs. Must meet specific criteria. Witnesses are allowed necessary travel expenses at the same rate as staff and clients.

British Columbia Manitoba

New Brunswick

Determined on a case by case basis.

Determined on a case by case basis. A written agreement is required prior to incurring the expense. No.

Ontario

Prince Edward No fixed amount. Island

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Child Care Expenses Quebec Day care centre : $26.24 in 2013 less the assistance of $7.00 granted by the Qubec Government to children aged 0 to 5 years for every child under 16 years old; Home: $3.02 per hour in 2013 and $40.41 per day in 2013 for one child under 16 years old; $3.50 and $44.49 for two children in 2013 and $4.04 and $50.52 for three children in 2013. Saskatchewan Considered an additional expense -- only the portion of expenses exceeding the amount a client would ordinarily incur while working. This may be reimbursed if the situation arose out of injury-related circumstances. These expenses considered are temporary. The amount and duration of reimbursement will not exceed what is reasonable in the circumstances determined by medical evidence. The client will be required to provide proof of the additional expenses. The Case Manager will review the circumstances to identify entitlement to an additional expense. The Case Manager will then pre-authorize the allowance and confirm in writing. Yukon Back to top See also Healthcare Service Providers Policy, Report Fees & Treatment Fees for: Acupuncture Audiologist Chiropractor Dentist Dietician / Nutritionist Hospital Fees Massage Therapy Naturopathy Nurses/Nursing Occupational Therapy Optometry Physician Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Podiatry Prosthetics / Othotics Psychology Specialist Speech pathology Determined on a case by case basis no fixed amount - authorization required.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

HEALTHCARE SERVICE PROVIDERS' FEES

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Healthcare Service Providers Policy, Report Fees & Treatment Fees These tables give the treatment fees and report fees for the following healthcare service providers: acupuncture; audiologist (including hearing aids); chiropractor; dentist; dietician / nutritionist; hospital fees; massage therapy; naturopathy; nurses/nursing; occupational therapy; optometry; physician; physical therapy / physiotherapy; podiatry; prosthetics / orthotics; psychologist; specialist and speech pathologist. The tables also link to policies and related information for the above disciplines (if available). Click the link below to go directly to: Acupuncture Audiologist Chiropractor Dentist Dietician / Nutritionist Hospital Fees Massage Therapy Naturopathy Nurses/Nursing Occupational Therapy Optometry Physician Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Podiatry Prosthetics / Orthotics Psychologist Specialist Speech Pathologist

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for acupuncture. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Acupuncture Policy Alberta Policy 04-06 Part II Benefits - Health Care General Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Vol. II: 78.14 Acupuncture Manitoba 44.120.10 Medical Aid 44.120.30 Support for Daily Living When acupuncture is delivered by medical doctors, physiotherapists, or chiropractors, it is an accepted form of treatment. Fees outlined in most recent agreement with the New Brunswick Medical Society. Report fees are included in fees for services. Treatment - $46.56 Jan 1, 2013 2 Service (tray) fee - $13.72 Jan 1, 2013 Five (5) treatments October 1, 2012 The rate paid is $65.83. For the treatment sessions, rates as above for the first 10 minutes and $25.00 for each additional 10 minutes up to a maximum of 40 minutes Initial Assessment - $15 Subsequent Treatment - Max. 8 Treatments. Additional treatments available upon request. N/A N/A Report fees Report Fee - $20.90 Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $45.34 Subsequent Treatment - $36.52 to a maximum 7 treatments N/A Payment provided according to the profession of the service provider 1 Acupuncture and WorkSafeBC Related links N/A

British Columbia

New Brunswick

Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers

Newfoundland and Labrador

HC-04 Acupuncture Treatment

Same as Physician Report

N/A

A physiotherapist providing acupuncture is paid at the subsequent visit rate of $41.98. A family physician providing acupuncture can provide acupuncture as part of the office visit rate. There is no extra fee or tray fee for acupuncture. Payment for acupuncture provided by persons other than family physicians or physiotherapists will be paid at the family physician rate. These fee amounts are paid to physiotherapists. Fees paid to chiropractors differ slightly: Treatment - $44.34, Tray fee - $14.06. These amounts are effective March 1, 2013.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Acupuncture Policy Northwest Territories and Nunavut 04.04 Complimentary and Alternate Treatments Report fees No reporting fee paid Treatment fees If provided by physiotherapy out of Hospital fee, hospital facility fee of $238 applies negotiated fee agreement Acupuncture is a MSI uninsured service. Where provided by a physician it will be reimbursed at the office visit rate. Reimbursement for acupuncture treatment rendered by physiotherapists or chiropractors is included in the current fee structure. There is no separate fee for this service. $38.78 per treatment An initial trial of up to 6 treatments may be allowed. Must be delivered by a regulated health professional who has received the education/training required by their regulatory College. Related links WSCC Policies

Nova Scotia

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

N/A

Acupuncture

Ontario

N/A

N/A

Fee Schedules: Chiropractor Physician Physiotherapy Occupational Therapy Podiatry Chiropody Registered Nurse (Extended Class) Massage Therapy

Prince Edward POL-29 Acupuncture Island

No fee schedule.

No fee schedule.

POL-29 Acupuncture

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Acupuncture Policy Quebec Regulation respecting medical aid 3 Report fees N/A Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $27.00 Still valid in 2013 Subsequent Treatment - $27.00 Still valid in 2013 Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) Physician and Physical Therapist only; visit fees only Yukon HC-01 Provision of Health Care Assistance N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Related links N/A

Acupuncture treatments must be prescribed by the physician in charge of the worker.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for audiologists and hearing aids. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Audiologist Policy Alberta Policy 03-01, Part II, Application 5: Hearing Loss Report fees First report included in Initial Assessment Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $100.00 Subsequent Treatment - $48.00 Hearing aids Related links

Hearing aids shall be Hearing loss paid in accordance with (Policy) the following formula: Hearing Aids with ear molds: Manufacturers Cost of the hearing aid device and compression circuitry (excluding shipping and handling) to a maximum of $850.00 + $50.00 for ear mold + $40 as a fixed shipping and handling fee + $445 fitting fee = WCB Price. Hearing Aids without ear molds: Manufacturers Cost of the hearing aid device and compression circuitry (excluding shipping and handling) to a maximum of $900.00 + $40 as a fixed shipping and handling fee + $445 fitting fee = WCB Price.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Audiologist Policy British Columbia Report fees Treatment fees Diagnostic Fee - $93.00 Hearing aids Hearing Aid Program Related links Hearing Aid Program

There are no policies N/A regarding audiologists but the following policies address hearing loss: Policy Items # 31.00 to 31.90

Manitoba

44.20.50.20 Hearing Loss

N/A

Amounts effective Oct 1, 2010 Fitting/ Dispensing - $431 Service Fee - $32 per visit Repair Fee - $110 over manufacturers invoice Ear Molds - $84 per ear Full Audiological Assessment - $104 Auditory Brain Stem Response $156 Audiological Assessment - $52

Up to $1,200 per aid

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Audiologist Policy New Brunswick Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29501 Medical Aid Providers Report fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, the Commission pays fees according to the rate negotiated. $20 Treatment fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. Hearing aids Related links N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

EN-12: Hearings Loss Hearing Aid Procurement Program 04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

$100 Audiology Assessment

WHSCC - Audiologists and hearing aid vendors

WHSCC Audiologists and hearing aid vendors WSCC Policy Manual

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

No reporting fee paid

Falls under Hospital fee schedule.

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

$85.00 for an audiological assessment and written report in a private clinic. $93.50 in hospital.

Initial Assessment - $85.00 in private clinic and $93.50 in hospital. Hearing aid $1,450 per aid with the worker paying any remaining costs. May be replaced once every 5 years if no longer serviceable as a result of normal wear and tear.

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Audiologist Policy Ontario Policy 16-01-04 Noise induced hearing loss/on or after January 2, 1990 Policy 15-04-01 Traumatic Hearing Loss Policy 16-01-03 Occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss Policy 17-07-04 Hearing Devices Policy 16-01-08 Tinnitus Post January 2, 1990 Policy 16-01-07 Tinnitus Pre-January 2, 1990 Report fees Noise Induced Hearing Loss Program of Care (NIHL POC): Trial period follow-up form -$25 Rehabilitation follow-up form -$25 Treatment fees Program of Care: For services related to the provision of a hearing aid during the first year of its use. Service block 1 (assessment and plan) -$288 per hearing aid Service Block 2 (6 month follow-up) -$192 per hearing aid Diagnostic Hearing Testing- July 1, 2000 MOHLTC Schedule of Benefits Audiometric TestingManual Impedance Testing G434 - technical component $7.90 G527 - professional componentHearing aid evaluation and/or refitting of tinnitus masker (does not include G526 and G441) $5.70 G447 - technical component $29.50 G531 - professional component $12.20 Hearing aid re-evaluation and/or re-fitting of tinnitus masker (does not include G526 and G441) G445 - technical component $14.80 G446 - professional component $6.10 Hearing aids Up to $1,000.00, this covers the hearing aid and its integrated options and features. Amount set out in Policy 18-01-05 Table of Rates Policy 17-07-04 Hearing Devices outlines an exception process for workers with special needs who require a hearing aid costing more than $1,000 per ear/per aid. Related links Program of Care for Noise Induced Hearing Loss

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Audiologist Policy Prince Edward POL-09, Hearing Loss Island POL-64 Health Care Providers Quebec Entente MSSS-CSST Annexe la circulaire (circulaire numro 03.01.42.19 du MSSS) and Regulation respecting medical aid Report fees No fee schedule. Treatment fees No fee schedule. Hearing aids Maximum $1,600 per hearing aid. Replacement limited to once every four years. $30.50 Still valid in 2013 Public sector: Interview and record consultation: $28.17 at May 1, 2012 per session Other fees according to the type of test For the list of fees, see the appendix to the circular (MSSS circular number 03.01.42.19) Private sector: Fees according to Appendix 1 of the Regulation respecting medical aid Initial Assessment - $20.25 Still valid in 2013 Subsequent Treatment - $20.25 Still valid in 2013 Other fees according to the type of test (see Appendix 1 of the Regulation respecting medical aid) Guide programme des aides auditives de la RAMQ Prostheses outside the RAMQ: Guide administratif Prothses auditives N/A Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Audiologist Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) PRO 50/2010 (background on relationship with SK Assoc. of Speech Language Pathologists & Audiologists (SASKPA)) Report fees N/A Treatment fees Evaluation: SK Hearing Aid Plan (HAP) clinics As per Ministry of Health fee schedule Private (non-HAP) clinics $114.40 Hearing aids Entry level hearing instrument: SK HAP clinics As per Ministry of Health fee schedule Private (non-HAP) clinics Manufacturers price + 10% handling fee + shipping cost + $525 inclusive of all fitting and follow-up Related links www.wcbsask.ca: Care Provider Service Audiology

Other fees - see PRO 50/2010 (Schedule B) at www.wcbsask.com

Other fees - see PRO 50/2010 (Schedule B) at www.wcbsask.com Yukon EN-06 Hearing Loss N/A N/A Schedule A Fee Structure (Hearing Claims) YWCHSB: Coverage Hearing Loss

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for chiropractors. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Chiropractor Policy Alberta Policy 04-06 Part II Benefits - Health Care General Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 74.20 Chiropractors 74.21 Duration of Treatment 74.22 Scope of Chiropractic Treatment 74.23 Examination by the Board 74.24 Consultation with Another Chiropractor 74.25 Physiotherapy 74.26 Belts and Back Supports 74.27 X-rays Manitoba N/A Chiropractor Fee - $39.35 (Mar. 1, 2013). Narrative Report or Referral - $124.84 (Mar 1, 2013). Initial Assessment $49.44 (Mar 1, 2013) Subsequent Treatment $34.46 (Mar 1, 2013). N/A Report fees First Report - $23.92 Chiropractor Progress/Discharge $23.92 Written Report requested by the Board - $42.98 Comprehensive Report requested by the Board - $209.59 Treatment fees Initial Assessment $43.64 Treatment $34.00 Rates effective Dec. 1/11-Nov. 30/14 Chiropractic treatment and progress/discharge report (fee is inclusive of progress/discharge report and all treatment visits up to and including eight weeks including home visit) - $379.00 Extenuating circumstances treatment visit - $30.75 Spinal cord injury - $40.53 Chiropractors and WorkSafeBC Related links Chiropractic services

British Columbia

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Chiropractor Policy New Brunswick Policy No. 25-001 - Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers Report fees Fees outlined in the most recent agreement with the New Brunswick Chiropractors Association. $10.00 reporting fee for Form 8C (First medical) for report that is complete and received within five working days. Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $40.00 4 (July 1, 2012) Subsequent Treatment - $43.004 (July 1, 2012) 1 set x-rays - $45.00 2 sets x-rays - $75.00 Up to $300 for orthotics Newfoundland and Labrador HC-02: Chiropractic Care Chiropractic Reporting Fees (initial and discharge reports): Report rec'd within 3 days - $21.00 Rec'd between 4 and 7 days - $5.00 Telephone Consult - $29.00 (plus $2.90 per minute beyond 10) Summary Report - $128.75 X-Ray Interpretation - $38.75 Comprehensive report with medico legal opinion - $128.75 / page Northwest Territories and Nunavut 04.02 Payment for Medical Aid 04.04 Complimentary and Alternate Treatments
4

Related links N/A

Initial Assessment $51.00 Treatment $44.50

WHSCC Chiropractors

No negotiated fee agreement

As billed

WSCC Policy Manual

Fee for service is negotiated with the New Brunswick Chiropractic Association.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Chiropractor Policy Nova Scotia Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services Report fees Chiropractic form/ report - $26.00 $30.00 for 2 x-rays $10 for additional x-ray views Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $38.51 Subsequent Treatment - $38.51 Generally, a maximum of 20 treatments. Related links Chiropractors Recommending Time Off Work Chiropractors Prescribing Supports, Braces, Orthotics. Chiropractor Fee Schedule Programs of Care: Acupuncture -$38.78 Home Visit - $31.26 Radiographic exams -$21.93-$76.67 Acute Low Back Injuries Upper Extremity Injuries Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Lower Extremity Injuries Shoulder Program of Care

Ontario

17-02-02 Health Care Practitioners Reports 17-01-03 Choice and Change of Health Professional 17-02-03 Payment of Clinical Assessment Reports Requested for Adjudication 17-03-01 Health Care Fees 17-01-02 Entitlement to Health Care

Health Professionals Report (esubmission) - $50.00 Health Professionals Report (paper submission) - $40.00 Progress Report or Narrative Report $23.54 Health Professionals Continuity Report - $33.00 X-ray Report - $23.54 Complex Report - $112.10 Functional Abilities Form for Planning Early and Safe Return to Work $45.00 In-office interview with WSIB representative -$29.15 Photocopies of medical reports (1-5 pages) -$23.54 and $1.12 each additional page Review of medical records/literature per 15 min.- $56.05 Telephone Consultation $23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB

Initial Visit - $30.56 Subsequent Treatment - $25.00

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Chiropractor Policy Prince Edward POL-25, Chiropractic Island Treatment POL-64 Health Care Providers Report fees N/A Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $65.00 Subsequent Treatment - $40.00 Work conditioning - $50.00 per session X-rays (per set) - $38.00 Recurrence: Initial visit & treatment $65.00 Recurrence: Treatments - $40.00 Supportive care - $40.00 Quebec Regulation respecting medical aid 5 N/A Private sector: fees according to Appendix 1 of the Regulation respecting medical aid Initial Assessment - $32.00 Still valid in 2013 Subsequent Treatment - $32.00 Still valid in 2013
5

Related links N/A

N/A

Chiropractic treatments must be prescribed by the physician in charge of the worker.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Chiropractor Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) PRO 50/2011 (Schedule A: Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines) Report fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 50/2011 (Schedule C) With function outcome info: Initial report - $56.50 or SK Medical Association (SMA) fee, if greater Progress report - $35.10 or SMA fee, if greater Without function outcome info: Initial report - $46.50 or $10 less than SMA fee, if greater Progress report - $25.90 or $9.20 less than SMA fee, if greater Other fees -- see PRO 50/2011 (Schedule C) Yukon HC-04 Chiropractic Treatment N/A N/A N/A Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 50/2011 (Schedule C) As of June 1, 2012: Initial visit - $47.00 Subsequent visit - $35.00 Emergency visit - $59.29 Related links www.wcbsask.com: Care Provider Service Chiropractors Support Package for Chiropractors and Physiotherapist s

Other fees -- see PRO 50/2011 (Schedule C)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for dentists. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Dentist Policy Alberta Policy 04-06 Part II Benefits Health Care - General Report fees First Report - $38.70 (General) First Report - $55.42 (Specialist) Progress Reports - $29.86 (General & Specialist) British Columbia Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII - 74.30 Dentists N/A N/A Treatment fees There is a dental fee guide in place for both Specialists and Generalists that can be obtained by contacting WCB-AB directly. This fee guide changes regularly and is not available by related links.
6

Related links Other services Dental/Denturist

Dentists and WorkSafeBC

Manitoba

N/A

There are six fee schedules based on specialist. All dental work is pre-authorized by the WCB. Fees paid in accordance with User Fee Guide published by the New Brunswick Dental Society effective January 1, 2013. Initial Assessment: $152.20 Examination and Diagnosis Oral Pathology General $152.20 Examination and Diagnosis Surgical General $152.20 Examination and Diagnosis Endodontic - Complete Endodontic examination and diagnosis and/or complicated diagnosis $160.80 Examination and Diagnosis, Oral Pathology Specific

N/A

New Brunswick

Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid Principles Fee Schedule No. 29501 Medical Aid Providers

Report fees are included in fee for service.

N/A

All new dental work must be approved by the Board before treatment begins, except in the case of emergencies. There is no set fee for reports or treatment. The Board uses the fee guide of the Association of Dental Surgeons of B.C. as a guide for treatment fees.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Dentist Policy Newfoundland and Labrador Report fees Treatment fees No established fee Related links N/A

Procedure 58.00: No established fee Health Care Services supplies (58.11 Dental Care Expenses) 04.05 Dental Treatment As billed

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

WSCC Policies

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

Fee charged. Estimate should be completed and submitted prior to services rendered. Fees suggested by NS Dental Association should be referenced. N/A

Initial Assessment - Fee Charged Subsequent Treatment - Fee Charged

Dental Statement

Ontario

17-03-03 Dental Entitlement

Percentage of Ontario Dental Association suggested Fee Guide and Denturists Fee Schedule No fee schedule.

N/A

Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec Policy 5.01 : Les services de professionnels de la sant (Professional health services)

No fee schedule.

N/A

N/A

Fair and reasonable amount according to the fee guides of the Feder ation of dental specialists of Quebec and the Association des chirurgiens dentistes du Qubec.

N/A

Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1)

Payment of reasonable amounts, using Fee Guides of the College of Dental Surgeons of Saskatchewan as the guideline.

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 56/2011 Payment of reasonable amounts, using Fee Guides of the College of Dental Surgeons of Saskatchewan as the guideline.

www.wcbsask.com: Care Provider Services: Dentistry

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Dentist Policy Yukon N/A Report fees N/A Treatment fees N/A Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for dieticians/nutritionists. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Dietician / Nutritionist Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Payment for services shall follow the most current Alberta Health rates. Report Fee - $50.00 Late Report Fee - $35.00 Treatment fees N/A Related links N/A

British Columbia

No

Visit = $20 per service unit One service unit = 15 minutes. Maximum 8 service units per day. Includes all costs associated with the visit. No fee schedule - invoice WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. No established fee

Dieticians and WorkSafeBC

Manitoba New Brunswick

N/A Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers

N/A WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. No established fee

N/A N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

N/A

N/A

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

None

As billed

WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services No

No set fee

No set fee

Ontario

No

No

No

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Dietician / Nutritionist Policy Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec None 7 Report fees No fee schedule. Treatment fees No fee schedule. Related links N/A

N/A

Public and private networks: Dieticians can be part of interdisciplinary teams. The CSST compensates their services under the agreement concerned and their fees are included in the per diem provided in the evaluation and development program of functional working skills.

N/A

Saskatchewan N/A Yukon None

N/A No fee schedule.

N/A No specific fees

N/A N/A

These expenses are payable only as part of rehabilitation because they are not provided for in the Regulation on medical assistance. The nutritionist or dietician must be a member of his/her professional order.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for hospital fees. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Hospital Fees Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Payment for services shall follow the most current Alberta Health rates.
8

Treatment fees N/A

Related links N/A

British Columbia

Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 76.00 Hospitals and Other Institutions 76.10 In-Patient Treatment 76.20 Short Stay Patients 76.30 Private Hospitals

Inpatient per diem rate varies by facility $825 $2,305; Intensive Care Unit rate varies by facility - $1,910 - $5,497; ER Visit $270.

Hospitals

Manitoba

N/A

N/A

Inpatient per diem rate varies by facility $777 $1,612. Apr 1, 2012 Outpatient per diem rate - $270. Apr 1, 2012

N/A

New Brunswick

Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers

Rates are updated annually.

Effective April 1, 2012: Standard out-patient visit (excluding specific services for which service codes apply) $270 Day care surgery $1,150 In-patient rate per day $402 - $1,248 (in ward) dependent on the hospital facility

N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

N/A

Same as physician reporting fees where report provided by hospital physician.

As billed based on provincial health care rates.

N/A

Payment is based on inter-provincial rates set by the Ministry of Health.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Hospital Fees Policy Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia 04.02 Payment for Medical Aid Report fees None Treatment fees As billed Related links WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

N/A

Rates vary & depend upon service provided. Inpatient and other rates vary according to District Health Authority & service provided. In patient rates range from $250.80 to $1,172.60.

N/A

Ontario

17-03-01 Health Care Fees

N/A

Initial Visit $95.83 Follow-up with Specific Additional Treatment $68.67 Normal Follow-up $23.96 Day care surgery -$332.05 CT scan -$381.10 Haemodialysis -$381.10 MRI -$875.00 (max per day)

Hospital Fee Schedule Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fee Schedule

Prince Edward N/A Island Quebec Politique 5.01 : Les services de professionnels de la sant (services provided by health professionals)

As per Provincial fee schedule.

As per Provincial fee schedule.

N/A

N/A

According to fees provided by the Rgie de lassurance-maladie du Qubec (RAMQ) MSSS CSST Agreement

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Hospital Fees Policy Saskatchewan N/A Report fees N/A Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 55/2010 The WCB will reimburse any hospital or treatment facility for out-patient and in-patient services, as well as high cost procedures, in accordance with the annual rates set by Saskatchewan Ministry of Healths Medical Services Branch, except where an alternate contract exists. Yukon No policy N/A Emergency care $247.00 N/A Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for massage therapy. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Massage Therapy Policy Alberta N/A Report fees N/A Treatment fees Not generally covered. Massage therapists do not have a regulatory licensing body or governing legislation in the province of Alberta and are not covered under the Health Disciplines Act. The practice of massage itself is covered under the Physical Therapy Profession Act. It may be used as part of the physical therapy treatment by a licensed physical therapist or part of an interdisciplinary treatment program (usually pain management). If massage therapy is provided as a part of a physical therapy program, the cost of the massage is covered in the active physical therapy fee. No provision is given for extra billing. British Columbia N/A Written report requested by WorkSafeBC - $27.00 Initial Visit with Massage Treatment Report $55.43 - $62.00 (inclusive of $27.00 report fee) Subsequent treatment - $25.44 - $30.00 Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador N/A N/A N/A Report $15 No fee schedule Treatment $80 N/A N/A Massage therapists and WorkSafeBC Related links N/A

N/A

No established fees

$40.00 per treatment

WHSCC - Policies and procedures; Procedure 69.00 Massage Therapy

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Massage Therapy Policy Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia Report fees Treatment fees As billed. Related links WSCC Policy Manual

04.04 Complimentary N/A and Alternate Treatments

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

N/A

Massage therapy is regarded as a treatment modality that may be delivered in conjunction with an overall physiotherapy or chiropractic program. Payment is made for the physiotherapy or chiropractic treatment not massage therapy. Massage Therapy visit - $50.00 Visit and payment is not time based. However, a visit is generally one hour in duration Acupuncture - $38.78 (per visit)

Massage Therapy

Ontario

17-03-01 Health Care Fees

Functional Abilities Form $45.00 Telephone Consultation $23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB

Fee Schedules: Massage Therapy

Prince Edward POL-10 Massage Island Therapy Quebec Regulation respecting medical aid

No fee schedule.

No fee schedule.

N/A

N/A

Not provided unless carried out as part of a physiotherapy treatment Private sector: Individual treatment: $36 Still valid in 2013

N/A

Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 2) PRO 51/2010 (Schedule C: Practice Standards for Massage Therapy Service Providers)

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2010 (Schedule A) Initial assessment report: $15.00 Progress report: $18.00 Discharge report: $15.00

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2010 (Schedule A) Initial assessment: $32.00 Subsequent treatment: $31.00 Telephone consultation: $40.00 / hour

www.wcbsask.com: Care Provider Services: Massage Therapy

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Massage Therapy Policy Yukon HC-05 Therapeutic Massage Therapy Report fees N/A Treatment fees Massage Services: Initial assessment and treatment plan: $125.00 Functional Abilities Form (upon request):$25.00 Request for extension Report: $25.00 Treatment session 30 minutes:$45.00 Treatment session 45 minutes:$65.00 Treatment session 60 minutes:$80.00 Case management team consultation: $25.00 Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for naturopathy. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Naturopathy Policy Alberta N/A Report fees N/A Treatment fees Naturopaths do not have a regulatory licensing body or governing legislation in the province of Alberta. In situations where the worker is treated by a chiropractor who is also a naturopath, the treatment must adhere to Policy 04-06 Health Care and Business Proc. 41.4 - Chiropractic Treatment. The treatment must be of a chiropractic nature. British Columbia Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual, VII: 74.40 Naturopathic Physicians Initial Report - $31.24 Progress Report - $29.12 Report Requested by WorkSafeBC - $42.98 Comprehensive Report + Report Requested by WorkSafeBC $209.59 Manitoba New Brunswick N/A N/A N/A Generally N/A. However, when WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. No established fees No fee schedule Generally N/A. However, when WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. No established fees N/A N/A Initial visit - $31.00 Subsequent visit - $30.15 Naturopathic physicians and WorkSafeBC Related links N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

N/A

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Naturopathy Policy Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia 04.04 Complimentary and Alternate Treatments Report fees N/A Treatment fees N/A Related links WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services No

Not approved. MSI Non-Insured Health Service. No N/A

Ontario

No N/A

No N/A

Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec N/A

N/A N/A

Not payable Still in effect in 2013 N/A

N/A N/A

Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 2) Yukon HC-01 Provision of Health Care Assistance

N/A

N/A

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for nurses/nursing. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Nurses / Nursing Policy Alberta N/A Report fees $140.33 for 3 hour authorized RN assessment & written care plan. WCB will pay the current RN rate per hour for additional assessment hours if required up to a maximum of 7 hours. WCB will pay the current RN rate per hour for authorized RN re-assessment to max of 3 hours British Columbia N/A Report - $20 Treatment fees $63.52 per hour with a 2 hour min. dispatch time for authorized service by RN. $40.17 per hour with a 2 hour min. dispatch time for authorized service by LPN. $31.52 per hour with a 2 hour min. dispatch time for authorized service by HCA. Visit - $29 Tray Fee - $26.68 (includes the use of a sterile instrument tray requiring suture materials or similar supplies. Nurse practitioners are reimbursed at the same rate as physicians Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. No established fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. No established fees N/A Nurse practitioners and WorkSafeBC Related links N/A

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut

N/A

04.04 Complimentary and Alternate Treatments

N/A

N/A

WSCC Policy Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Nurses / Nursing Policy Nova Scotia Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services 17-01-02 Entitlement to Health Care 17-01-03 Choice and Change of Health Professional 17-02-02 Health Care Practitioners Reports 17-02-03 Payment of Clinical Assessments/Reports Requested for Adjudication 17-03-01 Health Care Fees 17-06-06 Home Care Report fees N/A Treatment fees No established fees Related links N/A

Ontario

Health Professionals Report (esubmission) - $50.00 Health Professionals Report (paper submission) - $40.00 1 Health Professionals Progress Report (e-submission) - $60.00 Health Professionals Progress Report (paper submission) - $45.00 Health Professionals Continuity Report - $33.00 Progress or Narrative Report - $23.54 Functional Abilities for Planning Early and Safe Return to Work Form -$45.00 Photocopies of clinical reports (1-5 pages) -$23.54 and $1.12 each additional page Review of medical records/literature per 15 min.- $56.05 In-Office interview with WSIB representative -$29.15 Telephone Consultation- $23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB.

Initial Visit - $23.54 Continuing Treatment (per visit) - $19.26 Acupuncture -$38.78 per visit

Registered Nurse (Extended Class) Fee Schedule Programs of Care

1 Until the second footnote, all of the following apply to Registered Nurses (Extended Class).
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Nurses / Nursing Policy Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec Report fees N/A Treatment fees N/A Related links N/A

N/A

Home nursing care provided by the public sector: Application of fee provided in the MSSS-CSST Agreement (Appendix 1). Fee of $17.29 at May 1, 2012 for 15-minute session, chargeable per quarter of an hour. Supply and travel expenses are included in the fee. Travel expenses are payable in addition. Home nursing care provided by the private sector: Application of fee provided in Schedule 1 of the Regulation respecting medical aid. Fee of $44.00 per session. Still valid in 2013. Travel, transportation, parking, meal and supply expenses are included in the fee. As part of rehabilitation, travel and accommodation expenses are refundable under Section 150 of the ARIAOD

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Nurses / Nursing Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) PRO 57/2012: Registered nurses and nurse practitioners will bill for services according to the fee schedule noted in PRO 51/2009 (Medical Fees Physicians). Report fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Initial report - $56.50 If submitted electronically, add $11.90 Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Complicated consultation $90.30 Research fee (with GP) - $40.70/ 10 min Telephone consultation (with GP): $40.70 / first 10 min $54.00 / from 10 to 15 min $54.00 / each additional 15 min Related links N/A

Progress report - $35.10 If submitted electronically, add $11.90

Other fees see PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Yukon N/A N/A N/A N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for occupational therapy. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Occupational Therapy Policy Alberta N/A Report fees $20.70 per 15 minute units up to 16 units Progress Report - $94.85 Discharge Report - $94.85 N/A Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29501 Medical Aid Providers N/A Currently, there is no contract in place with the New Brunswick Association of Occupational Therapists or individual providers for most OT services with the exception of Work Capacity Evaluations and Hand Rehabilitation services delivered by an OT. Generally fees range $85$100/hr, although some providers may charge more. Treatment fees $20.70 per 15 minute units Related links N/A

British Columbia

N/A

Initial Assessment - $94.75 per hour OT Visits - $94.75 per hour 1 $46.56 per treatment January 1, 2013. Generally, fees are $85-100/hour, although some providers may charge more. Hand Therapy services: Initial Assessment - $90 session fee Subsequent Treatment - $70 session fee Initial, progress and discharge reports - $15 Reports including outcome measures - $20 Telephone consultation - $18 Flat fee for static splint - $100 Flat fee for dynamic splint - $200 Work Capacity Evaluation (Fees include all reports and data) One day - $1,100 Two day - $2,200

Community Occupational Therapy Services N/A N/A

Manitoba New Brunswick

Payable only upon receipt of progress or discharge report.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Occupational Therapy Policy Newfoundland and Labrador Policy HC-12 Occupational Rehabilitation Services Private Clinics Report fees Included in treatment fees. Treatment fees Effective March 30, 2012, the rates will be: Functional Assessment - $101/hour Professional Services - $101/hour Worksite OT Services - $101/hour (max. $1500) Clinic OT Services - $42/hour Clinic OT one-on-one - $101/hour Additional expenses are covered for worksite visits (travel, meals, etc.) Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia 04.04 Complimentary and Alternate Treatments Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services None As billed WSCC Policy Manual Related links HC Procedure #38.00; WHSCC Occupational rehabilitation providers

Independent $45.00/hour + report and travel time at $45.00 per hour and mileage at $0.34/km Physiotherapy Clinic: $90.00/ hour for JSA, CC, Ergonomic Coaching and visit to the worksite as part of a transitional RTW plan. Other OT services within clinics should be paid according to the PT contract rates.

$45.00 per hour

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Occupational Therapy Policy Ontario 17-06-06 Home Care 17-03-01 - Health Care Fees Report fees Functional Abilities Form $45.00 Telephone Consultation $23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB. Treatment fees $59.00 per visit (Visit and payment is not time based. However, a visit is generally one hour in duration) Home Visit $118.00 Acupuncture per visit $38.78 Related links Occupational Therapy Fee Schedule Programs of Care: Acute Low Back Injuries Upper Extremity Injuries Lower Extremity Injuries Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Shoulder Program of Care

Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec Regulation respecting medical aid Entente MSSS-CSST Annexe la circulaire (circulaire numro 03.01.42.19 du MSSS) Politique 4.04 : Les frais de radaptation (rehabilitation fees)

No fee schedule.

No fee schedule.

N/A

N/A

Occupational therapy treatments Private sector: Still in effect in 2013 Individual treatment: $36 Group treatment: $21 Home treatment: $50 For home sessions, the physician in charge must certify the workers inability to move due to his or her injury and prescribe such care. The CSST is bound by the opinion of the physician in charge in this matter.

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Occupational Therapy Policy Report fees Treatment fees Public sector: Per visit: $37.30 since May 1, 2012 Group fee: $22.36 since May 1, 2012 Home care: $50 Still in effect in 2013 Public and private sectors: Occupational therapists may be part of the interdisciplinary teams for workers who have suffered a head trauma (HT), a spinal cord injury (SCI), or a serious orthopedic injury (SOI) and serious burn victims (SBV). The CSST pays their services under the agreement concerned. Evaluation of functional working skills: $247 per day in 2013 for services offered by the interdisciplinary team. Maximum duration of 10 six-hour days; Development of functional working skills: $247 per day in 2013 for services offered by the interdisciplinary team. Maximum duration of 20 six-hour days; Analysis and adaptation of a work station (hourly fee of $73.00 in 2013) : Full analysis of a work station (maximum of 30 hours). Professional consultation on particular aspects of a work station (maximum of 15 hours) and adaptation of work station (variable). Related links

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Occupational Therapy Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) Report fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 57/2011 (Schedule B): Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 57/2011 (Schedule B): Initial assessment - $88.62 Subsequent visit - $39.88 Return to work planning - $92.00 Individual functional conditioning - $92.00 Related links www.wcbsask.com: Care Provider Services: Occupational Therapy

With functional outcome PRO 57/2011 (Schedule measures: A: Accreditation Initial report - $56.50 or Standards and Service Saskatchewan Medical Provider Guidelines) Association (SMA) fee, if greater Progress / discharge report $35.10 or SMA fee, if greater

Other fees -- see PRO 57/2011 (Schedule B)

Without functional outcome measures: Initial report - $46.50 or $10 less than SMA fee, if greater Progress / discharge report $25.90 or $9.20 less than SMA fee, if greater

Other fees see PRO 57/2011 (Schedule B) Yukon N/A N/A N/A N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for optometrists. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Optometrist Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Payment for services shall follow the most current Alberta Health rates. WorkSafeBC requested report or chart notes - $22.81 and $1.17 for each extra page Comprehensive written report requested by WorkSafeBC $132.60 N/A WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. N/A Exam fee upper limit $75 WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. N/A N/A N/A N/A Treatment fees N/A Related links N/A

British Columbia

Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 39.42 Visual Acuity 77.21 Eyeglasses

Extended Ocular Health Assessment - $81.60 2 Diagnostic eye exam - $45.73

Optometrists and WorkSafeBC

Manitoba New Brunswick

N/A Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut


2

N/A

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

As billed

WSCC Policy Manual

An internal health assessment which includes a dilated fundus examination, external health assessment, binocular assessment, manual or cycloplegic refraction. Tests to assess the integrity of the visual pathways such as Amsler grid or confrontation fields but not limited to these tests are included in this procedure. This procedure should occur at the initial visit for assessment of the injury and annually afterwards if requested by WCB. If a full visual field assessment is required it can be billed separately. Fee includes the report.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Optometrist Policy Nova Scotia Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services 17-07-01 Prescription Eyewear 17-01-02 Entitlement to Health Care Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec Politique 5.01 : Les services de professionnels de la sant (services provided by health professionals) No fee schedule. No fee schedule. N/A Report fees No set fee Treatment fees No set fee. Maximum of $150 allowed for frames Paid according to the Association of Optometrist Fee Guide Related links -

Ontario

N/A

N/A

N/A

General examination: $70 since May 24, 2012 Subsequent examination: $40 since May 24, 2012 Specific examination of visual impairment: $70 since May 24, 2012

N/A

Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1)

N/A

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 61/2011 Optometrists will direct bill the WCB for all services provided to WCB clients and will charge according to the most current rates set by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health.

www.wcbsask.com: Care Provider Services: Optometry

Yukon

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for physicians. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Physician Policy Alberta Policy 04-06 Part II Benefits - Health Care - General Policy 04-06 Part II Benefits Health Care Medical Aid Accounts British Columbia Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 74.00 Physicians and Qualified Practitioners 74.10 General Position of Physicians and Qualified Practitioners 95.00 Responsibilities of Physicians and Qualified Practitioners 95.10 Form of Reports
3 4 Up to 20 pages. If received within 15 business days.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Report fees Effective April 1/10 all reports must be sent electronic. First Report - $56.65 (electronic submission) Progress Reports - $34.42

Treatment fees Payment for the above services shall follow the most current Alberta Health and Wellness Schedule of Medical Benefits.

Related links Physician services

As of October 1, 2010: Initial form Fee - $49.03 Progress report - $40.28 WorkSafeBC request for a copy of an existing report or chart note - $40.80 3

Initial Assessment and Subsequent Treatment (for services not unique to WorkSafeBC) Charged according to the B.C. Medical Services Plan Fee Schedule plus a premium of 10% Standardized assessment form (includes physical examination) - $76.50 4 Job site meeting - $300.90 (where a physician has been requested by WorkSafeBC to attend a meeting at the workers job site) Return to Work consultation $265.20

Physicians

Physician Policy Manitoba N/A Report fees General Practitioner Fee 5 - $50.45 (Jan. 1, 2013) Narrative Report or Referral - $135.45 (Jan 1, 2013) Treatment fees Office Visit Under 10 minutes - $22.75 Apr 1, 2010 Over 10 minutes - $31.85 Apr 1, 2010 New Brunswick Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers Rates negotiated with the New Brunswick Medical Society and outlined in the Agreement for Provision of Medical Services WHSCC. Office Visit General Practice (applies to certain service codes only) Oct 1, 2012 If report is received within 5 days or less, rate paid is $78.88. If received beyond 5 days, rate paid is $65.83. Physician Reporting Fees: Report rec'd within 3 days - $35.50 Rec'd between 4 and 7 days - $18.00 Rec'd between 7 and 10 days - $10.00 Visit Fee (MCP plus 20%) - $42.02 Telephone Consult - $35.00 for up to 10 minutes (plus $3.50 per minute beyond 10) Summary or medical opinion Report - $155.00
5 6

Related links N/A

N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

N/A

Initial Assessment 6 Subsequent Treatment Treatment fees are the provincial Medicare rates plus 20% for the specific service provided
6

WHSCC Physicians

Additional Fees are paid for reports requested from specialists. Treatment Fees for GPs are the provincial Medicare rates for the specific service provided.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physician Policy Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia 04.02 Payment for Medical Aid Report fees Treatment fees Pay as per NWT Fee Schedule Related links WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

Treating Physician Assessment Fee: $123.40 New combined fee for office visit and Physicians Report (Form 8/10) completion within 5 days. EPS (Enhanced Physician Services Group = training in occupational medicine) Physician Assessment Fee: $153.55 For office visit and form completion within 5 days. Other Clinical Services: 10/9th of MSI rate Photocopying Charts: A minimum of $25 Or as negotiated with WCB on a case-by-case basis. Chart Summaries/ Written Reports: $150/ hour ; $125/ page. As requested by the WCB. Case conferencing and teleconferencing: Treating Physician - $75/ half hour EPS Physician - $100/ half hour Billable in quarters. Other services (i.e travel expenses): $0.4287/km and as pre-approved by WCB. Increases concurrent with changes in WCB's mileage rate.

Other Clinical Services: 10/9th of MSI rate.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physician Policy Ontario 17-03-01 Health Care Fees 17-02-03 Payment of Clinical Assessments/ Reports Requested for Adjudication Report fees Health Professionals Report (e-submission) - $85.00 Health Professionals Report (paper submission) $65.00 Health Professionals Progress Report (esubmission) - $60.00 Health Professionals Progress Report (paper submission) - $45.00 Narrative Progress Report - $23.54 Health Professionals Continuity Report - $33.00 Hospital Emergency Department Consultation Report - $47.09 X-ray report - $23.54 Operative Report - .$23.54 Consultation Report - $47.09 Functional Abilities for Planning Early and Safe Return to Work Form -$45.00 Photocopies of clinical reports (1-5 pages) -$23.54 and $1.12 each additional page Review of medical records/literature per 15 min.$56.05 In-Office interview with WSIB representative -$29.15 Medical Clearance for Functional Abilities Evaluation (FAE) (Form 0298A) - $23.54 Complex Report - $112.10
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Treatment fees Physician services Acupuncture -$38.78 per visit

Related links MOH&LTC Insured Services for Physicians Fee Schedule Programs of Care: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Occupational Asthma Occupational Contact Dermatitis

Physician Policy Report fees Physicians Special Report - $23.54 Physicians Report on Occupational Disease 8D $23.54 Physicians Report on Skin Disease 8D2 - $23.54 Physicians Report Occupational Chest Disease 85 - $23.54 Physicians Report Vibration Induced White Finger Disease - $23.54 Physicians Drug Utilization Report - $23.54 Physicians Report Home Oxygen Therapy $39.53 Physicians Complex Drug Utilization Report - $56.05 Physicians Orthotic Report - $23.54 Telephone Consultation- $23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB Prince Edward POL-92 Medical Island Aid POL-64 Health Care Providers Physician Fee - Emergency Room physicians: Fee code 0180: $37.05 (0800-1800 Monday to Friday) Fee Code 0181: $48.43 (1800-0800 Monday to Friday) Fee Code 0190: $42.90 (0800-1800 Sat, Sun and holidays) Fee Code 0191: $71.83 (1800-0800 Sat, Sun and holidays)
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Treatment fees

Related links

Physician fees paid are 30% over the Tariff of Fees agreed to between the Medical Society & the Province. The physicians fee will increase to $50.00 if the report is received within 7 days of the date of assessment.

N/A

Physician Policy Quebec Policy 5.01 : Les services de professionnels de la sant (Professional health services) Report fees Depends on type of report and content of information. Examples (physicians) : Still in effect in 2012 Doctors certificate - $20.50 since April 1, 2012 Summary report - $19.00 Same rate Evaluation report - $19 since April 1, 2012 Final report - $22 since April 1, 2012 Maintaining the Employment Relationship - $95.00 Same rate Additional medical information - $115.00 Same rate Medical evaluation report (MER) (physician in charge of worker) $360 since April 1, 2012 MER (physician designated by Commission) - $740 since April 1, 2012 MER Supplement for certain specialties - $85 since April 1, 2012 Written supplementary medical information - $75.00 Same rate Written CMPP report - $340 since April 1, 2012 Temporary assignment - $59 since April 1, 2012 RAMQ Specialists Invoicing Manual Manuel complet (Complete Manual) Treatment fees RAMQ General Practitioners Invoicing Manual: Manuel complet (Complete Manual) Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physician Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) Report fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Initial report - $56.50 If submitted electronically, add $11.90 Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Complicated consultation $90.30 Research fee (with GP) $40.70 / 10 min Telephone consultation (with GP): $40.70 / first 10 min $54.00 / from 10 to 15 min $54.00 / each additional 15 min Related links www.wcbsask.com: Support Package for Physicians Care Provider Services: Physicians

Progress report - $35.10 If submitted electronically, add $11.90

Other fees see PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Yukon N/A Initial - $48.00 Progress - $44.30 Summary Report (5 or fewer visits) - $107.10 Fees vary and are based on the Yukon Relative Value Guide to Fees. N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for physical therapy/physiotherapy. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Alberta Policy 04-06 Part II Benefits Health Care - General Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 75.10 Physiotherapists 75.12 Physiotherapy Given Privately Manitoba N/A Report fees Assessment - $20.90 Status - $20.90 Discharge - $20.90 British Columbia Standard Physiotherapy Report - $37.62 / 32.42 7 Comprehensive Report + Report Requested by WorkSafeBC - $374.54 Telephone Consultation - Board Initiated $27.59/ 15 min Initial Assessment - $62.75 / $56.75 8 Subsequent Treatment - $41.98 Physiotherapists and WorkSafeBC Treatment fees Initial Assessment $63.41 Treatment $38.00 Related links Physical therapy services

Physiotherapist Reporting Fee - $37.63 (Jan. 1, 2013) Narrative Report or Referral - $125.45 per page (Jan 1, 2013)

Initial Assessment $60.96 (Jan 1, 2013) Treatment $46.56 (Jan 1, 2013). Multi-sited injury fee (per session) $39.95 (Jan 1, 2013) Tray fee $13.72 (Jan 1, 2013)

Physiotherapy Manual

7 8

For standard treatment (stream 1): report fee varies depending on whether it is received within five days or fewer of the end of the course of treatment. For standard treatment (stream 1): Fees vary if depending on whether notification form is received within three business days of initial visit. Limit one initial visit per payee per claim. Limit one subsequent visit per payee per day per claim.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy New Brunswick Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers Report fees June 1, 2012 - May 31, 2013 Report with Functional Outcome Measures (FOM) $25.00 Pain & Activity Questionnaire $15.00 Treatment fees Work Conditioning Sept 4, 2012 Sept 3, 2013 o $1,780 o $200 for Work Conditioning Assessment - Paid to Service Provider when the client is determined not to be an appropriate candidate for work conditioning Sept 4, 2013 Sept 3, 2014 o $1,815 o $205 for Work Conditioning Assessment These fees include all the requisite clinical reports and telephone consultations. Primary physiotherapy service fees June 1, 2012 - May 31, 2013 o Initial Assessment $62.50 o Treatment $48.00 o Telephone consultation $18,00 o Home-based physiotherapy $ $100 + .35/km mileage Back management program and shoulder program o $1,500 o $100 assessment for those not participating Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Newfoundland and Labrador Policy HC-01 Physiotherapy Services Private Clinics HC Procedure #17.00 Report fees Current Rates: Treatment fees Current Rates: Related links WHSCC Physiotherapists

Initial Assessment $55.00 Initial Assessment Reports received within 3 days $23.00. Reports received in 4Treatment $50.00 7 days $5.00. Extension Reporting Form no fee Progress Reporting Form Reports received within 3 days $23.00; Reports received in 4-7 days $5.00. Discharge Reporting Form Reports received with 3 days $23.00 Reports received within 4-7 days $5.00.

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

04.04 Complimentary and Alternate Treatments

N/A

As billed

WSCC Policy Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Nova Scotia Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services Report fees Tier I Services: Initial physiotherapy assessment - $50.00 Physiotherapy Intake Report (Form A) $26.00, provided it is submitted to the Board within 3 days of the admission of the worker for treatment Completion of the Initial Physical Abilities Report (Form E) and the Linton Questionnaire (as reported in Form B) and is accompanied by a completed Physiotherapy Initial Assessment Report $85.00, provided it is submitted to the Board within 5 days of admission of the worker for treatment A qualified* Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Kinesiologist or Certified Ergonomist to participate in the following return to work initiatives is $90.00 per hour including travel time: job site analysis*, case conferencing, and ergonomic coaching and visit to the worksite as part of a transitional return to work plan* *Job site analysis and/or ergonomic assessment and coaching may be performed by an Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist or Kinesiologist (all of which must be qualified in Job Site Analysis or Ergonomic Assessment) or have status as a Certified Professional Ergonomist Treatment fees $42.00 per hour shall be paid by the Board to the Supplier for any treatment provided to an injured worker following the initial physiotherapy assessment *$80.00 per hour for in-home physiotherapy treatment (must be preapproved by a Board caseworker) Related links Hospital Physiotherapy

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Ontario 17-03-01 Health Care Fees 17-02-03 Payment of Clinical Assessment Reports Requested for Adjudication 17-01-02 Entitlement to Health Care 17-02-02 Health Care Practitioners Report 17-01-03 Choice and change of Health Professional Report fees Health Professionals Report (esubmission) - $50.00 Health Professionals Report (paper submission) - $40.00 Narrative Progress Report - $23.54 Physiotherapy Assessment Report $18.41 Functional Abilities for Planning Early and Safe Return to Work form -$45.00 In-Office Interview with WSIB representative -$29.15 Photocopies of medical reports (1-5 pages) -$23.54 and $1.12 each additional page Review of medical records/literature per 15 min.- $56.05 Telephone Consultation-$23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB Treatment fees Initial Visit - $24.00 Continuing Treatment (per visit) $24.00 Acupuncture -$38.78 per visit Related links Physiotherapy Fee Schedule Programs of Care: Acute Low Back Injuries Upper Extremity Injuries Lower Extremity Injuries Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Shoulder Program of Care

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Prince Edward POL-26, Island Physiotherapy Treatment Report fees Functional limitations form - $20.00 Job match exploration - $50.00 Treatment fees Initial Assessment - $50.00 Subsequent Treatment $45.00 (Treatments during first 4 wks, and extension visits) Work conditioning - $80.00 Recurrence initial visit: $50.00 Recurrence treatments: $45.00 Supportive care - $45.00 Meeting with WCB staff - $20.00/ 15 mins Quebec Regulation respecting medical aid 9 Entente MSSSCSST Annexe la circulaire (circulaire numro 03.01.42.19 du MSSS) N/A Private sector: Still in effect in 2013 Individual treatment: $36 Group treatment: $21 Home treatment: $50 For home sessions, the physician in charge must certify the workers inability to move due to his or her injury and prescribe such care. The CSST is bound by the opinion of the physician in charge in this matter. N/A Related links N/A

*Currently under negotiations

Physiotherapy treatments must be prescribed by the physician in charge of the worker.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Report fees Treatment fees Public sector: Per visit: $37,30 since May 1, 2012 Group fee: $22,36 since May 1, 2012 Home care: $50 Same rate Related links

Public and private networks: Physiotherapy services can be part of interdisciplinary teams for workers suffering a traumatic brain injury (TBI), a spinal cord injury (SCI), a severe orthopaedic injury (SOI), and severe burn injuries (SBI). The CSST compensates their services under the agreement concerned. Evaluation of functional working skills: $247 per day in 2013 for services offered by the interdisciplinary team. Maximum of 10 6hour days; Development of functional working skills: $247 per day in 2013 for services offered by the interdisciplinary team. Maximum of 20 6-hour days.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Therapy / Physiotherapy Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) PRO 64/2011 (Schedule A: Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines) Report fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 64/2011 (Schedule C) Effective January 1, 2012: With functional outcome measures: Initial report - $56.07 Progress / discharge report- $34.86 Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 64/2011 (Schedule C) Initial biomechanical assessment $86.46 Subsequent visit - $42.08 RTW planning & monitoring - $42.08 / 20 min Functional ability evaluation - $42.08 / 20 min Job site evaluation - $42.08 / 20 min Other fees see PRO 64/2011 (Schedule C) N/A Related links www.wcbsask.com: Support Package for Chiropractors / Physical Therapists Care Provider Services Physical Therapy Care Provider Services Exercise Therapy

Without functional outcome measures: Initial report - $44.22 Progress / discharge report - $23.00

Online submission of any report: $10.00 Yukon HC-03 Physiotherapy N/A

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for podiatry. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Podiatry Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Podiatry and/or podiatry surgeons $13.90 for all reports submitted to WCB Treatment fees Associated costs, original receipt required for payment. As a guideline, a maximum of 6 visits to a skin care facility per year is authorized. If the worker requires more than 6 visits per year, consider the reasons why more visits are required when deciding and documenting whether to authorize additional visits. Basic foot care may be authorized for workers who do not receive personal care allowance (PCA) and who are unable to maintain personal foot care as a result of the work-related injury or condition. The service provider hired must be appropriate for the service required (e.g., nail care must be done by a podiatrist, or LPN or RN with foot care training) British Columbia There are no policies regarding podiatry but the following policies address injuries to feet and legs: 77.25 Boots and Shoes 77.26 Belts and Braces Manitoba
10

Related links N/A

First Report of Injury $31.78/$17.39 10 Progress Report $25.36/$14.1810

Consult - $58.99 Subsequent visit - $26.53

Podiatrists and WorkSafeBC

N/A

N/A

No fee schedule

N/A

Within 5 days or within 6 to 7 days. Submissions received after 7 working days will not be paid.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Podiatry Policy New Brunswick N/A Report fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia N/A N/A Treatment fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated. Related links N/A

N/A

N/A

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

N/A

N/A

WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

N/A

Podiatrist Consultation $45.00 per session (includes report) + cost of custom orthotic. Orthopedic Footwear at retail price.

N/A

Ontario

17-03-01 Health Care Fees 17-01-02 Entitlement to Health Care

Functional Abilities Form -$45.00 Initial Visit -$53.15 Telephone Consultation -$23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB Repeat Visit with Treatment -$40.10 Follow-up Visit with no further treatment $16.80 Emergency call first patient seen -$34.55 Emergency call each additional patient $14.80 Acupuncture -$38.78 per visit Injections -$9.50-$32.45 Surgical Services -$79.08 - $306.13 Radiological Services -$15.65 -$31.00

Fee Schedules: Podiatry

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Podiatry Policy Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec Regulation respecting medical aid Report fees No fee schedule. Treatment fees No fee schedule. Related links N/A

N/A

$32 per treatment Still in effect in 2013

N/A

Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1)

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 55/2011; also see Treatment Fees.

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 55/2011. The amount invoiced will be in accordance with medical fees for physicians. When the recommended service is not in the fee schedule, Medical and Health Care Services may provide advice regarding a reasonable fee that should be paid. N/A

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Medical Fees Physicians)

Yukon

N/A

N/A

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for prosthetics/orthotics. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Prosthetics / Orthotics Policy Alberta N/A Report fees No reporting fees Treatment fees There is a prosthetics and orthotics fee guide in place that can be obtaining by contacting WCB-AB directly. This fee guide changes regularly and is not available by related links See Prosthetics Fee Schedule Related links N/A

British Columbia

Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual V II: 77.23 Artificial Limbs 77.25 Boots and Shoes

See Prosthetics Fee Schedule

Prosthetists Fee Schedule

Manitoba New Brunswick

N/A Policy No. 25-001 - Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers Policy No. 25-007 Prostheses, Orthoses and Assistive Devices

N/A When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated.

No fee schedule - invoice When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated.

N/A N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid 04.08 Medical Devices

N/A

No service provider of this type in the NWT/NU, pay as billed from out of province. Annually will bring up a service provider from Ontario for northern workers and the fees are negotiated each year

WSCC Policy Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Prosthetics / Orthotics Policy Nova Scotia Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services 17-07-05 Orthopaedic 17-07-02 Apparel 17-07-06 Health Care Equipment and Supplies 17-06-03 Independent Living Devices 22-01-02 Material Change in Circumstances-Worker 17-07-04 Hearing Devices 17-07-01 Prescription Eyewear Prince Edward POL-30, Orthoses, Prostheses, Island and Assistive Devices POL-64 Health Care Providers Quebec Politique 5.04 : Les orthses et les prothses 11 (prostheses and orthoses) 1. Prostheses and orthoses for Fees provided for by the trunk and limbs; Rgie de lassurance maladie du Qubec (RAMQ)
11

Report fees -

Treatment fees Invoiced with prior approval.

Related links Orthotics

Ontario

N/A

N/A

Specialty Programs Health Care Equipment and Supplies Independent Living Guide

No fee schedule

No fee schedule

N/A

N/A

1. Fees provided for by the Rgie de lassurance maladie du Qubec (RAMQ)

Ortheses and prostheses must be prescribed by the physician in charge of the worker.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Prosthetics / Orthotics Policy 2. Hearing aids; Report fees Treatment fees 2. The fees paid audioprosthetists for their professional services are listed in Appendix 2 of the Administrative Guide of Hearing Aids Intended for Audioprosthetists. Guide administratif Prothses auditives (Administrative Guide of Hearing Aids) and 3. Agreement negotiated with the CSST: 80% of fees suggested by the Guide tarifaire de lAssociation des denturologistes du Qubec 4. General examination ($70), subsequent examination ($40), ocular therapy examination ($50 maximum), specific contact lenses examination ($40) etc Fees provided for by the RAMQ for visual aids (glasses and contact lenses) and ocular prostheses 5. Orthopaedic shoes and foot orthoses; 5. The worker is entitled to 3 pairs of orthopaedic shoes or boots per year if he/she works and 2 pairs if he/she does not work. We pay the fee asked by the orthesist. Related links

3. Dental orthoses;

prostheses

4. Eye prostheses and visual orthoses;

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Prosthetics / Orthotics Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 17/2008 Report fees N/A Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 578/2011 (Schedule B) Orthotics and splint construction/ fitting / modification - $92.00 / hour Pre-manufactured therapeutic equipment and supplies for custom devices Providers cost + 15% handling fee Section 113(a) of the Act provides that the WCB may assume the expense of replacing or repairing any prosthetics or orthotics including eye glasses, when breakage is caused by an [injury] in the course of the workers employment. Yukon N/A N/A N/A Related links www.wcbsask.com: POL 19/2010 (Allowance Clothing) POL 17/2008 (Expenses Orthotics/ Appliances Provision, Replacement and Repair)

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for psychologists. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Psychologist Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Report fees included in treatment fees Treatment fees Assess Complex Psychological - $135.25 per hour (max 13 hrs) Marked Life Disruption - $135.25 per hour (max 13 hrs) Assess no show/cancellation (Day 1) - $400 Assess no show/cancellation (Day 2) - $100 Telephone Consultation - $33.81/15 min unit (max 2 units per call) Counsel Counseling - $135.25 per hour (max 10 sessions) TPI Intake/Screen - $135.25 per hour (max 3 hours) No show/cancellation < 24 hours notice - $135.25 per hour (max 1 hr) Telephone Consultation - $33.81/15 min unit (max 2 units per call) Neuro NPA - $160 per hour (max 13 hours) Expedited NPA Report - $285 Assess no show/cancellation (Day 1) - $400 Assess no show/cancellation (Day 2) $100 MTBI Intake Interview/Screen - $160 per hour (max 4 hours) MTBI Intake Interview/Screen no show/cancellation $200 Telephone Consultation - $40/15 min unit (max 2 units per call)
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Related links N/A

Psychologist Policy British Columbia Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 13.00 Section 5.1 Mental Disorders 22.40 D. Alcoholism and Drug Dependency Problem 22.20 Compensable Consequences Pain and Chronic Pain Report fees Treatment Psychologist Treatment Report Fee Treatment Progress and Discharge Report - $91.80 (August 2011 to July 2013) Assessment Psychology Assessment Timely Report Fee $150.00 (June 2012 May 2013) 12 Neuropsychology Assessment Timely Report Fee - $150.00 (June 2012 May 2013) 13 Treatment fees Treatment Initial treatment planning session conducted by a Psychologist - $248.66 (August 2011 to July 2013) Initial treatment planning session conducted by other mental health provider - $198.26 (August 2011 to July 2013) Treatment conducted by Psychologist - $156.86/hr (max 6 hrs/blk) (August 2011 to July 2013) Treatment conducted by Other Mental Health Providers - $106.44/hr (max 6 hrs/blk) (August 2011 to July 2013) Assessment Psychological Assessment - $163.20/hr (June 2012 May 2013); *max 12 hrs Neuropsychological Assessment - $163.20/hr (June 2012 May 2013) *max 16 hrs Supplemental Psychology/Neuropsychology Consultation - *flat fee; $270.60 flat fee (June 2012 May 2013) Document Review Fee - *flat fee; $270.61 flat fee (June 2012 May 2013) Consultation (in person or by telephone) $40.80/15 min (June 2012 May 2013) Manitoba N/A N/A Service Rate - $175 per hour (Jan 1, 2012) N/A Related links Psychologists and WorkSafeBC

39.01 Decision Making Procedure Supplemental Consultation under Section 23(1) Timely Report Fee - $75.00 (June 2012 May 2013) 14

12 Fees vary depending on whether the report is received within 10 business days of the confirmed appointment. 13 Fees vary depending on whether the report is received within 15 business days of the confirmed appointment. 14 Fees vary depending on whether the report is received within 10 business days of the referral.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Psychologist Policy New Brunswick Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers Report fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated No established Fee Treatment fees WorkSafeNB pays fees as billed for treatment and services. When WorkSafeNB makes special arrangements to procure medical aid services, WorkSafeNB pays fees according to the rate negotiated Related links N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

EN-06 Mental Health Adjustment following Physical Injury EN-07 Chronic Pain EN-18 "Mental Stress"

No established Fee

N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

As per NWT Fee Schedule

WSCC Policy Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Psychologist Policy Nova Scotia Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services Report fees Assessment and counseling $114/hour Neuropsychological assessment $120 per hour or an approved flat rate. Report writing will be reimbursed at $114.00/hour. Maximum 12 sessions. Greater than 12 sessions requires the approval of a medical advisor. Ontario 15-03-02 Traumatic Mental Stress 15-04-03 Chronic Pain Disability 15-04-02 Psychotraumatic Disability Prince Edward POL-01, Island Psychological Or Psychiatric Conditions POL-64 Health Care Providers No fee schedule. Functional Abilities Form $45.00 Telephone Consultation $23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB Initial Psychological Assessment (per hour or major part thereof to a max of 4 hrs.) - $67.00 Psychological Services - (per hour or major part thereof) - $67.00 Neuropsychological Assessment (per hour or major part thereof to a maximum of 12 hours) - $67.00 Psychology Fee Schedule Programs of Care: Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Treatment fees Assessment and counseling $114.00/hr Neuropsychological assessment $120 per hour or on approved flat rate. Related links N/A

No fee schedule.

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Psychologist Policy Quebec Politique 5.05 : Les soins, les traitements, les aides techniques et les frais dtermins par la Commission 15. (care, treatments, technical aids and fees determined by the CSST) Report fees $86.60 per hour for writing reports. Treatment fees Public and private sector: hourly fee of $86.60 Still in effect in 2013 Related links Annexe la circulaire (circulaire numro 03.01.42.19 du MSSS) Regulation respecting medical aid

Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) PRO 54/2010 (Schedule A : Practice Guidelines for Psychologists)

Primary Level Care initial assessment: $47.30 Primary Level Care progress, discharge: $29.40

www.wcbsask.com: PRO 54/2010 (Schedule B) Initial assessment or counseling session: Ph.D. level: $115.00 / hour MA level: $92.00 / hour, Other fees see PRO 54/2010 (Annexe B)

www.wcbsask.com: Care Provider Services: Psychology

Yukon

EN-09 Adjudicating Psychological Disorders

No fee schedule.

N/A

N/A

15

Psychological treatments must be prescribed by the physician in charge of the worker.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for specialists. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Specialist Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Consultation Report - $69.24 (electronic submission) Progress Report - $34.42 Expedited Consultation Report $309.79 (received within 15 working days from referral) Expedited Consultation Report $103.28 (received within 16-25 working days from referral) British Columbia Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual VII: 78.22 Consultation with Specialists Consultation Report The Consultation Report is included in the Initial Assessment fee of $337.32. Operating Room (OR) Report $76.50. $36.89 (Jan. 1, 2010) Report fees included in fee for service rates negotiated with the New Brunswick Medical Society. Fee Schedule based on Specialist Report received within 5 days - $131.60 $585.20 dependent on specialty Report received in more than five days $109.51 $486.97 dependent on specialty N/A N/A Initial Assessment- $337.32 Subsequent Treatment - $163.89 Medical and surgical specialists Treatment fees Payment for the above services shall follow the most current Alberta Health and Wellness Schedule of Medical Benefits Related links Physician services

Manitoba New Brunswick

N/A Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid Principles Fee Schedule No. 29501 Medical Aid Providers

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Specialist Policy Newfoundland and Labrador N/A Report fees See Physician Reporting Fee summary or medical opinion report $155.00 Treatment fees See Physician Treatment Fees MCP & Premium 20%. Related links N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

As per NWT Fee Schedule

WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services 17-02-02 Health Care Practitioners Reports

$150 per hour or $125 per page, as requested by WCB.

Unit value determined by MSI.

N/A

Ontario

See Physician Fee Schedule

Provincial Treatment Fees

See Physician Fee Schedule N/A

Prince Edward POL-92 Medical Aid Island POL-64 Health Care Providers Quebec Politique 5.01 Les services des professionnels de la sant (services provided by health professionals)

In accordance with Master Agreement between PEI Department of Health and Medical Society of Prince Edward Island. MER Supplement for some specialties - $85 since April 1, 2012 (see Report Fees for Physicians) RAMQ Specialists Invoicing Manual: Manuel complet (Complete Manual) Visiting fees tab

In accordance with Master Agreement between PEI Department of Health and Medical Society of Prince Edward Island.

RAMQ Specialists Invoicing Manual: Manuel complet (Complete Manual) Visiting fees tab

N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Specialist Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) Report fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Same as for Physician Treatment fees www.wcbsask.com: PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) - Same as for Physician, except: Research fee (with specialist) - $45.20 / 10 min Telephone consultation (with specialist): $45.20 / first 10 min $60.20 / from 10 to 15 min $60.20 / each additional 15 min Other fees see PRO 51/2009 (Schedule A) Yukon N/A Service Specialist - As billed Post-operative visit for a specialist within the first forty-two (42) days post-operation: $88.37 until April 1, 2012 then contract expires. N/A Related links www.wcbsask.com: Support Package for Physicians Care Provider Services: Physicians

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table gives the treatment fees and report fees for speech pathologists. If available, links to policies and related information are also included. Speech Pathologist Policy Alberta N/A Report fees Payment for services shall follow the most current Alberta Health rates. Report - $50.00 Late Report - $35.00 Treatment fees N/A Related links N/A

British Columbia

N/A

Clinical Time - $35 per unit (one unit = 15 minutes with a maximum of 8 units per day) (Includes all costs associated with the visit)

Speech-language pathologists and WorkSafeBC

Manitoba New Brunswick

N/A Policy No. 25-001 Medical Aid - Principles Fee Schedule No. 29-501 Medical Aid Providers

N/A Included in hospital outpatient charges.

No fee schedule - invoice Included in hospital outpatient charges

N/A N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

04.02 Payment for Medical Aid

None

As billed

WSCC Policy Manual

Policy 2.3.1R Provision of Health Care Services

No set rate

No set rate

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Speech Pathologist Policy Ontario 17-06-06 Home care 17-03-01 - Health Care Fees 17-01-02 Entitlement to Health Care Prince Edward POL-64 Health Care Island Providers Quebec Entente MSSS-CSST Annexe la circulaire (circulaire numro 03.01.42.19 du MSSS) Regulation respecting medical aid 16 Report fees Functional Abilities for Planning Early and Safe Return to Work Form -$45.00 Telephone Consultation -$23.54 Must be initiated by WSIB Treatment fees Speech Language Pathology Visit - $80.00 (Visit and payment is not time based. However, a visit is generally one hour in duration) Related links Speech Therapy Fee Schedule Programs of Care: Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

No fee schedule.

No fee schedule.

N/A

N/A

Public sector: Interview and record consultation: $44.56 since May 1 2012 per session Other fees according to the type of test For the list of fees, see the appendix to the circular (MSSS circular number 03.01.42.19) Private sector: Interview and record consultation: $32 per session Same rate in 2013 Other fees based on tests See the list of fees in Appendix 1 of the Regulation respecting medical aid

N/A

16

Speech therapy must be prescribed by the physician treating the worker.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Speech Pathologist Policy Saskatchewan www.wcbsask.com: POL 05/96 (Schedule 1) PRO 50/2010 (background on relationship with SK Assoc. of Speech Language Pathologists & Audiologists (SASKPA)) Yukon N/A No fee schedule. N/A N/A Report fees N/A Treatment fees N/A Related links N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION/AGGRAVATION

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Pre-Existing Condition / Aggravation The following table outlines how pre-existing conditions and aggravation are handled in each jurisdiction. PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION Alberta Temporary benefits will be paid until:

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections the aggravation has ended and the weight of evidence shows that ongoing temporary 56(6), 80(1)) disability is solely due to the pre-existing condition or some other unrelated, noncompensable health problem, or the compensable aggravation reaches a medical plateau, at which time the WCB will Policy (if any): Policy 03-02, Parts I & II evaluate whether there is any permanent impairment caused by the compensable accident.

When a claim is adjudicated under the aggravation policy the WCB authorizes all necessary medical treatment to help the worker recover from the effects of the work injury. Surgery Links (if any): N/A required solely for the non-compensable pre-existing condition may be accepted on a limited basis under the Rehabilitation Surgery Program. If the aggravation was temporary and the worker recovers to a pre-accident state there is no compensable permanent disability. When the pre-existing condition is permanently affected by the work injury, the WCB uses the following formula to determine the proportion of the clinical impairment reasonably attributable to the aggravation and to prorate the permanent disability award:

the value of the total post-accident clinical impairment, less the value of the total pre-aggravation clinical impairment,

established in accordance with the WCB's approved rating schedule or by medical assessment. The WCB does not prorate the permanent disability award when the compensable accident and its immediate consequences are so severe that the permanent disability would have resulted regardless of the pre-existing condition. Although the WCB prorates awards which are based on clinical impairment, it accepts full responsibility for permanent loss of earning capacity if, despite a pre-existing condition, a worker was able to perform the job duties prior to the compensable accident and is no longer able to do so because of the compensable injury.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION British Columbia

Section of Act, Policy, Links

See Item C3-16.00 and C3-16.10 for guidance on how the Board distinguishes between injury or Section of Act: Workers death that arises out of and in the course of employment and injury or death that results from a Compensation Act (sections 39(1)(e), section. 5(5)) pre-existing condition or disease. Section 39(1)(e) of the Act requires the Board to provide and maintain a reserve for payment of that portion of the disability enhanced by reason of a pre-existing disease, condition or disability. Under this section, eligible claim costs are redirected from an employers experience rating and rate group to the section 39(1)(e) reserve. Where a claim is accepted under the Act for personal injury, mental disorder or occupational disease, the Board provides cost relief under section 39(1)(e) for any portion of a compensation disability that is enhanced by reason of the pre-existing disease, condition or disability. The section 39(1)(e) cost relief decision does not impact a workers entitlement to compensation. See policy item #114.40 for Eligibility, The Evaluation Process, and Determining the Amount of Cost Relief. Policy (if any): Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual Volume II, C3-16.00; C3-16.10; #44.10; #44.30; #44.31; #114.40; #114.41; $114.42 Links (if any): Chapter 3 Personal Injury, Chapter 6 Permanent Disability Awards, Chapter 17 Charging of Claim Costs

Manitoba

Under policy 44.10.20.10, the WCB pays wage loss benefits where the worker's loss of earnings (LOE) is caused in part by a compensable accident and in part by a non-compensable pre-existing condition, or the relationship between them. Wage loss benefits will not be paid where the worker has recovered from the accident to the point that it is no longer contributing to the LOE, and the pre-existing condition has not been enhanced as a result of the accident, and the pre-existing condition is not a compensable condition.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 4(1), 81(1)(c)y(i)) Policy (if any): Policy 31.05.10 Cost Relief/Cost Transfers

A worker may be entitled to an impairment award. If the worker's impairment is an enhancement Policy 44.10.20.10, Pre of a pre-existing but non-compensable impairment, the worker is eligible for an impairment award Existing Conditions based on the difference between the new combined rating and the rating assigned to the preexisting condition. Links (if any): N/A Under the circumstances set out in policy 31.05.10, an employer may be entitled to cost relief if the accident is either caused by a pre-existing condition or is significantly prolonged by the pre-existing condition.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION New Brunswick

Section of Act, Policy, Links

In cases where a workplace accident aggravates a pre-existing condition, the aggravation (not Section of Act: Workers the entire pre-existing condition) becomes part of the compensable injury. As a result, Compensation Act (section WorkSafeNB is responsible to provide rehabilitation until the injured worker reaches the pre- 7(5)) accident functional capacity or a maximum level of functional capacity considering the injury. Policy (if any): Policy No. 21WorkSafeNB may also continue benefits beyond the expected healing time of the compensable 101 Conditions for Entitlement injury if the rehabilitation of the compensable injury takes longer because of a pre-existing Pre Existing Conditions condition. When a pre-existing condition is aggravated by a workplace accident, WorkSafeNB pays loss of Links (if any): N/A earnings benefits until the earliest of the following: The injured worker reaches pre-accident functional capacity and returns to work; All rehabilitation options have been explored, maximum functional capacity has been achieved, and the injured workers earning capacity has been estimated; The injured worker reaches age 65; or The injured worker has received benefits for two years if 63 years of age or more at the time benefits started. Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 43.1) Policy (if any): EN-01 - Permanent Functional Impairment ; EN-02 - Proportionment

Newfoundland and Labrador

Where a worker suffers personal injury arising out of and in the course of employment that aggravates, activates or accelerates a condition, disease or disability existing prior to the injury; or is aggravated, activated or accelerated by causes other than the injury, compensation is payable for the proportion of the loss of earnings or permanent impairment that the commission determines is attributable to the injury.

Links (if any): WHSCC Policies and procedures: EN-01 PFI Rating Schedule

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Section of Act, Policy, Links

The Northwest Territories and Nunavut may provide compensation benefits to an injured worker, Section of Act: No reference with a pre-existing condition, where it is determined that: Policy (if any): Policy 03.12, A workers treatment and recuperation are prolonged due to the pre-existing condition; or Pre-Existing Condition A worker has residual impairment beyond that usually associated with the compensable Links (if any): N/A injury or disease, due to the pre-existing condition. Section 10(5) of the Act states: Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section Where a personal injury by accident referred to in subsection (1) results in loss of earnings or 10(5)) permanent impairment (a) due in part to the injury and in part to causes other than the injury; or (b) due to an aggravation, activation or acceleration of a disease or disability existing prior to the injury, compensation is payable for the proportion of the loss of earnings or permanent impairment that may reasonably be attributed to the injury. Further details for treating pre-existing conditions and aggravations are included in Policy 3.9.11R1 Apportionment of Benefits. This policy states that where the compensable injury causes an exacerbation or aggravation, acceleration or activation of a pre-existing disease or disability, the WCB will assume full responsibility for Temporary Earnings Replacement Benefits and Medical Aid without apportionment. For injuries that result in a permanent impairment, the WCB will determine the portion of permanent impairment that is compensable by assigning a permanent impairment rating to the pre-existing condition and subtracting it from the whole person permanent impairment rating. If unable to assign a rating to the pre-existing condition, the WCB will determine the degree of permanent impairment that results from the pre-existing condition by examining the extent to which the pre-existing condition limited working capacity and the amount of medical care required to treat the pre-existing condition. If these are deemed to be minor, the WCB will assume full responsibility for the permanent impairment and extended earnings replacement benefits. Policy (if any): Policy 3.9.11R1 Apportionment of Benefits Links (if any): N/A

Nova Scotia

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION Ontario Entitlement on an Aggravation Basis

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 Where a worker has a pre-accident impairment and suffers a minor work-related injury or (section 98) illness to the same body part or system, the WSIB considers entitlement to benefits on an aggravation basis. Policy (if any): Generally, entitlement is considered for the acute episode only and benefits continue until the worker returns to the pre-accident state. A pre-accident impairment is a condition, which has produced periods of impairment/illness requiring health care and has caused a disruption in employment. 11-01-15 Aggravation Basis 14-05-03 Second Injury and Enhancement Fund (SIEF)

Links (if any): N/A Second Injury and Enhancement Fund If a prior disability caused or contributed to the compensable accident, or if the period resulting from an accident becomes prolonged or enhanced due to a pre-existing condition, all or part of the compensation and health care costs may be transferred from the accident employer in Schedule 1 to the SIEF. Prince Edward Where an accident causes personal injury to a worker and that injury is aggravated by some pre- Section of Act: Workers Island existing physical condition inherent in the worker at the time of the accident, the worker shall be Compensation Act (section compensated for the full injurious result until such time as the worker, in the opinion of the 6(9)) Board, has reached a plateau in medical recovery. Policy (if any): POL-61 Preexisting conditions Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION Quebec

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Aggravation of a pre-existing personal condition: The aggravation of a pre-existing Section of Act: Act respecting personal condition may be considered as an occupational injury when it occurs due to or in the Industrial accidents and occupational diseases (section course of a work accident or constitutes an occupational disease in the meaning of the Act. 329) When the aggravation of a pre-existing personal constitutes an occupational injury, it entitles Policy (if any): Politique 1.02 the worker to the indemnities and services provided by the ARIAOD. Links (if any): N/A Personal condition unrelated to the occupational injury: When a personal condition unrelated to the occupational injury extends the period of medical consolidation, the CSST may, of its own initiative or at the employers request, split the costs and attribute to the employer the sums solely related to the occupational injury (section 329 ARIAOD). In such a case, the CSST consults the treating physician to determine if, were there not a personal condition, the occupational injury could be consolidated. Once the occupational injury is consolidated and there remain functional limitations related to the occupational injury that do not prevent the worker from exercising his or her employment, the CSST determines a suitable employment without taking into account the personal condition. Once the occupational injury is consolidated and there remain functional limitations related to the occupational injury that prevent the worker from exercising his or her employment, the CSST determines a suitable employment taking into account both the functional limitations related to the occupational injury and the personal condition.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Saskatchewan The SK WCB uses pre-existing condition as the general term. Aggravation refers to a pre- Section of Act: Workers existing condition being worsened temporarily. Acceleration refers to a pre-existing condition Compensation Act, 1979, Section 50 being worsened permanently. Section 50 of the Act states: The board shall not reject the claim of a worker or a dependent for compensation or reduce the amount of compensation payable by reason of a pre-existing condition of the worker if the injury materially aggravates or accelerates the pre-existing condition to produce a loss of earnings or death. Conversely, coverage does not extend beyond the effects of a work injury; the board is not responsible for disablement arising solely from a pre-condition. The WCB staff must determine: The extent of the work injury; Whether or not the worker has recovered from the work injury; Whether, and to what extent, a pre-existing condition has been aggravated or accelerated by the work injury; Any history of prior problems in the same / nearby areas as the work injury; The pre-injury status and its effect on the workers function. Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 01/2000; POL 21/2010 Links (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: Hernias: PRO 37/86, amended by PRO 60/2000.

If the work injury results in an aggravation, the boards liability for earnings loss, medical treatment or other benefits ends when the worker has recovered from the effects of the work injury. Generally speaking, all hernia claims will be considered as aggravations of pre-existing conditions. If the work injury results in an acceleration of a pre-existing condition, the board will be liable for whatever earnings loss the worker may have, and whatever medical treatment / rehab / other benefits the worker may need as a result of the acceleration. Claims involving a pre-existing condition should be considered for cost relief under the Second Injury and Re-employment Reserve policy. Refer to POL 21/2010 for details on what the Reserve will be charged with, and when.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PRE-EXISTING CONDITION / AGGRAVATION Yukon See Policy EN-07 Pre-Existing Conditions.

Section of Act, Policy, Links Section of Act: N/A Policy (if any): EN-07 PreExisting Conditions Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Minors, Volunteers, Learners, Apprentices and Students Also see: Coverage for Volunteers The following table describes workers compensation for minors, volunteers, learners, apprentices and students. Go directly to: Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories & Nunavut Nova Scotia Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Alberta Minors There is no bar to coverage. Compensation is based on their earnings pattern and calculated in accordance with the Act and Regulations. There are no special provisions. Volunteers other than Emergency Service Workers

Section of Act, Policy, Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 56, 67 and 68)

Workers Compensation Provided they have coverage, which the employer must apply for, compensation for volunteers is Regulation (sections 1 based on their earnings pattern in all concurrent employment and calculated in accordance with the and 7) Act and Regulations. There are no special provisions. If the volunteer work is unpaid and the worker has no concurrent paid employment, temporary benefits are not paid as there is no basis for the calculation; however, coverage would apply to medical related items. When the accident causes Policy (if any): Policy 04-01, permanent disability, the compensation rate for permanent disability benefits is based on the greater Part I and Part II, of: Applications 1, 2 & 3 the temporary benefit rate adjusted by any applicable cost-of-living adjustments, and

the minimum monthly permanent disability award in effect at the time the permanent disability award is made. Links (if any): N/A

Volunteer emergency service workers are covered as special conditions apply: When an emergency response volunteer as described in s.14(3) of the Act (for example, a volunteer firefighter) is injured while working in that capacity, the WCB considers the following earnings when setting the compensation rate:

if the worker has regular employment, compensation is based on the earnings from that employment if the worker is unemployed at the time of the accident, compensation is based on a value of service for the worker's volunteer emergency service work. The value of service is calculated using the usual rates for the type of work, and takes into consideration the hours of service provided, together with any other relevant factors.

Learners: The term "learner" is defined in s.1(1)(o) of the Act. A learner is a person who, although not under a contract of service or apprenticeship, becomes subject to the hazards of an industry to which the Act applies for the purpose of undergoing testing, training or probationary work preliminary to employment in an industry to which the Act applies.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS If a learner is disabled as a result of an industrial accident, the WCB calculates compensation as though the worker's earnings were that of a beginner in that industry. Apprentices To be eligible for an adjustment, the worker must meet the following conditions of apprenticeship:

Section of Act, Policy, Links

there is a signed apprenticeship contract or an agreement with the employer that the worker would enter into an apprenticeship program, and the worker must be employed in a designated trade as defined in the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act.

In such cases the WCB will adjust the workers compensation rate based on the average earnings at the time of accident of a fully qualified worker in the same trade. This adjustment is effective the month the worker would, in the normal course of events, have qualified in the trade if the injury had not occurred. Students (subject to section 7 of the General Regulations) To be eligible for temporary wage loss benefits, the student must have an actual earnings loss or be injured while participating in an authorized work experience program. Earnings for temporary benefits are determined as follows:

if the student is injured while participating in an authorized work experience program [as set out in s.7(1)(c)(vi) and (7)(1)(e) of the Regulations], compensation is based on the usual rate of wages for an apprentice in the trade most similar to the training provided by the program if the student is injured while in attendance at an educational facility covered under s.7(1)(c)(i v) of the Regulations, compensation for temporary earnings loss is based on earnings from concurrent employment, if any.

When the accident causes permanent disability, the compensation rate for permanent disability benefits is based on the greater of:

the temporary benefit rate adjusted by any applicable cost-of-living adjustments, and the minimum monthly permanent disability award in effect at the time the permanent disability award is made.

If applicable, rates will be adjusted when the student reaches age 18, or when the student would have reached journeyman status if not for the accident (see Application 3, Adjustments).
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS British Columbia

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Apprentices, learners and workers with no earnings (e.g. volunteers) are exceptions to the general Section of Act: Workers rules for determining workers short term and long term average earnings. Compensation Act (definition of worker, s. Apprentices or learners: The Boards determination of the amount of average earnings for a 3(5), s. 3(6), s. 3(7), s. 12, temporary disability is based on the greater of a) the rate at which the worker was remunerated s. 33.2, s. 33.7) by each of the employers for whom he or she was employed at the time of the injury; or b) the workers gross earnings for the 12-month period immediately preceding the date of injury. The Policy (if any): RS&CM Boards determination of the amount of average earnings for a permanent disability is based on #6.20, #7.10, #67.00, the gross earnings for the 12-month period immediately preceding the injury, of a qualified #67.10, #67.30, #67.31, person employed at the starting rate in the same trade, occupation or profession by the same #67.32, #67.33, #67.34, employer, or if no person is so employed, by an employer in the same region. #67.40, #67.50, #67.60, C3 Persons working without pay are not generally considered as workers under the Act. 21.00 However, there are some exceptional situations of this type which are covered and for which Links (if any): Chapter 9, the Act or the Board has specified the earnings on which compensation is to be based: Average Earnings (a) section 3(5) Volunteers minimum $124.86 per week (2012), and no more than the maximum wage rate provided under s.33 of the Act. (b) Volunteer firefighters, ambulance drivers, and attendants average earnings are deemed to be the same in amount as the average earnings in their regular employment or employments, though not less than the amount on which the employer has been assessed. See policy item #67.32 for more information. (c) Sisters in Catholic Institutions if being paid wages they are treated as regular workers and compensated on the basis of their actual earnings. If no wages are being paid, their earnings are deemed to equal the amount on which their employers are being assessed ($75.00 per month for each person) (d) Emergency Services Workers average earnings are based on the earnings in the workers ordinary employment but where the worker has no regular employment are fixed by the Board at a figure not less than $25.00 per week nor more than the maximum under the Act. (e) Students where the Board is satisfied that the workers earnings in the 12 months immediately preceding the injury do not address the workers diminished future career options due to the nature and degree of the injury, or where, due to the workers young age, the employment at the time of injury may not be representative of the workers career path, the Board may determine long-term average earnings with reference to the class average of a qualified person in the workers field of study. See policy Item #67.60, Exceptional Circumstances, for more information.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Manitoba

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Policy 44.80.10.10, Average Earnings, sets out a framework for calculating a workers average Section of Act: earnings. Workers Compensation Act (sections 1(1), 1(4)This policy states that method of calculating an individuals average earnings should reflect the (8), 7(2), 9(9), 13(2), 26, worker's actual loss of earnings. In the short term, a minors average earnings may be based on his 75.1, 77, 77.1) or her earnings at the time of injury or an annual period prior to the injury. If the worker suffers a Manitoba Regulation long term loss of earnings, average earnings are calculated based on policy 44.80.30.30. This 545/88R, Declaration of policy considers the workers probable earning capacity. After 24 months, a young workers Workers in Government average earnings are increased by certain ratios based on the workers pre-injury earnings and age. Employment Orders Policy 35.10.70 sets out the rules for calculating average earnings for volunteers with a number of exceptions. In general, the average earnings of a volunteer are the greater of actual earnings or an amount determined by the WCB as fairly representing the probable earning capacity of the worker which must not exceed the provincial average wage. Regulations under The Apprenticeship and Certification Act

Policy (if any): Policy 35.10.60, Coverage under Work Experience Policy 35.10.70, Coverage for Volunteers Policy 44.80.20, Apprentices Policy 44.80.30.30, Prospective Earnings: Apprentices and Youthful Workers

Under schedule B of policy 44.80.10.10, the average earnings of a learner would be based on his or her projected earnings for the next twelve months. Under Policy 44.80.30.30, the average earnings of an apprentice are calculated based on the wage rates in his or her chosen field. These wage rates are set out in the Regulations under the Apprenticeship and Certification Act. Once average earnings have reached the prevailing wage of a starting journeyperson, policy 44.80.30.30 does not apply and adjustments will be made in accordance with the indexing provisions of the Act. Under subsection 7(2) of the Act, apprentices have WCB coverage while attending classroom courses.

Under Manitoba Regulation 545/88R, Declaration of Workers in Government Employment Orders, students enrolled in certain courses and programs have WCB coverage while performing work as part of the course or program. Average earnings are set based on subsection 77(3) of the Act. Links (if any): Fact Sheet Under this provision, average earnings are based on the higher of average earnings calculated Apprentices- Wage loss under policy 44.80.10.10 or a percentage (50% or 100%) of the provincial average wage. Benefits

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS New Brunswick Section 37 of the WC Act states that WorkSafeNB shall calculate average earnings and earning capacity as may appear to the Commission best to represent the actual loss of earnings suffered by the worker by reason of the injury. The section allows WorkSafeNB to consider, if established to its satisfaction, that under normal conditions the wages of a worker injured when under age 21 would probably have increased in establishing the workers earnings. Evidence that indicates that the average earnings would probably have increased includes (1) acceptance into an educational program at the time of accident; (2) the approaching completion of an educational or apprenticeship program; and/or (3) a job offer.

Section of Act, Policy, Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (Part 1; section 37) Policy (if any): Policy No. 21-208 Workers Under 21 Policy No. 21-010 Definition of Worker Section 2.2 and 2.3

Policy interprets that, Depending upon the workers individual circumstances, earnings upon which to base the loss of earnings benefit calculation may be either the entry level wage of an identified career path, or 50% of the maximum annual earnings. This means that any worker who is under 21 years of age at the time of injury, whether they are students, apprentices, or part-time/full-time Links (if any): N/A workers, may qualify to have their earnings increased over time. Learners are considered to be workers entitled to coverage under the Workers Compensation Act as per definition. Learners are individuals who do not receive remuneration for work being performed, but who are subject to the risks of an industry because of a training program supplied or required by an employer as a prerequisite to employment, including an individual who: Is required by employment to participate in an educational institutions approved program, or a government-approved work experience program; Participates in probationary on-the-job training, required by an employer before employment, to be a learner; Is attending regular classroom training and curriculum-related activities at a New Brunswick Community College (NBCC) facility; Is participating in work practicum as part of a NBCC course or program; or Is a high school student on NBCC premises for a purpose of the college.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Volunteers are considered to be workers entitled to coverage as per definition. Volunteers include: Members of a municipal volunteer fire department; A person asked to give assistance at a fire or accident site by the fire chief or deputy is included as a worker; Volunteer ambulance drivers/attendants*; Volunteer/auxiliary police officers* Volunteer executive members of a labour union*. *When the employer applies to have coverage for those individuals; and reports and assessments for these volunteers are submitted and paid. Newfoundland and Labrador

Section of Act, Policy, Links

If a person meets the definition of a worker under the Act and is injured during the course of Section of Act: employment, the worker is entitled to compensation in accordance with the Act. A "worker" means a Workplace Health, worker to whom this Act applies and who is a person who has entered into or works under a Safety and contract of service or apprenticeship, written or oral, express or implied, whether by way of manual Compensation labour or otherwise, and includes a person who is a learner, although not under a contract of service Act (sections 2(z), 40(1), or apprenticeship, who becomes subject to the hazards of an industry for the purpose of undergoing 42) training or probationary work specified or stipulated by the employer as a preliminary to employment. Workplace Health, Safety and Where a student is enrolled in an educational institution (as prescribed by regulation) and is Compensation participating in a work training program (as prescribed by regulation) he or she shall, while Regulations (sections participating in the work training program, be considered to be a worker employed by the province; 14-15.2) and, if injured while participating in a work training program and is entitled to compensation the amount payable to him or her shall be based on the current rate paid to a worker engaged in the Policy (if any): same or similar work provided that the maximum amount payable does not exceed that set by this Act. The age for admission to a work training program shall be 15 years or over but in exceptional EN-19 - Arising Out of circumstances the commission may, at the request of the Minister of Education, rule a student to be and in the Course of entitled to the benefits of this section. Employment; The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may by regulations in relation to volunteer fire brigades or EL-01 - Earnings Loss: Benefit Calculation departments located in or serving a municipality and the members of the fire brigades or departments; volunteers engaged in work or measures under the Emergency Services Act; and volunteers providing community ambulance services; provide that the provisions of this Act may Links (if any): WHSCC apply and to the extent that the regulations may provide. Student coverage

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Northwest Territories and Nunavut In the Northwest Territories and Nunavut benefits are provided to minors, volunteers, learners, apprentices, and students. Compensation to entitled volunteer workers will be made according to Policy 04.01 Payment of Compensation. Benefits for learners, students and apprentices are calculated according to Policy 03.07 Calculation of Temporary Compensation or Policy 06.03 Calculation of Permanent Compensation.

Section of Act, Policy, Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 4(1)) Policy (if any): Policy 00.05, Determining Employer/ Worker Status Links (if any): WSCC Policy Manual

Nova Scotia

Section 45 of the Act gives direction for determining compensation amounts for learners (NSs Section of Act: definition of learner includes apprentices). It states: Workers Compensation Act (section 45) 45 (1) Where the Board is satisfied that a worker's average earnings before the loss of earnings commences do not fairly represent the worker's actual loss of earnings because the worker was a learner, the Board may deem the worker's average earnings to be an amount that it determines better reflects the probable earnings of the worker had the worker, in the normal course, become qualified in the worker's trade or occupation. Workers Compensation General Regulations (section 21)

Policy 3.1.1R2 states: For purposes of establishing the long-term earnings profile (which is set after Policy (if any): Policy 26 weeks), the Board will generally deem the learner's earnings at the level they would have 3.1.1R2 - Calculation of achieved within the next 12 months. Gross Earnings Benefits are provided to volunteer fire fighters. Minimum and maximum compensation amounts are in Section 21 the General Regulations. It states: Links (if any): N/A 21 The gross annual earnings of a member of a volunteer fire department admitted to the operation of the Act pursuant to Section 5 of the Act shall be (a) a minimum of $10 200 dollars, and (b) a maximum of the amount determined as maximum earnings pursuant to clause 41(c) of the Act. As per 41(c) of the Act, maximum gross earnings are 135.7% of the average industrial wage for the Province. Benefits are not provided to minors or students.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Ontario

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Volunteers -- Individuals who arrange unpaid training placements on their own, with no training Section of Act: agency involvement, are generally considered to be volunteers. While volunteers are not generally Workplace Safety and covered by the WSIB, they may be entitled to take legal action against the employer in the event of Insurance Act, 1997 an injury. (sections 2(1), 53(4), 69) Learners Placed by a training agency with an employer (placement host) to obtain work skills and experience Participates, however minimally, in the employers activities (i.e., includes job shadowing). Not paid by the employer (i.e., not under a contract of service or apprenticeship) Earnings based on actual income at the time of injury (training allowances, social assistance, insurance benefits, funds from employer, wages from concurrent employment), or earnings to be received from an accepted job offer, scheduled to start after placement, or Ontario minimum wage, if no actual income. o Ontario Regulation 175/98, sections 16 and 17

Policy (if any): Learners: 12-04-04 Individuals on Unpaid Training Placements 12-04-05 Coverage for Unpaid Trainees 12-04-06 Coverage for Ontario Works Participants 12-04-07 Students in Work Education Programs 18-02-08 Determining Average Earnings Exceptional Cases 18-04-10 Calculating FEL for Students, Learners, and Apprentices

Apprentices Registered under the Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Act (specified construction trades) or the Apprenticeship and Certification Act (all other trades). Signed a contract of apprenticeship for training and instruction in a trade, through or from an employer and employers business is covered under the WSIA either compulsorily, or by registering for coverage by application Includes high school students participating in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (The provincial government pays for the cost of coverage for participants) Coverage is provided during the work placement but not during classroom courses. Earnings based on the average earnings of a typical journeyman employed by the employer at the time of the accident and in the same trade as the apprentice, even if it is higher than the apprentices actual wages

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Students

Section of Act, Policy, Links Policy (if any):

Pursuing formal education on a full-time or part-time basis (doesnt include learners or Apprentices: apprentices). o 12-04-13 Apprentices Employed by an employer for the purposes of the employers industry, and receiving wages under a contract of service with an employer whose business is covered under the WSIA either compulsorily, or has registered for coverage by application. Coverage is provided during the paid employment work, but not during classroom courses Initial pre-injury earnings based on actual earnings from all employers at time of injury. o o 12-04-07 Students in Work Education Programs 18-02-08 Determining Average Earnings Exceptional Cases Students: 18-02-08 Determining Average Earnings Exceptional Cases

Links (if any): Types of Workers - Students, Apprentices, and Learners

Prince Edward Compensation is payable to minors, learners, apprentices and students in accordance with the Island wage loss benefit provisions. The Act does provide that where an apprentice suffers an injury arising out of and in the course of instruction, the rate of wages that would have been payable to the apprentice under the agreement of apprenticeship if he or she had been working for his or her employer at the time of the accident shall be deemed to be the rate of wages for the apprentice. The Act provides that the Board may adjust a workers wage loss benefits where the Board is satisfied that a workers average earnings before the accident do not fairly represent the workers earning capacity because the worker was an apprentice in a trade or occupation or because of a workers age. Benefits are payable to volunteer firefighters (the Act does not cover other volunteers) in accordance with an agreement with the Province.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 1 (1)(2), 9 (2), 44) Policy (if any): POL-94, Learners Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Quebec Student under section 10, worker who is a full-time student or child under paragraph 3 of section 11:

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Section of Act: Act respecting Industrial The income replacement indemnity of a student under section 10 ARIAOD, a worker who is a full- accidents and occupational diseases (sections 80 and time student or a child under paragraph 3 of section 11 ARIAOD is: 82) up to the age of 18, $99 since January 1, 2013 per week; from the age of 18, based on the gross annual income determined on the basis of the minimum wage then in effect; from the age of 21, revised upwards if he or she shows to the Commission that he or she would probably have earned a higher income at the end of his or her studies if he or she had not suffered an occupational injury. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

The student or child can show to the Commission that, during the 12 months preceding the date of his or her disability, he or she earned an income warranting a higher indemnity. (section 80 ARIAOD).

Volunteer: The income replacement indemnity of a volunteer worker under section 13 is: up to the age of 18, $99 since January 1, 2013 per week; based on the annual income determined on the basis of the minimum wage in effect when the occupational injury occurred, if the worker has no paid employment with an employer and is not registered at the Commission (section 82 ARIAOD).

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Saskatchewan Apprentices and on-the-job training (POL 21/2001):

Section of Act, Policy, Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, 1979, sections 51, 12, 2(t) Workers Compensation Act Exclusion Regulations, Section 3(bb)

Where a worker is injured for which compensation is payable while undergoing training or instruction acceptable to the board, initial compensation benefits will be based on the workers earnings at the time of injury. Increases to the workers benefits will be based on probable earnings as outlined in the pre-injury employers salary grid or agreement, or if unavailable, from local labour market statistics. When an injury prevents a worker from completing an apprenticeship or on-the-job training program, a worker's probable earnings will be used to establish compensation benefits. The board may increase the compensation to what the worker would have otherwise been entitled to under the Act had he/she completed that training or instruction.

Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: POL 21/2001, PRO 21/2001 POL 12/2012, PRO 12/2012POL 08/2007 POL 04/2006, PRO 04/2006 POL 07/2009, PRO 07/2005 POL 07/2009, POL 28/77

Students in work-based learning assignments (POL 12/2012):

Coverage under the Act is extended to bona fide students participating in a work-based learning assignment that is sponsored in whole or in part by the Ministry of Education or the Ministry of Advanced Education. Under Section 12 of the Act, the WCB deems students to be workers while in the course of completing a work-based learning assignment with an employer covered under the Act. Coverage is not extended to students who attend job-shadowing programs.

No earnings loss payment will be made during training programs or school terms unless Links (if any): N/A actual loss of earnings is demonstrated. Calculation of wage loss benefits will be based on all earnings from a students employment in industries covered by the Act. Where there are no covered earnings, the provincial minimum wage for a 40-hour work week will be used for the first 24 months of earnings loss, and two-thirds of the average weekly wage for the period exceeding 24 months.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Volunteer Fire Fighters (POL 04/2006): The Act defines a member of a municipal volunteer fire brigade as a worker. Coverage under the Act is restricted to volunteer fire fighters who are registered with a Saskatchewan municipality and are in the course of employment while performing fire-fighting duties. Coverage starts at the time the volunteer fire fighter is first notified of the fire. Travel from the residence to the fire station and the site of the fire, and return, are covered; personal side-trips are excluded. Coverage is also in effect while attending fire fighter training. Any remuneration (excluding expense reimbursement) over $1,000 paid for fire fighting services is to be reported as assessable earnings. If there is loss of earnings, the calculation of wage loss benefits for claims will be based on all earnings from the volunteers employment in industries covered by the Act. Where there are no covered earnings, the provincial minimum wage for a 40-hour work week will be used for the first 24 months of earnings loss, and two-thirds of the average weekly wage for the period exceeding 24 months.

Section of Act, Policy, Links

First responders (POL 07/2005): First Responders are defined as volunteers that have completed training in emergency first response as certified by the Saskatchewan Department of Health (Saskatchewan Health); are registered with Saskatchewan Health; and are registered as current members of a first responder group that has a mutual aid agreement with a Saskatchewan health region. Coverage under the Act is extended to first responders in the course of responding to an emergency incident when called upon by their respective health regions.

Good Samaritans (POL 07/2009): A worker injured while assisting at an emergency situation encountered in the course of employment will be entitled to compensation benefits under the Act.

Other volunteers: The Act Exclusion Regulations state that voluntary workers are not covered, except those in mine rescue work, members of the Emergency Measures Organization, first responders or volunteer fire fighters.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

MINORS, VOLUNTEERS, LEARNERS, APPRENTICES AND STUDENTS Yukon

Section of Act, Policy, Links

Benefits may apply based on the Workers Compensation Act. Apprentices are considered workers Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections as are minors. Each would be considered on a case by case basis. 6(1),(2) and (3)) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

PAYMENT OF COMPENSATION BENEFITS (legislation and policy related)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Frequency of Payments (Payment of Compensation Benefits) The following tables describe the frequency of benefit payments and periodic and lump sum payments in each jurisdiction. Click the link below to go directly to: Frequency of Payments Periodic and Lump Sum Payments

The following table describes the frequency of benefit payments in each jurisdiction. Frequency of Payments Alberta Section of Act; Policy; Links

Alberta states that periodic compensation will be paid on a monthly Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 56) basis in the case of permanent disability, and on a bi-weekly basis in the case of temporary disability, or on any other basis if the board Policy (if any): N/A considers it appropriate to do so. Links (if any): N/A British Columbia states that payments of compensation must be Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 35) made periodically at the times and in the manner and form the Board Policy (if any): N/A considers advisable. Links (if any): N/A

British Columbia

Manitoba

Wage loss benefits will be paid periodically and at such times and in such manner and form as the WCB considers advisable. In general, impairment awards are paid out as lump sums. In some circumstances, an impairment award can be converted into an annuity. Some survivors benefits are paid out as lump sums while other benefits are paid monthly. In some situations, some of these survivors benefits may be converted into a different payment method.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 24(1), 39(4), 28(2), 29(1), 32.1, 36, 38) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Frequency of Payments New Brunswick

Section of Act; Policy; Links

New Brunswick may provide that compensation or benefits may be Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section paid weekly, bi-weekly or monthly, or may fix any other basis of 38.91(2)) payment. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

Payment of compensation shall be made in the manner and in the Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and form that may appear to the commission to be most convenient. Compensation Act (section 82) Policy (if any): Client services policies and procedures Links (if any): N/A

Northwest Northwest Territories & Nunavut states the Commission may, Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 52(1)) Territories and wherever it considers it advisable, provide that payments of Nunavut Policy (if any): N/A compensation be weekly or semi-monthly - instead of monthly. Links (if any): N/A Nova Scotia Payments of compensation shall be made in a manner and form as Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 74) may appear to the Board to be most convenient. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A Ontario Periodic payments under the insurance plan shall be made at such Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 times as the Board may determine. (section 62(1)) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Frequency of Payments

Section of Act; Policy; Links

Prince Edward Payment of wage loss benefits shall be made periodically, at such Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 40(4)) Island times and in such manner and form as the Board considers Policy (if any): N/A advisable. Links (if any): N/A Quebec Quebec states "the Commission shall pay the income replacement Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and indemnity, in the form of a pension, once every two weeks". Occupational Diseases (section 125) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A Saskatchewan Usually the Board makes bi-weekly payments, though it can provide Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, 1979 (section for other frequencies of payment (weekly, monthly). 102) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A Yukon The method and manner of making a payment will be determined by Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 22) the Board. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes periodic and lump sum benefit payments in each jurisdiction. Periodic and Lump-Sum Payments Alberta Periodic compensation benefits may be commuted to a lump sum. Section of Act; Policy; Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 47) Policy (if any): 04-04, Part II, Application 7 Links (if any): N/A British Columbia A lump sum payment can be divided into periodic payments if considered Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section beneficial. 35) Policy (if any): Policy item #45.00, Lump Sums & Commutations of the RS&CM Links (if any): Policy item #45.00, Lump Sums & Commutations of the RS&CM Manitoba Where accidents occur after December 31, 1991, Manitoba can convert the monthly payments payable to a sole dependent spouse or common-law partner into a one-time lump sum payment. The initial death benefit is payable as a lump sum. The fatal lump sum payment payable to the surviving spouse or common-law partner may be converted into an annuity. As well, the sum of contributions and interest of a retirement annuity set aside for an injured worker may be paid out as a lump sum if this amount is below a certain threshold level. As well, by regulation, if a permanent disability pension on a pre-1992 accident is below an amount set out in a regulation the Manitoba WCB may convert these periodic payments into a lump sum. To date, a regulation has not been passed. The Manitoba WCB does not pay wage loss benefits as a lump sum. In general, impairment awards are paid out as lump sums. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 28, 29(1)(i), 32.1, 38,109.4) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Periodic and Lump-Sum Payments New Brunswick New Brunswick may: commute the whole or any part of the payments due to any worker or dependent for a lump sum; substitute for such payments any other scheme of periodic payments; or substitute for any lump sum a scheme of periodic payments deemed in the best interest of the worker or dependent.

Section of Act; Policy; Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 40(1)) Policy (if any): Policy No 21-505 Advances and Payouts Links (if any): N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland & Labrador does not have a current provision to commute the compensation entitlement in whole or in part. A former provision now repealed allowed permanent disability benefits for pre-1984 claims to be converted to a lump sum where there is no loss of earnings related to the injury.

Section of Act: The Workers' Compensation Act, 1983, Section 74 and Section 115 (Repealed) Newfoundland Regulation 144/93, Section 25 (Repealed). Policy (if any): Client services policies and procedures Links (if any): N/A

Northwest A pension may be converted to a lump sum payment if requested and Territories and considered beneficial for the worker. A pension is automatically converted Nunavut to a lump sum payment if the workers personal injury or disease results in a disability that reduces the workers physical and mental abilities by no more than 10%.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 56) Policy (if any): Policy 06.02, Pension Conversions and Advances Links (if any): WSCC Policy Manual

Nova Scotia

A lump sum payment can be divided into periodic payments if considered Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 74) beneficial. Periodic payments may be communed into a lump sum. Policy (if any): 3.6.4 Payment when EERB Commuted Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Periodic and Lump-Sum Payments Ontario In Ontario, there are specific rules as to whether a long-term benefit must be paid periodically or as a lump sum. Loss of retirement income (LRI) benefits are payable as a lump sum or an annuity. The Good Government Act, 2011 increased the threshold amount for payment of the LRI benefit as an annuity from $3,183.48 to the maximum amount of average earnings determined for that year under section 54 of the legislation. For noneconomic loss benefits, if the benefit payable is higher than the threshold amount set out in the legislation ($12,808.90), it is automatically paid as a lump sum unless the worker elects to have the benefit paid monthly. For survivor benefits, spouses receive both a lump sum payment and periodic payments.

Section of Act; Policy; Links Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (sections 45(6) & (6.1), 46(3) & (4), 48, 62(2)) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Prince Edward Payment of compensation shall be made in such manner and form as the Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section Island Board considers most convenient. Impairment awards are paid as a lump 40(4)) sum. Policy (if any): POL89, Impairment Links (if any): N/A Quebec The Commission may pay an income replacement indemnity in one or Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents several instalments equivalent to the representative capital of the indemnity, and Occupational Diseases (section 131) for a maximum period of one year, or at intervals other than once every two Policy (if any): N/A weeks where: 1) the amount paid at those intervals is minimal; 2) the beneficiary is not resident or ceases to be resident in Quebec; or 3) it believes it beneficial to the rehabilitation of the beneficiary, if he consents to it. In the third case, the Commission may also pay part of the representative capital of the indemnity and pay the balance as a pension at the intervals it determines.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Links (if any): N/A

Periodic and Lump-Sum Payments

Section of Act; Policy; Links

Saskatchewan Saskatchewan does not have a provision to commute the compensation Section of Act: entitlement in whole or in part. Not specified in the current Act or in the Policy Manual Lump sum payments can be made to dependents and migrant workers. Workers Compensation Act, 1979, (sections 67.1(1) & 89(3)) An annual independence allowance may be made to qualifying claimants. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: PRO 05/2010 Yukon Only in prior Acts. Section of Act: N/A Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Types of Compensation 1 (Payment of compensation benefits) 1 Wage or Earnings Loss Additional Earnings Loss information at: o o o Weekly Benefits for Temporary Disability Employment Earnings Considered When Establishing the Compensation Rate Permanent Disability Awards and Escalation Benefits

Functional Impairment Also See 'Permanent Disability Awards and Escalation Benefits'

Annuity 3(a) Annuity at 65 3(b) Other Annuities

Supplemental Benefits 4(a) Supplemental Benefits 4(b) Group Benefit Plan 4(c) Employment-Related Remuneration, Collateral (Top-up) Benefits

For more detailed information on comparisons of benefits between Canadian Workers' Compensation Boards/Commissions, please see 'Workers' Compensation Benefits & Rehabilitation'

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table is a quick jurisdictional comparison of types of compensation payments including: wage or earnings loss and functional impairment. AB WCB/Commission has a dual award system Yes BC Yes MB Yes NB Yes NL Yes NT/NU No NS Yes ON Yes PE Yes QC No SK Yes YT Yes

WCB/Commission: Yes 1,2 Yes 4,5 Yes1,4 Yes2,5 Yes 3 Yes 6 Yes6 Yes6

awards temporary compensation

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

awards permanent compensation

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

recognizes total disability

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

recognizes partial disability

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No Yes 7

Yes

Yes

Payments can be made as long as a disability or wage loss exists

Yes

N/A

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

N/A

No

Yes

or to age 65

Yes

Yes 8

Yes 9 Yes 12

Yes 10 Yes 13

Yes Yes 14

N/A

Yes

Yes 11

Yes
15

No

Yes

Yes

Payments can be made for life in some cases of permanent disability

Yes

N/A

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes
16

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

AB WAGE OR EARNINGS LOSS Additional Earnings Loss information at: Weekly Benefits for Temporary Disability

BC

MB

NB

NL

NT/NU

NS

ON

PE

QC

SK

YT

Employment Earnings Considered When Establishing the Compensation Rate Permanent Disability Awards and Escalation Benefits The following wage or earnings loss terms are used in each jurisdiction: percentage impairment of earnings capacity projected loss of earnings loss of earning capacity long term disability temporary and extended earnings loss benefits earnings loss loss of earnings wage loss income replacement indemnity Yes Yes 17 No No No Yes No No No No No No

No Yes No Yes

Yes2,5,17 N/A N/A N/A

No Yes No No

No Yes Yes No

No Yes No Yes

No No Yes No

No No No No

No Yes No No

No Yes No Yes

No Yes No No

No Yes Yes No

No Yes Yes No

Yes Yes Yes No

N/A Yes5,17 Yes 18 N/A

No No Yes No

Yes Yes Yes No

Yes Yes Yes No

No No No No

Yes Yes No No

No Yes Yes No

Yes Yes Yes No

No No No Yes

Yes Yes Yes No

Yes Yes Yes No

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

AB FUNCTIONAL IMPAIRMENT 2 See 'Permanent Disability Awards and Escalation Benefits' WCB pays a lump sum amount for a permanent functional or physical impairment It is based on: o the estimated degree of disability or clinical impairment o the age of the worker o a base or maximum/minimum amount as specified in the Act or regulations WCB establishes a life pension based on an estimate of the disability resulting from the functional impairment applied to the average or net earnings. WCB may pay as a lump sum if there is functional impairment but no immediate earnings loss WCB allows the worker to convert the lump sum impairment award into an annuity Yes Yes 22

BC
19

MB

NB

NL

NT/NU

NS
20

ON

PE

QC
21

SK

YT

No 23

Yes 24

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes 25

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes 26

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No Yes 29

Yes 27 No

28

No Yes

No Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

No Yes

Yes Yes

No Yes

No Yes

Yes

30

No

30

No 31

No

Yes

No 32

30

No

No

No

No

N/A

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes 33

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Yes

When a workers physical or mental capacities are reduced or impaired, a functional loss may have occurred. This may or may not result in a projected or actual earnings loss to the worker.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

AB WCB pays a lump sum for disfigurement. WCB pays functional impairment as a monthly award unless the worker elects to take a lump sum Upon a request from the worker, the WCB will also consider establishing an annuity rather than pay a lump sum ANNUITY See 'Annuity' SUPPLEMENTAL BENEFITS See 'Supplemental Benefits' Yes Yes

BC Yes5 No 38

MB Yes 34 No

NB Yes 35 Yes 39

NL Yes No

NT/NU Yes Yes

NS Yes 36 Yes 40

ON
37

PE Yes No

QC Yes No

SK Yes No

YT Yes No

41

No

No

Yes33

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Yes

N/A means not applicable or not available. Contact individual WCBs/Commissions if you require further information or clarification.
Section 29. Section 30. Benefits for accidents before January 1, 1992, are based on the disability model. Benefits for accidents after December 31, 1991, are based on a dual-award system of wage loss and impairment awards. 4 Section 22. 5 Section 23. 6 For accidents before January 1, 1992. 7 The right to an income replacement indemnity is extinguished at the sixty-eighth birthday of the worker or, if he suffers an employment injury when 64 years of age or over, four years after the date he became unable to carry on his employment. 8 Section 23.1. 9 In general, wage loss benefits are payable until the WCB determines the loss of earning capacity ends or the worker turns 65. Workers who are 61 years of age or older are eligible to receive wage loss benefits until they are fit to return to work or for four years, whichever occurs sooner. 10 When an injured worker is 63 years of age or more at the time of injury, compensation is provided for a period not exceeding two years following the commencement of loss of earnings resulting from the injury or recurrence of injury. Age 65 is the age at which LTD benefits end. Age 65 limit does not apply to life-long pensioners and pre-1982 surviving spouses. 11 For a maximum of two years if the worker is 63 years of age or older on the date of the injury. 12 This refers to the Manitoba Act as it existed prior to January 1, 1992.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

1 2 3

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20

21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

For accidents that occurred before January 1, 1982. For pre-1984 injuries. Yes, under previous Act. Prior Acts. Section 33. Not with reference to permanent awards. Section 30. In BC, loss of function awards are also called "section 23(1) awards". Section 23(1) of the Act states that, if a permanent partial disability results from a workers injury, the Board must estimate the impairment of earnings capacity from the nature and degree of the injury. The percentage of disability determined from the workers condition under section 23(1) reflects the extent to which a particular injury is likely to impair a workers ability to earn in the future. It takes into consideration such factors as: short term fluctuations in the compensable condition; reduced prospects of promotion; restrictions in future employment; reduced capacity to compete in the labour market; and variations in the labour market. Loss of function is the primary method of assessing permanent disability. Only in "so exceptional" circumstances will a loss of earnings assessment be considered. In Nova Scotia, a monthly benefit known as the Permanent Impairment Benefit (PIB) is payable for life. The PIB is equal to (85%) X (30%) X (% impairment rating) X (net pre-injury earnings). The PIB is normally commuted to a lump sum if the impairment rating is less than 30% and no Extended Earnings Replacement Benefits is being paid. In Quebec, a worker who sustains one or several permanent physical or mental impairments as a result of the same work accident or the same occupational disease is entitled, where the total of the percentages of these impairments exceeds 100%, to receive an amount equal to 25% of the amount of the compensation determined on the basis of the excess percentage. In Quebec, the worker whose occupational injury is consolidated is entitled to the income replacement indemnity for as long as he needs rehabilitation to enable him to carry out his employment or, if this goal cannot be attained, to enable him to carry out suitable full-time employment. When the worker unable to carry out his employment becomes able to carry out suitable full-time employment, his income replacement indemnity is reduced by the net income he could draw from this suitable employment. If his employer terminates the workers suitable employment within the ensuing two years, the worker recovers his right to full income replacement indemnity. However, if this suitable employment is not available, the worker is entitled to a full income replacement indemnity until he occupies this employment or refuses it without a valid reason, but for at most one year from the date he becomes able to occupy it. For claims on or after January 1, 1995. BC pays periodic payments which may be commuted out as lump sums in some cases. Sections 35(2) and 35(3). Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #45.10. If the impairment award granted exceeds $15,000 in 2013, the worker has the option of converting this lump sum into an annuity. Conditionally. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #39.10. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #39.11. For claims from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2005. Maximum & minimum amounts are specified in policy, not in the Act or Regulations. This also applies to Manitoba for accidents occurring before January 1, 1992, Ontario for accidents occurring before January 1, 1990, and Alberta for accidents occurring before January 1, 1995. WorkSafeNB does not presently provide life pensions, but did for accidents that occurred pre-1982. Permanent Impairment Benefit (PIB) is payable for life but does not factor in the effect of impairment on earnings. This is covered by Extended Earning replacement Benefit (EERB), which is not a life pension. If the award is greater than $15,000 in 2013, the worker has the option of converting the lump sum impairment award into an annuity. The definition of impairment includes disfigurement. In general, impairment awards are paid out as lump sums. If a permanent physical impairment. If PMI (permanent medical impairment).

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

37 If it is a permanent impairment resulting in a non-economic loss (NEL) award, the usual rules apply regarding whether the NEL award will be paid as a lump sum, depending on the amount. 38 In British Columbia, a worker or dependent has to apply for a commutation of benefits and meet guidelines. Sections 35(2) and 35(3). Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #45.10. 39 Does not apply to PPIs, but does apply to lifelong pensioners with identified permanent physical impairments (pre-1982). 40 If 30% or less paid as a lump sum, if over, paid monthly but will consider a commutation request. 41 Ontario pays a non-economic loss (NEL) benefit as a monthly or as a lump sum depending on whether the benefits is under or over the threshold, and in some cases, on the payment option selected by the worker. The NEL benefit threshold is set yearly.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY (Payment of compensation benefits - Types of Compensation) The following table describes annuities at each jurisdiction. Go directly to: Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories & Nunavut Nova Scotia Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes annuities at each jurisdiction.

ANNUITY Alberta Annuity at 65 Alberta does not pay an annuity. Instead, the Economic Loss Payment is adjusted upon reaching retirement age (usually age 65 but may be later) to reflect the loss of retirement income, rather than employment income, and continues for the life of the worker. The adjustment formula is similar to those used for employment pensions. N/A N/A 04-04, Part II, Application 3, Benefits, Permanent Disability

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

British Columbia Annuity at 65 In BC, the Board is required to set aside an additional amount equal to 5% of each payment toward a retirement benefit, which is invested. The worker may contribute an amount from 1% to 5%. On retirement, the worker will receive the retirement benefit as a lump sum award. N/A Workers Compensation Act (sections 23.2 & 23.3) Rehab Services & Claims Manual (#116.00 - #116.30)

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY Manitoba Annuity at 65 In Manitoba, once a worker has received wage loss benefits in each of 24 months, the WCB sets aside a percentage of future wage loss benefits to form a retirement annuity, generally payable at age 65. This percentage depends on the amount contributed by the employer to the workers company pension plan before and after the accident. Where the employers contribution rate before the injury was 5% or less, the WCB will set aside the difference between 5% and the employers contribution rate after 24 months on wage loss benefits. Where the employers contribution rate before the injury was more than 5% but did not exceed 7%, the WCB will set aside the difference between the employers contribution rate before the injury and the employers contribution rate after 24 months on wage loss benefits. Where the employers contribution rate before the injury was more than 7%, the WCB will set aside the difference between 7% and the employers contribution rate after 24 cumulative months. The worker has the option of contributing up to the same percentage of future wage loss the WCB is contributing towards the annuity. If the worker dies before electing the type of annuity, a lump sum is payable to the spouse or common-law partner. If this lump sum is greater than an amount determined by the WCB, the spouse or common-law partner may convert this sum into an annuity. This threshold amount is $15,000 in 2013. If there is no spouse or common-law partner, this lump sum is payable to the estate. The annuity benefits are also divisible on marriage break-up. Other Annuities In Manitoba, a worker, spouse, or common-law partner can choose from a variety of annuity options. If the lump sum payable for an impairment award, retirement benefit or fatality benefit is above a certain threshold, the worker, spouse or common-law partner can obtain independent financial advice up to $400.00 to assist in choosing one of the annuity options. In 2013, this threshold level is $37,500. If the worker, spouse or common-law partner selected a particular type of annuity and dies before the annuity term expires, a designated beneficiary, or the estate, is entitled to receive the balance of the annuity. If an annuity is unclaimed after six years, it is paid into the Accident Fund. Workers Compensation Act (sections 36, 42) 44.100.20 Annuities

Section of Act Policy (if any)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY New Brunswick Annuity at 65 In New Brunswick, when a worker is in receipt of benefits for 24 consecutive months, an amount equal to 10% 1 of the benefits paid plus interest accrued monthly based on the amount of benefits to which the injured worker is entitled is set aside to offset some of the effect of lost CPP and private pension contributions. The same applies to surviving spouses -- if surviving spouses receive benefits as a result of a fatality since January 1, 1982, they are entitled to set aside 5% or 8%. Workers' Compensation Act (section 38.22) Policy 21-206 Funding Annuity Benefits

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Newfoundland and Labrador Annuity at 65 For injuries after December 31, 1983, the commission will pay workers who are receiving compensation at age 65 an amount equal to the demonstrated loss of CPP Retirement or registered employer sponsored pension plan benefits that the worker has lost as a result of the injury. N/A Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 75) RE-15 - Determining Suitable Employment and Earnings

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

On or after January 1, 2009.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY Northwest Territories and Nunavut Annuity at 65 Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any) The Northwest Territories and Nunavut are not required to provide annuities as benefits provided are lifetime pensions. N/A N/A N/A

Nova Scotia Annuity at 65 In Nova Scotia, the percentage set aside to fund the annuity is 5% per month and the annuity is payable at age 65 and may be payable earlier as long as it is a qualifying case and the amount is less than $10,000. N/A Workers' Compensation Act (sections 50-58) Policy 3.6.1 Amounts to be Reserved to Provide Annuity

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY Ontario Annuity at 65 In Ontario, after the worker has received loss of earnings benefits for 12 months, the Board is required to set aside an additional amount equal to 5% of each payment toward a retirement benefit, which is invested. The worker may contribute a further 5%. If the worker dies before turning age 65, this retirement benefit may be payable to the spouse, dependants, designated beneficiary, or estate depending on whether the worker's death was work-related. If the worker's death is work-related, the spouse and dependants receive survivor benefits and that portion of the retirement benefit to which the worker had made voluntary contributions. Effective March 30, 2011, for workers turning 65 on or after April 30, 2011, the threshold amount for payment of the LRI benefit as an annuity when the worker reaches age 65 is increased from $3,000 (indexed) to the maximum amount of average earnings determined under section 54 of the WSIA. In Ontario, there are a variety of annuities which are described in WSIB policy. Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (section 45) 18-03-07 Loss of Retirement Income Benefits (Accidents on or after January 1, 1998) 18-01-02 Benefit Dollar Amounts - Accidents from 1998

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Prince Edward Island Annuity at 65 For injuries occurring after January 1, 1995, Prince Edward Island pays workers at age 65 for demonstrated loss of CPP Retirement or registered employer sponsored pension plan benefits. N/A Workers Compensation Act (section 43) POL-124 Pension Replacement Benefits

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY Quebec Annuity at 65 In Quebec, the right to the income replacement indemnity expires upon the injured workers 68th birthday or, if he suffers an occupational injury when he is at least 64 years old, four years after the beginning of his disability. The income replacement indemnity is reduced by 25% upon the workers 65th birthday, by 50% in the second year, and by 75% in the third year after this date. However, the income replacement indemnity of the worker who suffers an occupational injury when he is at least 64 years old and employed is reduced by 25% from the second year following the beginning of his disability, by 50% from the third year, and by 75% from the fourth year following this date. N/A Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (sections 56, 57) N/A

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Saskatchewan Annuity at 65 In Saskatchewan after a pension has been paid for 24 months, an additional amount of 10% each month is set aside to form an annuity for the worker. At age 65, the disability pension or wage loss ceases and the annuity payment commences. This is felt to mirror most workers situations where normal earnings cease and a retirement pension or its equivalent commences. N/A Workers Compensation Act, 1979.(section 74) www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 10/2008

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ANNUITY Yukon Annuity at 65 In Yukon 2, after an earnings loss has been paid for 24 months, an additional amount of 10% each month is set aside to form an annuity for the worker. At the age of eligibility for old age security benefits, the disability pension or wage loss ceases and the annuity payment commences. This is felt to mirror most workers situations where normal earnings cease and a retirement pension or its equivalent commences. N/A Workers' Compensation Act (section 32) FA-06 - Annuities

Other Annuities Section of Act Policy (if any)

In the Yukon, compensation must have been payable in respect of the SAME disability for at least 24 months.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Supplemental Benefits The following tables describe supplemental benefits in each jurisdiction, including group benefit plans and employment-related remuneration, collateral (top-up) benefits. Click the link below to go directly to: Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Alberta.

Alberta

Supplemental Benefits

In Alberta, for those with disabilities assessed at 50% or more and injured prior to April 1, 1975, a supplement may be paid to age 65 to raise the amount to the level set in 1980 amendments. Earnings Loss Supplement for pre 1995 claims, Alberta may pay an earnings loss supplement if the workers compensable loss of earning capacity exceeds the amount of the permanent partial disability pension.

Group Benefit Plan

No

Employment-Related Remuneration, Collateral (TopUp) Benefits

An employer is not prohibited from paying a worker more than the amount that a worker would receive under the Act. The Board will reimburse the employer up to the amount of monies that would have been paid to the worker had he or she been paid directly by the Board. The Board will not reimburse for any amount above that figure.

Section of Act

Workers' Compensation Act (section 66)

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in British Columbia.

British Columbia

Supplemental Benefits

N/A

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, Collateral (TopUp) Benefits

An employer is not prohibited from paying a worker more than the amount that a worker would receive under the Act. The Board will reimburse the employer up to the amount of monies that would have been paid to the worker had he or she been paid directly by the Board. The Board will not reimburse for any amount above that figure.

Section of Act

Workers Compensation Act (section 34)

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Manitoba. Manitoba Supplemental Benefits In Manitoba, a supplemental benefit may be paid if the loss of earning capacity is proportionately greater than the disability pension the worker is receiving or received. This benefit is called special additional compensation (SAC) and is only available to workers with accidents prior to January 1, 1992. Under certain circumstances, workers may qualify for a postretirement benefit. Manitoba may establish benefit programs or a group insurance plan for workers receiving wage loss benefits for more than 24 months, and for dependants of those workers or deceased workers. Separate from these group benefit plans and programs, the WCB must establish a group life insurance plan for workers who have received wage loss benefits for more than 24 months. Coverage under this plan is extended for a period of 90 days to workers who meet the criteria outlined and whose benefits have been discontinued. The funding of this group life insurance plan is from the Accident Fund and is not to exceed 5% of future wage loss benefits. Should a worker die in 2013 and leave a dependant, $44,000 is payable to the estate. If the worker has no dependants, $11,290 is payable to the estate. Under the Manitoba Act, collateral benefits are any additional benefits an injured worker may be entitled to receive for a workplace accident under the Canada Pension Plan, the Quebec Pension Plan, the Employment Insurance Act, a disability insurance plan, and employer "top-up benefits". Collateral benefits will either be deducted from wage loss benefits or will be considered earnings after the accident, depending on whether the collateral benefits are taxable or non-taxable. Collateral benefits are deducted from wage loss benefits to ensure that the total amount of benefits a worker receives from the various sources does not add up to more than 100% of the worker's actual loss of earning capacity. Links (if any) Back to top
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Group Benefit Plan

Employment-Related Remuneration, Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits

Section of Act

Workers Compensation Act (section 40(2) Act prior to January 1, 1992) Workers Compensation Act (sections 41, 43) Manitoba Regulation 187/2005, Group Life Insurance Manitoba Regulation 146/2012, Adjustment in Compensation Regulation Policy 44.60.30, Special Additional Compensation Fact Sheet - WCB Group Life Insurance

The following table describes supplemental benefits in New Brunswick. New Brunswick

Supplemental Benefits

In New Brunswick, workers receive reimbursement of any income tax that must be paid on retroactive Canada Pension Plan Disability benefits related to a work injury.

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, Injured workers are allowed to earn, through the combination of compensation benefits and financial Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits remuneration, a maximum of 85% of their pre-accident net earnings. While this does not prevent the employer from paying remuneration to the injured worker who is receiving compensation benefits, it requires that WorkSafeNB staff reduce compensation benefits so that the combined total received by the injured worker does not exceed 85% of pre-accident net earnings.

Section of Act

Workers' Compensation Act (sections 38.91(1.01), 38.11(9))

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Newfoundland and Labrador. Newfoundland and Labrador Supplemental Benefits Group Benefit Plan N/A N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, Newfoundland & Labrador prohibits any agreement between an employer and a worker that would allow a Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits worker to be paid more than the amount that would be paid as compensation under the Act. Effective September 1, 1998, a benefit relative to the injury that a worker is entitled to receive from the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan are offset from the compensation payable at a rate of 75% of the net benefit and a benefit from an employer-sponsored pension plan is offset from the compensation payable at a rate of 75% of the net benefit.

Section of Act Links (if any)

Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (sections 81, 81.1) N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Northwest Territories and Nunavut Supplemental Benefits Where a workers assessed functional capacity resulting from a permanent disability prevents the worker from returning to pre-accident or comparable employment, or limits the worker to occasional part-time work, he or she may be entitled to an Earnings Loss Adjustment in addition to the basic pension benefit. Depending on the circumstances, an Earnings Loss Adjustment will be the workers basic pension benefit multiplied by 50% or 100%.

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, N/A Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits

Section of Act

Workers Compensation Act (sections 41, 42, 44) Policy 06.03 Calculation of Permanent Compensation

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia

Supplemental Benefits

In Nova Scotia, supplemental benefits are payable to certain low-income permanently impaired workers whose injury occurred before March 23, 1990.

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, Top Ups are not prohibited under the Act. Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits

Section of Act

Workers' Compensation Act (section 227(4)

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Ontario. Ontario

Supplemental Benefits

Not applicable.

Group Benefit Plan

In Ontario, the accident employer is required to continue employment benefits throughout the year following the injury, if the worker is absent from work because of the injury, and if the worker continues to pay his share of these benefits, if any.

Employment-Related Remuneration, In Ontario, employers are not prohibited from paying collateral or additional benefits. Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits

Section of Act

Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (section 25)

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Prince Edward Island. Prince Edward Island

Supplemental Benefits

N/A

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, Wage loss benefits awarded to a worker shall be reduced by collateral benefits that the worker receives or Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits is entitled to receive as a result of the injury only to the extent that such benefits, together with wage loss benefits payable, have the effect of compensating the worker in excess of 80% of the workers actual net loss of earning capacity for the first 38 weeks for which benefits are payable and 85% of the workers actual net loss of earning capacity thereafter.

Section of Act

Workers Compensation Act (section 42)

Links (if any)

Policy: POL-41 Collateral Benefits

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Quebec. Quebec Supplemental Benefits The Act does not prohibit an employer from paying a worker an amount higher than that which he would have obtained under the Act. The Commission will reimburse the employer up to the amount which the worker would have received if he had been paid directly by the Commission. The Board will not reimburse for any amount above that figure. (section 126) In Quebec, a worker who is away from his work because of an occupational injury continues to accumulate seniority and continued service under both the collective agreement applicable to him and the Act respecting labour standards. He also continues to take part in the pension and insurance plans in effect in his place of employment, provided he pays his share of the contributions, in which case his employer is required to assume his share. These rights may be exercised until the expiry of his right to return to work, either in the year following the beginning of his period of continued absence, if the establishment includes 20 workers or less, or within two years if the establishment includes more than 20 workers. After this period, the worker who, because of an occupational injury, suffers a severe, extended disability making him unable to hold truly remunerative employment, is entitled to continue to take part in the pension plan offered by his employer if he pays his share of the required contributions and, in such a case, the Commission assumes the employers share. Finally, the worker who reinstates his employment or equivalent employment is entitled to receive the salary and benefits at the same rates and conditions as those he would enjoy had he continued to carry out his employment during his absence.

Group Benefit Plan

Employment-Related Remuneration, N/A Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits Section of Act Links (if any) Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (sections 235-240) N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan

Supplemental Benefits

Saskatchewan may make a supplemental payment to the annuity at age 65 if the impact of the injury is greater than recognized by the annuity and causes the worker undue hardship. The amount may be increased to the minimum compensation rate.

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, N/A Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits

Section of Act

Workers Compensation Act, 1979.(section 75)

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table describes supplemental benefits in Yukon. Yukon

Supplemental Benefits

Yukon may make a supplemental payment to the annuity at the time a person is eligible for old age security benefits if the impact of the injury is greater than recognized by the annuity and causes the worker undue hardship. The amount may be increased to the minimum compensation rate.

Group Benefit Plan

N/A

Employment-Related Remuneration, N/A Collateral (Top-Up) Benefits

Section of Act

Workers' Compensation Act (section 30)

Links (if any)

N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension, Reduction and Termination of Payments (Payment of Compensation Benefits) The following table outlines when workers compensation benefit payments may be suspended, reduced or terminated in each jurisdiction. Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Alberta The WCB may reduce or suspend compensation when: Section of Act; Policies and Related Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 36, 38, 39, 52 54)

the worker refuses reasonable medical treatment considered necessary for recovery, and/or Policy (if any): 04-02, Part II, Applications 1&3 the worker knowingly engages in conduct or activities that endanger or delay recovery. Related links (if any): N/A

Benefits will not be reduced or suspended if the delayed recovery is caused by a worker's error in judgment, with no evidence of a deliberate attempt to delay recovery. Compensation benefits may also be suspended when a worker leaves the province (policy 04-02, Part II, Application 3)

British Columbia

WorkSafeBC will terminate temporary total or temporary partial wage loss benefits once the workers temporary disability ceases. A temporary disability ceases when it either resolves entirely or stabilizes as a permanent impairment. In all cases, benefits will be terminated where, notwithstanding the existence of a temporary total or temporary partial impairment, the worker is suffering no loss of earnings as a result of the work injury.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 31.1; 23.1; 16) Policy (if any): Rehab Services & Claims Manual #34.51, #35.30, #40.32, #41.00. C11-88.00.

If a workers physical impairment has disappeared or stabilized, wage loss must be Related links (if any): Rehabilitation terminated even though the worker, to prevent further occurrences of his or her Services and Claims Manual Chapters 5, 6 and 11. condition, remains off work. Compensation is not payable for preventive measures.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Finally, the duration of temporary benefits may be affected by the workers age at the date of injury. If a worker should unexpectedly recover from a disability classified as permanent, the permanent disability award would be subject to termination or downward adjustment. Vocational rehabilitation services (including benefits paid under Section 16) may be discontinued where: The worker refuses available employment that is considered suitable in relation to the applicable phase of benefit entitlement; The worker fails to cooperate with vocational rehabilitation process; The worker has for personal reasons, withdrawn from the labour force; Non-compensable medical, psycho-social or financial problems alone preclude active participation in the rehabilitation process; The worker retires or is deemed to have retired; or The plan is completed and it is neither necessary nor cost effective to provide further vocational rehabilitation assistance.

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links

Age 65 is recognized as the standard retirement age for workers. WorkSafeBC is also permitted to pay benefits where it is satisfied that the worker would retire after the age of 65 if the worker had not been injured.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Manitoba

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links

Under subsection 24(1) of the Act, the WCB has very broad powers of review Section of Act: Workers Compensation regarding payments. The Act and WCB policy set out the circumstances where Act (sections 21(2). 22(2), 24(2), 27.1) compensation payments may be reduced or suspended. Policy (if any): Section 21 gives the WCB the authority to suspend payments to a worker who fails to submit to a medical examination requested by the WCB or obstructs the examination. Under section 22, the injured worker has a responsibility to cooperate and mitigate the consequences of the injury or illness. If the worker fails to comply with this responsibility, WCB benefits payable to the worker may be reduced or suspended. Policy 44.10.30.60, Practices Delaying Worker's Recovery, explains the obligations of the worker and the WCB. Policy 44.10.30.60 Practices Delaying Worker's Recovery Policy 44.10.30.30 Serious and Wilful Misconduct Policy 44.80.30.20 Post Accident Earnings - Deemed Earning Capacity Policy 43.20.40 Relocation

Where a claimant is confined to a prison, the WCB may withhold or suspend payments. Subsection 24(3) permits the WCB to pay benefits to the claimant's Related links (if any): N/A dependents or to such other persons it deems advisable. If a worker persists in working in an occupation for which he or she is medically unfit, the WCB has offered rehabilitative assistance for another class of employment, and the WCB has asked the worker not to return to that work, then benefits for future claims might be limited or denied under subsection 27.1 of the Act. Where the injury is attributable solely to the serious and willful misconduct of the worker, subsection 4(3) of the Act states that the first three weeks of medical aid and wage loss benefits are not payable. Policy 44.10.30.30 defines serious and willful misconduct as a voluntary act of a worker that demonstrates a reckless disregard for the worker's own safety and which the worker should have recognized as being likely to result in personal injury.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Policy 44.80.30.20, Post Accident Earnings - Deemed Earning Capacity, describes the circumstances where the WCB deems an amount that the worker is capable of earning. This amount may reduce or eliminate benefits payable. A deemed earning capacity is determined when the worker refuses an actual job offer; the worker stops working; the worker refuses to cooperate or participate in vocational rehabilitation program. Policy 43.20.40, Relocation, describes the relationship between relocation and benefits eligibility. Benefits may be reduced or discontinued where: i. The worker is unwilling to consider relocation as an option and the WCB does not consider it reasonable for the worker to decline relocation as part of a vocational rehabilitation plan; or,

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links

ii. The worker has agreed to a plan involving relocation and subsequently discontinues the plan; or, iii. The worker independently relocates and this delays or otherwise negatively affects the worker's recovery, rehabilitation, or return to employment.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments New Brunswick

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links

When injured workers do not attend examinations, or in WorkSafeNBs opinion they Section of Act: Workers Compensation do not participate with maximum effort, WorkSafeNB may suspend benefits until the Act (sections 41(15), 41(16)) examination has been completed. Policy (if any): When injured workers do not attend treatments, participate with maximum effort, or persist in activities that impede recovery or return to work, WorkSafeNB may suspend Policy No. 25-070 Responsibility in Rehabilitation benefits until the injured worker returns to treatment activities. WorkSafeNB has a discretionary authority to suspend benefits. In determining whether to suspend benefits immediately, WorkSafeNB considers the following: The significance of the treatment missed relative to the duration of the claim; The availability of the treatment; and/or The attendance and participation record of the injured worker. Policy No. 21-413 Return to Work Responsibilities and Re-employment Obligations Policy No, 21-100 Conditions for Entitlement General principles Policy No, 25-010 Personal Noncompensable Intervening Conditions During Rehabilitation

Injured workers are required to actively participate in their rehabilitation and return to work. This includes accepting suitable employment. WorkSafeNB may temporarily reduce or suspend benefits when evidence shows that an injured worker: Is not complying with the WC Act provisions; or Has not accepted an offer of suitable employment.

Related links (if any): N/A

When a personal non-compensable intervening condition is present during the rehabilitation of a compensable injury, WorkSafeNB may discharges its responsibility by Suspending benefits, or paying benefits for the period of the healing time of the compensable injury.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Newfoundland and Labrador Worker to Mitigate Injury: The commission may suspend, reduce or terminate any compensation otherwise payable to a worker where the worker fails to take all reasonable steps to reduce or eliminate a permanent impairment and loss of earnings resulting from an injury; Fails to seek out and co-operate in any medical aid or treatment that, in the opinion of the commission, promotes the workers recovery and return to work; fails to take all reasonable steps to provide to the commission full and accurate information on a matter relevant to a claim for compensation; and fails to notify the commission immediately of a change in circumstances that affects or may affect the workers initial or continuing entitlement to compensation. Failure to cooperate with Rehabilitation: Where the commission determines that a worker has failed to comply with his /her duty to co-operate in return to work, the commission may suspend, reduce or terminate the workers compensation.

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (sections 54.1(2), 62, 64, 68 89(7)),89.2) Policy (if any): WHSCC - Policies and procedures: o EN-11 Investigations; EN-17 - Interruptions and Delays in Work Injury Recovery; EN-20 - Weighing Evidence ; EN-21 - Compensation Entitlement During Confinement ;

o o

Failure to Report for Examination: The commission may require a worker applying for o RE12 to RE14; RE16, HC14 or receiving compensation to submit to a medical examination by the commission or its appointed officer and, in default of the requirement being complied with, may withhold the compensation. Related links (if any): N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Suspension Suspension of compensation may occur for a number of reasons including when a non-compensable condition, such as, heart disease, prevents the worker from undergoing treatment for the compensable condition. Travel or relocation outside of Canada is not permitted if ongoing medical attention is required and may be cause for suspension of compensation.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Acts (section 31) Policy (if any): Policy 04.01, Payment of Compensation

Termination Compensation may be terminated if it is discovered that the worker is Related links (if any): WSCC Policy employed, if medical confirmation is received that the worker can work or if fraudulent Manual activity or malingering is discovered.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Nova Scotia

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links

The Board may suspend, reduce or terminate any compensation made to a worker Section of Act: Workers' Compensation pursuant to this Part where the worker fails to co-operate in the development or Act (section 113 (2)) implementation of a rehabilitation program. Policy (if any): Where a worker is unable to commence, or continue, medical treatment required with Policy 1.3.2R Interruption of Medical respect to the compensable injury for reasons which, in the opinion of the Board, are Treatment Circumstances Beyond genuinely beyond the worker's control, compensation benefits will be temporarily Workers Control suspended and reinstated when the worker is once again able to commence or Policy 4.1.4 Non-cooperation by resume medical treatment. Worker Generally, where a worker has been judged as non-cooperative, provision of further Related links (if any): N/A VR assistance may be terminated. Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (sections 23(2), 34, A worker who is receiving benefits under the insurance plan, or who is entitled to do 35, 43(7)) so, is required to Suspension/Reduction

Ontario

provide the WSIB with any information necessary to adjudicate the claim co-operate in health care measures the WSIB considers appropriate undergo an examination by a health professional selected and paid for by the WSIB undergo an examination by a health professional selected and paid for by the employer if directed by the WSIB co-operate in work reintegration (WR) or work transition (WT) activities

Policy (if any): 22-01-03 Workers' Co-operation Obligations 22-01-02 Material Change in Circumstances - Worker 19-02-02 Responsibilities of the Workplace Parties in Work Reintegration

If a worker does not fulfill these obligations, the worker's benefits may be reduced or suspended.

Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Prince Edward Island If a worker refuses appropriate treatment, the Workers Compensation Board will suspend the workers wage loss benefit until treatment resumes. Where a worker refuses to cooperate in a medical evaluation, or vocational rehabilitation program, or provide required information, benefits will be suspended. A worker may be reinstated effective the date the worker cooperates in the medical evaluation or vocational rehabilitation program. Benefits will not be paid for the period the worker was in noncompliance. To validate the earnings, the worker is required to provide documented proof of earnings, usually in the form of the workers Tax Return, Notice of Assessment, and applicable schedules provided by the Federal department responsible for taxation. Where the worker does not provide the necessary documentation, the workers benefits will be suspended until such time as the information has been provided to the Workers Compensation Board. If the information is received from the worker after benefits have been suspended, benefits will be reinstated effective the date the information was received by the Workers Compensation Board.

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 18 (12)(13)(14) Policy (if any): POL-76 Responsibilities of Recovering Workers POL-85 Review of Benefits

Related links (if any): N/A

Quebec

The CSST may suspend the payment of benefits if the beneficiary provides Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial inaccurate information or refuses or neglects to provide the information required or to Accidents and Occupational Diseases (section 142) give the authorization necessary to obtain it. The CSST may also suspend the payment of the income replacement indemnity if the Policy (if any): Politique 2.03.2 worker, without a valid reason, fails to abide by an ARIAOD requirement. Examples: A worker who, without a valid reason, regularly misses physiotherapy treatments Related links (if any): N/A prescribed by his/her physician, fails or refuses to avail himself/herself of a rehabilitation measure, fails or refuses to carry out a temporary assignment, etc. By valid reason, we mean a reason that is generally out of the workers control such as the death of a close family member, a serious illness, a summons to appear as juror, etc.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Saskatchewan

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links

The Act, section 104 and the Policy Manual, section 4.5 specifies a number of Section of Act: Workers Compensation conditions where compensation may be suspended, reduced or terminated. These Act, 1979 (sections 50, 68(2), 99, 103, may include: 104) Being held in a prison or correctional facility; Situations where the earnings loss is not related to the injury; Refusal by the worker to accept employment which they are capable of doing; The worker being unwilling to take part in a return-to-work (RTW) program; Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: Section 4.5 (Benefits to Worker: Reduction, Suspension or Termination)

The worker not finding employment after completion of the RTW program Related links (if any): N/A after a reasonable length of time; and The injured worker accepting employment at a lower level of pay than they are capable of earning.

Retirement age (POL 09/2012): Workers under age 63 at the time of injury are entitled to earnings loss compensation from the start of the earnings loss until the earnings loss ends, or once the worker reaches the age of 65, whichever comes first. Workers age 63 or over at the time of injury are entitled to earnings loss compensation from the start of the earnings loss until the earnings loss ends, or until a period of two years has expired (i.e. compensation will be payable up to and including the day prior to the second anniversary of the start of the earnings loss), whichever comes first.

Other CPP benefits: (Section 99 of the Act; POL 09/2012): Compensation may be reduced by Canada Pension Plan benefits. Retirement benefits such as CPP retirement benefits will not be considered as earnings in the calculation of earnings loss compensation under the Act.

Pregnancy: See POL 01/2008 for details on how pregnancy may affect compensation payments. A pre-existing condition is not a valid reason to reduce the amount of compensation payable.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Suspension / Reduction / Termination of Benefit Payments Yukon Benefit payments may be suspended or reduced or terminated when: worker impedes recovery or rehabilitation, worker fails to report for examination, worker fails to immediately notify if there is a change in circumstances that may affect entitlement to compensation, worker does not take all reasonable steps to provide full and accurate information on any relevant matter, worker fails to maintain level of functioning.

Section of Act; Policies and Related Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 14) Policy (if any): RE-01, RE-02,1-4, RE-03 EL-06

Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

ADJUSTMENTS OF EXISTING COMPENSATION PAYMENTS (legislation and policy related)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Adjustments of Existing Compensation Payments The following tables outline adjustments of compensation payments including: temporary compensation; minors and apprentices; physical impairment, death benefits and maximum earnings. Click the link below to go directly to: Adjustments of existing compensation payments Temporary compensation Minors and apprentices may have their compensation increased at age 18 (or other specified age or time) Physical impairment Death benefits Maximum earnings

The following table outlines general adjustments of existing compensation payments in each jurisdiction. Adjustments of Existing Compensation Payments Alberta Adjustments are annual in Alberta (mandated by policy, not legislation). Sections of Act; Policy; Related Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 56, 58, 59, 60, 67, 68) Policy (if any): 04-01, Part II, Application 4, Benefits, Establishing Net Earnings Related links (if any): N/A British Columbia British Columbia adjusts payments on January 1st annually. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 24, 25, 25.2, 26, 27, 33) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Adjustments of Existing Compensation Payments Manitoba In Manitoba, death and permanent disability benefits arising from pre-1992 accidents are adjusted on a biennial basis. Indexing for permanent disability benefits cease when the worker turns 65. Also in Manitoba, temporary disability benefits, minimums and maximums for pre-1992 accidents are indexed annually. Workers with accidents on or after January 1, 1992 have their average earnings adjusted after two years and annually thereafter. Survivors monthly benefits are adjusted after two years and annually thereafter. The fixed dollar amounts of compensation listed in the Act are adjusted annually.

Sections of Act; Policy; Related Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 29(4), 40(2), 44, 47, 48, 49) Manitoba Regulation 146/2012, Adjustment in Compensation Regulation

Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

New Brunswick

New Brunswick has frozen benefit levels for pre-1993 accidents until they Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act represent an amount that is equal to 85% of net earnings plus subsequent (sections 38.1, 38.11, 38.2, 38.52, 38.53, 38.6, 38.8, 48) consumer price indexation. Adjustments are annual. Workers who were receiving benefits at 90% of the loss of earnings at the time Policy (if any): their claim was finalled and suffer a recurrence of injury on or after January 1, Policy No. 21-210 Calculation of Benefits 1993 will have their benefits calculated in accordance with Policy No. 21-210 Calculation of Benefits and are no longer subject to the transitional calculation. Policy No. 21-213 Transitional Entitlement Related links (if any): N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland & Labrador adjusts dependency benefits and extended Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (sections 65, 74.1) earnings loss benefits using the CPI for Canada. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

The WSCC applies a Supplementary Pension Increase as of January 1 of Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act each year. The requirement for an increase is legislated, though the value of (sections 1(1), 53) the increase is mandated by policy. Policy (if any): Policy 06.03, Calculation of Permanent Compensation Related links (if any): WSCC Policy Manual

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Adjustments of Existing Compensation Payments Nova Scotia

Sections of Act; Policy; Related Links

In Nova Scotia, indexing of benefits (permanent and temporary) was Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 41, 70, 71, 72, 73) suspended by statute until January 1, 2000 and is now in place again. Policy (if any): Policy 3.9.12 Inflation-Indexing of Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

Ontario

Adjustments are annual.

Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (sections 49-52.1) Policy (if any): 18-01-02 Benefit Dollar Amounts - Accidents from 1998 Related links (if any): Facts and figures

Prince Edward Island

Adjustments are annual.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 49.1, 50(2)(1)) Policy (if any): POL-12, Survivor Benefits POL 85 Review of Benefits

Related links (if any): N/A Quebec Indemnities are revalued every year on the basis of the variation in the Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational consumer price index (CPI). Diseases (sections 117-122) The amount of the gross annual income used as the basis for the calculation of the income replacement indemnity is revalued on the anniversary of the Policy (if any): N/A beginning of the workers disability. Related links (if any): N/A All other sums of money are revalued on January 1 of each year.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Adjustments of Existing Compensation Payments Saskatchewan

Sections of Act; Policy; Related Links

Maximum wage rate reviewed annually. Compensation payments may be Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, reviewed on request of worker, employer, dependent spouse or the Board; the 1979 (sections 68(1), 68(2), 69(1)) compensation levels may be adjusted based on this review. Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 37/2010 (CPI annual indexing) POL 02/2003 (Maximum wage rate)

Related links (if any): N/A Yukon Adjustments are annual. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 35) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table outlines adjustments of temporary compensation payments in each jurisdiction. Also see: Weekly Benefits for Temporary Disability Temporary Compensation Alberta N/A Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 56) Policy (if any): 04-02, Part I & II, Benefits, Temporary Benefits Related links (if any): N/A British Columbia In British Columbia compensation benefits are based on 90% of a worker's average net earnings. The Board will use the workers average earnings at the time of injury to determine their average net earnings for the first 10 weeks of compensation benefits. The Board will also deduct probable Canada Pension Plan contributions, Employment Insurance premiums and federal and provincial income taxes from the workers average earning to determine their average net earnings. After ten weeks, the Board will normally use the worker's earnings in the 12 month period prior to the injury to determine their average earnings. At this time, the Board will also take into consideration individual aspects of a worker's tax situation. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 33, 33.1, 33.8, 33.9) Policy (if any): Rehab Services & Claims Manual Chapter 9 Related links (if any): Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual Chapter 9.

Manitoba

Once a worker has received wage loss benefits in each of 24 months, Section of Act: he or she may become eligible for other benefits like retirement Workers Compensation Act (sections 42, 43(5)) annuities and group life insurance. Manitoba Regulation 187/2005, Group Life Insurance Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): Fact Sheet - Retirement Annuities Fact Sheet - WCB's Group Life Insurance

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Temporary Compensation New Brunswick Estimated loss of earnings are reviewed no later than 12 consecutive weeks after the commencement of compensation to ensure that calculations best represent the pre-accident earning pattern of the worker. Benefits are reviewed annually based on the anniversary date of the injury and indexed by the percentage increase in the New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings (NBIAE). See Policy No. 21210 Calculation of Benefits.

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 38.11(12), 38.2(4), 38.2(4.1, 4.2, 4.3)) Policy (if any): Policy No. 21-210 Calculation of Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland & Labrador reviews the average pre-injury annual Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and earnings of the worker after 13 consecutive weeks of compensation to Compensation Act (section 80(7)) establish a fair and equitable rate. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

The Northwest Territories and Nunavut does not recognize a specific Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections formula for adjustments. However the legislation does state that any 91(2), 92(4)) payments made to a worker may be reviewed. On this review the Commission may stop, reduce or increase the payment, but no Policy (if any): payment shall exceed the maximum set out within the Act. The Policy 03.07, Calculation of Temporary Commission also has the authority to reconsider, alter or amend any Compensation decision or order previously made. Policy 04.01, Payment of Compensation Related links (if any): WSCC Policy Manual

Nova Scotia

Earning loss adjusted according to year-over-year change to Average Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 37) Industrial Wage where earnings loss set in year following injury date. Policy (if any): N/A Indexed thereafter. Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Temporary Compensation Ontario

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

Ontario, as a matter of policy, will recalculate average earnings if not Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, representative of the worker's long-term employment income. Ontario 1997 (sections 43, 44, 53) pays at 85% of net average earnings and may review yearly, or if a Policy (if any): material change in circumstances occurs. 18-02-03 Determining Long-term Average Earnings: Workers in Permanent Employment 18-02-04, Determining Long-term Average Earnings: Workers in Non-permanent Employment

Related links (if any): N/A Prince Edward Island The Board may review and adjust its determination of the amount of Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 48.5) compensation payable to a worker as temporary wage loss benefits at Policy (if any): POL 85 Review of Benefits any time. Related links (if any): N/A Quebec Irrelevant Section of Act: N/A Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A Saskatchewan Calculation of the loss of earnings is based on the difference between Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, 1979 the workers pre-injury earnings (indexed by CPI) and the workers (section 69) current earnings. This is reviewed and adjusted annually. Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 26/2010 (Determination of Long-Term Loss of Earnings) Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Temporary Compensation Yukon

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

Yukon reviews the pre-injury annual earnings of the worker after 90 Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 23) days of compensation. Policy (if any): EL-01 Loss of Earnings Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table outlines adjustments of compensation payments to minors and apprentices once they reach a certain age in each jurisdiction. Also see Minors, Volunteers, Learners, Apprentices and Students Minors and apprentices may have their compensation increased at age 18 (or other Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links specified age or time) Alberta Minors: The WCB may adjust a worker's compensation rate effective the day of the worker's 18th birthday, if all of the following conditions are met: the worker was under age 18 at the time of the accident, Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 67, 68) Policy (if any): 04-01, Part II, Application 3, Question 2 & 3

the resulting injury caused a loss of earning capacity that continues beyond Related links (if any): N/A the worker's 18th birthday, and the employer has a higher pay rate for workers 18 and over.

In these cases, the WCB will adjust the compensation rate to reflect the earnings, at the date of accident, of a similarly employed worker of age 18 or older working for the same employer. Apprentice: To be eligible for an adjustment, the worker must meet the following conditions of apprenticeship: there is a signed apprenticeship contract or an agreement with the employer that the worker would enter into an apprenticeship program, and the worker must be employed in a designated trade as defined in the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act.

In such cases the WCB will adjust the workers compensation rate based on the average earnings at the time of accident of a fully qualified worker in the same trade. This adjustment is effective the month the worker would, in the normal course of events, have qualified in the trade if the injury had not occurred.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Minors and apprentices may have their compensation increased at age 18 (or other Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links specified age or time) British Columbia There is no provision in the British Columbia Workers Compensation Act to increase a minor or apprentices compensation at a specific age. However, if a worker is an apprentice or a learner as defined in the British Columbia Workers Compensation Act, then the Board will, in the case of a permanent injury, base the workers average earnings on the gross earnings for the 12 month period immediately preceding the date of injury, of a qualified person employed at the starting rate in the same trade, occupation or profession by the same employer or a an employer in the same region if no person so employed. (In the case of a temporary disability, the Board determines the amount of average earnings of the worker based on the greater of either (a) the rate at which the worker was paid by each of the employers for whom he was employed at the time of the injury; or (b) the workers gross earnings for the 12-month immediately preceding the date of the injury.) Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 33.2) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Manitoba

The Act permits the WCB to adjust a workers average earnings based on his or her Section of Act: Workers Compensation age. Apprentices will have their average earnings adjusted to reflect wage Act (section 45(4)) schedules in their respective apprenticeship program. Workers who are 28 and younger and sustain a long-term loss of earnings may be eligible to have their Policy (if any): average earnings adjusted up to the provincial industrial average wage. See Policy Policy 44.80.30.30 Prospective 44.80.30.30, Prospective Earnings Apprentices and Youthful Workers. Earnings - Apprentices and Youthful Workers Policy 44.80.20 Apprentices

Related links (if any): Fact Sheet Apprentices Wage loss Benefits

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Minors and apprentices may have their compensation increased at age 18 (or other Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links specified age or time) New Brunswick Legislation allows for WorkSafeNB to estimate future potential earnings for workers Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 38.1(1)) under 21 years of age. See Policy No. 21-208 Workers Under 21 Policy (if any): Policy No. 21-208 Workers Under 21 Related links (if any): N/A Newfoundland and Labrador Where a student is injured while participating in a work training program the Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety compensation payable is based on the current rate paid to a worker engaged in and Compensation Act (section 42(2)) similar work, subject to the maximum. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A Northwest Territories and Nunavut The Northwest Territories and Nunavut does not recognize a specific formula for Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act adjustments for minors, but does recognize learners and may consider their future (sections 91(2), 92(4)) lost earning potential when considering compensation. Policy (if any): Policy 03.07, Calculation of Temporary Compensation Policy 04.01, Payment of Compensation

Related links (if any): WSCC Policy Manual Nova Scotia Section 45 Act - where board satisfied that average earnings before loss of earnings commences do not fairly represent actual loss of earnings because worker was a learner, may deem average earnings to be an amount that it determines better reflects the probable earnings had worker, in normal course, become qualified in the worker's trade or occupation. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 45) Policy (if any): Policy 3.1.1R2 Calculation of Gross Earnings Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Minors and apprentices may have their compensation increased at age 18 (or other Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links specified age or time) Ontario Ontario pays apprentices based on the average earnings of a journeyman. Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (section 53(4)) Ontario Regulation 175/98 General (section 16)

Policy (if any): 18-02-08 Determining Average Earnings: Exceptional Cases Related links (if any): N/A Prince Edward Island Where the Board is satisfied that a workers average earnings before the accident do not fairly represent the workers earning capacity because (a) the worker is an apprentice in a trade or occupation, the Board may adjust the workers wage loss benefits by considering the workers average earnings to be an amount that, in the opinion of the Board, is the probable earning capacity of the worker had the worker become qualified in the workers trade or occupation; or (b) of the workers age, the Board may adjust the workers wage loss benefits by considering the workers average earnings to be an amount that, in the opinion of the Board, is a better reflection of the probable earning capacity of the worker. From 18 years of age, the indemnity is computed on the basis of the minimum wage. The income replacement indemnity of a student in unpaid internship, a child who performs a job, does community service or works as an apprentice, paid or unpaid, as part of judicial decisions or a full-time student is $99 $ since January 1, 2013 per week, unless he can show that his gross annual income of the past 12 months was higher. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 44(3)) Policy (if any): POL 86 Wage Loss Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

Quebec

Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (section 80) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Minors and apprentices may have their compensation increased at age 18 (or other Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links specified age or time) Saskatchewan Initial compensation benefits for apprentices injured on the job will be based on the Section of Act: N/A apprentices earnings at the time of injury. Increases to the benefits will be based on probable earnings. These increases will end on the date the worker was due to Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 21/2001 complete the apprenticeship. CPI adjustments will be made annually. (Apprentices) Related links (if any): N/A Yukon In some exceptional circumstances, the calculation of a workers long-term benefit rate will not provide a reasonable representation of a workers loss of earning. In exceptional circumstances such as this, the YWCHSB may base its benefit calculation on the average earnings of other workers in the same or a similar occupation in Yukon. This is done by Policy EL-01- Loss of Earnings Benefits. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 23) Policy (if any): EL-01 Loss of Earnings Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table outlines adjustments of physical impairment payments in each jurisdiction. Physical Impairment Alberta Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

Alberta has provision for a supplemental increase to age 65 for pensions for a Section of Act: Workers' Compensation disability over 50% based on proportionate amount of compensation under the Act (section 58) 1980 adjusted benefit levels. It is considered before other increases are granted. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

British Columbia

In British Columbia, only permanent disability awards of 12% or greater or those Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act which use a projected loss of earnings method of calculation are considered for (section 24) adjustment and then only upon application of the worker. This is in addition to the annual adjustments, and takes place only after the worker has been receiving the Policy (if any): N/A compensation for 10 years. An application can be made every 10 years. Related links (if any): N/A See above. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 38) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): Fact Sheet Permanent Partial Impairment Award

Manitoba

New Brunswick

An injured worker may request a review of the PPI award or WorkSafeNB may perform a reassessment if medical evidence shows that impairment has increased over time. If WorkSafeNBs review results in a new impairment rating, WorkSafeNB adjusts the award by multiplying the increase in the impairment rating by the maximum annual earnings for the year in which the accident occurred.

Section of Act: Regulation 82-165, Permanent Physical Impairment Rating Schedule Regulation Policy (if any): Policy 21-250, Permanent Physical Impairment Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Impairment Newfoundland and Labrador

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

In Newfoundland and Labrador, a lump sum award for the permanent impairment is Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 73) paid as determined by the commission after consideration of a rating schedule. Policy (if any): Policy EN-01 Related links (if any): WHSCC - Policies and procedures - EN-01 PFI Rating Schedule

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

An injured workers permanent medical impairment may be reassessed by the Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act commission, should medical evidence show that the impairment has increased over (sections 91(2), 92(4)) time. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Nova Scotia

The Board may review and adjust its determination of the amount of compensation payable as a permanent-impairment benefit where there is, in the Boards opinion, a change in the workers condition that (a) was not taken into account at the most recent determination of the workers permanent-impairment rating by the Board; and the Board shall not review or adjust a permanent-impairment benefit pursuant to subsection (1) until sixteen months have elapsed from the time of the Boards most recent determination of the workers permanent-impairment rating. Ontario provides non-economic loss benefits for permanent impairments.

Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 71) Policy (if any): Policy 3.3.3R Review of Permanent Impairment Benefit Related links (if any): N/A Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (section 46) Policy (if any): Section 18-05 of Operational Policy Manual Related links (if any): N/A

Ontario

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Physical Impairment Prince Edward Island

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

PEI provides a lump sum payment in recognition of a permanent medical Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 49) impairment. Policy (if any): Policy-89, Impairment Related links (if any): N/A

Quebec

The indemnity for physical impairment is only paid as a lump sum.

Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (section 84) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Saskatchewan

An independence allowance may be granted when the physical impairment is Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, 1979 (section 67.1(1)) severe. This independence allowance is reviewed annually. Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 27/2010 (Allowance Independence) Related links (if any): N/A

Yukon

The YWCHSB may review a permanent impairment award no earlier than five Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act years after the initial assessment. Subsequent reviews of the same permanent (section 20) impairment may occur no earlier than five years after the most recent review. Policy (if any): EN-12 Permanent However, if new medical evidence supports the conclusion that the permanent Impairment impairment has deteriorated substantially, the YWCHSB may conduct a review of a permanent impairment award before the five-year period has elapsed. Related links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table outlines adjustments of death benefit payments in each jurisdiction. Also see: Dependency Benefits Survivor Benefits Summary Fatal Benefits Other than Pensions DEATH BENEFITS Alberta N/A Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 70-77) Policy (if any): 04-08, Part I & II, Establishing Net Earnings Related links (if any): N/A British Columbia Under the British Columbia Workers Compensation Act a dependent surviving spouse, common law spouse or foster parent in Canada to whom compensation is payable is entitled to a lump sum payment which is adjusted annually [$2,526.30 in 2012] in addition to any other compensation provided. There are specific formulas setting out the amount of compensation payable in various situations depending on whether there is a dependant spouse, if the dependant spouse is an invalid, whether there is a child or children, or other dependants. Please refer to section 17 of the Workers Compensation Act and Chapter 8 of the Rehabilitation Service & Claims Manual Volume II for specific information. See above. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 17) Policy (if any): Chapter 8 of the Rehabilitation Service & Claims Manual Volume II Related links (if any): N/A

Manitoba

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 28, 29-35) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): Fact Sheet - Benefits for Dependants of Fatally Injured Workers

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEATH BENEFITS New Brunswick

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

WorkSafeNB reviews survivor benefits annually. Post-1982 dependent spouse Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 38.52(4), 38.53(1)) benefits are increased by the percentage increase of the NBIAE. Pre-1982 surviving dependents benefits are adjusted to equal 40% of the NBIAE Policy (if any): Policy No. 21-515 Benefits for Survivors annually. Related links (if any): N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

Applies the Consumer Price Index for Canada to dependency benefits that are Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (section 65) payable under section 65(1.1). Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

On January 1 every year the commission adjusts by a percentage that is based on Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 53) the weighted average of the consumer price index (CPI). Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Nova Scotia

Commencing January 1, 2000, the Board shall, as of the first day of January in each year, determine an indexing factor based on one half of the percentage change in the consumer price index for the preceding year. As of the first day of January in each year, commencing January 1, 2000, the Board shall adjust the amount of compensation payable as survivor pensions.

Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 70(1) and 70(2)(c)) Policy (if any): Policy 3.9.12 InflationIndexing of Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

Ontario

Death benefits are paid in accordance with certain rules to spouses (including same Section of Act: Workplace Safety and sex spouses), children, other dependants, and to a parent/person acting in the role Insurance Act, 1997 (section 48) of a parent with respect to one or more children entitled to payments under section Policy (if any): Section 20 of Operational 48. Policy Manual Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEATH BENEFITS Prince Edward Island Payments to surviving spouses and dependents are adjusted annually in accordance with section 50(2) of the Act.

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 50) Workers Compensation Act General Regulations (section 8)

Policy (if any): POL-12, Survivor Benefits Related links (if any): N/A Quebec The surviving spouse is entitled to a maximum monthly indemnity of $2,183.80 since January 1, 2013 equal to 55% of the income replacement indemnity the deceased worker was or would have been entitled to during a period of 1 to 3 years depending on the age of the spouse at the time of death (1 year if less than 35 years of age, 2 years between 35 and 44 years of age, 3 years if between 45 and 54 years of age and 2 years if 55 years or older) The surviving spouse is also entitled to a lump sum of $101,052 to $202,500 in 2013 ($198,530 if disabled) at the end of that period. Each minor child is entitled to a monthly benefit of $507 in 2013 up to the age of 18. This indemnity is paid to the guardian. In addition, a lump sum of $18,194 in 2013 is paid to the child if he goes to school full time at the time of his majority. A child under 25 years of age is also entitled to this lump sum if studying full time at the time of death. The law also provides for the payment of lump-sum indemnities to a major disabled child of less than 25 years of age, other dependents and parents of the deceased worker who has no spouse or dependents. Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (sections 98 to 111) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

DEATH BENEFITS Saskatchewan Adjustments are made similar to Temporary Compensation (see above).

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, 1979 (section 83(4)) Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 33/2010 POL 10/2009

Related links (if any): N/A Yukon The surviving spouse is entitled to a maximum monthly payment for life equal to Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49) 3.125 percent of the maximum wage rate for the year of payment. The Board may pay the workers spouse an additional amount if, in the boards opinion, the spouse is in need, but in no case may a spouse receive more than the Policy (if any): RE-11 Vocational And amount that the deceased worker would have received in respect of the loss of Academic Assistance For Surviving Spouse earnings had the worker survive and been totally disabled. Each dependent child is entitled to a monthly benefit of 1.25 per cent of the Related links (if any): N/A maximum wage rate for the year of payment until the child reaches 19 years of age; the child reaches 21 years of age and is in full-time attendance at an educational institution recognized by the board, or such time as the board believes that a special needs child of the worker would not have been dependent on the worker. Further information available in the Act.

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table outlines adjustments of maximum earnings in each jurisdiction. Also see 'Maximum Earnings Covered and Methods of Adjustment' Maximum Earnings Alberta Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

In Alberta, the Board of Directors has approved a formula, giving rise to a change Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 56(4),(5)) January 1st annually. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

British Columbia

British Columbia uses the annual average wages and salaries in the province for Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 33(9)) the preceding year as published or supplied by Statistics Canada. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Manitoba

Manitoba uses the change in the provincial industrial average wage to adjust the maximum for accidents from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2005 and the change in the Manitoba CPI to adjust the maximum for accidents prior to January 1, 1992. In addition, Manitoba has a maximum annual indexing ratio of 1.06 or a regulation may be passed authorizing a greater ratio. For accidents after 1991, if this ratio is over 6% and a regulation is not passed, the amount that exceeds the threshold is carried forward for a period of five years. Recent amendments to the Act ensure that indexing does not result in benefits being reduced.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (sections 46, 47, 48, 49) Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

New Brunswick

New Brunswick uses the Canadian CPI applied to the industrial aggregate earnings Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (sections 38.1(1)(3), 38.2(4)) for 1993 ($27,323), which will be changed thereafter using the CPI. Policy (if any): Directive No. 37-110.01 New Brunswick Industrial Aggregate Earnings Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Earnings Newfoundland and Labrador

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

As the Annual Industrial Wage Index for the Province multiplied by 150% equals or Section of Act: exceeds $45,500 in annual gross wages, the Commission reviews the maximum Workplace Health, Safety and compensable and assessable earnings amount annually by applying CPI. Compensation Act (section 80) Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Regulations 1025/96 (section 21.(2))

Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A Northwest Territories and Nunavut In Northwest Territories & Nunavut, the Board recommends to the Minister a Section of Act: change in the level of maximum earnings. The Minister must then approve the Workers Compensation Act (sections change and amend the General Regulations. 1(1), 53) General Regulations (section 1.1)

Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A Nova Scotia After January 1st, 1996, 135.7% of the Average Industrial Wage rounded to nearest Section of Act: $100. Workers' Compensation Act (sections 41, 124) General Regulations (section 21(3))

Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Earnings Ontario

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

Ontario uses the Average Industrial Wage for maximum earnings and two Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (sections 49, 50, 54) variations on CPI for indexation. 1 Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): Facts and figures

Prince Edward Island

The maximum annual earnings are adjusted on July 1 of each year by the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for Charlottetown and Summerside for all items for the twelve-month period ending on the December 31 previous as determined by the Board on the basis of monthly reports published in that respect by Statistics Canada for that period; or 4%.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 47(2)) Policy (if any): POL 85 Review of Benefits Related links (if any): N/A

Quebec

The maximum insurable earnings are $67,500 in 2013. The amount is revalued on Section of Act: Act Respecting Industrial the basis of the annual variation in the consumer price index (CPI) on January 1 of Accidents and Occupational Diseases (sections 66 and 119 to 122) each year. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

Saskatchewan

Section 38 of the Act sets out the formula for the maximum wage rate for injuries Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act, occurring prior to September 1, 1985. Section 38.1 sets out the maximum wage 1979 (sections 38, 38.1) rate where the injury is sustained on or after September 1, 1985. Policy (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 03/2007 POL 02/2003 POL 14/2012

Related links (if any): N/A

Two formulae are used, 100% CPI for some workers and 1/2 CPI - 1 for others.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Maximum Earnings Yukon

Sections of Act, Policy, Related Links

The Yukon uses a percent change in the Consumer Price Index for Whitehorse. If Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act the percent change is greater than 4% the percent change is 4%, if the percent (section 3) change is less than 0% the percent change will be consider 0%. Policy (if any): N/A Related links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

REHABILITATION / RETURN TO WORK

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Rehabilitation - Legislation, Policy and where to find additional information Also see: Summary of Rehabilitation Services by Jurisdiction; and Rehiring Worker / Obligation to re-employ and Duty to Accommodate

The following table links to legislation, policy and general information about rehabilitation at each jurisdiction. Sections of Legislation Alberta Workers' Compensation Act (section 89) Policy Information Return-To-Work Services Policy Additional Info at (Click link): Vocational Rehabilitation Your case plan & return-to-work options

British Columbia Manitoba

Workers Compensation Act (section 16) Workers Compensation Act (section 27(20), 33, and 49.3) Manitoba Regulation 65/2006, Interest, Penalties and Financial Matters Regulation Manitoba Regulation 233/2006, Interest, Penalties and Financial Matters Regulation, amendment

Vocational Rehabilitation Policy

Rehabilitation and Return to Work

See 'Vocational Rehabilitation' at Benefits Administration Policies

Return to Work Fact Sheet Return to Work Information for Workers Return to Work Information for Employers

Policy 43.20.25, Return to Work with the Accident Employer

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Sections of Legislation New Brunswick Workers' Compensation Act (sections 41(1), 41(2), 41(3), 41(16), 42.1, 42.2, and 43)

Policy Information Policy No. 21-400 Rehabilitation Policy No. 21-420 Return to Work Principles Policy No. 21-421 Vocational Rehabilitation See also generally: WorkSafeNB Policies

Additional Info at (Click link): WorkSafeNB's Rehabilitation Centre

Newfoundland and Labrador

Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (Sections 8889.4) Workers Compensation Act (sections 35(1) and 46)

Return-To-Work and Rehabilitation Policies

See WHSCC 'Publications'

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Nova Scotia

Policy 4.14, Return to Work

Workers Safety & Compensation Commission

Workers' Compensation Act (sections 89-101, and 112-113)

See 'Vocational Rehabilitation' and 'Reemployment' at Policy Manual

Re-employment Benefits Additional Return-to-Work Services Return to Work Returning to Work Information for Employers Returning to Work Information for Workers Work Reintegration and RTW: Workers Work Reintegration/RTW: Employers

Ontario

Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (Sections 40-42 and Section 48(9))

Policy: Return to Work (Section 19 in OPM)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Sections of Legislation Prince Edward Island Workers Compensation Act (Sections 18 and 86-86.12)

Policy Information Vocational Rehabilitation Policy (POL-117) Return to Work Policy (POL-93)

Additional Info at (Click link): Return to Work Return to Work - Workplace Guide Return to Work Poster Vocational Rehabilitation Information for Workers Droits et obligations Le droit la radaptation Droits et obligations Quest-ce que le droit au retour au travail?

Quebec

Act Respecting Industrial Accidents and Occupational Diseases (sections 145-180, and 234-264) Workers Compensation Act, 1979 (sections 2(s.2), 21.1, 51.1, 104(4)(b), 115, and 117) Labour Standards Act (section 44.2)

Politiques en matire de radaptation et dindemnisation

Saskatchewan

www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: Section 8.0 (Reemployment Assistance & Return-toWork): POL 01/2011 (Vocational Rehabilitation Programs and Services) POL 08/96 (Return-to-Work Plans)

www.wcbsask.com: Worker Services: Recovery Return to Work

Employer Services: Return to Work

Publications: Information for Workers Information for Employers Recovery and Return to Work The Right Care at the Right Time Focus on Return to Work package Return to Work Audit

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Sections of Legislation Yukon Workers Compensation Act (sections 14, 36, 39, 40)

Policy Information YWCHSB: Return to Work & Rehabilitation Policies

Additional Info at (Click link): N/A

Statistics: Please note, the following return to work and rehabilitation-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community: Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Costs Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Payments Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Liabilities Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Rehiring Worker / Obligation to re-employ and Duty to Accommodate The following tables summarize rehiring workers, obligation to re-employ and the duty to accommodate in each jurisdiction. Click the link below to go directly to: Rehiring Worker / Obligation to Re-Employ Duty to Accommodate

Also see: 'Rehabilitation Legislation, Policy and where to find additional information'; and Summary of Rehabilitation Services by Jurisdiction

The following table describes rehiring workers and obligation to employ in each jurisdiction. Rehiring Worker / Obligation to Re-Employ Alberta Section of Act; Policies; Links

There is no requirement under the Workers' Compensation Act for employers to Section of Act: No reference rehire injured workers. However, under human rights legislation, employers have a duty to accommodate workers with disabilities. Policy (if any): Policy 04-05, Part I, Benefits, Return-to-Work Services Links (if any): N/A

British Columbia

There is no requirement under the Workers Compensation Act for employers to Section of Act: No reference rehire injured workers. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Rehiring Worker / Obligation to Re-Employ Manitoba

Section of Act; Policies; Links

The obligation for certain employers to re-employ workers became effective Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act January 1, 2007. Employers who employ 25 or more full-time or regular part-time (section 49.3) workers are obligated to re-employ injured workers who were in their employ for at least 12 continuous months prior to their injuries. The re-employment obligation is Policy (if any): Policy 43.20.25, Return to time-limited. Work with the Accident Employer When injured workers are medically able to return to the essential duties of the jobs held at the time of their injuries, employers are obligated to reinstate the Links (if any): N/A workers in their original jobs or alternative jobs that are comparable in tasks and earnings to their original positions. When injured workers are not able to return to their original positions, but can safely do other work, employers are obligated to offer their injured workers the first opportunity to accept suitable work that becomes available.

New Brunswick

New Brunswick exempts employers of less than 10 workers. New Brunswick has a range of 10-19 workers for one year and 20 or more for two years. New Brunswick requires the worker to have been employed by the accident employer for at least one year before the employer is required to re-employ. The employer must reinstate the worker in New Brunswick, without loss of seniority or benefits. In New Brunswick, the employer is not bound to re-employ the worker if the worker refuses a suitable job. Re-employment obligation is enforced under the Employment Standards Act.

Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 42.1) Policy (if any): Policy No. 21-413 Return to Work Responsibilities and Re-employment Obligations Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Rehiring Worker / Obligation to Re-Employ Newfoundland and Labrador

Section of Act; Policies; Links

Legislation took effect January 1, 2002 regarding employers' duty to cooperate in Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and early, safe RTW and re-employ obligations. Employers with less than 20 workers Compensation Act (sections 89 to 89.4) are exempt from re-employment obligations, and workers must have been employed by the injury employer for at least one year at the time of the injury. Policy (if any): Similar provisions for the construction industry took effect January 1, 2003. Policies RE-01 - RE-11; Employers who have a re-employment obligation must accommodate the work or the workplace to the extent that the accommodation does not cause undue Procedures 33.00 - 43.00 hardship. Links (if any): N/A

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

In the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, if it is considered to be appropriate, the Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act Commission will provide vocational rehabilitation, including consultation, advice, (section 46) counseling, the planning and design of a rehabilitation plan and the costs of rehabilitation, to help the worker return to work and to assist them in lessening or Policy (if any): Policy 04.14, Return to Work removing the consequences of his/her injuries. Links (if any): N/A

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia will exempt employers with less than 20 workers, and will require the Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act worker to have been employed by the accident employer for at least one year (sections 89-101) before the employer is required to re-employ. Nova Scotia exempts the construction industry. In Nova Scotia, the employer is not bound to re-employ the Policy (if any): N/A worker if the worker refuses a suitable job. Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Rehiring Worker / Obligation to Re-Employ Ontario Employers are obligated to re-employ their injured workers, if the worker was continuously employed for at least one year prior to the date of injury, and the employer regularly employed 20 or more workers. Employers who fail to re-employ may be found to be in non-compliance unless it can be shown that the noncompliance was not due to the work-related injury, treatment for the work-related injury, or the claim for benefits. Employers must make accommodations to the work or to the workplace to allow an injured worker to resume duties, unless such actions cause the employer undue hardship. Employer can provide suitable work which accommodates the workers disability until the worker is fully able to resume the pre-accident job or an alternative job comparable in nature and earnings. (Note: different re-employment obligations apply to the construction industry).

Section of Act; Policies; Links Section of Act: Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (section 41) Ontario Regulation 35/08 Return to Work and Re-employment Construction Industry

Policy (if any): 19-02-02 Responsibilities of the Workplace Parties in Work Reintegration Construction Industry: 19-05-01 Overview 19-05-02 Re-employment Obligation in the Construction Industry Threshold, Duration and Specific Employer Requirements 19-05-03 Compliance with the Reemployment Obligation Construction Industry 19-05-04 Re-employment Penalties and Payments - Construction Industry

Links (if any): N/A Prince Edward Prince Edward Island requires the worker to have been employed by the accident Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act Island employer for at least one year prior to the injury before the employer is required to (sections 86.1 86.12) re-employ. The obligation to re-employ does not apply to an employer who Policy (if any): POL-93, Return to Work regularly employs fewer than 20 workers and the construction industry. Links (if any): N/A
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Rehiring Worker / Obligation to Re-Employ Quebec In Quebec, a worker is entitled to be reinstated, in priority, in his employment or in an equivalent job. This right may be exercised within one year following the date of the injury in an establishment with 20 workers or less and within two years in an establishment with more than 20 workers. The employer must reinstate the worker in Quebec without loss of seniority or benefits. Quebec allows an employer to provide a temporary work assignment which accommodates the workers disability until the worker is fully able to resume the pre-accident job. In Quebec, the employer cannot dismiss, suspend, layoff, discipline or discriminate or refuse to rehire a worker because of a work injury without paying a penalty for noncompliance. There are particularities for a construction workers right to return to work.

Section of Act; Policies; Links Section of Act: Act respecting Industrial accidents and occupational diseases (sections 32 and 234 to 251) Policy (if any): Politique 3.01 Le droit de retour au travail Politique 3.02 Le droit de retour au travail pour un travailleur de la construction

Links (if any): N/A

Saskatchewan

There is no requirement under the Workers' Compensation Act for employers to Section of Act: Labour Standards Act, rehire injured workers. However, under human rights legislation, employers have Section 44.2(1) a duty to accommodate workers with disabilities. Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): www.wcbsask.com: Employer Services - Return to Work

Yukon

Section 41 requires employers to offer to re-employ injured workers once they are medically able to perform their pre-injury duties or other suitable employment. This obligation applies to workers who: Have been in a continuous employment relationship with their employer for at least a year; and Are injured on or after January 1, 2011.

Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 41(1)) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): What Employers need to know about section 41

This section of the Act applies to employers with 20 or more workers.

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

The following table identifies whether there is a duty to accommodate in each jurisdiction and if so describes the duty to accommodate. Duty to Accommodate Alberta There is no duty to accommodate specifically contained within the Act. Section of Act; Policies; Links Section of Act: No reference Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A British Columbia There is no mandatory accommodation legislation in the British Columbia Workers Section of Act: No reference Compensation Act. In the second phase of the vocational rehabilitation process, as outlined in the Rehabilitation Services and Claims Manual, 1 employers are encouraged to accommodate Policy (if any): N/A job modification or alternate in-service placement for workers who cannot return to the same Links (if any): N/A job. Effective January 1, 2007, employers who have 25 or more full-time or regular part-time workers will be required to re-employ injured workers who have been in their employ for at least 12 continuous months prior to their injuries. The duty to accommodate under the Workers Compensation Act is similar to the duty under human rights law. Employers are required to accommodate the work or workplace of injured workers providing it does not cause employers undue hardship. In New Brunswick, the Workers' Compensation Act does not contain any specific references to a duty to accommodate. However, the New Brunswick Human Rights Act requires employers to accommodate workers with disabilities up to the point of undue hardship, as determined by the Human Rights Commission. WorkSafeNBs role is to communicate the duty to accommodate to the workplace parties and work in cooperation with the Human Rights Commission to educate parties of their obligations. The New Brunswick Workers' Compensation Act does, however, contain reemployment obligations. An employer has an obligation to reemploy an injured worker for 1 year in an establishment employing between 1019 workers inclusive, and for 2 years in an establishment of 20 or more workers. This obligation applies to an employer of an injured worker who has been employed by that employer for at least one year. Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 49.3) Policy (if any): N/A Links (if any): N/A Section of Act: No reference Policy (if any): Policy No. 21413 Return to Work Responsibilities and Reemployment Obligations Links (if any): N/A

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Policy item C11-87.00 (Vocational Rehabilitation process).


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate Newfoundland and Labrador The obligation to re-employ took effect January 1, 2002 for most employers (and January 1, 2003 for employers of construction workers). The obligation applies only to an employer and a worker who have been in an employment relationship for a continuous period of one year immediately prior to the date of the workers injury and the employer regularly employs 20 or more workers.

Section of Act; Policies; Links Section of Act: Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act (sections 89, 89.1, 89.2) Policy (if any):

Policies RE-01 - RE-11; Where the worker is medically able to perform the essential duties of the pre-injury employment, the employer with a re-employment obligation must offer to re-employ the worker Procedures 33.00 in the position that the worker held on the date of injury or offer the worker alternative 43.00 employment of a nature and earnings comparable to the pre-injury employment. Where the worker is medically able to perform suitable work, the employer must offer suitable employment Links (if any): N/A that may become available. The obligation to re-employ is until the earliest of 2 years after the date of injury, one year after the worker is medically able to perform the essential duties of his or her pre-injury employment and the date the worker reaches age 65. Employers shall accommodate the work or workplace for the worker to the extent that the accommodation does not cause the employer undue hardship. Where a collective agreement is binding on the employer and the re-employment obligations under the Act give the worker greater re-employment terms than the collective agreement, the Act prevails. However, the Act does not displace seniority provisions of a collective agreement. Where the employer re-employs the worker and then terminates the employment within 6 months, the employer is presumed not to have fulfilled the re-employment obligation. Where the Commission decides that an employer has not fulfilled the obligation to the worker, the Commission may levy a penalty on the employer not exceeding the amount of the workers net average earnings for the 12 months immediately preceding the beginning of the loss of earnings resulting from the injury and make payments to the worker for a maximum of one year as if the worker were entitled to payments under the Act. The penalty will be added to the employers assessment.

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate All employers and workers regardless of the number of workers and length of time employed have a duty to co-operate in early and safe return to work. Employers must contact the worker as soon as possible following an injury and maintain effective communication throughout the period of recovery, provide suitable work that becomes available and where possible restores the workers pre-injury earnings, and give the Commission information it requires. Workers have the same communication requirements with the employer and the Commission, and they must accept suitable work that becomes available. A hierarchy of return to work priorities has been developed to allow workplace parties to achieve maximum benefit from the return to work process. It focuses on maintaining the link to the pre-injury job, where possible, and clarifies accommodation requirements. A series of definitions promote a consistent understanding of the various programs used throughout the process. Mediation is offered by the Commission where there is a dispute or difficulty concerning cooperation efforts. Where there is a finding of employer non co-operation, the Commission may levy a penalty. Where there is a finding of worker non co-operation, the Commission may suspend, reduce or terminate the workers compensation benefits. Northwest There is no duty to accommodate specifically contained within the Acts. Territories and Nunavut

Section of Act; Policies; Links

Section of Act: No reference Policy (if any): Policy 04.14, Return to Work Links (if any): N/A

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia has a mandatory duty to accommodate. Under s. 91 of the Act:

Section of Act: Workers' Compensation Act (section 91)

The employer shall, in order to fulfill the employers obligations pursuant to Sections 89 to 101, accommodate the work or the workplace to the needs of a worker who requires accommodation as a result of the injury to the extent that the accommodation does not cause the employer Policy (if any): N/A undue hardship. The Board may determine whether the employer has fulfilled the employers obligations. Links (if any): N/A

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate Ontario

Section of Act; Policies; Links

In Ontario, the duty to accommodate is set out in the reemployment provisions (section 41). Section of Act: The duty is similar to that in the provincial human rights code. An employer subject to section Workplace Safety and 41 must accommodate the work or the workplace for the injured worker to the extent that the Insurance Act, accommodation does not cause the employer undue hardship. Undue hardship is generally 1997 (section 41(6)) interpreted to mean undue financial loss. Ontario Regulation 35/08 Return to Work and Reemployment Construction Industry (section 7) Policy (if any): 19-02-02 Responsibilities of the Workplace Parties in Work Reintegration 19-05-02 Re-employment Obligation in the Construction Industry Threshold, Duration and Specific Employer Requirements

Links (if any): N/A Prince Edward In Prince Edward Island, an employer shall accommodate the work or workplace to the needs Section of Act: Workers Island of a worker who requires accommodations as a result of the injury to the extent that the Compensation Act (sections accommodation does not cause the employer undue hardship.(see Sections 86-86.12 of PEI's 86.1 86.12) Act for specifics). Pursuant to section 86.5: Policy (if any): POL-93, Return An employer shall, to the satisfaction of the Board and in order to fulfil the employers to Work obligations pursuant to sections 86.1 to 86.11, accommodate the work or the workplace to the needs of a worker who requires accommodation as a result of the injury to the Links (if any): N/A extent that the accommodation does not cause the employer undue hardship.
Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate Quebec The Commission may reimburse the cost of adapting a position if the adaptation enables a worker who has sustained permanent physical impairment to carry on his employment, equivalent employment or suitable employment. The cost includes the expenses incurred for purchasing and installing the materials and equipment necessary for adapting the position, but no cost may be reimbursed except with the prior authorization of the Commission to that effect. The employer is not required to adapt the work or the work site.

Section of Act; Policies; Links Section of Act: Act respecting Industrial accidents and occupational diseases (section 176) Policy (if any): Politique 4.08 Ladaptation dun poste de travail Links (if any): N/A

Saskatchewan

Employers do have a legal duty to accommodate. Duty to Accommodate is a legal concept Section of Act: that has evolved out of case law and Human Rights Legislation. If these legal requirements are Labour Standards Act, not met, legal action could result. Section 44.3 Recent court decisions have made it clear that the duty to accommodate requires much more Workers Compensation Act, 1979, Section 51.1 & from an employer than simply investigating whether any existing job might be suitable for a 104(4b)(ii) disabled employee. Saskatchewan Human Rights Code, Sections 9 & Duty to accommodate requires the employer to look at all other reasonable alternatives to the 16(1) point of undue hardship. The term "undue hardship" has no single legal definition, this is a concept developed by the Courts in recent years. The Supreme Court of Canada has developed a non-exhaustive list of six factors that it said were relevant to what constitutes Policy (if undue hardship: any): www.wcbsask.com: Policy and Procedure Manual: POL 1. Financial cost 06/2004 (Vocational Rehabilitation Programs and 2. Impact on a collective agreement Services) 3. Problems of employee morale Links (if 4. Interchangeability of the workforce and facilities any): www.wcbsask.com: Employer Services - Return to 5. Size of the employer's operations Work 6. Safety

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate According to the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code: (Section 9) Every person shall enjoy the right to engage in and carry on any occupation, business or enterprise under the law without discrimination on the basis of a prohibited ground. (Section 16(1)): No employer shall refuse to employ or continue to employ or otherwise discriminate against any person with respect to employment, or any term of employment on the basis of a prohibited ground. The definition of disability includes, but is not limited to, any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement; all illnesses; any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical coordination or other impediment. Most work-related injuries are included in this list. While it is not a violation of Human Rights legislation for an employer to refuse to reinstate a disabled worker who cannot do a job, an employer is acting in a discriminatory manner when he or she assumes the disabled worker cannot do any job, based on no facts. The Saskatchewan Labour Standards Act, Section 44.3 states: 1. Where an employee becomes disabled and the disability would unreasonably interfere with the performance of the employees duties, the employer shall, where reasonably practicable, modify the employees duties or reassign the employee to another job. 2. In any prosecution alleging a contravention of this section, the onus is on the employer to prove that it is not reasonably practicable to modify the employees duties or reassign the employee to another job. Although the employer does not have a duty to hire or reinstate an employee who is incapable of doing a job, the scope of the duty to accommodate is wide. Injured employees must show reasonable cooperation.

Section of Act; Policies; Links

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate The Workers Compensation Act, 1979, Section 51.1, states that a worker shall: 1. Take all reasonable action to mitigate the loss of earnings resulting from an injury; and 2. Where circumstances require, co-operate with the board in the development of a rehabilitation plan that is intended to return the worker to a position of independence in suitable productive employment. Section 104(4b)(ii) further states that the Board may terminate or reduce payment to a worker of any compensation based on the workers loss of earnings if, without good reason, the worker is not available or declines to accept a bona fide offer of employment in an occupation in which the worker is capable of engaging. One of the WCB policies referring to Return-to-Work plans (POL 08/96) says, Where a collective agreement exists, the WCB expects the parties to establish appropriate procedures to accommodate Return-to-Work plans. The onus is on the employer to prove that all efforts have been made to accommodate a disabled employee. The courts have outlined a hierarchy of accommodation for employers to follow, with the objective of accommodating the disabled worker in a suitable position. Step 1: Same job, modified: The disabled worker can return to his / her own job with either modified duties or changes in work schedule. Step 2: Alternate job: The disabled worker performs another job in its existing form. Step 3: Alternate job, modified: The disabled worker performs another job in a modified or rebundled form. Employers following the hierarchy of accommodation should be able to provide documented evidence that they have looked at all reasonable alternatives and exhausted all viable options. As each case will have its own unique merits it is ultimately up to the courts to decide whether the employer has or has not fulfilled their duty to accommodate. The WCB will assist employers to set up a Return-to-Work program or individual transitional Return-to-Work plan.

Section of Act; Policies; Links

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Duty to Accommodate Yukon Section 41 of the Workers Compensation Act contains a mandatory accommodation provision.

Section of Act; Policies; Links Section of Act: Workers Compensation Act (section 41) Policy (if any): RE-04 Employers Obligation to Re-employ Overview RE-05 Alternative Employment Comparable to Pre-injury Employment RE-06 Accommodating Work or a Workplace RE-07-1 Compliance with the Re-employment Obligation RE-07-2 Re-employment Penalties and Payments RE-07-3 Termination after Re-employment RE-08 Re-employment Provisions of Collective Agreements

Links (if any): N/A

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Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Statistics: Please note, the following return to work and rehabilitation-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community: Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Costs Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Payments Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Liabilities Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

Summary of Rehabilitation Services by Jurisdiction The following table identifies what rehabilitation services are available in each jurisdiction including: vocational rehabilitation, relocation, residence/vehicle modification, counseling, childcare, homecare, personal care allowance and rehabilitation for dependants. Also see: Rehabilitation Legislation, Policy and where to find additional information; Rehiring Worker / Obligation to re-employ and Duty to Accommodate; and Expense Rates Information (includes independent living allowance, personal care allowance and childcare expenses) AB Vocational rehabilitation (VR) Work assessment Work Hardening Training on the job Formal and Academic Training Assistance Tuition, Books & Supplies Placement Services/Job Search Assistance Subsidize Employer Subsistence & Transportation Worksite or Workstation Modifications Ergonomic Services Tools & Equipment for new job Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2 Yes2 Yes 3 Yes 4 Yes4 Yes 5 Yes3,7 Yes 9 Yes7 Yes7 Yes 11 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes BC MB NB NL
1

NT/NU

NS

ON
1

PE

QC

SK

YT

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 8 Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 6

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes 10 Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

N/A Yes Yes Yes Yes

No Yes Yes No Yes

N/A Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No Yes Yes Yes Yes

N/A Yes Yes Yes Yes

No Yes Yes6 Yes Yes6

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

AB Additional Services Provided: Relocation Assistance Self-Employment Residence adaptation/modification Vehicle adaptation/modification Counselling: Psychological/Social Child Care Homecare and Independence Financial Counselling Legal Services Home Maintenance Personal Care Allowance Rehabilitation for Dependants Rehabilitation for Spouse (or CommonLaw) Rehabilitation for Dependants (other than spouse) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 29 Yes Yes

BC

MB

NB

NL

NT/NU

NS

ON

PE

QC

SK

YT

Yes 12 Yes 14 Yes 16 Yes* Yes 18 Yes 20 Yes 24, 25 Yes Yes 30 Yes16,25 Yes24,33

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 21 Yes


27

Yes Yes Yes Yes* Yes* Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes

Yes Yes Yes* Yes* Yes Yes Yes Yes N/A Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 22


26

Yes 13 No 15 Yes Yes Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes

No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes22 Yes No No No No

Yes Yes Yes 17 Yes Yes 19 Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes Yes6 Yes Yes Yes Yes 23 Yes No 28 No Yes Yes

Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

N/A Yes 31 Yes 32 Yes 34

N/A Yes Yes

Yes 35 Yes35

Yes

No

Yes 36

No

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes Yes 37

Yes

No

N/A

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Yes

Board provides benefit/service although not specifically in Act.


Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

AB Return to Work:

BC

MB

NB

NL

NT/NU

NS

ON

PE

QC

SK

YT

See: Rehiring Worker / Obligation to re-employ and Duty to Accommodate N/A means not applicable or not available. Contact individual WCBs/Commissions if you require further information or clarification. Statistics: Please note, the following return to work and rehabilitation-related statistics can be found on the AWCBC Online Data Community: Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Costs Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Payments Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation Benefit Liabilities Percentage of Lost-Time Claims Receiving Wage-loss Benefits Percentage of Wage-Loss Claims off Compensation at X days

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Health Care and WR (Work Reintegration) in Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.10. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.40. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.50. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.30. Refer to the policies POL 05/2004 and POL 01/2011 to find out when conditions may apply. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.20. The Commission may pay a subsidy to a person creating permanent jobs for workers permanently disabled due to an occupational injury. This subsidy reaches a maximum of $7,942 per job created and is not renewable. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-82.00. Limited modification such as ergonomic chair or vehicle hand controls may be made to accommodate temporary work restrictions. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.20. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.90. See policy document, 19-03-11, Relocation Services Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II Item #C11-88.60. A worker aged 55 and over who requires a WT plan to achieve employment in a suitable occupation (SO) with a new employer has two options a) participating in a WT plan aimed at achieving the SO, or b) choosing a 12 month Transition Plan (TP) focused on a self-directed WR which may include self-employment. (see 19-03-05,Work Transition Plans).

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

37

Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #90.00. The worker must commit to live there for at least three years. Renewal of the measure is subject to certain conditions. Counselling. Also to dependent spouse. See Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #85.00. Evaluation of potential. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #84A.00. The WCB will reimburse claimants for costs incurred over and above the usual pre-accident childcare costs. Child care may be covered where the need is related to the claim/ the need would not exist if it were not for the compensable injury and there is an additional expense incurred because of the need. Some temporary additional expense allowance can be made to cover the portion of child care expenses exceeding the amount a client would ordinarily incur while working (POL 15/2008). Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #80.00. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #81.00. Yes, for personal care. The WCB will pay for independent financial advice to assist claimants in making an informed choice between a lump sum and various annuity options under the Act. The Bridging Program is to advise clients about alternative financial assistance and psychosocial support. It does not do financial counselling (POL 11/2000) Limited to 3rd party actions and Guardians & Trustee. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #88.70. Workers Advisers Program. Special consideration can be given in relation to the compensable injury and the Bio-psycho-social model. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #80.40. Attendance allowance is intended to cover the cost of personal care of a worker and is not intended to cover nursing or other health care services for which a worker is eligible under medical aid. Rehabilitation Services & Claims Manual Volume II #91.00 The commission may take those measures and make those expenditures that it may in its discretion consider necessary or expedient to provide counseling, academic and vocational services to a dependent spouse or cohabiting partner who survives a worker, where the workers death resulted from an injury which occurred before July 1, 1996. Up to six counselling sessions per dependent can be provided to assist in coping with emotional stress associated with severe injury; more may be provided where circumstances warrant (POL 11/2001)

Source: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada 2013 **These tables have been designed for general information purposes only. The AWCBC makes no representations as to the completeness or accuracy of the information (which is not exhaustive) and individual workers' compensation boards/commissions should be contacted for specific or additional information and clarification. For links to legislation, see: here. For links to policy, see: here.