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The master teacher

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JSTANDARD.COM
2013 83
JAUARY 3, 2014
VOL. LXXXIII NO. 17 $1.00
DAY SCHOOL LEADERS TRAIN TOGETHER page 7
CELEBRATING SANS CHINESE page 8
NAVIGATING THE NEGEV page 12
J e w i s h S t a n d a r d
1 0 8 6 T e a n e c k R o a d
T e a n e c k , N J 0 7 6 6 6
C H A N G E S E R V I C E R E Q U E S T E D
The magic of
Dorothy Roffman
page 18
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NOSHES ...................................................5
OPINION ................................................ 14
COVER STORY ..................................... 18
KEEPING KOSHER ............................. 32
DEAR RABBI ....................................... 34
TORAH COMMENTARY ................... 35
CROSSWORD PUZZLE .................... 36
ARTS AND CULTURE........................ 37
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CONTENTS
Candlelighting: Friday, January 3, 4:22 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, January 4, 5:26 p.m.
Th-th-th-thats wrong, folks!
We love a great correction, and this
one is a winner:
An earlier version of this article
erroneously stated that Bugs Bunnys
most notorious enemy is Porky Pig.
While the two are known to squabble
frequently, often in the public eye,
they are in fact good friends.
The correction was appended to a
four-paragraph story on the Haaretz
website, called Is Bugs Bunny Jew-
ish, which relied on a Maariv report
of a British lecture to look at the Jew-
ish roots of the wascally wabbit of
Warner Bros. fame.
Haaretz quoted lecturer David
Yehuda Sterns claim that the
cartoon character exhibits telltale
Jewish traits: He lives in a Jewish
neighborhood, has a distinctly New
York/Jewish accent, and uses witty
repartee to sidestep all attempts to
eliminate him.
Haaretz noted that in an early
cartoon showing Bugs Bunnys early
life in New York, the scene was filled
with an array of Eastern European
Jewish types, including ultra-
Orthodox Jews.
And of course, both the cartoons
producer and the characters voice
actor, Leon Schlesinger and Mel
Blanc, were Jews, Haaretz noted.
Unfortunately, the final bit of
the argument apparently fell
victim to the sticklers for celluloid
truth who evidently sparked the
correction, but the gist can be seen
in the subheading that remains on
the Haaretz article: And do you
remember what animal was his arch-
nemesis? LARRY YUDELSON
COVER PHOTO BY JERRY SZUBIN
Governors nephew nabbed
in Stamford yeshiva shikker shanda
You say you want to learn about
Judaism?
Wandering into a boys yeshiva
high school with your girlfriend by
your side and alcohol on your breath
probably is not the best way to do it.
Just ask Kerry Mallory, an actor
who appears in the new movie The
Wolf of Wall Street. Last Monday
morning, he and his girlfriend,
Courtney Wilson, wandered into
Yeshiva Bais Binyomin in downtown
Stamford.
Both apparently were intoxicated,
the Stamford Advocate reported.
Police arrived at the all-male
high school to find the couple in
a classroom with students; the
students said they were afraid of
him, police told the newspaper.
The couple told police they had a
constitutional right to ask about the
Judaism being taught at the school.
They were escorted off school
property but returned 25 minutes
later, when they were arrested,
according to the Advocate.
Mallory would have been better
off seeking an introduction to the
Jewish community from his uncle,
Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy, who
not only meets with Jewish leaders
and lights the Chanunkah menorah
with dozens of Chabad rabbis, but
also braved a slander suit from a
politician he had denounced as
anti-Semitic for blaming the 9/11
terrorist attacks on Israel.
Even better still: He could hold his
curiosity until February, when the
Limmud Jewish learning conference
will be meeting for four days at the
Stamford Hilton.
LARRY YUDELSON
ON THE COVER: Maeve Cleary Goldman, age 8,
with Dorothy Roffman. PHOTO BY JERRY SZUBIN
#IfTheMovieWereJewish
Last Wednesday, December 25, it seemed to those on the Internet that many
of the Internets usual presences were ... elsewhere. At home celebrating a birth-
day with family and friends? Opening presents? Sharing milk and cookies with a
rotund, bearded stranger? Whatever it was that was distracting the masses and
apparently luring them into real-world interactions, those who remained online
seemed disproportionately Jewish.
How else to explain that #IfTheMovieWereJewish became a trending phrase
on Twitter? Herewith some of the best of the hundreds of suggestions:
And the winner is...
Congratulations to Adina
Weinstein of Fair Lawn for
winning the gift certificate to
BurritOlam in our recent contest.
4 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
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6 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
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Debating open Orthodoxy
Rabbis Shmuel Goldin and Asher Lopatin talk about boundaries and red lines
JOANNE PALMER
T
wo Jews, three opinions, right?
Possibly even one Jew, three
opinions.
We are a people of strong and
deeply held ideas, and we are not loathe to
express them.
Case in point the smoldering debate
between modern Orthodoxy and open
Orthodoxy, which now is beginning to
ignite.
There were sparks in early October,
when Rabbi Asher Lopatin was installed as
the second president of Yeshivat Chovevei
Torah, open Orthodoxys Riverdale-based
flagship institution. Rabbi Lopatin invited
rabbis from outside the Orthodox world to
be his guests and as a result, luminaries
from inside that world chose not to attend
the celebration.
Last week, the flames flared as Rabbi
Shmuel Goldin of Congregation Ahavat
Torah in Englewood, the immediate past
president of the Rabbinical Council of
America, crossed metaphoric swords with
Rabbi Lopatin on a radio show hosted by
Zev Brenner.
He has been hesitant about engaging in
such a debate until now, Rabbi Goldin said,
but its time. There is a growing sense
among the mainstream Orthodox rabbin-
ate that there is a concerted effort on the
part of some to push the agenda of this
open Orthodox movement, he said, defin-
ing mainstream Orthodox as members of
the RCA, which has over 1,000 members,
and is the largest organization of Orthodox
rabbis in the world.
While many of us have remained silent
about it for a long time, basically assuming
that everybody has a right to make his own
decision, it is clear by now that the Ortho-
dox community is looking for leadership
and guidelines, he continued.
Many of the Orthodox rabbis out in the
field are looking for the RCA to support
them by determining those guidelines and
establishing boundaries. Nonetheless,
he made clear that he was speaking as a
private citizen. I was not representing
the views of the organization, but my
own personal views, which I believe
reflect the views of many in the RCA.
Rabbi Goldin said that he was con-
cerned with some of open Orthodoxys
stances because there is an overarch-
ing issue, and that is when decisions
concerning halacha are agenda-driven.
That means, he explained, that halachic
arguments are chosen to lead inevitably
toward a desired outcome, rather than
looking at each situation, each particu-
lar issue, and honestly weighing the pros
and the cons, and determining the halacha
that way.
There is a growing sense that open
Orthodoxy is an agenda-driven move-
ment, wanting to change the parameters,
to become more lenient or venturesome in
a variety of areas, and being willing to do
whatever they can to come to that conclu-
sion. To push the envelope.
They know where they want to go, and
they want to find leniencies to get there,
Rabbi Goldin said.
There are two problems with that, he
said. First, you are not showing real
respect for the law itself; second is the
unintended consequences. You are not
taking into consideration the real conse-
quences down the road. He cited as an
example of unintended consequences the
Conservative movements decision, some
60 years ago, to allow people to drive to
the nearest shul on Shabbat. That led, he
said, to the destruction of the tight-knit
Jewish communities that characterize the
Orthodox world.
It is halacha that has kept Jews together,
Rabbi Goldin said. The only reason you
and I are able to talk to each other as Jews
in 2013 is because over the span of cen-
turies, there was a halachic process that
held us together. There were people who
dropped off, yes, but this is what holds us
together and keeps us identifiable as Jews.
When I walk into the Sephardic minyan
at my shul and someone says to me, Wow,
this is so different, I think the miracle really
is that its so much the same. After centu-
ries with no communication, the Shema is
the same, the Amidah is similar. This bril-
liant halachic process has to be respected.
There has to be a balance between pres-
ervation and change.
The partnership minyan a service in
which men and women are separated by a
mechitzah; only men are counted as mak-
ing up the minyan; and only men can lead
the parts of the service that demand a sha-
liach tzibur, but women can lead the parts
that do not demand such a communal
representative is a particularly conten-
tious issue.
The mainstream Orthodox world does
not consider it halachic, Rabbi Goldin said.
If the open Orthodox are going to adopt
practices that the mainstream do not con-
sider halachic, they will create a division.
In fact, he said, Zev Brenner invited
Agudas Israel, an Orthodox group to the
right of the RCA, to send a representa-
tive to the debate, but Agudas turned him
down because it does not acknowledge
non-Orthodox rabbis and does not con-
sider open Orthodoxy as truly Orthodox.
In general, Rabbi Goldin said, the RCAs
disagreements with open Orthodoxy come
from differences of opinion over the sta-
tus of women, how to deal with the gay
community, and the issue of boundaries
in terms of acceptance in dealing with the
non-Orthodox community as a whole.
Their primary drive which I think is
commendable is to be as inclusive as pos-
sible so the halachot they are dealing with
are the ones about inclusion and exclu-
sion, Rabbi Goldin said. How you deal
with intermarriage and conversion, and the
problem of agunot of women chained to
a dead marriage.
Charedi Jews accept RCA rabbis as Ortho-
dox, Rabbi Goldin said; charedim will
daven in modern Orthodox shuls. There
always has been a push and pull between
us and the charedi community, but in spite
of that push and pull they consider us
Orthodox. They do not daven in a partner-
ship minyan. Therefore, he said, a partner-
ship minyan is something that will divide
the Orthodox community.
Responding to Rabbi Goldin, Rabbi Lopa-
tin said that open Orthodoxy is not really a
movement. Instead, Its a way of learning;
its a methodology within Orthodoxy.
Just like modern or centrist or ultra-
Orthodoxy, its a part of the vision of the
mesoret the tradition that we are try-
ing to enact in the world.
I think thats why Im sort of perplexed,
he continued.
Im not exactly sure why there is this
obsession with boundaries and red
lines.
If people were slipping out of
Orthodoxy if they were gushing out
of Orthodoxy, bleeding out of Ortho-
doxy then we should put up those
walls.
There was that sense, in the 1950s,
that they were bleeding to the Conser-
vative movement. But not now. Now
people are excited about Orthodoxy.
They are coming in to Orthodoxy. So
why would we set up red lines now?
I welcome people into this world of tra-
dition and the mesoret. I dont understand
this sudden obsession with boundaries. I
dont feel that Orthodoxy is in danger.
The real danger for Orthodoxy is that
we are not passionate enough. Are we
really addressing the issues of our times? I
worry about that. I dont worry about peo-
ple spilling out.
I think there is a danger to the centrist
Orthodox, who really dont want to address
the issues of our times, particularly wom-
ens issues. They do address them but there
is an inflexibility they do not see new
things within halacha that address it.
They dont really want to come up with
halachic solutions to hot-button issues,
even to the agunah issue.
I think that we should work on con-
necting more, rather than on setting up
red lines, in the hope that they will make
people to our right like us more, respect us
more.
Lets just teach Torah, preach Torah.
Lets talk about how to revitalize Jewish
life on campus. The charedi world is doing
that very well; Chovevei Torah is sending
people to college campuses, too. We have
to work harder.
Maybe the easy path is just to set up
red lines, as if that will earn us bona fides.
The hard work is genuine debate, is teach-
ing Torah. We want our students to do that
work; to go to hospitals and schools and
shuls and teach Torah. That is our business.
There will be consequences of teaching
Torah, consequences of taking the strong
stands that we think are Torah stands, but
we cannot be afraid.
Thats my bottom line. There is fear of
unintended consequences, yes, but we can-
not act from fear.
I want to teach my students to be
respectful of all Jews, to connect to all Jews,
and I want to teach them not to be afraid.
We must not take from the Torah a
sense of rejectionism and xenophobia.
We have to welcome people in. Thats the
direction we have to move in. We do not
need red lines.
Rabbi Shmuel Goldin Rabbi Asher Lopatin
Now people are
excited about
Orthodoxy. They
are coming in to
Orthodoxy.
RABBI ASHER LOPATIN
All together now
Day schools cooperate
in upping their fundraising game
LARRY YUDELSON
Leaders of five area Jewish day schools
came together last month for a joint work-
shop on raising money.
Yeshivat Noam in Paramus hosted the
workshop, which featured fundraising
consultant Amy Schiffman of Chicago.
Originally, the school had planned to bring
Ms. Schiffman to speak to its board. But
when Dov Adler, the schools president,
mentioned her talk to board members of
the Yavneh Academy in Paramus, they
asked if they could come too.
Sure, Mr. Adler said, and Noams
director of development, Amy Vogel,
reached out to the development direc-
tors of other area day schools. All told,
five schools participated, sharing the
expenses of the Chicago-based consultant
five ways and bringing together about 75
people to hear her speak. (Along with
Noam and Yavneh, participating schools
were the Moriah School in Englewood, the
Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen
County in New Milford, and Ben Porat
Yosef of Paramus.)
The workshop generated a sense of
community among the leaders of the dif-
ferent schools, Ms. Vogel said.
Fundraising, she said, is an isolating
job and isolation is particularly diffi-
cult to deal with because a fundraiser fre-
quently faces rejection.
It was so inspiring to see all the lead-
ers in the schools who are making asks and
developing resources for financial cultiva-
tion, she said.
Ms. Schiffmans central message for the
day school leaders: Lay leaders must take
responsibility for maintaining the relation-
ships with donors.
Oftentimes people will say, Ill do any-
thing for the school but Ill not ask for
money, Ms. Vogel said. We need people
to ask for money. The most effective way
to do that is peer-to-peer solicitation to
go into peoples living rooms.
There already have been two follow-
ups to the meeting, Ms. Vogel added. She
and her Noam lay leaders put together a
plan to implement the ideas Ms. Schiff-
man suggested.
And there was a meeting with the devel-
opment directors of the schools to brain-
storm future collaborations.
Ms. Vogel said she doesnt see the other
day schools as competition.
Fortunately or unfortunately, 75 per-
cent of day school fundraising dollars
come from current parents, she said.
Thats a national statistic thats true in
Bergen County as well. So we each have
our own unique group of beneficiaries,
who are our parents. Other people in
the community who support day school
education can get excited about multiple
schools, so I dont think were in competi-
tion for dollars.
With parents of present schools the
most likely target for fundraising, Ms.
Vogel said the challenge is to make the
case that people should make the school a
philanthropic priority above and beyond
paying that tuition.
We need to market day schools as
a real tzedakah priority like any other
tzedakah. We have 20 percent of our
students on scholarship, and we need
to fund academic excellence. Tuition
doesnt cover it. The message we send is
that the public schools get $19,000 per

JS-7*
Jewish day school leaders gather for a workshop on fundraising.
Fundraising
FROM PAGE 41
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JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 7

JS-8*
The YJCC offered Israeli dancing. Children and their parents listen to Israeli music.
FIRST PERSON
Who needs Chinese food?
YJCC helps local Jews reclaim December 25
LOIS GOLDRICH
You have to admit. Christmas lights are
pleasing to the eye, and some of that music
is glorious.
Still, its not ours and it is possible
(inevitable?) to feel just a bit marginalized
on Christmas Day.
But this year, scanning the Internet
and, of course, the Jewish Standard
for non-Christmas-related activities on
December 25, I was particularly pleased
to find a perfect diversion for my visiting
grandchildren.
Thanks to the Bergen County YJCC in
Washington Township, Jewish families,
adults as well as children, had an oppor-
tunity to gather, play, dance, and watch
Israeli films all at no cost.
Our senior team gets together peri-
odically to discuss what we can do thats
new and unique, the YJCCs CEO, Gary
Lipman, said. Looking at it collectively
but putting it through the filter of our
own experiences we asked, why not do
something big for the Jewish community
on Christmas?
The resulting event a daylong simu-
lated visit to the State of Israel ultimately
drew some 500 participants.
Making the day a trip to Israel hap-
pened organically, Mr. Lipman said.
Thats what happens when you turn cre-
ative people loose, he joked, suggesting
that the fact that he was out of the way
on vacation the week before the event
might have helped make it a success.
While Mr. Lipman insisted that you
cant credit one person for the positive
outcome, he did note that all programs
were coordinated by Anette McGarity, the
YJCCs associate executive director of pro-
gram services.
He said that the day was advertised in
local newspapers, through social media,
and by word of mouth.
But while we knew some people
would come, we had no clue about the
final turnout, he said, describing it as
amazing.
The day, extending from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m., involved all YJCC departments, each
Children create art with saladspinners during a day of activities at the Bergen YJCC.
8 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014

JS-9*
offering age-appropriate activities. Guests
were welcomed with passports that
could be stamped throughout the day at
different activity stations. Those visitors
with four or more stamps received a prize.
(My 6-year-old grandson got a water bot-
tle before he even started, and ended the
day with a lightstick imprinted with Jewish
stars.)
Parents and children found much to
occupy them throughout the day. That was
a relief to many of them. Sharon Goldrich,
a JCC teacher visiting from Maryland (and,
OK, my daughter-in-law), noted that on a
day associated in the national conscious-
ness with family and community, it was
amazing to have that sentiment embraced
by the YJCC, which offered a wonderful,
family-friendly program.
Though my family does not live in
the area and are not regulars to the cen-
ter, we were warmly welcomed and were
thrilled that our children had a fun-filled
afternoon.
Her son Micah clearly agreed, taking
advantage of all the activities and conclud-
ing that it was really fun. I was happy to
be there.
Older visitors had fun as well.
Linda Gould of Paramus who
said she met several friends at
activities there throughout the day
spent about three hours at the
YJCC, cutting the day short only
because she had other engage-
ments. She learned about it through
the listing in the Jewish Standard,
she said.
It was special, Ms. Gould said.
I usually volunteer at a Hacken-
sack nursing home on Christmas,
but this caught my eye. That was
not entirely surprising, because it
was the only such event she saw
advertised.
Ms. Gould said she attended the
days screening of two Israeli films,
which she called excellent. I didnt
expect them to be so entertaining.
And someone was there to discuss
them afterward. She also took
part in an Israeli dance class, which
included young families with small
children.
Some parents brought their children,
she said. They were trying to keep up it
was adorable, she said.
In summation, this was a very good
idea, she said. They should expand on
it.
And they will, Mr. Lipman said. In fact,
halfway through the day, four of us gath-
ered in the hall and said we have to do
this next year and every year after that.
We also plan to do something on Easter
Sunday.
In keeping with the Israel theme, the
gym was decked out as Masada, with an
inflatable slide/fortress drawing steady
streams of children and an obstacle
course/desert providing entertainment for
others. Those with more of an artistic bent
could enjoy sand art, meant to remind us
all on a cold winters day that we could be
lying on the warm beaches of the Jewish
state; or jewelry making, for those who
prefer rainbow loom bracelets to red
strings.
The more hands-on types had an oppor-
tunity to scoop up black mud (think Dead
Sea) or plant seeds in paper cups (no
explanation necessary).
The PJ Library sponsored a special
morning presentation by mainstages, an
educational theater company for children,
which is developing a set of programs for
the PJ Library Storybook Theater.
According to Linda Ripps, the PJ Library
coordinator, the works involve puppetry
and imagination, and offer the children in
attendance a chance to participate in the
program.
She noted that mainstages has been
engaged for three more performances this
year. The next one will be offered on Sun-
day, January 19, at Temple Avodat Shalom
in River Edge. It will be centered on Tu
Bi-Shvat.
The December 25 YJCC event was noth-
ing if not consistent. Guests were offered
an opportunity to write prayers for the
Kotel, participate in a Maccabi-style track
run, and enjoy Israeli foods in the caf and
Israeli candy bars in the hall.
Just like in Williamsburg, Va., where
the actors never come out of their colonial
character for example, you cant make
Thomas Jefferson laugh we decided that
once something was in [the program], it
had to have an Israeli theme, Mr. Lipman
said.
Subsidized by the YJCC, and with
support from a few individual donors,
the day was free to the entire commu-
nity, so that everyone who wanted a
place to be on December 25 had a place
to come, in a Jewish environment, without
spending a dime, he continued.
We all remember our childhood and
know the struggle of being absorbed in
the Christmas season, Mr. Lipman con-
cluded. But at the end of the day, it can
be lonely for Jews to be expected to share
in the merriment of the season.
Why not have someplace in the Jew-
ish community where Jews can come and
not feel left out, where we can learn about
Jewish issues a place where we can go
and be pridefully Jewish, not getting lost
in everything else. It gives families a place
where they can spend several hours and
they can still go out for Chinese food and a
movie later if they want.
Parents await children at the
Masada slide.
PJ Library enterains youngsters at the YJCC.
Children and their parents listen to Israeli music.
Children create art with saladspinners during a day of activities at the Bergen YJCC.
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 9
Local
10 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-10*
Israeli sex abuse
case heats up
Local rabbi wants convicted
abuser barred from teaching
JOANNE PALMER
A prominent Israeli educator convicted
of sexually abusing his students is being
allowed to continue teaching. That move
has drawn protest in Teaneck.
Last Friday, the International Rabbinic
Fellowship posted a statement reaffirm-
ing its support for the victims of sexual
harassment and abuse and urging
educational institutions to refrain from
hosting R. Elon to deliver lectures and
teach Torah to their students
It was sent out to a wide mailing list
by the IRFs treasurer, Nathaniel Helfgot
of Teaneck, rabbi of that towns Netivot
Shalom.
That makes the ongoing situation in the
Bnei Akiva schools in Israel a local story,
but to tell it properly demands backing
up and starting closer to the
beginning.
The rel i gi ous Zi oni st
movement in Israel has been
rocked by charges that one
of its most charismatic teach-
ers, Rabbi Moti Elon, sexually
abused and harassed some of
the young men whose edu-
cation and moral develop-
ment he was charged with
overseeing.
Rabbi Elon had headed the
Yeshivat HaKotel, a flagship
religious Zionist institution
in Jerusalems Old City for
young men seeking a closer
relationship to God and to
the Jewish people. He was
convicted in August of two
charges of sexual indecency
against male students charges he con-
tinues to deny but last week he was sen-
tenced to probation and community ser-
vice rather than jail time.
Saying forcefully that he thinks the con-
viction was wrong, Rabbi Chaim Druck-
man, the revered 81-year-old teacher who
heads the Bnei Akiva youth movement
and who won the Israel Prize in 2012, has
made clear that he intends to allow Rabbi
Elon to teach in Bnei Akiva institutions.
The Bnei Akiva youth movement is an
old and proud pillar of the religious Zion-
ist movement, inculcating a love of the
Jewish state. Its schools emphasize a love
of Zion as well as a deep and sound tex-
tual understanding of traditional Jewish
texts. Its flagship school in Israel, Yeshi-
vat Or Etzion, is a hesder yeshiva, which
readies young men for both the Israel
Defense Forces and a religiously obser-
vant life during and after their service.
Reaction to the sentence and to Rabbi
Druckmans decision has been mixed,
loud, and furious.
According to Allison Kaplan Sommer in
Haaretz, Miriam Zussman of the Israeli
town Beit Shemesh sent a letter to Bnei
Akiva supporters abroad, asking them to
alert members of the board of American
Friends of Yeshiva Bnei Akiva to the issue.
In that letter, Ms. Kaplan Sommer
continues, she describes Elon as a dan-
gerous, habitual sexual predator.
Allowing him to teach, the Haaretz
story continued, reflects very badly on
Rabbi Druckmans judgment, and calls
into question whether he should be
entrusted with the welfare of the 24,000
students in the school
network
In a radio interview last
week, on the other hand,
Rabbi Druckman said, At
the end of the day, were
talking about an incident in
which two people were in
the room, Rabbi Elon and
the complainant It was a
basic he said/he said situ-
ation, and he chose to trust
Rabbi Elon rather than
the alleged victim, Rabbi
Druckman said.
This response further
enraged victims right
advocates.
The American Friends
of Bnei Akiva so far has
declined to address the
issue, although it has held out the possi-
blity that a statement might be forthcom-
ing later in the week.
The IRFs statement also was in
response to Rabbi Elons sentence.
Supplying necessary background,
Rabbi Helfgot said that the group had
been founded by Rabbi Avi Weiss of
the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale in the
Bronx and Rabbi Marc Angel, rabbi emer-
itus of the Spanish-Portuguese Synagogue
in Manhattan, about a decade ago, as a
modern Orthodox rabbinic organization
that would be a safe space for discussion
and conversation in a non-authoritarian
context. It has grown to over 150 mem-
bers. It is a fellowship of Orthodox rab-
bis and community scholars who come
together in conversation. We also do a
little bit of writing, and put out a couple
of publications. We have a very vigorous
listserv, where people discuss issues in
an open context.
Some of the IRFs members also are
members of the Rabbinical Council of
America, the mainstream modern and
centrist Orthodox rabbinical association;
the largest number are Yeshiva Univer-
sity graduates, some come from Yeshi-
vat Chovevei Torah, where Rabbi Helfgot
heads the Bible department, and others
from seminaries around the world, Rabbi
Helfgot added.
This is the text the IRF posted:
In the wake of the conclusion of the
trial of Rabbi Motti Elon in the Israeli
court system, and the explicit findings of
the respected Takanah Forum, the Inter-
national Rabbinic Fellowship today reaf-
firms its support for the victims of sexual
harassment and abuse.
It strongly supports the call by the Beit
Hillel rabbinic organization, and other
leading figures in Israeli society such as
Minister of the Economy Naftali Bennet,
calling on all educational institutions to
refrain from hosting R. Elon to deliver
lectures and teach Torah to their stu-
dents, particularly in light of his refusal
to acknowledge his inappropriate actions
and behavior.
We thought its important to express
support for victims of sexual harassment
and sexual abuse in our day and age,
Rabbi Helfgot said. We also want to sup-
port the work of the Takana Forum.
Takana is a small Israeli by-invitation-
only organization, made up of Orthodox
rabbis, psychologists, and social activists
who wanted to address the challenge
of sexual abuse and harassment, and to
address the issues that the court system
cant necessarily address, because of
such issues as the statute of limitations
or of not having enough proof, Rabbi
Helfgot said. They see their goal not as
criminal prosecution but as helping the
community address these issues, and let-
ting the community know when they feel
that someone has abused his standing or
his power.
Takana has found that Rabbi Elon
indeed did commit acts of sexual abuse.
This is not the first time that he has
been found guilty of such acts, or that
Takana has agreed with the finding. A few
years ago, the body decided that Rabbi
Elon should be kept away from students.
He returned to teaching nonetheless; the
result was the most recent guilty verdict.
Its important to make a statement
about the fact that we feel that this is an
important issue, Rabbi Helfgot contin-
ued. And it is an issue where both the
Israeli court system and Takana, which
did a very serious investigation, have
spoken. Takana is led by very honest and
preeminent people across the spectrum
of religious Zionism.
We feel that their work, and the rul-
ing of the Israel court system, should
be supported, especially given the fact
that there are voices within the religious
Zionist community that unfortunately
express support for Rabbi Elon continu-
ing to teach.
What should parents looking for a
gap-year program for their children do?
They should vote with their feet, and not
attend Rabbi Elons classes, Rabbi Helf-
got said. And should parents send their
children to the schools that allow him to
teach? I dont think that youre actually
sending your child into a dangerous situ-
ation, but its a very questionable deci-
sion to have him teach, Rabbi Helfgot
said. I think that it does raise real ques-
tions about the schools values and judg-
ment, even outside this particular case.
Yeshivat HaKotel WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Rabbi Nathaniel
Helfgot: Its
important to express
support for victims
of sexual harassment
and sexual abuse.
Local
JS-11*
The other side of the gap year
Yeshiva program teaches local freshmen how to integrate Israel and America
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
M
any modern Orthodox high
school graduates defer
freshman year in college
in favor of a so-called gap
year of religious study in Israel. Return-
ing to North America with a renewed
commitment to Judaism, nevertheless
often they find that the college class-
room and dormitory present challenges
to their beliefs, practices, and morals.
The problem was documented 10 years
ago in A Parents Guide to Orthodox
Assimilation on University Campuses,
co-written by Bergenfield native Gil Perl,
then a Harvard graduate student. Three
years before the report was published,
Englewood residents Heshe and Harriet
Seif founded the Jewish Learning Initia-
tive on Campus. Administered by the
Orthodox Union in partnership with
Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Cam-
pus Life, JLIC today has young Orthodox
rabbinic couples providing program-
ming and guidance at 16 North American
campuses.
Rabbi Mordy Friedman, raised in
Teaneck, was the JLIC rabbi at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania from 2006 through
2010. Now teaching at Yeshivat Eretz
Hatzvi in Jerusalem, Rabbi Friedman
heads a unique curriculum devised to
better prepare gap-year students to con-
front successfully the spiritual dilemmas
they likely will face as college freshmen.
Some yeshivas approach the question
of university like a bathroom, telling their
students, You have to go there, but its
stinks, so get out as soon as you can. Our
approach is the opposite, Rabbi Fried-
man said. We teach our students that
they can grow in their Judaism through
being articulate spokesmen for Ortho-
doxy and the leadership and initiative
they take on campus.
Eretz Hatzvis rosh yeshiva, Teaneck
native Rabbi Yehuda Susman, says
that while some gap-year schools urge
students to attend a Jewish university
such as Yeshiva or Touro or none at
all his institution accepts that most
of the student body will choose secular
universities.
Although traditionally the message to
yeshiva students has been to exclusively
attend religious campuses like Yeshiva
University, 60 to 70 percent of students
are not listening to that, Rabbi Susman
said. We say, Youre making this choice
what are the issues you are likely to
face? Lets talk about them and prepare
you for them.
Eretz HaTzvi students get training in
Israel advocacy, public speaking, and
countering biblical criticism. They
receive advice on how to fit Torah study
into their schedules, and what to do
about Friday night parties and classes
held on religious holidays. They role-
play how to handle social situations and
how to relate respectfully to Reform and
Conservative peers. On request, Rabbi
Friedman presents guidance to students
at other Israel programs, too.
Im not giving rules, but encouraging
them to consider values and realize pos-
sible consequences, Rabbi Friedman
said. The more they practice, the more
successfully they can think through real
situations.
He has firsthand experience of the
problem; Rabbi Friedman is a product
of the Yeshiva of North Jersey, the Torah
Academy of Bergen County, and Yeshiva
University. He completed two gap years
at Yeshivat Har Etzion in Israel before
beginning college and graduate school.
A strong emphasis is also placed on
becoming articulate spokesmen for
Orthodoxy, he said. We try to give
them the attitude that they are on a mis-
sion, not just to grow as a person but as
a Jew.
Yeshivat Eretz Hatzvis associate direc-
tor, Todd Berman, said that it is no
coincidence that graduates have taken
leadership roles on campuses including
MIT, Carnegie Mellon, the University of
Pennsylvania, Cornell, and Brandeis.
Teaneck native Zeke Pariser, now 24,
was elected president of Rutgers Univer-
sitys Orthodox community in his junior
year and became president of Rutgers
Hillel in his senior year. Former Colum-
bia Hillel President Daniel Bonner, cur-
rent Penn Hillel president Alon Krifcher,
and current NYU Hillel president Zach
Schwarzbaum all went to Eretz Hatzvi.
The piece de resistance of the schools
approach is Recharge, which provides up
to $1,000 toward airfare for every student
who returns for two weeks of study during
university breaks. Funds must be raised
separately for the project; about 25 to 30
students take up the offer each year.
The very first educational decision
we made when creating the yeshiva was
that there would be a Recharge program,
Rabbi Susman said. Its a crucial part of
who we are.
Many Recharge participants come with
notebooks full of questions for their for-
mer teachers everything from the logis-
tics of keeping kosher in a dorm kitchen
to the proper response when encounter-
ing a professors religious hostility.
The program literally recharges them,
but it also recharges us, because hearing
about the situations they face gives us a
current student perspective on whats to
come, Rabbi Friedman said.
David Kamins of Teaneck, a Muhlen-
berg Col l ege sophomore now on
Recharge, said: The name speaks for
itself. Its reinforcing what I learned and
gives me ideas of what I can do when Im
back at college in terms of setting times
to learn and making more practical goals
for how much [Torah] studying I can
accomplish.
Mr. Berman recalled one student who
came on Recharge during his sophomore
year at McGill University. He wrote us
afterward that since McGill doesnt have
a large Orthodox population, he felt he
was drifting off religiously, and our pro-
gram got him excited about modern
Orthodox Judaism again, he said.
Hoping to connect with the rest of its
recent alumni, Eretz Hatzvi sends teach-
ers to run Shabbat programs for them at
campuses including Washington Univer-
sity, Columbia, NYU, Maryland, Cornell,
Brandeis, Michigan, Penn, Rutgers, North-
western, Princeton, McGill, and others.
The goal of the yeshiva is to relate to
students, no matter where theyre going
afterward, Mr. Berman said.
Recharge program participants at Eretz Hatzvi over winter break. All are from Teaneck. From left, David Kamins, Matthew
Federbush, Rabbi Mordy Friedman, Rabbi Yehuda Susman, A.J. Varon, and Don Greenberg. ADAM ROSS
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 11
Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-12*
Letters
from
Israel
Our excellent
adventure
in the Negev
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
With the major exception of Eilat the
Red Sea beach resort at the southern tip of
Israel most people do not consider the
Negev Desert a swinging vacation spot.
Its not just that the summer heat is swel-
tering and the winter nights are bone-chill-
ing. This vast expanse, covering more than
half of Israel, houses less than 10 percent
of its population. You can drive for miles
without a break in the magnificent rocky
landscape.
But theres good reason why the Lonely
Planet tour guide recommended the Negev
as the No. 2 worldwide tourism destination
for 2013. Scattered from Beersheva in the
north to Eilat in the south are rare jewels,
from boutique wineries, dairies, and fam-
ily farms to crunchy eco-lodgings and awe-
some nature and historical sites.
Recently, my husband and I spent two
nights in Mitzpeh Ramon, an hours drive
south of Beersheva, where the worlds larg-
est natural crater, the centerpiece of Isra-
els largest national park, draws tourists
from far and wide.
Last year, Conde Nast Traveler singled
out the Beresheet resort in Mitzpeh Ramon
as one of the worlds best new hotels. Built
on the precipice, Beresheet looks like a
high-end garden apartment complex. Its
best suites have infinity pools that seem
to spill into the heart-shaped, 25-mile-long,
1,640-foot-deep crater formed over mil-
lions of years by a weird geological process.
You learn all about that process in the
recently renovated, impressively high-
tech Visitors Center. (The self-guided tour
is available in English.) The first part of the
center is devoted to a multimedia exhibi-
tion on Israeli astronaut Ilan Ramon, who
died in the 2003 Columbia space shuttle
disaster.
There is no discernible connection
between the crater and the man except
for the common name, yet somehow this
exhibition works beautifully. After viewing
a movie ending with Ramons final video
chat with his family, the curtains part,
and you find yourself looking out a huge
picture window over the natural wonder
outside.
We did not go rappelling or jeeping in
the crater, but since Mitzpeh Ramon is
a prime location for stargazing, we took
a nighttime sky tour with Ira Star Man
Machefsky, who used to live in Englewood.
(We wrote about him in the November 8
issue; see From Englewood to the stars.)
On the way down from our home north
of Jerusalem, we stopped for a cup of lem-
ongrass tea with Yoni Sharir, co-owner of
Orliyya Farm. The farms 400 Moroccan
argan trees produce nuts whose oil has
exceptional healing and antiseptic quali-
ties, as well as nutritional value. We bought
a bottle for our son-in-law, a student of Chi-
nese medicine, to use for massage.
We also hiked around Avdat National
Park, one of four Negev UNESCO World
Heritage sites. Avdat is situated on the
2,000-year-old Nabatean spice route,
and contains the remains of Byzantine
churches, Nabatean residences and farms,
and one of Israels oldest wine presses. It
felt strange to explore a site in Israel that
has nothing to do with Jewish history.
But then there is Sde Boker, in some
ways the cradle of modern Israeli civiliza-
tion. It was here that first Prime Minister
David Ben-Gurion cast his lot with a hardy
(and much younger) bunch of pioneering
kibbutzniks in 1952. We happened to visit
just weeks before ceremonies marking the
40th anniversary of his death.
The modest home (The Hut) shared
by Ben-Gurion and his wife, Paula, is open
to visitors, and an excellent animated film
tells the story of Ben-Gurions dream that
someday the Negev would be home to
seven million Jews. Were not quite there
yet; todays 700,000 Negev residents
include both Jews and Bedouin Arabs.
However, new communities are popping
up constantly.
Sde Boker also houses the Ramat Hane-
gev Birding Center and the Sde Boker Win-
ery, established by a native Californian in
1999. The winery, kosher since 2011, has
a new visitors center and vineyards full of
Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Cari-
gnan, and Zinfandel grapes.
We hiked through the Ein Avdat canyon,
where three springs feed several small rock
pools sustaining numerous flora and fauna.
We were lucky enough to see ibexes and
convocations of eagles.
One day of our trip was devoted to Eilat.
We gawked at brilliantly colored corals and
tropical fish at Coral World, watched the
daily shark feeding, and sat on the wharf at
the Dolphin Reef, one of my favorite places.
In a quick detour from nature, we also
shopped at a local mall because I couldnt
resist the zero sales tax exclusive to Eilat.
Heading back, we drove through Timna, a
national park on the ruins of a copper-min-
ing operation from the time of King Solo-
mon. Olive pits found at Timna were radio-
carbon dated to the 10th century B.C.E.
Though the Negev is largely uninhab-
ited, we could have spent many more days
sightseeing. Maybe next time well book a
room at Zimmer Bus in Ezuz, a B&B near
the Egyptian border that offers accommo-
dations in renovated old buses.
Prospective visitors can look for help-
ful tourist info at Ramat Hanegev Regional
Councils website, http://rng.org.il/en/#.
Jewish Standard correspondent Abigail
Klein Leichman made aliyah about six
years ago. This is one of an occasional series
of letters from Israel she sends us.
Todays 700,000
Negev residents
include both
Jews and
Bedouin Arabs.
However, new
communities are
popping up
constantly.
Steve Leichman explores the Ein Avdat stream.
Abigail Klein Leichman at Avdat National Park.
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 13
JS-13
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Braiding our world
T
he braid is a potent symbol,
and we Jews tend to use it
often.
Shabbat begins with the
braid on the challah and ends with
the braid on the havdalah candle; in
between we weave together observ-
ing and remembering. Separate
strands combine to make one lovely
interwoven whole.
We also have many new years; the
warming green hope of spring on
the first of Nissan, the waning of the
summers searing heat on the first
of Elul, and the personal and com-
munal challenges of Rosh Hashanah.
The trees even have their very own
new year, which this year falls on
January 16.
And, of course, we have the secular
new year.
There is much wisdom in being
able to celebrate a new year in the
depths of winter, just as the terri-
bly short days have begun slowly to
lengthen, just as it seems maybe a
possibility that there will be sun and
the sky might turn blue again.
And we can braid the joy and light
of this new year, the one we share
with the culture that surrounds us,
into the others that we celebrate as
well.
More braiding happened this year
on December 25. Joshua Nelson, the
black Jewish gospel singer, performed
at the Museum of Jewish Heritage,
way down at Manhattans southern
tip. His life is a braid, and his music is
a glorious manifestation of it.
No one at the concert ignored the
outside world. It was Christmas. That
was why the auditorium could be
packed on a Wednesday afternoon,
not with retirees and parents of small
children, but with a cross-section
of the Jewish community. And the
music that Joshua Nelson sings, the
clothing that he wears when he per-
forms, and the style that he embod-
ies come directly from the black
community. But the words are Jew-
ish words, mostly in Hebrew, and his
talk between songs was entirely and
intensely Jewish.
We are privileged to be able to
braid our worlds together as we do,
with the Jewish part and the Ameri-
can part curling around each other.
They do not mix they stay sepa-
rate strands, with the space between
them vitally important but they
combine and dance. JP
KEEPING THE FAITH
Taking aim
at acceptable
deaths
SHAMMAI ENGELMAYER
G
un control was back in the news in Decem-
ber not because government at any level
imposed new controls, but because one
year after the horrific mass murder of chil-
dren in Newtown, Conn., no government at any level
did anything at all.
In fact, one opponent of gun control actually told
an NPR interviewer that he did not understand what
all the fuss was about, considering that only about
.08 percent of the population die by guns every year.
The number itself is ludicrous, of course, because
it would mean that somewhere around 25 million
Americans die each year by gun. The annual toll is
somewhere between 28,000 and 31,000, or about 10
gun deaths a year per 100,000 people. What grates
is the notion that there exists within the gun culture,
and within society itself, the notion that there is such
a thing as an acceptable number of deaths. In the busi-
ness world, this is known
as the benefit-to-risk ratio,
the premise of which is that
if only a certain number
of people die because of a
flaw in a car, or from a bad
reaction to an otherwise
innocuous drug, or from a
potentially unsafe piece on
a childs toy, or whatever,
society can live with those
deaths.
Judaism cannot. For us,
each life is considered pre-
cious so precious, in fact, that halachah requires us
to act when someone is in danger (see Leviticus 19:16).
It also sets aside virtually every law including Shab-
bat and kashrut regulations when there is the mere
suspicion of a life in danger. (See Mishnah Yoma 8:6
and the gemara that follows it.)
In the case of guns, it is true to say that guns do not
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel
Community Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael in
Cliffside Park. Although he is the executive editor of the
Jewish Standard, the views expressed in his columns do
not necessarily reflect the opinions of this newspaper.
14 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-14*
Speaking out
against the boycott
As we sit here, during what is semes-
ter break for most American univer-
sities, a difficult situation is gaining
more and more attention from uni-
versity students, professors, and
administrations.
By now you might have heard that
a group called the American Studies
Association voted to adopt a boycott
of Israeli academic institutions.
This boycott obviously is part of
the unfortunate Boycott, Divest-
ment and Sanctions effort to rob
Israels legitimate right to exist in
the eyes of the world.
The good news is that the ASAs hate-
ful action also has brought together a
number of universities opposing the
mere suggestion of boycotting Israel.
The 40,000-member American
Association of University Professors
recently released a statement calling
the ASA vote a setback for the cause
of academic freedom. Also, the exec-
utive committee of the Association of
American Universities, a group of 62
leading research universities, which
includes Rutgers and Princeton as
well as Harvard, Stanford, and Yale
condemned the ASAs actions.
The AAU st at ement cal l ed
restrictions imposed on the ability
of scholars of any particular country
to work with their fellow academ-
ics in other countries, participate
in meetings and organizations, or
otherwise carry out their scholarly
activities violate academic freedom.
It went on to say that boycotting
Israeli academic institutions vio-
lates the freedoms not only of Israeli
scholars but also of American schol-
ars who might be pressured to com-
ply with the boycott.
We urge American academics to
oppose this and other such academic
boycotts.
We ask that you get in touch with
your alma mater to consider an insti-
tutional resignation from ASA.
Locally, Rutgers and Princeton
already have taken that step. But our
families, our students, and our alum-
nae have connections to schools
both large and small throughout the
land. It behooves us all to make sure
that the schools our children or we
attended or attend hear loudly from
us that they need to have their educa-
tional institutions boycott this insidi-
ous ASA boycott.
Theres no shortage of irony that
the Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas has spoken out against ASA
and this boycott. If he has done so,
than we should too. PJ
Shammai
Engelmayer
Op-Ed
kill people. People kill people. It is true to say it, but
it is not a fair statement to make. In the space of just
a handful of minutes, 20 children and six adults were
killed in Newtown a year ago. Within the same amount
of time in July 2012, 12 people were killed and more
than 70 wounded in an Aurora, Colo., movie theater.
Yes, guns kill people, but rapid-firing automatic weap-
ons kill far more people faster than six-shooters do, and
both varieties still require a finger to pull the trigger.
There are surely many fingers on many triggers
annually. It is estimated that seven people are shot in
the United States every hour. Three of them will die
from their wounds. At least once every two hours, one
of those deaths will be that of a child.
There is no reason anyone has to carry an automatic
pistol or rifle that shoots multiple rounds in seconds.
These weapons are not necessary for the maintenance
of a well-regulated militia, which we do not need in
any case because its job is in the capable hands of
the U.S. Armed Forces, recent Supreme Court deci-
sions notwithstanding. They are not necessary for
bird shooting, unless the object is to rip the bird com-
pletely apart. They are not necessary for hunting ani-
mals, unless the object is to hang a head on a wall that
looks less like a moose and more like a Swiss cheese.
Among the annual gun statistics, of course, are
the accidental shootings. In the year since Newtown,
nearly 200 children have been killed by guns and
about 90 of those deaths were accidents in their own
homes or in friends homes, for the most part. About
40 other children were willfully murdered in their own
homes by guns, often by a parent or other relative.
Anti-gun control advocates form a very powerful lob-
bying group, and they tend to want rapid-fire automat-
ics to stay on the market and be easily bought there.
They also do not want anyone adding tamperproof
safety mechanisms to their assault weapons. It is here,
however, that some progress could be made; the acci-
dental deaths, especially of children, can be avoided.
This column views issues through the prism of hal-
achah. Even though the world we live in is not ruled by
halachah, we should at least be guided by it.
As I understand Jewish law, it is not permissible to
own a gun that either does not have state-of-the-art
protective devices to prevent its being fired by acci-
dent or by an unauthorized user, or that is not 100 per-
cent secure from children or anyone else other than
the owner. The owner him- or herself must be fully
trained both in the use of the gun and in how to keep
it out of unauthorized hands.
That brings us to the Torahs law of the parapet (see
Deuteronomy 22:8). It requires that when someone
builds a house, he must build a parapet around the
roof, that you should not bring any blood upon your
house, if any man falls from there.
As I have noted in previous columns, rabbinic
decisions interpret this law broadly, so that it even
includes not keeping a ladder at home if it is broken
(see the Babylonian Talmud tractate Bava Kama 15b).
Maimonides, in his Mishneh Torah, the Laws of Mur-
der and the Preservation of Life, Chapter 11:4, puts it
this way: The parapet covers everything that is inher-
ently dangerous and could, in normal circumstances,
cause a person to die.
One child died of a gunshot wound while I wrote
and edited this column. Another will die before the
editor processed it and sent it to production. Many
others will have died by the time you read this.
The gun lobby says these are all within the range of
acceptability.
Jewish law says it is not.
What do you say?
JS-15*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 15
KEEPING THE FAITH
Taking aim
at acceptable
deaths
SHAMMAI ENGELMAYER
G
un control was back in the news in Decem-
ber not because government at any level
imposed new controls, but because one
year after the horrific mass murder of chil-
dren in Newtown, Conn., no government at any level
did anything at all.
In fact, one opponent of gun control actually told
an NPR interviewer that he did not understand what
all the fuss was about, considering that only about
.08 percent of the population die by guns every year.
The number itself is ludicrous, of course, because
it would mean that somewhere around 25 million
Americans die each year by gun. The annual toll is
somewhere between 28,000 and 31,000, or about 10
gun deaths a year per 100,000 people. What grates
is the notion that there exists within the gun culture,
and within society itself, the notion that there is such
a thing as an acceptable number of deaths. In the busi-
ness world, this is known
as the benefit-to-risk ratio,
the premise of which is that
if only a certain number
of people die because of a
flaw in a car, or from a bad
reaction to an otherwise
innocuous drug, or from a
potentially unsafe piece on
a childs toy, or whatever,
society can live with those
deaths.
Judaism cannot. For us,
each life is considered pre-
cious so precious, in fact, that halachah requires us
to act when someone is in danger (see Leviticus 19:16).
It also sets aside virtually every law including Shab-
bat and kashrut regulations when there is the mere
suspicion of a life in danger. (See Mishnah Yoma 8:6
and the gemara that follows it.)
In the case of guns, it is true to say that guns do not
Prince of the Jews
Local student remembers intellectually honest,
entirely Jewish Edgar Bronfman
W
ithin moments of the news alert announc-
ing that Edgar Bronfman had passed away,
I received several text messages from col-
lege friends asking me whether Id heard
the news.
Edgar M. Bronfman was not simply the name of the
benefactor of our Hillel. To us, the word Bronfman was
synonymous with home.
The structure that is in place at the Bronfman Center
for Jewish Student Life at NYU is a direct result of Edgar
Bronfmans dream. He wanted
it to be not only a place where
students could grow as Jews,
which indeed it is, but he also
imagined it as an environ-
ment where student leaders
would master the fundamental
skills necessary to make their
dreams for the Jewish commu-
nity come true.
During the two years that I
served on the student board of
NYUs Hillel, I learned several
essential skills, all while on the
job: how to propose an idea, gain access to funding and
use that funding, manage a budget, and work with other
people, whose ideas and interests both complemented
and conflicted with my own. Most importantly, I learned
to execute the ideas that my peers and I developed and to
ensure the realization of my goals.
Learning these essential skills was a vital component of
my college education, and I owe that aspect of my growth
to Edgar Bronfman.
At the conclusion of my year as president of NYUs
Hillel, Mr. Bronfman graciously took me and two other
students out to lunch. We had met before, at the annual
Bronfman Center Advisory Board meeting and at the
Samuel Bronfman Foundation for one of his frequent
Torah study sessions. To say that Mr. Bronfman was can-
did, sincere, and warm doesnt begin to describe him. He
asked us questions about our accomplishments and our
aspirations. He told us jokes and stories. With a grin, he
playfully challenged some of my Orthodox beliefs, and,
despite having thoroughly considered the issues at hand,
was deeply interested and genuinely engaged in thinking
about the responses that I provided. I felt that I had so
much to learn from this great man and yet, here he was,
actively listening to the ideas presented by me, a 22-year
old college student!
His decidedly assured confidence in his beliefs and his
never-ending engagement with texts and ideas was one
of his hallmark characteristics. His focus on young adults
was emblematic of his constant demand to grapple with
the newest iterations of Jewish thought.
At one point during the meal, he offered us the oppor-
tunity to ask him questions. A passage from his autobiog-
raphy, The Making of a Jew, came to mind.
In 1981, Mr. Bronfman went on a mission whose goal
was to meet with Romanias president, Nicolae Ceausescu.
It was an attempt to protect the rights of Romanian Jews.
Mr. Bronfman writes:
On the Saturday morning I was to see the President,
[Romanian Chief ] Rabbi Rosen told me that all traffic
would be stopped, not only automobile but pedestrian.
We walked because it was Shabbat. I am not usually a
keeper of the Sabbath, but I am when I represent the
Jewish people.
I asked Mr. Bronfman why he chose to walk that day.
His response was simple and to the point: A Jew does not
drive on Shabbat.
I was stunned by his answer. Edgar Bronfman was cer-
tainly a Jew the prince of the Jews, as JTAs Ami Eden has
so movingly written and he certainly drove on Shabbat.
How could he make such a blanket statement?
Perhaps sensing my surprise, he continued: My Shab-
bat is my Shabbat. No one can tell me how to rest on my
Shabbat and what to do with my Shabbat. But I knew that
this was the right thing to do. And, he concluded after a
pause, Ceausescu respected me for it.
Over the years, Ive thought about that statement. Its
illustrative of Edgar Bronfmans Jewishness; it highlights
a deeply personal, and thus unique, engagement with tra-
dition, and a broad commitment to the Jewish people at
large.
Mr. Bronfmans statement was indicative of his personal
dedication to Shabbat. In his day-to-day life, he expressed
that dedication in his own intellectually honest way. But
he also understood that other Jews, with whom he felt an
inherent kinship and toward whom he exhibited a pro-
found responsibility, observed it differently.
He did not need to show that respect by walking
through the streets of Romania. He could have let his
words to world leaders convey his respect. But he knew,
in Romania and elsewhere, that his actions would speak
louder than his words. He walked where his brethren
walked, felt and alleviated their pain, all the while tread-
ing a path guided by a personal yet traditional moral com-
pass, a compass he consistently reconfigured through the
great Jewish tradition of endless discussion, debate, and
learning.
May his memory continue to be a blessing for us all.
Gabriel Slamovits of Englewood is a medical student at the
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and chair of the
Bronfman Center at NYUs alumni association.
Gabriel
Slamovitz
Gabriel Slamovitz and Edgar Brofman at the
Bronfman Center in May 2009.
Op-Ed
16 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-16*
Chicken Little vs. Mr. Blue Bird
Narratives clash as the American Studies Associations flails at Israel
E
very week after Shabbat services,
our congregation adjourns to a
festive kiddush luncheon.
Inevitably, there are two peo-
ple who come and talk to me in between
my bites of sponge cake and tuna fish. I
have given both of them nicknames; they
are terms of affection.
The first is Chicken Little. He is a distin-
guished man with salt and
pepper hair, somewhere, I
am guessing, in his mid 60s.
He earns a nice living, and his
children are grown. I call him
Chicken Little because every
week he tells me that the sky
is falling. It might be because
of Irans nuclear capabilities,
which will be achieved by this
Thursday, or because a ter-
rorist cell that infiltrated the
United States and will strike
Jewish targets any minute,
or perhaps the result of a grand scheme,
engineered by our government, that soon
will deport all Jews from our homes. No
matter which one seems most urgent at
the time, he is convinced that the good
days for the Jewish people are not so good.
No, our sky is falling.
His counterpart is known (only to me)
as Mr. Blue Bird. He is the optimistic fowl
who sits on the shoulder of the person
singing Zippity Doo Dah; he symbolizes
cheer and hope. He is in his mid 40s, and
his kids are in high school. He has a few
streaks of gray in his moustache, and his
hair is thinning. Each week, he finds me
as I socialize during our post-service lunch,
and he shares with me the latest and most
advanced discovery in the world and tells
me how the Jews are a critical ingredient
in its arrival. From the RE-Walk, which
helps people who are paralyzed to walk
again, to the pill-cam, to the story of a shul
that feeds police officers and
firefighters on Christmas, he
inevitably highlights some
story that underscores the
significant contribution
made by Jews in general or
Israelis in particular.
I am not sure if Chicken
Little and Mr. Blue Bird
have ever broken challah
together. I would love to be
a fly on the wall during that
conversation. I imagine that
it would be tantamount to
a human being having a dialogue with an
Anglo-Martian a shared language but no
shared understanding of how to see the
world.
Rabbi Danny Gordis once said that there
are two narratives of the Jewish people
today, symbolized through two distinc-
tive images. One is the boy in the Warsaw
ghetto, with a yellow star stitched to his
tattered jacket and his hands in the air.
Fear is painted on his face as he stares
down a rifle. His eyes beg for his life. The
other is a picture of young Israeli men
praying atop an Israeli made tank. One
picture is the narrative of imminent doom
and the other is a picture of invincibility.
Chicken Little and Mr. Blue Bird.
We live in an era where the awareness
and simultaneous delta between these two
camps has never been more present. The
latest episode from the American Studies
Association highlights this divide perfectly.
Less than two weeks ago, the ASA chose,
for the very first time ever, to boycott a
country and cease academic relationship
with it. The country they chose to boycott
was Israel. Their reasoning was to protest
Israels treatment of Palestinians and what
it described as the involvement of Israeli
universities in supporting government
policy. The leader of the ASA was asked
why, for its very first academic boycott, it
chose Israel, a country that educates men
and women, people of all religious and
political stripes, a country where openly
gay people can serve in the military. Why
choose the only democracy in the Middle
East?
His response?
We have to start somewhere.
It isnt hard to strip this down to what
it is anti-Semitism, clear and simple.
Countries that surround Israel violate
countless human rights that the ASA holds
dear. Nations like China, North Korea, and
Afghanistan violate such rights daily. But the
ASA did not choose to boycott any of those
countries. Instead, it singled out Israel.
Chicken Little has plenty to bring up
this Shabbat.
But the ASA never predicted that scores
of universities would reject the boycott
outright, and even consider leaving the
association in reaction to its decision. Ivy
League, Big Ten, Division AA and count-
less other schools, led by presidents and
board chairs, have stood shoulder to
shoulder with Israel and vociferously
denounced this boycott. Whether it is sti-
fling academic freedom or whitewashing
anti-Semitism, the hypocrisy is thick, and
the tolerance for unfounded discrimina-
tion is thin.
So far, four universities have with-
drawn from the ASA and 81 schools have
excluded themselves from this action.
The list is growing by the day. In short, the
boycott seems to hurt the ASA much more
than Israel. Mr. Blue Bird has a file full of
evidence too.
Today we are at the crossroads, where
two narratives of the Jewish people collide
and we do not always know which one to
follow: The anti-Semites are gaining on
us and we are victims story or the we
are strong and we stand together account.
The latest episode of the ASA showcases
a world where both influences and story-
lines rise to the top.
Who will you be sitting with during kid-
dush this Shabbat? Chicken Little or Mr.
Blue Bird?
Rabbi David-Seth Kirshner leads Temple
Emanu-El of Closter.
Rabbi David-
Seth Kirshner
One fish, two fish, red fish, Pew fish: the year in rhyme
ANDREW SILOW-CARROLL
Its time to remember two thousand thirteen
And recap in rhyme all that went on in between
The president picking his aide Jacob Lew
And the mixed diagnosis from the good folks at Pew,
From the deaths of Ed Koch, forever Hizzoner
To Edgar M. Bronfman, the consummate donor.
The biggest story of the year
Involved a poll that made us fear
That religion is no longer key
To a Jewish identity,
And while Jews are proud of being Jews,
You wont find them in the pews.
Less God, more lox; less shul, more jokes,
Its pick and choose for the Chosen folks.
Iran appeared to turn a page,
Offering up more charm than rage,
And agreeing to a six-month freeze
On nuclear activities.
Well, not all, theyre still allowed some
Enrichment of uranium.
The West is hoping that the im-
ams arent crazy as they seem.
Bibi was reelected with a team
Out of a political fever dream.
On the right was Bennett, a balding hawk,
On the left Lapid, with a gift for talk.
Could Netanyahu lead Zions revival
With this ungainly team of rivals?
The answer it turned out was, no.
A captain must say where to go.
Obama found the Jewish state
To his liking in fact great.
In talks before Israeli youth
He shared an inconvenient truth.
Peace is made by folks like you.
But Ill lend you Kerry and when he is through,
Perhaps we will have cured this mess
(Believe me I could use the rest).
Obamacare turned out to be more
Complex than most had bargained for.
With promises broken and websites a-breakin,
Am I covered for having my confidence shaken?
Is there a cure for bad execution?
Even its fans were plagued by confusion.
A clash of wills at the Western Wall
Would dominate headlines for much of the fall.
Women opened the box of Pandora
Merely by seeking the right to read Torah.
Imagine the horror if another lands naysayers
Were hounding the Jews for saying their prayers?
The year brought Jews a level of scandal
That often seemed more than we could handle.
William Rapfogel seemed to rob from the poor
To make himself rich, while Bob Filner swore
That the pinches and kisses that made women cry
Were friendly advances from a mere hands-on guy.
But dont let the bad eggs spoil our cheer
As we enter another Gregorian New Year.
So lift your glass of kosher Champagne
And hope we dont see a year like this again.
Andrew Silow-Carroll is editor-in-chief of the New Jersey
Jewish News, where this originally appeared. He lives in
Teaneck.
I
srael ended 2013 in
much the same way
as previous years:
facing a surge of
terrorist activity from the
Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip. On
December 24, Salah Shukri
Abu Latyef, a 22-year-old
Israeli Defense Ministry
worker who was repairing
the border fence with Gaza,
was shot dead by a Pales-
tinian sniper. Abu Latyefs
murder was followed by a series of rocket
attacks that provoked response strikes from
the Israeli military which deemed that the
assault directly threatened the 13,500 Israe-
lis living in the immediate vicinityon weap-
ons manufacturing facilities in Gaza.
Israels explanation of its response was
also little different from previous years.
The manufacturing of rockets in Gaza has
no other purpose except to target Israel and
its sovereignty, putting thousands of lives
at risk, said Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, the IDFs
spokesman. Exactly three years after the so-
called Arab Spring descended on the region,
bringing both the promise of political
change and the threat of even
deadlier violence from jihadi
groups, the fundamental men-
ace that Hamas represents has
remained unaffected by these
broader developments. Israel is
still the Islamist groups eternal
enemy, and its aim of destroying
the Jewish state remains sacred.
But what has been pro-
foundly altered is Hamass room
for maneuver. Had this latest
sequence of events unfolded
five years ago not just the murder of Abu
Latyef and the rocket attacks, but the bomb
explosion on a bus in the city of Bat Yam
moments after the passengers were fortu-
nately evacuated its quite conceivable
that we would have seen a military reaction
on the part of the Israelis that stretched well
into January.
Quite simply, Hamas does not enjoy
that kind of clout anymore. Over the past
12 months, the fortunes of the Muslim
Brotherhood, Hamass parent organiza-
tion, which loudly proclaims Islam is
the Solution, have gone from a peak to a
trough in a dizzyingly short space of time.
In Tunisia, the governing Islamist Ennahda
party was chastened by a coalition of secu-
larist groups and is now in the final stages
of handing over to a caretaker government.
And in Egypt, where the Brotherhood first
was formed in the late 1920s, the regime of
Mohamed Morsi, who came to power in
2012, was unseated by the Egyptian military,
following angry demonstrations against the
Brotherhood that if left unchecked might
have resulted in a civil war.
In these conditions, Hamas is just about
clinging on to power in Gaza. But all the
signs are that the Gaza Strips Palestinian res-
idents are becoming more and more fed up
with Islamist rule. Recently, a fuel crisis trig-
gered by Egypts destruction of tunnels from
Sinai into Gaza that had been used for smug-
gling, as well as a tax hike on fuel prices engi-
neered by the Fatah-dominated Palestinian
Authority in Ramallah, compelled Hamas
to cancel the celebrations around the 26th
anniversary of its formation. And when lead-
ing Palestinians gathered for a conference
about political unity in the Qatari capital of
Doha, the proceedings merely underlined
their deepest differences. Fatah, reported
the Saudi Gazette, has been left with a
feeling of impasse, while Hamas is hardly
more ebullient. Continued the Gazette,
The lack of a shared visionthe Islamic mili-
tant group depends on force and Fatah con-
tinues to negotiateonly deepens the sense
of fragmentation, said participants.
All this suggests that a killer blow to
Hamas might be dealt as early as 2014 and
will emanate not from Israel but from Egypt.
One IDF officer has even spoken of an Egyp-
tian strategic decision to paralyze Hamas.
Such a decision certainly would be in
keeping with Egypts strategy towards the
Muslim Brotherhood at home, along with
its determination to defeat the jihadi fighters
who have gathered in Sinai. Following the
recent suicide bombing against a security
compound in Mansoura, which left 16 peo-
ple dead and more than 100 wounded, the
Cairo authorities banned the Brotherhood
by declaring it a terrorist organization.
JNS.ORG
Ben Cohen, JNS.orgs Shillman analyst, writes
on Jewish affairs and Middle Eastern politics.
His work has been published in Commentary,
the New York Post, Haaretz, Jewish Ideas
Daily, and many other publications.
JS-17*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 17
Op-Ed
Ben
Cohen
YARCHEI
KALLAH
312 public school students from across North
America gathered for 5 days of profound Torah
study during their winter break. 45 master
educators including Rabbi Zvi Sobolofsky and
Rabbi Yosef Mendelevitch. 88 volunteer advisors
served as positive Jewish role models.
Rabbi Kenny and Ruchie Brander
Shea and Tobah Farkas
Jerald and Esther Friedman
Shimmie and Alissa Horn
Yitzi and Terri Karasick
David and Marcia Kreinberg
Nachman and Batya Paul
Barry and Joy Sklar
www.ncsy.org
NCSY is the international
youth movement of the OU
Thank you to Congregation Keter Torah and
the Teaneck /Bergenfeld community for
opening their homes and synagogues to the
students of NCSYs Yarchei Kallah
Thank you to the following families who hosted inspirational onegs on Friday night:
See You Next Year!
Sponsored in part by
Touros Lander Colleges
Yarchei Kallah is sponsored
in part by NCSYs Ben Zakai
Honor Society
Hamas closes 2013 not with a bang, but a whimper
Cover Story
JS-18*
Dorothy
Roffmans
way
The power and spirit behind the
Thurnauer School of Musics
master teacher
PHIL JACOBS
F
rom time to time, a student
at the Thurnauer School of
Music says I cant to Dor-
othy Roffman.
Ms. Roffman, the schools director,
simply throws the word out the door.
Is that metaphoric? Yes, but it
works.
She once waved her arms around
an infant, as if she were a good witch,
and pretended to cast a spell on her.
She wanted to ensure that the baby
would become a violinist. That child,
Katja Adolphe, now 15, already is an
accomplished violinist, with a bright
future in music ahead of her.
Then there was the time when
Ms. Roffman, who lives in Tenafly,
asked a student to see how long she
could hop on one foot and play at the
same time. Shes also had students
measure the length of the room by
the number of lines of music they
need to practice.
Dont get this wrong. There is seri-
ous musical training going on at the
school, which is part of the Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly,
every day but Shabbat. But the train-
ing is tailored to fit each child; they
are measured for lessons almost as if
for a new suit or formal gown.
And thats not all. Ms. Roffman
also makes sure that her students
are having fun.
She must be doing something
wonderful. On November 7, she was
named, along with six other com-
munity arts education leaders, as a
winner of the 2013 National Guild
Milestone Certificate of Appreciation
for their longstanding, exceptional
service to the field.
To t hose who know, t he
30-year-old Thurnauer School of
Music is a one-of-a-kind success story.
There is nothing like it at any other
JCC, the JCCs executive director, Avi
Lewinson, said. That, he added, is
because of Roffman.
Shes an amazing gift, he added.
He also credited Dr. Sandra Gold,
who brought the master teacher to
the JCC, with the schools creation.
Dr. Gold and Ms. Roffman met
when Dr. Gold was searching for a
violin teacher for Amelia, who was 4
years old. They clicked.
That meeting was momentous on
both an individual and a communal
level. On the individual level, Amelia
Gold, who was the little girl who was
able to play on one foot, went on to
Julliard. Now, at 42, she is a teacher
at Thurnauer, and her own two chil-
dren study there.
On the communal level, the idea
for the school took more shape when
Amelia was about 11. Her mother
would drive her to the Manhattan
School of Music, where Ms. Roffman
was on staff, for lessons on Saturday
mornings. They often passed Ortho-
dox pedestrians on their way to or
from synagogue. Amelia told her mom
that it was unfair that Orthodox Jews
didnt have music lessons available to
them, because it seemed that those les-
sons were offered mostly on Saturdays.
All of the fine music schools were
in New York, Dr. Gold said. There
was nothing in Bergen County at all.
An observant person could not go to
a really outstanding music school.
There wasnt one that operated on
Sundays.
That was a motivation to become
a founder.
The music school at the JCC
opened in 1984 with two part-time
teachers and 25 students. Now it has
more than 450 students, taught by
more than 65 teachers. The school is
18 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
From the top, Ms. Roffman with
students Talia Miller, 5; Quincy
Eby, 7, and 14-year-old Sophia
Winograd, back when she was 6.
Cover Story
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 19
JS-19*
not open on Shabbat or any other Jewish
holiday.
A turning point in the schools history
came in 1987, when William and Maria
Thurnauer, both of whom since have died,
endowed the JCCs music school. Many of
Marias photographs of children making
music there still grace the schools walls.
William Thurnauers second wife, Lilo,
carries on the familys close association
with the school. Lilo Thurnauer estab-
lished a scholarship endowment in her
late husbands memory.
I get a feeling of marvel when I walk
through the hallways and hear the music,
Dr. Gold said. But I know that it is Doro-
thys enthusiasm and her passion that has
made the Thurnauer School the jewel that
it is. She is a leader of education of chil-
dren. She has no boundaries. There is no
such thing as a 40-hour week for Dorothy.
Perhaps nobody knows that better than
Thurnauers associate director, Michael
Reingold, who has worked by Ms. Roff-
mans side since June 1993.
Mr. Reingold, who grew up in Pitts-
burgh, was playing the French horn in the
Stanford University Orchestra when he
met Karen Roffman, one of Dorothy Roff-
mans daughters. Karen Roffman, knowing
about Mr. Reingolds interest in both JCC
work and music, put him in touch with her
mother. After getting his masters degree
at SUNY Long Island, Mr. Reingold joined
her at the JCC.
Dorothy was the driving force of
what kind of school this should be, Mr.
Reingold said. She wanted it to be open
to everybody, not just for JCC members.
She wanted a place both serious and fun.
She is a particularly hard-working per-
son, who does a lot to make magic happen
here.
She has endless ideas, shes fantastic at
picking great faculty members, and when
the faculty thrives, the students thrive, he
continued. Shes passionate about music
being for everybody. Without the support
of the Thurnauers, much of what were
doing wouldnt be possible. Many families
receive financial assistance. And Dorothy,
shes very driven.
It is not surprising that Ms. Roffman is
driven by the need to share music. It has
shaped her life.
She was born in Havana; her parents,
Holocaust escapees, had been able to get
Cuban visas. Her parents, Paul and Aranka
Kaplan, escaped Berlin via Brussels, and
fled to Havana, where her grandparents
joined them. Ms. Roffman was six months
old when her family left for the United
States, settling in Manhattans Washington
Heights. Her dad was a dentist, and both
her parents felt it important that their
daughter be educated in music. (Her par-
ents were so instrumental in her develop-
ment as a musician that the school hon-
ors their memory every year through the
Kaplan Honors Recital.)
Providing her with a musical education
was not easy, but her parents persisted.
They didnt have much, but she got les-
sons, Mr. Reingold said. She went to the
She has endless ideas, shes
fantastic at picking great faculty
members, and when the faculty
thrives, the students thrive.
MICHAEL REINGOLD
Dorothys parents
in 1938, Dr. Paul and
Aranka Kaplan in
Havana, Cuba, where
Dorothy was born.
Dorothy Kaplan in 1947
Dorothy Kaplan Roffman, left, with her
mother, Aranka Kaplan, her grandmother,
Sarah Gruenwald, and her aunt, Jenny
Cohen.
Dorothy grew up with music.
The Kaplan-Roffman family in the early 1990s: Dr. Paul and Aranka
Kaplan, Dorothy and Eric H. Roffman, and Kim, Ian, Karin and
Sharon Roffman.

20 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-20*
Cover Story
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High School for the Performing Arts (now Fio-
rello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art
and Performing Arts) and then on to the Uni-
versity of Rochester, where she majored in Eng-
lish, studied at the universitys Eastman School
of Music, and played violin for the schools
Eastman Philharmonic.
She realized that she wanted to teach; it
was her burn, she said. It was her passion; she
has known it, she said, since she was 5 years
old. She remembers riding in a cab with her
mother, and explaining something to her
mother. I remember the feeling that it was
because of my explanation, my mother under-
stood, she said.
I was 5, but I knew that teaching is what I
wanted to do. That moment in the cab was one
of the greatest feelings Ive ever had.
I still feel that way. I never get tired of teach-
ing a child how to stand with a beautiful posi-
tion, how to hold the bow. To teach a child
these sophisticated concepts of learning violin
is the biggest high for me.
She also remembers how she realized the importance
of individualized instruction. When she was 18, she
taught a young boy, the son of her parents friends. It
didnt go well. She realized that she wasnt teaching in
a way that was comfortable for herself or her student.
I remember thinking that the lesson was awful, she
said.
So she took the subway to 56th Street, to the by-now-
long-gone Joseph Patelsons Music House, which offered
rack after rack of sheet and book music.
You could go and stand there and pull out a music
book to look, she said. I stood there for four hours,
looking at every single book they had on teaching vio-
lin. Every book presented the same problems I had in
teaching that child. If you put the bow on the string, you
have every conceivable problem. How do you hold the
bow? What does each finger do on the bow hold? Where
is your elbow in relationship to your hand? The bow is
heavy. The books I looked at didnt seem like they were
giving the best way to engage someone interested in vio-
lin who wants to start, especially a child.
But then, finally, she found what she was looking for. It
was a book called Listen and Play Book 1: Based on the
Violin Teaching of Shinichi Suzuki by John D. Kendall.
For Roffman, this book was the golden key.
I still open Kendalls book today and feel goose
bumps, she said.
For decades, Suzukis method has been the gold stan-
dard for teachers of young violinists.
It is more of an attitude than a way of teaching, Ms.
Roffman said. Suzuki believed that if children are to
start to play violin very young, their parents have to be
involved. It is important for parents to know what their
children feel as they learn to play.
Suzuki taught that lessons should build up, step by
step. Students should not be overloaded with too much
Famed violinists Joshua Bell, above, and Gil Shaham, below, at master classes at Thurnauer.

JS-21*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 21
Cover Story
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information at once. The ideal pace var-
ies from child to child.
And, he taught, much of what students
learn is physical. Suzuki taught that it
takes time for the muscles to understand
and to learn what to do, Ms. Roffman
said. The Suzuki method involves lots
of repetition. You are always building on
what you have learned.
Suzuki also stressed the importance of
having children listen to the music they
are learning to play, and its the teachers
job to help them understand what they
are listening to. They must be helped to
understand that they will not be able to
sound like the musicians to whom they
listen in a short time. Learning music
properly is a process.
Ms. Roffman began teaching accord-
ing to the Suzuki method.
Her first job as a music teacher on staff
was at the Lighthouse School of Music,
a school for the visually impaired. Next,
she joined the Harlem School for the
Arts and worked with its director, Doro-
thy Maynor, a world-class soprano.
Ms. Maynor wanted Ms. Roffman to
go to Japan to meet and study with the
methods creator, Shinichi Suzuki.
That was in 1967. The trip was
planned, and Ms. Roffman wanted to go,
but it was the eighth month of her first
pregnancy. What to do? As Mr. Reingold
put it, it was a very big deal, actually.
I dont think many people studied with
Dr. Suzuki.
But, as Ms. Roffman said, I had a
woman gynecologist. She told me not to
worry and by all means go to Japan. Its
much easier when they are inside than
when they are on the outside.
A few weeks after the trip, Dorothy
and Dr. Eric Roffmans first child, Kim,
was born. The Roffmans were married
in 1964; they have four children and 6
grandchildren.
Dr. Suzuki was an amazing educator,
Ms. Roffman said. In addition to all the
specific details I learned about teach-
ing the violin, what was most important
was the spirit and attitude with which
he taught. He created his ideas from the
things he observed as he was teaching
children.
If something didnt work with a par-
ticular child, hed try something else.
He had a very creative spirit about
Former Roffman student is
Roffman teacher and Roffman parent
PHIL JACOBS
With a father and a
grandfather who both
played violin, it was no
surprise what Carey
White, 5, would do. Her
first teacher was Doro-
thy Roffman, years ago,
at the preparatory divi-
sion of the Manhattan
School; she continued
to study there through her senior
year of high school.
Now, Ms. White teaches at the
Thurnhauer School of Music. She
lives in Tenafly.
Memories? Shes got a ton of
them.
I can remember seeing a recital
of Dorothys students many years
ago, she said. I complimented
her, and said Wow, how do you
get all of their bow arms to look so
beautiful? So controlled yet flexible,
graceful and strong? And some of
those kids are so wiggly and dif-
ficult.
Ms. Roffman, she remembers, an-
swered, It doesnt matter. Lets see
how they play when they are 20.
Ms. White was surprised by that
answer.
She spends all of her time with
the little ones, but she is always
looking forward, she said. It
reminded me that Dorothy sees
music-making and learning to love
music as a process, a lifelong pro-
cess.
When she was ready to move on
to another teacher, Ms.
White said, she already
had a solid technique.
She didnt need to fix any
bad habits that children
can pick up easily when
they first learn to play
because Ms. Roffman
had prepared her to
move ahead.
Dorothy planted the
seed and nurtured it in
its beginning few years, she said.
There is no question that had I not
had Dorothy as my first teacher, I
might not have continued violin.
Ms. White has taught at Thurnau-
er part time for 17 years, and now
she also teaches at the Elisabeth
Morrow School in Englewood. Her
violin groups have performed at
the JCC, the Metropolitan Museum
of Art, Carnegie Hall, the Museum
of Jewish Heritage, Merkin Hall, Dis-
ney World, and Central Park.
Its a huge commitment to study
at the JCC, but its worth it, she
said. We work to develop a com-
prehensive understanding of music.
Its not only about the instrument.
Whites daughter, Talia Miller,
started studying violin with Ms.
Roffman last year. Now she is 5
years old, and her mom sits in on all
the lessons.
Watching Talia and Dorothy
together is very moving, Ms. White
said. It makes me think of my
mother and me, of how far I have
come, and how far all of Dorothys
students have come.
Famed violinists Joshua Bell, above, and Gil Shaham, below, at master classes at Thurnauer.
SEE ROFFMAN PAGE 22
Cary White

22 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-22*
Cover Story
the whole thing. He was constantly
evaluating what he was doing and creat-
ing, because he was observing what was
working best with young children.
Ms. Roffman combined what she
learned from Dr. Suzuki with her own
experience and style.
I had to learn that I could explore
with each new student what the answer
for that student might be, she said. All
children are different. They think differ-
ently and they are also physically differ-
ent. What might be easy for one child is
not necessarily easy for another child.
Strengths and weaknesses vary from
child to child.
Bruce Adolphe, a professor at Julliard,
is a pianist and composer whose credits
stretch from the Lincoln Center to NPR.
He is the resident lecturer and director
of Lincoln Centers Chamber Music Soci-
ety, and he is National Public Radios
piano puzzler. He has written music for
cellist Yo-Yo Ma and violinist Itzhak Perl-
man, among many others. He is also a
big fan of Dorothy Roffman; it was his
infant daughter, Katja, upon whom Ms.
Roffman cast a pretend spell.
The spell took. Ms. Roffman taught
Katja from the time she was 4 until she
was 9. Mr. Adolphe remembers that
she taught with a childs sense of won-
der, and that she knew that too many
comments and critiques from the
teacher could harm a childs sense of
self-confidence.
To have the children have their own
objectivity, said Adolphe, she and the
children created imaginary listeners in
the room. Katjas imaginary listener was
named Shtarsht.
As Katja tackled something difficult,
Ms. Roffman would ask her what Shart-
sht was saying. Katja would reply, for
example, that Shartsht talked about the
left hand.
Ms. Roffman had a hat filled with sug-
gestions that Mr. Adolphe and his wife
would write. Katja would pull the sug-
gestions from the hat. One might be
practice phrasing. Another might
demand do a dance. Others might ask
for behavior that had nothing to do with
the violin kiss your mother or eat a
cookie. Ms. Roffman said she included
those notes to lower the pressure and
put some fun into the lesson.
When it was time for Katja to move to
another teacher, Ms. Roffman broke the
news by saying, You dont actually leave
a teacher, you just collect new ones, Mr.
Adolphe recalled.
Dorothy keeps everything imagi-
native, fun and unexpected, he con-
tinued. None of this by rote stuff. She
was teaching Suzuki, which can be dull,
depending on the teacher. Dorothy
brought in a counterbalance.
Dorothy is committed to excellence,
and she puts the time in to create it. Thats
why her school is special. Dorothy is the
parent of all the children in the school.
She had the vision of bringing musi-
cal experiences into the lives of chil-
dren, Mr. Adolphe continued. Dorothy
is like the wizard of a castle. The children
want to be with her. Her commitment is
to the children. All the children.
One last story, told by both Ms. Roff-
man and Mr. Reingold. Each was asked
separately for a memorable Dorothy
moment. They both came up with the
same answer.
It seems that Ms. Roffman saw the leg-
endary young violinist Maxim Vengerov
present the childrens book Ferdinand
the Bull at Carnegie Hall he nar-
rated, played the violin, and acted the
part of the matador. She loved it. She
was so taken with the performance that
she brought Mr. Reingold to an open
rehearsal of the New York Philharmonic
with her. When the rehearsal was over,
we went to the backstage door, and
Mstislav Rostropovich himself, the con-
ductor, opens the door, Mr. Reingold
said. He told us that Vengerov wasnt
there. But he had a great sense of humor,
so and then he said, Mr. Vengerov is
right this way.
Mr. Roffman asked Mr. Vengerov to
come to the JCC to play for the schools
Gift of Music gala benefit concert. He
agreed. When the moment came to
play Ferdinand the Bull, Mr. Vengerov
invited all the children in the hall to
come on stage with him. Both Ms. Roff-
man and Mr. Reingold said it was one of
the most amazing moments theyd seen
at Thurnauer.
When you get people like Wynton
Marsalis and Itzhak Perlman to do a
master class at your JCC school, you
cant do that unless you have Dorothy
Roffman, a person whose heart is filled
with a passion in music and in the edu-
cation of children, said Lewinson. She
is amazing with kids. She knows how to
speak to them. They say you cant give
more than 100 percent? Yet when I
think of Dorothy she gives the extra. She
is still as passionate about it for every
single youngster. She is a Jewish educa-
tor par excellence. Im not taking any
credit. I am a great supervisor; I stay out
of her way when it comes to running a
music school.
Ms. Roffman says that she still learns
from the children.
Recitals are my food for my soul, she
said. I am still growing after 30 years,
and reacting to what is working.
When you have the freedom to keep
shaping things, it helps you with the
vision of creating a great community
music school. We need to offer the best
we possibly can in music education. It
needs to be for everyone.
We dont make judgments about tal-
ent or ability. We just allow people to
come and learn to help us create this
wonderful community.
Roffman
FROM PAGE 21
Keeping the American Dream:
Can Democracy be Democratized?
Hear Andy Kroll of Mother Jones Magazine and David Donnelly,
Exec Director Public Campaign Action Fund, address the problems
and solutions to the infuence of money on democracy.
JANUARY 16, 2014 @ 7:30PM
Wilson Auditorium, FDU Metro Campus, Hackensack, NJ
99 University Plaza Drive/Temple Avenue (of Hackensack Avenue)
Program is FREE and open to all. RSVP info@njppn.org to register
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JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 23
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Snowden revelations
boost calls for
Pollards release
BEN SALES
TEL AVIV The disclosure last week that American
intelligence spied on former Israeli prime ministers
has given new momentum to the effort to secure a
pardon for convicted spy Jonathan Pollard.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and sev-
eral leading members of Knesset have called in recent
days for Pollards release, in response to reports that
documents leaked by former defense contractor
Edward Snowden showed U.S. intelligence had tar-
geted the email addresses of Ehud Barak and Ehud
Olmert.
Mr. Pollards case isnt disconnected from the U.S.
spying on Israel, Nachman Shai, the co-chair of the
Knesset caucus to free Pollard, said. It turns out, its
part of life. And what he did is a part of life.
Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein accused the United
States of hypocrisy for holding Pollard, who as a
civilian U.S. Navy analyst spied on the United States
for Israel, even as it spied on Israeli leaders. Transpor-
tation Minister Yisrael Katz said he wants the Israeli
government to demand Pollards release and insist the
United States cease its espionage operations in Israel.
And opposition leader Isaac Herzog said Pollards pun-
ishment has long passed the limits of sensibility.
We hope that the conditions will be created that
will enable us to bring Jonathan home, Mr. Netanyahu
said Sunday at the Israeli Cabinets weekly meeting.
This is neither conditional on, nor related to, recent
events, even though we have given our opinion on
these developments.
When Mr. Pollards crimes first came to light in the
mid-1980s, his activities seemed like a major act of
betrayal given the close alliance between Israel and
the United States. But the Snowden revelations show
that spying by the United States and Israel was a two-
way affair, prompting a new round of calls for Pollards
release.
Support for freeing Mr. Pollard represents a rare
point of consensus in Israeli politics, with 100 Knes-
set members among the 120 signing a letter asking
www.jstandard.com
Jewish Agency chief Natan Sharansky called for
Jonathan Pollards release in his speech to the
Jewish Federations of North America General
Assembly in Jerusalem on November 12.
YONATAN SIDNEL/FLASH90
SEE POLLARD PAGE 24
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 23
Jewish World
24 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-24
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Mr. Obama to release Pollard, according to Mr. Shai.
Eighty members signed a similar letter last year.
But Ronen Bergman, an expert on Israeli intelli-
gence who is writing a history of Israels spy agencies,
says Israeli pressure is unlikely to convince President
Obama to free Mr. Pollard in the short term.
Im quite positive that it wont happen tomorrow
because otherwise it will look as if the president of
the United States accepts the claim that following the
recent revelations from Edward Snowden, he should
parole Jonathan Pollard, Mr. Bergman said. But
once the Americans were caught with their hands in
the cookie jar, it paints the Pollard issue in a different
color.
The clamor for Mr. Pollards release has grown
steadily over the past two years, with the late U.S.
Sen. Arlen Specter, former Attorney General Michael
Mukasey and former Secretary of State George Shultz
expressing their support.
Jewish Agency for Israel Chairman Natan Sharansky,
a vocal advocate for Pollards release who raised the
issue last month in his speech to the General Assembly
of the Jewish Federations of North America, said that
American calls for the release of Pollard matter more
than Israeli advocacy.
What really matters is what American public opin-
ion and American professionals and the American
Jewish community feel, Mr. Sharansky said. I want
to be cautious, but I think we passed a checkpoint.
Now we dont see people thinking [Pollards release]
is unthinkable.
Mr. Pollards supporters long have argued that his
three decades of incarceration for spying on an ally is
excessive. Revelations about American espionage may
strengthen the rhetorical argument on Mr. Pollards
behalf, they say, but the merits of the case for release
stand on their own.
Without any connection to the recent news, theres
no question that the time has already come when the
Israeli public and senior officials want this tragedy to
come to an end, said Adi Ginsburg, a spokesperson
for the advocacy group Justice for Jonathan Pollard.
American justice and shared values between the two
countries, like justice and mercy, necessitate Pollards
freedom. JTA WIRE SERVICE
Pollard
FROM PAGE 23
BRIEF
Israeli youths forced to
compete anonymously in
Dubai chess tournament
Israelis competing in the World Youth Chess Champi-
onships in Dubai are being forced to compete anony-
mously and not represent Israel in the international
tournament.
On the 2013 World Youth Chess Championships offi-
cial website, Israelis aged 10-18 are identified under
the generic country acronym FIDE, the Federation
Internationale des Echecs, or World Chess Federation.
The Israeli youngsters were allowed to compete
only after Israeli Chess Federation head Moshe Sha-
lev, supported by Deputy Foreign Minister Zeev Elkin,
warned the Dubai organizers that the FIDE would can-
cel the tournament, the Times of Israel reported.
The United Arab Emirates, like most Arab countries,
does not recognize Israel. In 2009, the country denied
Israeli tennis player Shahar Peer a visa to compete in
the Dubai Tennis Championships, garnering wide-
spread condemnation. JNS.ORG
Jewish World
JS-25*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 25
Dutch Jews
and the slave trade
CNAAN LIPHSHIZ
AND IRIS TZUR
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS On a
busy street near the Dutch Parliament,
three white musicians in blackface regale
passersby with holiday tunes about the
Dutch Santa Claus, Sinterklaas, and his
slave, Black Pete.
Many native Dutchmen view dressing
up as Black Pete in December as a ven-
erable tradition, but others consider it a
racist affront to victims of slavery. With
Holland marking the 150th anniversary of
abolition this year, the controversy over
Black Pete has reached new heights. Hun-
dreds demonstrated against the custom
in Amsterdam last month, and more than
2 million signed a petition supporting it.
Through it all, Dutch Jews some of
whom celebrate their own version of the
Black Pete custom, called Hanukklaas
largely have remained silent.
But that changed in October, when
Lody van de Kamp, an unconventional
Orthodox rabbi, wrote a scathing cri-
tique about it on Republiek Allochtonie,
a Dutch news-and-opinion web-
site. The portrayal of Peter
the slave dates back to a period
when we as citizens did not
meet the social criteria that bind
us today, Rabbi Van de Kamp
wrote.
Speaking out against Black
Pete is part of what Rabbi van de
Kamp calls his social mission, an
effort that extends to reminding
Dutch Jews of their ancestors
deep involvement in the slave
trade. In April, he is set to pub-
lish a book about Dutch Jewish complic-
ity in the slave trade, an effort he hopes
will sensitize Jews to slavery in general
and to the Black Pete issue in particular.
I wrote the book and I got involved
in the Black Pete
debat e because
of what I learned
from my Dutch predecessors on what it
means to be a rabbi namely, to speak
about social issues, not only give instruc-
tions on how to cook on Shabbat, Rabbi
van de Kamp said.
Money was earned by Jewish commu-
nities in South America, partly through
slavery, and went to Holland, where Jew-
ish bankers handled it, he said. Non-
Jews were also complicit, but so were we.
I feel partly complicit.
Though he holds no official position in
SEE SLAVE TRADE PAGE 26
Amsterdam musicians dress up as Black Pete, the slave of
the Dutch Santa Claus, Sinterklaas. CNAAN
Rabbi Lody van de Kamp
Jewish World
26 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-26
Giving Tzedakah is the
greatest thing a Jew can
do. My husband and
I made Tzedakah an
essential part of our lives,
just as my parents did.
Thats why I endowed my gift
to Jewish Federation.
Rosalind Green
Dor LDor Society member
THE STRENGTH OF A PEOPLE. THE POWER OF COMMUNITY.
Robin Rochlin | legacy@jfnnj.org | 201.820.3970
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
What is your reason?
the Dutch Jewish community, Rabbi van
de Kamp, 65, is among the best-known
Orthodox rabbis in the Netherlands, a
status earned through his several books
on Dutch Jewry and frequent media
appearances.
His forthcoming book, a historical
novel called The Jewish Slave, fol-
lows an 18th-century Jewish merchant
and his black slave as they investigate
Dutch-owned plantations north of Brazil
in the hope of persuading Jews to divest
from the slave trade. In researching the
book, van de Kamp discovered data that
shocked him.
In one area of what used to be Dutch
Guyana, 40 Jewish-owned plantations
were home to a total population of at
least 5,000 slaves, he says. Known as the
Jodensavanne, or Jewish Savannah, the
area had a Jewish community of several
hundred before its destruction in a slave
uprising in 1832. Nearly all of them immi-
grated to Holland, bringing their accumu-
lated wealth with them.
Some of that wealth was on display last
year in the cellar of Amsterdams Portu-
guese Synagogue, part of an exhibition
celebrating the riches of the synagogues
immigrant founders. Rabbi van de Kamp
says the exhibition sparked his interest in
the Dutch Jewish role in slavery, which
was robust.
On the Caribbean island of Curacao,
Dutch Jews may have accounted for the
resale of at least 15,000 slaves landed by
Dutch transatlantic traders, according
to Seymour Drescher, a historian at the
University of Pittsburgh. At one point,
Jews controlled about 17 percent of the
Caribbean trade in Dutch colonies, Dr.
Drescher said.
Jews were so influential in those colo-
nies that slave auctions scheduled to take
place on Jewish holidays often were post-
poned, according to Marc Lee Raphael, a
professor of Judaic studies at the College
of William & Mary.
In the United States, the Jewish role
in the slave trade has been a matter of
scholarly debate for nearly two decades,
prompted in part by efforts to refute the
Nation of Islams claim that Jews domi-
nated the Atlantic slave trade. But in Hol-
land, the issue of Jewish complicity is
rarely discussed.
This is because we in the Netherlands
only profited from slavery but have not
seen it in our own eyes, Rabbi van de
Kamp said. The American experience is
different.
The slavery issue is not Rabbi van de
Kamps first foray into controversial ter-
ritory. In Jewish circles, he has a reputa-
tion as a contrarian with a penchant for
voicing anti-establishment views.
That image was reinforced last year
when he spoke out against a compromise
the Dutch Jewish community had reached
with the government over kosher slaugh-
ter. Designed to avert a total ban, the
compromise placed some restrictions on
kosher slaughter that Hollands chief rab-
bis said did not violate Jewish law. Rabbi
van de Kamp denounced the deal as an
unacceptable infringement on religious
freedom.
More recently, he angered Dutch activ-
ists by suggesting that vilifying Dutch
Muslims helped generate anti-Semitism.
He also advocated dialogue with pro-
fessed Muslim anti-Semites at a time
when Jewish groups were calling for their
prosecution.
But his reputation as a maverick rabbi
in a consensusoriented community has
also endeared Rabbi van de Kamp to
some supporters.
He is in a league of his own, says Bart
Wallet, an Amsterdam University histo-
rian and expert on Jewish history. From
the sideline, he is free to criticize and
does not have to conform to anything.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Slave trade
FROM PAGE 25
In the United States, the Jewish
role in the slave trade has been
a matter of scholarly debate
for nearly two decades.
Jewish World
JS-27
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 27
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Rocket from Lebanon
strikes northern Israel
A Katyusha rocket fired from Lebanon exploded west
of the northern Israeli city of Kiryat Shmona on Sun-
day. Four other rockets were fired from Lebanon but
did not land in Israel, and no injuries were reported.
Palestinian groups in southern Lebanon likely were
responsible for the rockets, Lebanese media reported.
In response, the IDF fired shells at the source of the
rocket fire, according to Army Radio.
The IDF responded powerfully and quickly to the
fire from Lebanon today, Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu said at his cabinet meeting Sunday. This
is our policy in Lebanon, like it is in Gaza. We wont
permit a trickle [of rockets] and, if needed, will act [to
thwart rocket fire] beforehand.
In another incident last Thursday, two rockets from
Gaza were fired into the southern Israeli city of Ash-
kelon. The rockets landed in open areas and caused no
injuries. The Israel Defense Forces responded by strik-
ing a weapons-manufacturing facility and a weapons-
storage facility in Gaza. JNS.ORG
Iran announces
new centrifuges
for nuclear program
Irans nuclear chief said the country is building a
new generation of centrifuges for uranium enrich-
ment. Novembers interim nuclear deal between Iran
and world powers stipulated that the Islamic Republic
would not make new centrifuges operational for six
months, but did not prohibit Iran from developing
centrifuges.
The new generation of centrifuges is under devel-
opment. But all tests should be carried out on it before
mass production, said Ali Akbar Salehi, head of the
Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Iranian reported.
JNS.ORG
Third Palestinian intifada may
be imminent, says PA report
Palestinian security officials warned over the weekend
that a third intifada might be imminent, despite Israeli
assessments to the contrary.
Israel Defense Forces officials have deemed that
recent attacks on Israel are atmospheric attacks that
have not been directed by any of the major Palestinian
terrorist groups.
But a report compiled by the Palestinian Authoritys
security forces, leaked to the media over the weekend,
warned that chances of a third intifada are very high.
The report recommended that the PA formulate con-
tingency plans to combat the possibility that a violent
uprising would erupt, so that it would not be dragged
after the street like in the second intifada.
There is a lot of rage on the ground over the diffi-
culties in the peace process and the continued settle-
ment construction, a senior Palestinian security offi-
cial told Israel Hayom. Under these conditions, an
intifada is very likely, the official said. JNS.ORG
www.jstandard.com
Jewish World
28 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-28*
ROBERT GLUCK
W
hy has education been so important to the
Jewish people?
Author Maristella Botticini says a unique
religious norm Jews enacted two millennia
ago made male literacy universal among Jews. This was many
centuries earlier than such literacy became prevalent for the
rest of the worlds population.
Wherever and whenever Jews lived among a population
of mostly unschooled people, they had a comparative advan-
tage, Dr. Botticini said. They could read and write contracts,
business letters, and account books using a common alphabet
while learning the local languages of the different places they
dwelled.
These skills became valuable in the urban and commer-
cially oriented economy that developed under Muslim rule in
the area from the Iberian Peninsula to the Middle East.
Emphasizing literacy over time set Jews up for economic
success, according to Dr. Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, authors
of a 2012 book The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped
Jewish History.
An economic historian, Dr. Botticini earned a B.A. in eco-
nomics from Universit Bocconi in Milan and a Ph.D. in eco-
nomics from Northwestern University. After a stint at Boston
University, she returned to Italy and works at her alma mater.
Dr. Eckstein, an economist, received his B.A. from Tel Aviv
University and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He
spent five years as the Bank of Israels deputy governor and is
now dean of the School of Economics at the Interdisciplinary
Center in Herzylia.
In their book, which they describe as a reinterpretation of
Jewish social and economic history from the years 70 to 1492
C.E., Drs. Botticini and Eckstein say that Jews over those years
became the chosen few a demographically small popula-
tion living in hundreds of places across the globe and special-
izing in the most skilled and urban occupations. These occu-
pations benefited from literacy and education.
Our book begins with the profound and well-documented
transformation of the Jewish religion after the destruc-
tion of the Second Temple in 70 [C.E.] at the end of the first
Jewish-Roman war, Dr. Eckstein said. Judaism perma-
nently lost one of its two pillars the Temple in Jerusa-
lem and consequently the religious leadership shifted
from the high priests, who were in charge of the Temple
service, to the rabbis and scholars, who had always con-
sidered the study of the Torah, the other pillar of Juda-
ism, the paramount duty of any Jewish individual.
The Jews new religious leadership set their people
on a path to become a literate religion, which required
every Jewish man to read and study the Torah and every
father to send his sons to a primary or synagogue school
to learn to do the same, Dr. Eckstein said.
From an economic point of view, the authors write,
it was costly for Jewish farmers living in a subsistence
agrarian society to invest a significant amount of their
income on the rabbis imposed literacy requirement.
A predominantly agrarian economy had little use for
educated people. Consequently, a proportion of Jew-
ish farmers opted not to invest in their sons religious
education and instead converted to other religions,
such as Christianity, which did not impose this norm
on its followers.
During this Talmudic period (third to sixth centu-
ries), just as the Jewish population became increas-
ingly literate, it kept shrinking through conversions,
as well as war-related deaths and general population
decline, Dr. Botticini said. This threatened the exis-
tence of the large Jewish community in Eretz Israel
the land of Israel and in other places where siz-
able Jewish communities had existed in antiquity, such
as North Africa, Syria, Lebanon, Asia Minor, the Bal-
kans, and Western Europe. By the seventh century,
the demographic and intellectual center of Jewish life
had moved from Eretz Israel to Mesopotamia, where
roughly 75 percent of world Jewry now lived.
Like almost everywhere else in the world, Meso-
potamia had an agriculture-based economy, but that
changed with the rise of Islam during the seventh cen-
tury and the consequent Muslim conquests under the
Zvi Eckstein, co-author of the 2012 book The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, is
dean of the School of Economics at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzylia, Israel. COURTESY OF ZVI ECKSTEIN
Book examines educations impact
as a pillar of Jewish history
Jewish World
JS-29
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 29
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caliphs in the following two centuries. Their establish-
ment of a vast empire stretching from the Iberian Penin-
sula to India led to a vast urbanization and the growth of
manufacture and trade in the Middle East, the introduc-
tion of new technologies, the development of new indus-
tries that produced a wide array of goods, the expan-
sion of local trade and long-distance commerce, and the
growth of new cities.
These developments in Mesopotamia increased the
demand for literate and educated people the very skills
Jews had acquired as a spillover effect of their religious
heritage of study, Dr. Eckstein said.
Between 750 and 900 C.E., almost all Jews in Meso-
potamia and Persia nearly 75 percent of world Jewry
left agriculture and moved to the cities and towns of the
newly established Abbasid Empire to engage in skilled
occupations. Many also migrated to Yemen, Syria, Egypt,
and the Maghreb; to, from, and within the Byzantine
Empire; and later to Christian Europe in search of busi-
ness opportunities.
Once the Jews were engaged in these skilled and
urban occupations, they rarely converted to other reli-
gions, and hence, the Jewish population remained stable
or grew between the eighth and the 13th centuries, Dr.
Botticini said.
The book does not whitewash the persecution that
took place during the 15 centuries of Jewish history it
examines, Dr. Eckstein said.
When it happened, we record it in our book, he
said, but what we say is something different. There
were times and locations in which legal or economic
restrictions on Jews did not exist. Not because we say so,
but because it is amply documented by many historians.
Jews could own land and be farmers in the Umayyad
and Abbasid Muslim empire. The same is true in early
medieval Europe.
If these restrictions did not exist in the locations and
time period we cover, they cannot explain why the Jews
left agriculture and entered trade, finance, medicine.
There must have been some other factor that led the
Jews to become the people they are today. In The Cho-
sen Few we propose an alternative hypothesis and we
then verify whether this hypothesis is consistent with
the historical evidence.
Dr. Botticini said the key message of the book is that
even in very poor communities or countries, individu-
als and families should invest in education and human
capital, even when it is costly and it seems to bring no
economic returns in the short-run.
Education and human capital endow those individu-
als and those communities that invest in them with skills
and a comparative advantage that pays off and can bring
economic well-being and intellectual achievements in
many dimensions.
A motto in which we strongly believe [is] go to the
local public library and borrow a book and read it, she
added. Even when you end up disagreeing with or not
liking a book, it is never a waste of time reading a book.
Reading and studying are precious gifts. This is the
bottom line message of The Chosen Few. JNS.ORG
30 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-30
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JS-31
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 31
2014
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Phoenix, Arizona
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Palm Beach, Florida
Entire Hotel Kosher for Pesach
Private Balcony in all rooms
5 Tournament-ready Golf Courses
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Four Seasons
Whistler, British Columbia
Outstanding Spring Skiing
#1 Ski Resort in North America
Beautiful oversized guest rooms & suites
Entire Hotel Kosher for Pesach
Scholar - Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks
Glatt Kosher Supervision
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39 Lush Acres with 8 Swimming Pools
2 Championship Golf Courses
In cooperation with VIP Passover
Danzinger Caterers Phoenix Vaad
Westchester Hilton
Rye Brook, New York
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30 minutes from New York City
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BRIEFS
Natan Sharansky
a possible candidate
for Israeli president
Natan Sharansky, the former refusenik and now
chairman of the Jewish Agency for Israel, is a pos-
sible candidate for Israeli president in June, Israel
Hayom reported.
Habayit Hayehudi party Chairman Naftali Bennett
reportedly has thrown his support behind Sharan-
skys candidacy. Prime Minister Benjamin Netan-
yahu and Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman have
not ruled out the possibility of supporting Sharan-
sky, but have yet to consider the matter closely.
Sharansky has overseen the Jewish Agencys stra-
tegic shift in attention from aliyah to building global
Jewish identity.
Many Jews in the world are spending time in
repairing the world activities, or tikkun olam activ-
ities, Sharansky said in 2012. But unfortunately,
for many of them, that is a way for them to aban-
don their Jewishness, to abandon their identity. We
believe that it has to be absolutely the opposite.
It is very important that they understand that
the source of the energy, the motivation to make the
world better, all comes from your connection to your
identity and to your family,
JNS.ORG
Jewish hostage in Pakistan
feels abandoned by U.S.
in newest video message
Kidnapped Jewish U.S. government contractor War-
ren Weinstein said he feels totally abandoned and
forgotten by the U.S. government. In a 13-minute
video message released on Christmas by al Qaeda,
he urged President Obama to negotiate his freedom.
Weinstein, 72, was abducted in Lahore, Pakistan,
in 2011. According to police reports at the time, eight
to 10 men approached Weinsteins house on a ploy,
tied up Weinsteins three guards, and took him away.
At the time of his capture, Weinstein had been work-
ing in Pakistan for several years as a director of J.E.
Austin Associates, a U.S.-based development con-
tractor that advises Pakistani business and govern-
ment sectors.
Nine years ago, I came to Pakistan to help my gov-
ernment and I did so at a time when most Ameri-
cans would not come here, he said on this latest
of a string of video messages released since his kid-
napping, CNN reported. And now, when I need my
government, it seems I have been totally abandoned
and forgotten.
U.S. officials have continued to indicate that the
U.S. government does not plan to bargain with al
Qaeda.
JNS.ORG
Turkish PM Erdogan
threatened by new
scandal resignations
Turkeys Islamist Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdo-
gan is facing increasing pressure on his rule amid a
corruption scandal that has already forced three of
his top ministers to resign. The corruption probe,
revealed by prosecutors December 17, targeted
the resigned ministers sons with allegations that they
received bribes for constructions projects.
The resignation included Environment and Urban Plan-
ning Minister Erdogan Bayraktar, a close adviser to Erdo-
gan, as well as two other ministers. In a surprise move,
Bayraktar then called for Erdogan to step down as well.
To soothe the nation, I believe that the prime minister
should resign, too, Bayraktar said, the Wall Street Journal
reported.
An additional seven ministers were also forced out after
Erdogan met with Turkish President Abdullah Gul.
Last summer, a protest over the development of Istan-
buls Gezi Park devolved into widespread protests against
Erdogan and his Islamist AKP party. Many accused Erdo-
gan and the AKP of pushing Islamic values and stifling dis-
sent against the government. JNS.ORG
Israel names 26 Palestinians
to be freed in third phase
of prisoner release
On Saturday night Israel named the 26 Palestinian terrorist
prisoners to be freed in the third installment of its prisoner
release for negotiations with the Palestinian Authority.
The prisoners involved are nearly all convicted of mur-
dering Israeli civilians, soldiers, or Palestinian collaborators,
according to the Israel Prison Services website, and have all
have served 19 to 28 years of their terms.
Among the murderers being released are Muammar Ata
Mahmoud Mahmoud and Salah Khalil Ahmad Ibrahim, con-
victed of stabbing Menahem Stern to death. Stern was a his-
tory professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and
winner of the prestigious Israel Prize. JNS.ORG

32 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-32*
Keeping Kosher
OU Kosher certifying
certain quinoa for Pesach
Rabbi Menachem Genack, CEO of OU
Kosher, announced that quinoa, the
grain-like seed grown in South Amer-
ica, is kosher for Passover when pro-
cessed with special OU Passover
supervision and bearing the OU-P
symbol.
According to Genack, it is only
recently that quinoa has become
popular outside of its high-altitude
growing area in the Andean moun-
tain region of South America. Known
for its nutritional qualities, it has
been referred to as a superfood.
Due to conflicting reports regard-
ing growing conditions and final
usage of this gluten-free pseudo-
cereal plant, OU Kosher hesitated
to conclusively declare it kosher for
Passover and non-kitniyot.
Kitniyot is a category of foods that
were forbidden by Ashkenazic custom
during Passover because they bear simi-
larities to and might become confused
with forbidden grains and could become
intermingled with those grains. Included
in this group are: beans, buckwheat/
kasha, caraway, cardamom, chickpeas,
corn, fennel, fenugreek, grains-of-par-
adise, lentils, millet, mustard, peas,
poppy seeds, rapeseed/canola, rice, ses-
ame seeds, snow peas, sorghum, sugar-
snap peas, soybeans, sunflower seeds,
and according to some, cottonseed.
Following research and on-site inves-
tigation of cross-contamination issues by
OU Kosher personnel at all quinoa grow-
ing areas including: Puno, Cuzco, Areq-
uipa, Ayacucho, Junin and Chiclayo in
Peru; and Alto la Paz and Chayapata in
Bolivia; as well as the collection, wash-
ing and milling stations of quinoa, OU
Kosher is recommending quinoa for
Passover when processed with special
OU Passover supervision and bearing
the OU-P symbol.
In addition to quinoa, OU Kosher has
concluded that related canihua, kiwicha,
and maca seeds processed under super-
vised conditions may also be approved
for Passover (OU-P).
Teaneck eatery offers food at resort
Teanecks Kosher Experience restaurant
will be offering food at Great Wolf Lodge
in the Poconos, from Sunday, January 19,
to Wednesday, January 22. There will be
a Grab & Go Fridge selling food daily at
the Bear Paw Sweets & Eats located in
the water park lobby.
The restaurant, under RCBC supervi-
sion, is located at 669 Cedar Lane. It offers
a full menu including burgers, hot dogs,
steaks, deli, hot soups, salads, tacos, bur-
ritos, wraps, pasta, Chinese food, sushi,
and also low-calorie options. Delivery is
available.
For information, call Avi at (201)
692-7722 or visit www.thekosherex-
perience.net or www.facebook.com/
kosherexperience.
Butterflake has football cakes
Butterflake Bakery in Teaneck is now
making custom made football helmet
cakes. All team logos can be made.
Advance orders are requested. Cakes
cost $19.95.
The bakery is at 448 Cedar Lane. Call
Richie at (201) 836-3516 or www.Butter-
flake.com.
That versatile food ...
And..speaking of quinoa, heres a great recipe from
Chic Made Simple fresh. fast. fabulous. Kosher Cui-
sine, by Esther Deutsch.
Scallion quinoa patties with
lemon garlic paprika aioli
PATTIES
2 1/2 cups quinoa, prepared according to package
directions
4 eggs
1 cup flavored cornflake crumbs
1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt or sea salt
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup scallions or chives, thinly sliced
fresh black pepper
oil for frying
AIOLI
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon water
1/2 teaspoon paprika
PREPARATION
1. Prepare the aioli: In a small bowl, combine all ingredi-
ents until mixed.
2. Prepare the patties: Combine the quinoa, eggs,
cornflake crumbs, salt, garlic, scallions or chives, and
pepper.
Keeping Kosher
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 33
JS-33*
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Kosherfest 2013 draws more than 6,500
The recently completed 25th Kosher-
fest, the annual tradeshow for the
kosher food and beverage industry,
drew more than 6,500 buyers and
industry professionals to the two-day
event at the Meadowlands Exposition
Center.
Menachem Lubinsky, president of Lubicom Market-
ing Consulting and Kosherfests founder, co-produced
the show with Diversified Business
Communications.
This years show, which included
a 28 percent increase in the number
of attendees from last year, featured
350 booths in a sold-out exhibit hall,
with 275 exhibitors from the United
States, Israel, Argentina, the U.K., the Philippines, Bra-
zil, and Canada.
Biova announces certifications
Biova LLC, the global leader for water soluble egg mem-
brane ingredients, has received both kosher certifica-
tion and halal certification for its branded ingredients,
as well as its production facilities.
According to Matt Stegenga, Biovas director of sales
and marketing, We strive to be more than just an ingre-
dient supplier for our customers. Ensuring that all of
Biovas branded ingredients and production facilities
comply with the Orthodox Unions rigorous kosher
foods guidelines and the strict halal requirements of the
Islamic Food and Nutrition Council of America helps our
customers expand their market.
Biova is the market leader for water soluble egg mem-
brane ingredients including BiovaFlex for joint health,
BiovaDerm for skin care, and BiovaPlex(R) for animal
health. Biovas patented water-soluble process creates
expanded delivery options for consumer products,
including functional foods, beverages, and lotions.
Party showcase set for January 12
Celebrate! Party Showcase, presented by Mitzvah Mar-
ket, the bar/bat mitzvah planning event of 2014, will
be at the Park Ridge Marriott on Sunday, January 12,
from noon to 4 p.m.
The showcase, celebrating its 22nd year, offers ven-
dors with photo booths, creative room dcor, out-of-the-
box venues, invitations for all budgets, wearable favors,
music and party entertainment, and photographers.
Admission is free. Pre-registration is at www.cele-
brateshowcase.com.
The hotel is located at 300 Brae Boulevard in Park
Ridge. For information, call (646) 652-7512.
That versatile food ...
And..speaking of quinoa, heres a great recipe from
Chic Made Simple fresh. fast. fabulous. Kosher Cui-
sine, by Esther Deutsch.
Scallion quinoa patties with
lemon garlic paprika aioli
PATTIES
2 1/2 cups quinoa, prepared according to package
directions
4 eggs
1 cup flavored cornflake crumbs
1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt or sea salt
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup scallions or chives, thinly sliced
fresh black pepper
oil for frying
AIOLI
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon water
1/2 teaspoon paprika
PREPARATION
1. Prepare the aioli: In a small bowl, combine all ingredi-
ents until mixed.
2. Prepare the patties: Combine the quinoa, eggs,
cornflake crumbs, salt, garlic, scallions or chives, and
pepper.
3. In a skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Form the
quinoa mixture into patties and fry in oil until golden
and crispy, about 5 minutes per side.
4. Serve warm or at room temperature with the aioli
spooned on top.
Yield: 10-12 patties.
Yes, you are right to have
been affronted. And no mat-
ter how long ago it took
place, you are not wrong to
object to social abusiveness
cloaked in the camouflage
of religion. Our community
benefits greatly from those
who reject divisiveness and
narrow-mindedness and who
instead pursue comity and
understanding with vigor and
persistence.
Dear Rabbi,
Our synagogue has a periodic Carlebach
service based on the melodies of the famous
singing rabbi Shlomo Carlebach. I have prob-
lems with that new practice. First, I come to
synagogue to hear the traditional melodies
for the prayers, not newly invented tunes. Sec-
ond, I have heard that Rabbi Carlebach was
banned by his peer rabbis for his experimen-
tation with the liturgy and for his personal
shortcomings.
Am I wrong to object to the Carlebach min-
yan in our synagogue?
Tradition, Tradition
Engelwood
Dear Tradition,
You left out from your inquiry the factor
that most troubles synagogue-goers when it
comes to the Carlebach-style prayer service,
usually conducted on Friday night. That is,
because of all the extra singing, the service
can take much longer than the ordinary
Kabbalat Shabbat.
On the specific point that you raise, of
course, you may object to any and all inno-
vations in the synagogue. But I dont know
if that will get you anywhere. Its undeni-
able that avant-garde is not desirable in a
place where millennia-old liturgy is cher-
ished. Yet the humdrum boredom of many
of our congregations motivates people to
seek in different directions for new forms
of spirituality.
And true, some say that the Carlebach
tunes are inspiring. But I have heard classi-
cally trained chazanim object vociferously
to the extra-liturgical innovations that those
songs contain. They say the rabbi did not
honor the parameters of the prescribed and
sanctioned chanting and singing.
During his life, Rabbi Carlebach indeed
was chastised for his unorthodox actions
and innovations. And most recently his
daughter Neshama announced that she was
converting to Reform Judaism. Her decision
may be controversial, but it makes good
sense to me, since Orthodoxy prohibits
women from singing in public.
Now, you dont tell me if your congrega-
tion is Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, or
Reconstructionist. Carlebach services are
held in all of those venues. But to answer
your question, yes, you are wide of the mark
to object to a minyan in your synagogue that
was instituted by the proper procedures of
your community. Although you may have
good arguments in your corner, remember
that synagogue attendance is voluntary.
When there is a service that takes place that
does not meet with your liking, you may
stay home or attend another synagogue.
Dear Rabbi,
Several years ago I attended a bat mitzvah
at a Conservative synagogue in a Midwestern
city. I recall witnessing something that has
troubled me since that time. The principal of
the Orthodox day school in the city attended
the event but he would not enter during the ser-
vice. He stood outside the sanctuary in the hall
instead. I found this action discourteous and
disrespectful.
Am I wrong to have been offended? Am I
wrong to be raising this question after much
time has passed?
Polite Jew
Teaneck
Dear Polite,
Its not surprising or remarkable that you
continue to recollect the event you describe
years later. The scenario has all the trap-
ping of a traumatic passive-aggressive social
confrontation.
First, its an odd circumstance that you
describe, one that is more likely to occur out
of town than in one of the big metropolitan
areas. In the small community context, on
the one hand the rabbi likely felt obliged to
accept the invitation because people in town
would know if he did not. On the other hand,
the dictates of his right-wing Orthodoxy pro-
hibited him from entering a church or any
non-Orthodox place of worship.
The rabbis ill-conceived compromise was
to partially attend the event. He would have
been better advised to make an excuse and
not be present at all. Of course, thats easier
to do in a big busy town.
By all ordinary social conventions, a per-
son invited to a bar or bat mitzvah comes to
see and hear the child be called
to the Torah and be accepted
into the adult community. It
seems that the rabbis religious
inhibitions were like blinders,
preventing him from under-
standing the discourtesy of his
actions.
Unfortunately, often we use
the arena of the synagogue as a
small field on which to play out
the dramas of our larger social
and communal lives. And do
note that among these arenas, there are good
synagogues and communities and bad ones.
In a healthy synagogue and commu-
nity, dramas unfold with dignity and can
be resolved with polity. In a toxic environ-
ment, spectacles can lead to insolence and
be poorly worked out, leaving contempt and
recriminations in their wake. These ill afteref-
fects can and will linger for years.
In this case that you raise, the rabbi acted
out the conflict between Orthodoxy and Con-
servative Judaism by his personal action
standing in a synagogue hallway.
He came to the event with this baggage.
Orthodoxy maintains, first, that it is the only
true form of Judaism, that all other varieties
are falsifications of the religion. Orthodoxy
maintains, secondly, that Jews must shun
other forms of Judaism lest they be granted
legitimacy. In the system of thought that justi-
fies Orthodoxy, its okay to do what needs to
be done, and even to disrespect other forms
of Judaism, because the very survival and
future of Judaism (and the world) hangs in
the balance.
And yet, basic human courtesy does per-
sist as a factor even in the face of such strong
sentiments. In your scenario, the rabbi you
reference felt impelled to be polite, in a way
that was offensive to you.
34 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-34*
Dear Rabbi
Your talmudic advice column
Rabbi Tzvee
Zahavy
Rabbi Dr. Tzvee Zahavy was ordained at
Yeshiva University and earned his Ph.D. in
religious studies at Brown University.
The Dear Rabbi column offers timely
advice based on timeless talmu-
dic wisdom. It aspires to be equally
respectful and meaningful to all
varieties and denominations of Ju-
daism. You can find it here on the
first Friday of the month. Send your
questions to DearRabbi@jewishme-
diagroup.com
BRIEFS
London church accused
of anti-Israel bias over
Christmas festival
A prominent London church is drawing accusations of
bias and protests over its Christmas-themed festival that
criticizes Israels policies toward the Palestinians.
Called Bethlehem Unwrapped, the December 23-Janu-
ary 3 festival at St. Jamess Church is held to draw atten-
tion to the Barrier that affects every aspect of daily life in
Bethlehem, the churchs website said. The church erected
a 26-foot replica of a walled section of the Israeli security
fence outside Bethlehem and included several pro-Pales-
tinian speakers in the festivals program.
The installation at St. Jamess Church is grossly one-
sided and extremely insensitive to countless victims of Pal-
estinian terrorist attacks that were the reason the security
barrier was built. The church has put much effort and
expense into a stunt that misleads visitors with its partial
representation of the conflict and does nothing to pro-
mote the cause of peace, Michael Dickson, Israel direc-
tor of the pro-Israel education group StandWithUs, told
JNS.org.
StandWithUs is organizing daily protests at the church
with U.K.-based pro-Israel groups including We Believe in
Israel, the Board of Deputies of British Jews, and the Zion-
ist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland. Volunteers are
leafleting during the festival events and sharing the story
of terrorisms victims with visitors who are being denied
this information by the church, said Dickson.
A recent report by the watchdog group NGO Monitor
accused several non-governmental groups and Christian
charities of using the Christmas season to wage politi-
cal warfare against Israel. These groups are using
theological themes to advance immoral anti-Israel cam-
paigns, boycotts (BDS), and, in some cases, anti-Semi-
tism, NGO Monitor said in its report. JNS.ORG
Dore Gold is appointed
Netanyahu political adviser
Dore Gold, the head of the Jerusalem Center for Pub-
lic Affairs and former Israeli ambassador to the United
Nations, will serve as an external political consultant to
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in 2014, Israel Hayom
reported.
Gold replaces Netanyahus former political adviser,
Ron Dermer, the new Israeli ambassador to the U.S. Gold
will not be considered a state employee of Israel and will
therefore be able to maintain his post at the JCPA. JNS.ORG
Dvar Torah
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 35
JS-35*
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 35
Parashat Bo:
The heart of darkness
T
he plagues that
God bri ngs to
Egypt become
increasingly more
serious. At first the Nile
turns to blood and then
frogs infest Egypt. There
are gnats, flies, livestock kill-
ing disease, boils, hail, and
locusts. The Egyptians lose
their farm animals and their
crops. The final plague, the
death of the first born, is of
course the most horrifying
and tragic. So why is the
plague that preceded it only
darkness? Maybe before the plague bring-
ing death there should have been some-
thing more serious, perhaps some really
grotesque disease?
To answer that question, let me start
with a different query. How do you
know when the sun rises and sets? I
have a simple answer, Theres an app
for that! In fact I have been known
to take out my HTC One phone just
before evening minyan at my syna-
gogue, which always begins at 7:30 p.m.
I touch the icon Sundroid. At certain
times of the year 7:30 p.m. is before
sunset, at other times it is after sun-
set. Can we recite the afternoon min-
cha service at that hour or not? Once
the sun sets we cannot. Sundroid gives
me the information I need. I cant look
out the window in the chapel because
it is a bit complicated. The curvature
of the earth bends the rays of the sun.
When the sun is below the horizon, just
before it rises and just after it sets, it is
not totally dark. Sunrise and sunset are
gradual changes that cannot be seen
precisely by the eye.
In ancient times, how did the Rab-
bis determine when to recite the vari-
ous daily prayers? The Mishnah asks,
From what time may one recite the
Shema in the morning? [i.e. When is
sunrise?] From the time that one can
distinguish between blue and white. R.
Eliezer says between blue and green
In Talmudic times, they were able to
tell when the sun rose the old-fashioned
way, by looking but not by looking at
the sun. They asked, how much natu-
ral light allowed you to make a visual
distinction? The first opinion in the text
suggests that you could take a lump of
blue wool that had some white spots
in it and when you could see the white
spots clearly, the sun was up. To say
that you can distinguish between blue
and green probably means that you can
see the horizon where the blue of the
sky meets the green of the vegetation
growing on the earth. There are other
opinions in the Talmud. Some say that
you must be able to distin-
guish between a wolf and
a dog, or an ass and a wild
ass, or that there must be
enough light so that a per-
son can distinguish his
friend at a distance of four
cubits [six feet].
After all of these opin-
ions are quoted, what
is the final word in Jew-
i sh l aw on thi s poi nt,
determining when the
day really begins? The
accepted conclusion is the
last one. When you can
see and recognize your fellow human
being, then the day has dawned.
If we apply these thoughts to the
plague of darkness, we can read the
Biblical text in a different way. The
Torah says of the ninth plague,
thick darkness descended upon all the
land of Egypt for three days. People
could not see one another Why is
that plague just before the plague that
brought death? Darkness is the inability
to see other human beings and know
them as your brother and sister. Once
they are removed from our common
humanity, death is not far away.
Tragically we know of times when we
Jews were not seen as human beings, a
step that preceded genocide. There
were horrible eras when people who
did not have white skin were consid-
ered as less than human. There are
places today where having political
beliefs that challenge the government
removes you from society. We are for-
tunate to live at a time when differences
of sexual orientation are finally being
accepted and are no longer reasons for
ostracism or worse.
Just as I am writing these words I read
the following from the Israel Hayom:
Israeli doctors perform life-saving
heart surgery on 4-year-old Syrian ref-
ugee from war-torn Homs. As the boy
recovers, his father says: The man we
thought loved us is trying to kill us and
the supposed enemy saves my sons life.
I could live here. We might ask who
is living in darkness in the Middle East
and who lives in light?
A recent best seller is simply called,
Humans of New York, a collection of
photographs documenting the wide
variety of people who live in that city.
No matter how different they look, they
are our fellow humans. I hope we never
suffer from the plague of darkness, a
plague not far from the plague of death.
Our people know this lesson from our
history. Let us pray for the day when
such darkness will never again descend
on the earth.
YOU CAN SAVE A LIFE!
MARROW
REGISTRY
DRIVE
SUNDAY
JANUARY 5, 2014
9:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Temple Israel
475 Grove Street
Ridgewood, NJ
ECO ED
SCHWARTZ
EcoEd is an amazing husband, wonderful
father and a lifelong eco-warrior! On
November 4, 2013, EcoEd was diagnosed
with a RARE & AGGRESSIVE form of Acute
Myeloid Leukemia, a form of blood cancer.
A stem cell transplant from AN UNRELATED
DONOR IS ESSENTIAL for Ed and thousands
of other blood cancer patients.
Each year, more than 30,000 children and adults
in the US are diagnosed with a life-threatening
blood disorder. The good news: They can be
CURED with a stem cell or marrow transplant!
Patients are most likely to match someone who
share their ancestry. For Ed, it would be Jewish,
between the ages of 18 44, with parents of
Ashkenazi descent.
You have the Power to Save A Life!
Every $100 raised helps add another member to
the registry! Text Match 038 to 50555 to
Donate $10 to the cause!
A
S
IM
P
LE
C
H
E
E
K
S
W
A
B
IS
A
LL IT TA
K
E
S
TO
B
E
S
O
M
E
O
N
E
S
H
E
R
O
!
L
e
a
rn
m
o
re
a
t
B
e
T
h
e
M
a
tc
h
.o
rg
If interested or need more information, please contact
Patrice Foresman: PatriceF@cbsblood.org / 201-274-5381
2014 Benet Dinner
Please join us to support our
communitys school for Jewish children with special needs
HONORING
David & Marjorie Bernstein
GUESTS OF HONOR
Temimei Lev Award
William & Gail Hochman
Nedivei Lev Award
Aryeh & Arielle Sheinbein
Rigshei Lev Award
Maadan Caterers
Stuart Kahan & Yossie Markovic
Tovei Lev Award
Cantor Joseph & Beatrice Malovany
Yishrei Lev Award
Sunday Evening
FEBRUARY 9, 2014
Bufet Dinner at 5:15 PM
Program Promptly at 6:45 PM
MARRIOTT GLENPOINTE HOTEL
Teaneck, New Jersey
201-833-1134, ext. 105
www.sinaidinner.org/support
Rabbi Ronald
S. Roth
Fair Lawn
Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai
Israel, Conservative
36 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-36
Paying Cash for:
Dishes Glassware Watches
Stamp Collections Old Toys Lamps
Paintings Dolls Hummels
Jewelry - Rings, etc. Flatware Coins
Antique Furniture Trains
Pocket Watches Diamonds Rugs
Buying Musical Instruments of All Kinds
We will turn your old stuff into cash!
Please call or stop in.
NOW OPEN!
Paramus Antiques
Estate Buyers
300 Route 17 North, Paramus
(3/4 mile north of Century Rd.)
Store: 201-967-0222 Cell: 201-334-2257 Ask for Paul
Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-6-pm, Sat 9-9, or by appointment
Buying Anything Old!
One Piece or a House Full
Will Travel - House Calls
FREE
APPRAISALS
www.njcampfairs.com
NJ Summer Camp Fairs
Connecting great kids with great camps
Come nd a great
summer camp!
Saturday, January 11, 2014
The Outlets at Bergen Town
Center, Route 4, Paramus
Saturday, January 25, 2014
The Shops at Riverside,
Route 4, Hackensack
Sunday, January 26, 2014
East Hanover Ramada Inn and Conference
Center, 130 Route 10 W., East Hanover
Meet Camp Directors from all kinds of
summer camps and programs
For more info, additional NJ
camp fairs, and directions:
FREE
ADMISSION
Noon to 3 pm
Bring this ad
for a Free Gift!
One gift per family.
Limit frst
100 families.
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
www.jstandard.com
Across
1. Lottys ___ Tablecloth (Jewish
Heirloom Stories)
5. Conservative camp since 1947
10. Yiddishe ___
14. High holiday preparation month
15. American Yiddish poet Greenblatt
16. Jerem. alternative
17. Pioneer of graphic novels (A
Contract with God)
19. Historian Levin (While Messiah
Tarried)
20. Urges forward
21. Lawmakers
23. Floppy-eared dog
25. Jewish American Heritage Month
26. Golden Boy playwright Clifford
29. Cynthia Ozicks Holocaust short
story The ___
33. Small bay
37. Wisconsin Jewish camp
38. Champion figure skater Cohen
39. Eilat sight
40. Etz Chayim ___ (Hebrew for it is
a tree of life)
41. Violated the Ninth Commandment
42. ___ in the Prussian Forest
(Holocaust poem)
44. Some Atlanta Jewish Times employ-
ees (abbr.)
45. Ramon and Halimi
46. ___ Stooges
47. Drudge and Stone
49. Oscar-winner Buttons (Sayonara)
51. Plains Indian
56. ___ on Hebrew Themes (Prokofiev
work in C-minor)
61. Triptik, notably
62. Kabbalah Center devotee Moore
63. A Fish Called Wanda Oscar-winner
65. Garcetti or Cantor
66. ___ is a curved line
67. Man on the ___ (Andy Kaufman
biopic)
68. Smith & ___ (vaudeville comedy
duo)
69. ___ of humor (Seinfeld specialty)
70. Slaloms
Down
1. Jerry or Shari
2. Walk with ___ (hobble)
3. Part of an apology
4. Barkin of The Big Easy
5. Taken in, as by a Federation
6. Jolson and Capp
7. Land ___ (Golan Heights problem)
8. One God Clapping: The Spiritual Path
of ___ Rabbi
9. ___-esh-Sharif (Temple Mount)
10. Lets Make a Deal host
11. Suffix with peek
12. Lenny Bruces comedian mother Sally
13. Workers for Robert Morgenthau
18. Scandal-plagued Spitzer
22. Dream a Little Dream of Me singer
Mama ___
24. HaMotzi word
27. Bara in Salome
28. Shabbat activity for a Spanish Jew
30. From Haifa to Hanoi
31. ___ Harry Met Sally... (Rob Reiner
film)
32. Bar mitzvah boys
33. The peacemkers time ___ hand!
(Light One Candle lyric)
34. Bible from Joshua to Chronicles
35. Holocaust denier, e.g.
36. The Adding Machine playwright
43. Amanda of Syriana
45. Red Cavalry author Babel
48. Shamanic ___ in Modern Kabbalah
(Jonathan Garb book)
50. The Sorcerers Apprentice com-
poser
52. Hamsas
53. Self-evaluating question for the self-
help crowd
54. Trip to ___ (1968 Susan Sontag
book)
55. Begins on Broadway
56. Israeli negotiator Eran, who held out
the prospect of a Palestinian state
57. Former Portland mayor Katz
58. Holocaust philosopher Fackenheim
59. Civil libertarian Cassin
60. Actress ___ Rachel Wood (Across
the Universe)
64. In 2013, it targeted groups with
Israel in their names
The solution for last weeks
crossword is on page 43.
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 37
JS-37
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades 411 EAST CLINTON AVENUE, TENAFLY, NJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFO, VISIT
jccotp.org OR CALL 201. 408.1436
Infant & Toddler Center
Tiny Tumblers
PARENTS WITH TODDLERS 18-24 MONTHS
Kids enjoy climbing activities, obstacle courses and
learn pre-sport skills in this active, fun class. A great
way to develop hand-eye/foot coordination, ne and
gross motor skills in a safe and enjoyable environment.
Mon, 1/27-3/17, 9:30-10:10 am, $132/$232
at the KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades
MUSIC SOCIAL SPORTS
Parents Get Together
PARENTS WITH BABIES 3-8 MONTHS
Socialize with new parents and your
baby through play and music. Includes
an informal discussion on early childhood
development including sleep, nutrition,
and language development.
Sun, 2/9, 3/9, 3/30, 10-10:45 am, $55/$155
Little Maestros
PARENTS WITH BABIES 0-24 MONTHS
Featuring catchy music, musical story time, funny
puppet shows, and bubble musicthis is an upbeat
and catchy class BOTH you and your child will look
forward to. Children learn about and play with a
variety of instruments, and enjoy fun movement
exercises, pretend play and other interactive activities.
12-24 mos, Fri, 1/31-5/30, 10:30-11:15 am, $530/$630
0-12 mos, Fri, 1/31-5/30, 11:30 am-12:15 pm, $530/$630
Wiggles and Tiggles
PARENTS WITH BABIES 3-24 MONTHS
Its never too early to move and groove to music! You
and your child can play, sing, dance, giggle, and share
together. Your little one will develop both ne and
gross motor skills through music, movement and
interactive play.
3-9 mos, Wed, 2/12-6/18, 10:30-11 am, $220/$260
12-24 mos, Wed, 2/12-6/18, 11:15-11:45 am, $220/$260
Sunday Family Fun
PARENTS WITH TODDLERS 12-24 MONTHS
Fun for the whole family! Join other families in a variety
of art activities, free play and music.
Sun, 2/2, 3/2, 4/6, 10-11 am, $65/$165
Toddler Time
PARENTS WITH BABIES 9-26 MONTHS
Your toddler will love this class featuring music,
movement, dance, and hands-on activities. Led by a
licensed social worker who will explore topics such as
developmental stages, family life issues, and any other
parenting questions you may have.
9-16 mos, Thurs, 1/30-5/29, 10:45-11:30 am, $295/$395
17-26 mos, Tues, 1/28-5/27, 10:30-11:30 am, $315/$415
20-26 mos, Tues, 1/28-5/27, 9:15-10:15 am, $315/$415
20-26 mos, Thurs, 1/30-5/29, 9:15-10:30 am, $350/$450
Winter Registration is Open!*
Ways to register:
ONLINE - visit jccotp.org
IN PERSON **new** - register at the main lobby
front desk during the following times: Mon-Thurs
9 am-6 pm, Fri 9 am-12 pm & Sun 9 am-5 pm
BY PHONE - call 201.408.1448
Infant & Toddler classes are open to members and to nonmembers for up to 2 semesters.
*Registration for nonmembers opens Jan 9.
MUSIC
Calendar
38 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-38*
Friday
JANUARY 3
Shabbat in Paramus:
The Young Jewish
Families club of the
Jewish Community
Center of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah hosts a service
and Tu BShevat program
for young families,
7:30 p.m. Dairy oneg/
playtime in the gym
follow. East 304 Midland
Ave. (201) 262-7691 or
yjf@jccparamus.org.
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel hosts a fun and
casual Adon Olam
service; members and
non-members are invited
to share a few stanzas
of Adon Olam sung
to various melodies,
7:30 p.m., 53 Palisade
Ave. (201) 265-2272 or
www.bisrael.com.
Saturday
JANUARY 4
Shabbat in Fort Lee:
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee
offers tot Shabbat led
by Roberta Seltzer, with
songs, props, stories, and
a giant siddur, 11 a.m. Also
a family service led by
education director, Cory
Chargo. 1449 Anderson
Ave. (201) 947-1735.
Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley holds
a Havdalah service for
young families, 6:45 p.m.
87 Overlook Drive. (201)
391-0801.
Sunday
JANUARY 5
War veterans meet
in Hackensack: The
Teaneck/New Milford
Post #498 Jewish War
Veterans meets for
breakfast at the Coach
House Diner, 9 a.m.
Prospective members
welcome. Route 4 East.
Past Commander Stan
Hoffman, (201) 836-0814.
Bone marrow drive in
Ridgewood: Community
Blood Services holds a
marrow registry drive at
Temple Israel & JCC, to
help Eco Ed Schwartz
of Ridgewood, who is
suffering from a rare and
aggressive form of acute
myeloid leukemia, find a
donor match. 475 Grove
St. (201) 444-9320,
BeTheMatch.org, or
PatriceF@cbsblood.org.
Toddler program
in Tenafly: As part
of the shuls Holiday
Happenings program,
Temple Sinai of Bergen
County offers music,
stories, crafts, and
snacks, with a Tu
BShevat theme, for
pre-k students and their
parents, 9:30 a.m. 1
Engle St. (201) 568-6867
or educationoffice@
templesinaibc.org.
Childrens program:
The Jewish Community
Center of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah continues Sunday
Specials for 4- to 7-year-
olds with Fun with
Zumba, led by a licensed
Zumba instructor, 10 a.m.
Program includes nut-
free snacks. East 304
Midland Ave. (201) 262-
7733 or edudirector@
jccparamus.org.
Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds Club Katan
for children who will
begin kindergarten
in September 2014,
10:15 a.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801,
ext. 12.
Adult holiday workshop
in Woodcliff Lake:
Rabbi Benjamin Shull
continues the Jewish
Experience with
Shabbat Unplugged:
A Day to Reconnect!
a workshop for parents
and grandparents at
Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley, 10:15 a.m.
87 Overlook Drive. (201)
391-0801 or events@tepv.
org.
Israel summer program/
gap-year fair in
Teaneck: The Bergen
County High School
of Jewish Studies
hosts its Israel summer
programs/gap-year
fair, with school and
program representatives,
at Maayanot Yeshiva
High School for Girls,
10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
1650 Palisade Ave. (201)
488-0834 or office@
bchsjs.org.
Family activity/lunch
in Paramus: The Young
Jewish Families club of
the Jewish Community
Center of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah offers hot dogs
for lunch, with arts and
crafts for Tu BShevat,
including making a
terrarium, 11:30 a.m.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691 or yjf@
jccparamus.org.
Monday
JANUARY 6
Kindergarten open
house in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
holds a program for
parents of children
entering kindergarten in
September, 10 a.m. 87
Overlook Drive. (201)
391-8329 or amy@tepv.
org. The synagogue
offers a full-day
kindergarten program.
Tuesday
JANUARY 7
Computer open house
in Tenafly: The EGL
Foundation Computer
Center for adults 40+
at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades offers an
open house/orientation,
10:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.,
with a class, Most
Interesting Websites,
and a chance to win a
free computer course.
Refreshments. 411 East
Clinton Ave. Rachel, (201)
569-7900, ext. 309.
Discussion in
Englewood Cliffs:
Shaar Communities
hosts its monthly Gate
of Study rosh chodesh
class, Drink & Think, at
a private home, 8 p.m.
Debra Brown Steinberg
leads the discussion, Sex
Trafficking and Slavery in
America Today. $25 per
person. JoAnne, (201)
213-9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Wednesday
JANUARY 8
Baby/toddler programs
in Wayne: Congregation
Shomrei Torah in
Wayne begins two 14-
week programs: Baby
and Me with parent-
educator Fran Korman
at 9:15 a.m., and a
parent/toddler program
at 10:15. (973) 696-
2500, toddlerteacher@
shomreitorahwcc.org.
Tu BShevat family
program in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers
a program with music,
stories, dance, and crafts,
for 2- to 5-year-olds and
parents/grandparents,
9:30 a.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. Dora, (201) 833-
8466.
Caregiver support in
Rockleigh: A support
group for those caring
for people who are
frail or suffering from
Alzheimers disease or
The Museum of Jewish Heritage A Living
Memorial in New York City holds a family day
with music by rock musician Naomi Less, crafts,
and tours, on Sunday, January 12, at 2 p.m. 36
Battery Place. (646) 437-4202 or www.mjhnyc.org.
COURTESY MJHNYC
JAN.
12
related dementia meets
at the Gallen Adult Day
Health Care Center at
the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh, 10-11:30 a.m.
Topics include long-term
care options, financial
planning, legal concerns,
and the personal toll of
care-giving. 10 Link Drive.
Shelley Steiner, (201)
784-1414, ext. 5340.
Hearing screenings:
The Wayne YMCA offers
free hearing screenings
conducted by Total
Hearing Care, 1 p.m.
Refreshments. 1 Pike
Drive. The Metro YMCAs
of the Oranges is a
partner of the YM-YWHA
of North Jersey. Wendy,
(973) 595-0100 or Mariet
at THC, (862) 257-1370.
Caregiver support
in Teaneck: Ohel
Childrens Home &
Family Services begins
a caregiver support
group at CareOne in
Teaneck, in conjunction
with the Jewish Center
of Teanecks New
Beginnings group,
1:30 p.m. 544 Teaneck
Road. Devorah, (201)
692-3972, Devorah_
Sinensky@ohelfamily.org,
or (201) 862-3300.
Thursday
JANUARY 9
De-stressing parents in
Englewood: Rabbi Dr.
Laibl Wolf of Australia
discusses The Seven
Habits of De-Stressed
Parents: How to eliminate
worry and anxiety from
your life through mindful
living, at the Moriah
School, 8 p.m. 53 South
Woodland St. (201) 567-
0208 or www.moriah.org.
Friday
JANUARY 10
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: The Chabad
Center of NW Bergen
County holds its monthly
character tot Shabbat
with songs, cartoon
character guests, food
crafts, and dinner for
children up to age 6,
4 p.m. 375 Pulis Ave.
(201) 848-0449 or www.
chabadplace.org.
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 39
JS-39*
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
informal tot Shabbat
with songs, stories, and
crafts, with Rabbi David
S. Widzer and Cantor
Rica Timman, 5:15 p.m.
Optional monthly family
dinner at 5:45 and family
service at 6:45. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112.
Shabbat in Wayne:
The Chabad Center of
Passaic County hosts a
homemade Israeli-style
Hebrew school Shabbat
dinner with songs and
performances led by the
boys Hebrew school
class, 6 p.m. 194 Ratzer
Road. (973) 964-6274 or
www.jewishwayne.com.
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: Barnert Temple
offers Shabbat Shirah
musical services, 7 p.m.,
with a potluck supper.
747 Route 208 South.
Natalie, (201) 848-
1800 or ncohen1847@
barnerttemple.org.
Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
offers Shabbat Tikvah,
a service of inspiration
and renewal, 8 p.m.
Chocolate and other
sweets at a reception at
7:45 p.m., and optional
discussion in a quiet
corner on mending
relationships during the
oneg. 87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801 or www.
tepv.org.
Shabbat in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishon
offers Shabbat Shira,
a service in song, led
by Cantor Ilan Mamber
and featuring the Kol
Rishon Choir with
soloist Jo-Ann Skiena
Garey, with instrumental
accompaniment by
Ilan Mamber and Mark
Kantrowitz on guitar
and Jimmy Cohen on
percussion. Dessert and
coffee. 8 p.m. 585 Russell
Ave. (201) 891-4466 or
www.bethrishon.org.
Saturday
JANUARY 11
Shabbat learning in
Teaneck: In honor of
the Jewish Federation
of Northern New
Jerseys One Book One
Community program,
Temple Emeth offers a
day of learning focused
on themes in the
selected book, By Fire,
By Water by Mitchell
James. Program begins
at 9 a.m. with Torah study
and four concurrent
programs at 10:30,
including tot Shabbat; a
family activity; Longing
for Sefarad: Why the
Jews of Spain Matter,
presented by Florette
Rechnitz Koffler, professor
emerita of romance
languages and literature
at Thomas Aquinas
College; and Shabbat
services. A screening
of The Key from Spain:
The Songs and Stories of
Flory Jagoda will follow
lunch. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322 or
lindaposkanzer@msn.
com.
Sunday
JANUARY 12
Tu BShevat in Wayne:
Temple Beth Tikvah
offers a Tu BShevat
seder, 10:30 a.m.
950 Preakness Ave.
(973) 694-1616 or
tbtmembers@aol.com.
Israel experience
open house: Teens
and their families are
invited to learn about
organizations including
Israel Experience,
Chetz VKeshet, and
Naale, offering trips
and short/long term
experiences to Israel,
at the YMCA of Wayne,
11 a.m.-1 p.m. 1 Pike Drive.
Call community youth
shlicha Adi Rubin at
(973) 595-0100, ext. 228.
Sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey. The Metro
YMCAs of the Oranges
is a partner of the YM-
YWHA of North Jersey.
Concert in Wayne: The
YMCA of Wayne begins
a Sundays Backstage
at the Y series with a
performance by pianist
Vivian Choi, 11:45 a.m.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive. (973)
595-0100, ext. 257.
College admission
parent workshop in
Tenafly: Abbie Rabin
leads a college admission
workshop for parents
of teens in 10th- to
12th grades, 3 p.m., at
the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades. Rabin is the
director of Personalized
College Consulting, LLC
and founding director
of the college guidance
program at Maayanot
Yeshiva High School for
Girls. Sara Sideman, (201)
408-1469 or ssideman@
jccotp.org.
In New York
Wednesday
JANUARY 8
Divorce workshop in
West Nyack: Licensed
therapists lead an eight-
week divorce workshop,
Women in Transition,
at the Rockland Jewish
Community Campus,
6 p.m. Run by Rockland
Jewish Family Service.
(845) 354-2121 or www.
rjfs.org.
Sunday
JANUARY 12
Camp workshop
for special needs
participants: Rockland
Jewish Family Service
offers an open house
to learn about summer
camps for children
with social deficits
at Rockland Jewish
Community Campus
in West Nyack,
10 a.m.-1 p.m. RJFS will
run six-week programs
for children with social
deficits run by RJFS
therapists, at Ramapo
College in Mahwah
this summer. Discount
for registering at open
house. (845) 354-2121,
ext. 141, mkoenig@rjfs.
org, or www.rjfs.org.
Singles
Sunday
JANUARY 12
Senior singles meet in
West Nyack: Singles
65+ meet for a social
event/brunch at the JCC
Rockland, 11 a.m. 450
West Nyack Road. $8.
Gene Arkin, (845) 356-
5525.
Singles meet in
Caldwell: New Jersey
Jewish Singles 45+ meet
at Congregation Agudath
Israel, for Israeli dancing
and lunch, 12:45 p.m. $15.
20 Academy Road. (973)
226-3600 or singles@
agudath.org.
Line dancing/brunch:
North Jersey Jewish
Singles (40s-60s) at the
Clifton Jewish Center
offers line dancing with
instructor Terri Defelice,
11 a.m., followed by a
bagels and conversation
brunch. $20. Karen, (973)
772-3131 or join North
Jersey Jewish Singles at
www.meetup.com.
Program for young children
Recently children made stuffed Torah
toys at the Jewish Community Center
of Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah,
under the auspices of Shalom Baby of
UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey.
The next Shalom Baby meeting is Sun-
day, January 5 at 9:30 a.m., at the JCCP/
CBT.
The program, for newborns through
3 year olds, with their parents, includes
stories, songs, crafts, and treats. It is
administered by JFNNJs Synagogue
Leadership Initiative, funded by the
Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation.
Call (201) 820-3917 or (201) 262-7733,
or email ellenf@jfnnj.org.
Children at a recent Shalom Baby meeting at the JCCP/CBT.
PHOTO PROVIDED
Mother/daughter spa Shabbat
Shaar Communities Gates of Prayer
offers a mother/daughter spa Shabbat,
from Friday, January 31, to Sunday, Feb-
ruary 2, at the Lodge at Woodloch, in
Hawley, Pa.
For information, call JoAnne Forman
at (201) 213-9569 or email her at joanne@
shaarcommunties.org.
Mah jongg cards from Hadassah
The Teaneck Hackensack chapter of
Hadassah is selling 2014 Mah jongg
cards through January 15. A regular
card is $8 and a large print card is $9.
Checks payable to Hadassah can be sent
to Hadassah, C/M. Salzman, 513 Rutland
Ave., Teaneck, NJ 07666.
For information, call (201) 837-8157.
In celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the Lubavitcher Rebbe sending Rabbi Shmuley and Debbie
Boteach to Oxford, England, to establish the LChaim Society at Oxford University and to honor
several of its distinguished graduates.
Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey
President
Oxford LChaim Society (1994)
Ambassador Ron Dermer of Israel
President
Oxford LChaim Society (1996)
Bret Stephens
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for
Distinguished Commentary
Master of Ceremonies
Rabbi Shmuley Boteach
Americas Rabbi
Founder
Oxford LChaim Society (1988-1999)
This World: The Values Network
Co-Hosts
Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson
Global Jewish Philanthropists
Judy and Michael Steinhardt
Co-founders, Birthright Israel
Special Guest
John Prendergast
Human Rights Activist, Anti-Genocide
Campaigner
For more information write to
dinner@thisworld.us or call (201) 221-3333
www.thisworld.us
The Second Annual Champions of Jewish Values
International Awards Gala
This World: The Values Network
T HE VA L U E S NE T WOR K
S AV E
T H E
DAT E
M AY
18
2 0 1 4
Sunday evening
May 18, 2014
Lag BOmer, 5774
Cipriani 42nd Street


New York City
Invites you to
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 39
Calendar
40 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-40*
Program for young children
The program, for newborns through
3 year olds, with their parents, includes
stories, songs, crafts, and treats. It is
administered by JFNNJs Synagogue
Leadership Initiative, funded by the
Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation.
Call (201) 820-3917 or (201) 262-7733,
or email ellenf@jfnnj.org.
Children at a recent Shalom Baby meeting at the JCCP/CBT.
PHOTO PROVIDED
Rabbi Rex Perlmeter
Adding spiritual
wisdom to our lives
Temple Beth Or in Washington Township
will host Mindfulness in a Jewish Con-
text, an eight week program starting in
mid-January, led by Rabbi Rex Perlmeter
and Beth Sandweiss of the Jewish Wellness
Center of Montclair.
According to Rabbi Ruth A. Zlotnick of
Beth Or, over the course of the year our
community is studying Torah as a spiritual
path, so that we can use the wisdom of our
tradition to live our lives with meaning and
fulillment. This class will give concrete
tools to help us live in the moment and
deepen our appreciation for Judaism.
The irst class will start on January 21 at
7 p.m.
For information, call Lynne Graizel at
(201) 664-7422 or email her at Lgraizel@
templebethornj.org.
Local artist
exhibiting in
West Orange
The JCC MetroWest in West Orange
is exhibiting Judaism: A Visual Con-
versation, with art by six contempo-
rary Jewish artists, including sculptor
Milt Ohring of Teaneck. Other art-
ists include soferet and calligrapher
Linda Coppelson, painters Jo Joch-
nowitz and Jennifer Moses, iber art-
ist Rachel Kanter, and photographer
Gene Lowinger.
The exhibit will run from January 12
to February 23. An opening celebra-
tion will be held on Sunday, January
12, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Aaron-High Priest made of
bronze. COURTESY MILT OHRING
Linda Eder
at bergenPAC
Linda Eder will perform at the
Bergen Performance Arts Center
in Englewood on Thursday, Janu-
ary 23, at 8 p.m. Her repertoire
includes Broadway, standards,
pop, country, and jazz. For tick-
ets, call (201) 227 1030 or go to
www.ticketmaster.com or www.
bergenpac.org.
In celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the Lubavitcher Rebbe sending Rabbi Shmuley and Debbie
Boteach to Oxford, England, to establish the LChaim Society at Oxford University and to honor
several of its distinguished graduates.
Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey
President
Oxford LChaim Society (1994)
Ambassador Ron Dermer of Israel
President
Oxford LChaim Society (1996)
Bret Stephens
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for
Distinguished Commentary
Master of Ceremonies
Rabbi Shmuley Boteach
Americas Rabbi
Founder
Oxford LChaim Society (1988-1999)
This World: The Values Network
Co-Hosts
Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson
Global Jewish Philanthropists
Judy and Michael Steinhardt
Co-founders, Birthright Israel
Special Guest
John Prendergast
Human Rights Activist, Anti-Genocide
Campaigner
For more information write to
dinner@thisworld.us or call (201) 221-3333
www.thisworld.us
The Second Annual Champions of Jewish Values
International Awards Gala
This World: The Values Network
T HE VA L U E S NE T WOR K
S AV E
T H E
DAT E
M AY
18
2 0 1 4
Sunday evening
May 18, 2014
Lag BOmer, 5774
Cipriani 42nd Street


New York City
Invites you to
Musical concert in Ridgewood
Temple Israel and JCC of Ridgewood
continues this years series of Win-
ter Music Saturdays on January 11,
as Israeli musicians clarinetist Moran
Katz, violist Shmuel Katz and pianist
Anna Polonsky play works by Mozart
and Max Bruch.
The evening begins at 7:45 with a
brief Havdalah service, followed by an
hour-long concert and a dessert recep-
tion with the artists.
The concert is sponsored by Temple
Israel member Richard Schnaittacher
in honor of his father, Fred Schnait-
tacher, and in honor of the America-
Israel Cultural Foundation, which sup-
ports artistic life in Israel. This will be
the irst event and launching point for
AICFs 75th anniversary in the United
States.
All are welcome; a $10 donation is
requested.
For more information, call (201) 444-
9320 or email ofice@synagogue.org.
Shmuel Katz
SOPHIA KESSINGER
Anna Polonsky
STEVE RISKIND
Moran Katz
KENN STOLTE (AT GITTINGS)
Announce your
events
We welcome announcements of upcoming
events. Announcements are free. Accompany-
ing photos must be high resolution, jpg les.
Send announcements 2 to 3 weeks in advance.
Not every release will be published. Include a
daytime telephone number and send to:
NJ Jewish Media Group
pr@jewishmediagroup.com 201-837-8818
De-stressing
parents
The student life committee at the Moriah
School offers a discussion with Rabbi
Dr. Laibl Wolf, The Seven Habits of De-
Stressed Parents, on Thursday, January 9,
at 8 p.m.
The presentation will offer suggestions
on how to eliminate worry and anxiety
from life through mindful living. Rabbi
Wolf is the dean of Spiritgrow the Josef
Kryss Center in Australia. A spiritual men-
tor and teacher, he is also a chassidic
rabbi, psychologist, lawyer, and author.
His bestselling book, Practical Kabbalah,
has been translated into many languages.
The Moriah School is at 53 S. Woodland
St., Englewood. For information, call (201)
567-0208, email ekessler@moriahschool.
org, or go to www.moriahschool.org.
Friendship
teens to meet
survivors
The Chabad Center of Passaic
Countys Friendship Circle Action
Teens will meet for its monthly
program on Sunday, January 12 at
2 p.m. The group will visit local
Holocaust survivors. Transporta-
tion will be provided to and from
the Chabad Center and community
service hours will be awarded.
Call Chani at (973) 694-6274 or
email her at Chanig@optonline.
net.
Rabbi Dr. Laibl Wolf
COURTESY MORIAH
Norpac hosting
Minnesota
senator
Norpac welcomes Senator Al Fran-
ken (D-MN) at an event hosted
by Esther and Mort Fridman in
Teaneck, on Sunday, January 5, at
11 a.m. For information, call (201)
788-5133 or email Avi@Norpac.net.
Senator Al Franken
Like us
on
Facebook.
facebook.com/
jewishstandard
Obituaries
JS-41
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 41
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Jean Ruff
Jean Pomerantz Ruff, 88, of Boynton Beach, Fla.,
formerly of Fair Lawn and Freehold, died December 24.
Born in the Bronx, she was predeceased by her
husband, Herb; a grandson, Jeffrey Miller; and a
sister, Sylvia Rose. She is survived by her children,
Dee Rothschild (Ken) of Hillsborough, Ellen Miller of
Freehold, Douglas (Heidi) of Jacksonville, and Howard
(Fran) of Allendale; a sister, Lenore Tauber (Arthur);
eight grandchildren; six great-grandsons; and many
nieces and nephews.
Donations can be made to Freedom Institute, New
York, or a charity of choice. Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Betty May Thaler
Betty May Thaler, ne Smith, of Laurel Hollow, N.Y.,
died December 15.
Born in Philadelphia, she was a medical office
manager.
Predeceased by her husband, Dr. David, and
a brother, Irving Smith, she is survived by her
children, Dr. Bruce (Sharon), Dr. Fred (Roni), and
Jean (Abdullah Kayaalp); sisters, Gabrielle Weinstein
and Shirley Fletcher; four grandchildren, and one
great- grandchild.
Contributions can be sent to Hadassah or Feed
the Hungry. Arrangements were by Gutterman and
Musicant Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.
child on average; were delivering a double curriculum
for $15,000.
Yeshivat Noam is now in its 13th year and has more
than 820 students. Its annual fundraising goal is
$700,000. A much larger capital campaign so far has
raised $6 million to pay for the schools campus, with a
further $13 million still to be raised.
Thats why its so important to have lay leaders to
share the responsibility of identifying new donors and
making the pitch, she said. Its an investment in future
Jewish leaders, future Jewish thinkers, future Jewish
doers. Thats who were raising in our building now.
Many of our donors see it first hand because their
children are in the school or their grandchildren are in
the school. For some, its bringing them in for a tour and
showing them the energy of the building.
Mr. Adler said that board members can learn to raise
money. He was trained in solicitation techniques when
he became president of Noam three years ago. I felt it
was an important part of my role, he said. Now I do
it all the time.
The more face-to-face solicitation you can do, the
higher percentage success rate youre going to have.
Face-to-face solicitations is the way youre going to
increase your fundraising.
When youre sitting in someones living room, and
you ask them, if you look them in the eye if they can
afford it theyre probably going to give, Mr. Adler said.
Fundraising
FROM PAGE 7
BRIEF
Sephardic group cautiously praises Iraq
The Sephardic group Jews Indigenous to the Middle
East and North Africa cautiously praised the Iraqi govern-
ment for its recognition of the Jewish communitys role in
the countrys history, but still has reservations about the
governments claim to the Iraqi Jewish Archive.
In a recent religious ceremony attended by Iraqs
ambassador to the U.S., 49 fragments of a Torah scroll
that were part of the Iraqi Jewish Archive collection
were buried in accordance with Jewish tradition at the
New Montefiore Cemetery in West Babylon, N.Y.
The Iraqi government said the Jewish community
played a key role in building the country; it shared in
its prosperity and also suffered exile and forced depar-
ture because of tyranny.
This is an important step in the recognition of Jew-
ish suffering that took place in Iraq as this admission
of truth will facilitate reconciliation, JIMENA said.
JIMENA, however, rejected the assertion by the
Iraqi government that the 2,700-item Jewish archive
is Iraqs property. JNS.ORG
Te Board of Te Moriah School
extends deepest sympathies
to the family of
Mrs. Gertrude Prager, z"l
Beloved mother of Moriahs
principal, Dr. Elliot Prager
May the family be comforted among the
mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim
Evan Sohn, President
Jay Goldberg, Chairman
From left, Rena Resnick and Ray Goldberg of Solomon Schechter of Bergen County; Cheryl Rosenberg,
Rav Tomer Ronen, and Laurent Bensimon of Ben Porat Yosef; Amy Schiffman of Giving Tree Associates;
Jason Eichenholtz and Careena Parker of Moriah School; Brenda Ruditsky and Joshua Buchsbayew
of Yavneh Academy, and Rabbi Chaim Hagler and Dov Adler of Yeshivat Noam.
Classified
42 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-42
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Every day, hungry people have to make impossible choices, often
knowing that, no matter which option they choose, they will have to
accept negative consequences. It shouldnt be this way.
MAZON is working to end hunger for Rhonda and the millions of
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Gallery
44 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-44*
n 1 David Tower, a Ben Porat
Yosef parent whose hobby is
piloting planes, talked about
airplanes and flight with BPY
pre-k students. Students
also had the chance to in-
terview Mr. Tower about his
experiences. COURTESY BPY
n 2 Forty women attended
Chabad of Fort Lees Blurbs
on Herbs last month, which
was led by homeopath and
herbalist Sara Chana Silverstein.
She discussed the benefits
of various herbs and the way
they can be used to prevent
and cure flus and colds. Here,
participants making their own
medicinal vinegar. Later, a buf-
fet dinner included samples
from the Superedibles com-
pany. COURTESY CHABAD
n 3 Children in the Etz Chayim
Choir and teens in Shir Cha-
dash of Temple Emeth in
Teaneck sang at Riverside
Square Mall in Hackensack last
month. The groups are under
the direction of Cantor Ellen
Tilem. COURTESY TEMPLE EMETH
n 4 Jewish Home at Rockleigh
employees Joseph Hanson, seat-
ed, David Evans, standing, Eve
Renna, and Nancy McGuire were
among those at a program last
month honoring 58 staff mem-
bers who have been with JHR
for five and ten years. JHR logo
jackets were given to each hon-
oree. The facilitys executive vice
president, Sunni Herman, and its
president, Charles P. Berkowitz,
who also is CEO of the Jewish
Home Family, offered thanks to
the employees. COURTESY JHR
n 5 On December 24, children
from all over the Jewish com-
munity visited the Gerrard
Berman Day School, Solomon
Schechter of North Jersey, in
Oakland for a Science Explo-
ration program. Participants
made slime, play-doh, gelatin,
and snow. The program was
sponsored by the Academies
at GBDS. COURTESY GBDS
1 2
3
4 5
JS-45
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 45
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JS-46
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Elly & Ed Lepselter
(561) 826-8394
THE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE
Now Selling Valencia Cove
and Villaggio Reserve
FORMER NJ
RESIDENTS
SPECIALIZING IN: Broken Sound, Polo, Boca West, Boca Pointe,
St. Andrews, Admirals Cove, Jonathans Landing, all the Valencia
communities and everywhere else you want to be!
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
TEANECK INVITING $349,000
Delightful 4 bedroom, 3 bath cape was renovated inside and out in 2009, living
room offers fireplace, crown moldings & new floor, dining room with bay window,
modern kitchen with granite, stainless & door to breezeway,
fenced back yard with above ground pool.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
568-1818
TENAFLY
894-1234
CRESSKILL
871-0800
ALPINE/CLOSTER
768-6868
RIVER VALE
666-0777
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
150 COLUMBUS DRIVE
TENAFLY
511 KNICKERBOCKER ROAD
TENAFLY
82 OAK AVENUE
TENAFLY
29 FARVIEW ROAD
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ENGLEWOOD
150 GLENWOOD ROAD
ENGLEWOOD
35 KING STREET
ENGLEWOOD
154 MEADOWBROOK ROAD
ENGLEWOOD
377 ELKWOOD TERRACE
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ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
35 KARENS LANE
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
48 VAN NOSTRAND AVENUE
CLOSTER
41 MCCAIN COURT
DEMAREST
164 COUNTY ROAD
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TEANECK
240 SCHLEY PLACE
TEANECK
368 WINTHROP ROAD
NEW MILFORD
1134 KORFITSEN ROAD
BERGENFIELD
8 ALICE PLACE
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FORT LEE
WHITEMAN HOUSE, 7-I
FORT LEE
NORTHBRIDGE PARK, 11-G
FORT LEE
800 PALISADE AVENUE, #1605
FORT LEE
100 OLD PALISADE AVENUE, #2507
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
Holy Name will present
variety of January programs
Holy Name Medical Center offers a host of programs this winter,
including health seminars, support groups, health fairs and well-
ness classes. To view the full calendar, visit holyname.org/events.
Most events are free, unless otherwise noted. To register call
HOLY-NAME (877-465-9626), Prompt #5, unless otherwise noted.
Book Club meets monthly on the first Thursday of the month:
January 9, February 6, March 6. Time: 78:30 p.m. Come pre-
pared to socialize and expand your mind. Bring your suggestions
for future reading.
Immunizations: You Never Outgrow Your Need! Wednes-
day, January 22, 12 p.m. Karen Schmidt, RN, will explain how
immunity can wane over time, leaving adults vulnerable to such
diseases as whooping cough, pneumonia and shingles. Learn
what immunizations are recommended to protect yourself and
your loved ones (especially those who are immuno-compromised
or too young to be fully immunized).
Wellness for the New Year Tuesday, January 14, 7-8 p.m. Well-
ness has long been an admirable goal, but in recent years, health
care has increasingly turned its focus to keeping people healthy
in addition to caring for them when they are sick. Wellness
involves more than just an absence of disease, and remain-
ing healthy requires active participation on your part. Learn
about steps you can take to maximize your health and your
role in working with your health care professional. The
speaker will be Linda Lohsen, RN, director of the Center
for Healthy Living.
What Have You Got to Lose? Managing Your Weight
New sessions begin January 7. Tuesdays 10:3011:30 a.m.
This 6-week series includes lively sessions on topics such
as portion distortion, move to lose, emotional eating, and
more, followed by engaging discussions, goal-setting, and
optional weekly weigh-in. Faciliated by Linda Lohsen, RN,
director of the Center for Healthy Living. $60 for the six-
week session.
Rutgers Safety Program for Coaches Wednesday, Jan-
uary 8, 6:309:30 p.m. The Rutgers SAFETY Program is a
3-hour safety orientation program for volunteer coaches.
It is designed to satisfy the requirements of the NJ Little
League Law and is utilized by many municipal and recre-
ational athletic programs to meet this requirement. Topics
covered include general coaching concepts, legal aspects,
psychological aspects, training and conditioning aspects
and medical aspects of coaching. Fee: $35. Register by email
to mendler@holyname.org
Diabetes Seminar: Keeping Your Kidneys Healthy
Wednesday, January 22, 78:30 p.m. Kidney damage
associated with diabetes is called nephropathy. The condi-
tion is progressive and can eventually result in kidney fail-
ure. When coupled with high blood pressure, it can progress
even more quickly The number one way to prevent kidney
damage is to keep blood sugar levels and blood pressure as
close to normal as possible. Learn all about protecting your
kidneys with nephrologist Dr. Benjamin W. Aronoff.
Lose Weight Naturally with Hypnosis Tuesday, Janu-
ary 7, 79 p.m. This two-hour weight reduction program
teaches behavior modification and uses hypnosis to help
you make permanent lifestyle changes that will reduce your
weight gradually and naturally. The program is conducted
by a certified hypnotist and includes a 30-day reinforcement
CD, a series of behavior modification cards for daily posi-
tive reinforcement, and free reinforcement sessions for one
year. Fee: $70.
Hypnosis for Smoking Cessation Tuesday, Janu-
ary 14, 79 p.m. This two-hour program teaches behav-
ior modification and uses hypnosis to help you stop
smoking. We dont use scare tactics or gloomy statis-
tics; instead, we focus on the pleasure and increased
self- esteem you can attain as a non-smoker...without
withdrawal symptoms or gaining weight. The program
is conducted by a certified hypnotist and includes a
30-day reinforcement CD, a series of behavior modifi-
cation cards for daily positive reinforcement, and free
reinforcement sessions for one year. Fee: $70.
Friedberg wraps up help
to Shelter Our Sisters
Friedberg Properties agents again participated in
the annual gift-wrapping fundraiser for Shelter our
Sisters, staffing the gift-wrap table at Chef Central
in Paramus for three days in December. The SOS
elves cheerfully wrapped gifts for customers who in
return made a donation to SOS. It was also an oppor-
tunity to give information about Shelter our Sisters
to the public. Many customers took the pamphlets,
and then returned with an additional donation.
Shelter our Sisters assists women and children
who are victims of abuse. The agency provides emer-
gency and transitional housing, as well as emotional
support and other services.
To find out more about SOS and how you can help,
please call (201) 498-9247 or visit shelteroursisters.org
Mitzvah Market bills
a party showcase
The annual Celebrate! Party Showcase presented by
Mitzvah Market takes place Sunday, January 12, from
12 to 4 p.m. at the Park Ridge Marriott, 300 Brae Bou-
levard, Park Ridge.
Families who are planning a bar/bat mitzvah, sweet
16, or wedding celebration can meet with more than
60 exhibitors and discover the newest and hottest
ideas to help make their event special. This showcase
will feature creative cakes, invitations for all budgets,
unique venues, the newest in favors, and many more
ideas. In one afternoon, attendees can discover new
forms of entertainment for their guests, sample deli-
cious food, meet DJs and photographers, and have fun.
Admission is free, but it is recommended that
attendees register in advance at www.celebrateshow-
case.com.
JulieDance Nutcracker
raises research aid
This years JulieDance and Donetsk Ballets presenta-
tion of The Nutcracker raised $33,500 in support of
pediatric cancer, research, care and treatment
The production has become a Bergen County tradi-
tion, affording young dancers from Miss Pattis School
of Dance an exceptional opportunity to perform in a
professional production with one of the worlds lead-
ing ballet companies and raising money for an impor-
tant cause.
JulieDance is dedicated to fostering appreciation for
and participation in dance and music, and supporting
the research and treatment of childhood cancer.
For more information, visit www.misspatti.com.
Miriam Kim and Tal Tanne of Friedberg Proper-
ties Tenafly office wrap gifts to raise support
and awareness for Shelter Our Sisters.
www.jstandard.com
JS-47
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014 47
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
150 COLUMBUS DRIVE
TENAFLY
511 KNICKERBOCKER ROAD
TENAFLY
82 OAK AVENUE
TENAFLY
29 FARVIEW ROAD
S
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D
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S
O
L
D
!
J
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O
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!
S
O
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!
ENGLEWOOD
150 GLENWOOD ROAD
ENGLEWOOD
35 KING STREET
ENGLEWOOD
154 MEADOWBROOK ROAD
ENGLEWOOD
377 ELKWOOD TERRACE
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ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
35 KARENS LANE
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
48 VAN NOSTRAND AVENUE
CLOSTER
41 MCCAIN COURT
DEMAREST
164 COUNTY ROAD
S
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TEANECK
240 SCHLEY PLACE
TEANECK
368 WINTHROP ROAD
NEW MILFORD
1134 KORFITSEN ROAD
BERGENFIELD
8 ALICE PLACE
U
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E
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FORT LEE
WHITEMAN HOUSE, 7-I
FORT LEE
NORTHBRIDGE PARK, 11-G
FORT LEE
800 PALISADE AVENUE, #1605
FORT LEE
100 OLD PALISADE AVENUE, #2507
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
B
U
C
K
I
N
H
A
M
T
O
W
E
R
T
H
E
P
A
L
I
S
A
D
E
S
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
JulieDance Nutcracker
raises research aid
This years JulieDance and Donetsk Ballets presenta-
tion of The Nutcracker raised $33,500 in support of
pediatric cancer, research, care and treatment
The production has become a Bergen County tradi-
tion, affording young dancers from Miss Pattis School
of Dance an exceptional opportunity to perform in a
professional production with one of the worlds lead-
ing ballet companies and raising money for an impor-
tant cause.
JulieDance is dedicated to fostering appreciation for
and participation in dance and music, and supporting
the research and treatment of childhood cancer.
For more information, visit www.misspatti.com.
48 JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 3, 2014
JS-48
RCBC
*
GLATT
TO GO
Come see our expanded
selection of meats
and salads
Like Glatt Express
Supermarket on
Facebook for daily
specials and offers!
1400 Queen Anne Rd Teaneck, NJ
201-837-8110
Mashgiach Temidi / Open Sun & Mon 7am-6pm Tues 7am-7pm
Wed & Thurs 7am-9pm Fri 7am-2:30pm