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Republic of the Philippines BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY Jose P.

Laurel Polytechnic College Malvar, Batangas COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM COURSE SPECIFICATION Second Semester, AY 2013-2014 VISION A leading University in the region which shapes a globally competent citizen imbued with moral courage nurtured through values and quality education MISSION Batangas State University commits to develop productive citizens by providing the highest standard of instruction, research, extension service and production through value-laden learning experiences, community partnerships and internalization initiatives. CORE VALUES Spirituality Nationalism Harmony and Teamwork Commitment to Excellent Service Human Dignity and Gender Equality Transparency, Honesty, and Accountability Concern for the Environment

COURSE CODE: PREREQUISITE: LECTURE UNIT: LABORATORY UNIT:

COURSE TITLE: LITERARY CRITICISM ENG 8 DOCUMENT CODE: ENG 6 REVISION NUMBER: 3 ISSUE NUMBER: None ISSUED DATE:

00 01 November 11, 2013

1. PHILOSOPHY This course is designed to expose the students to various literary analyses as medium of getting at the heart of different masterworks in literature. It is based on a number of analytical approaches important in literary criticism. Students should accomplish assignments in hope of fulfilling two goals of English courses: to write good themes, and to assimilate great works of literature into imagination. It also aims to raise their standards of judging literature and therefore their ability to appreciate good literature by requiring them to apply, in well-prepared themes, the techniques of good reading, thinking, and writing. 2. AUDIENCE The course is intended for third year Bachelor in Secondary Education major in English students. 3. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course, the students must be able to: 1. respond and interpret different literary works by exploring their meaning, structure, style and background influences, 2. demonstrate through written work and in-class comments their ability to apply various theories to works of literature and aspects of contemporary culture, 3. evaluate the relevance of theories applied to a particular work by analyzing conflicting readings, and 4. generate instructional devices that will serve as supplementary materials in teaching literary theories to secondary school students. 4. COURSE OUTLINE The following is the list of topics and required readings for the course. However, the instructor has the right to alter the outline any time due to inevitable circumstances or presence of other resources which he deems essential for the class.

Week

Topics A. Understanding Literature and Literary Criticism 1. The Nature of Literature Escape and Interpretation in Connells The Most Dangerous Game and Wolfes The Child by the Tiger 2. Thinking Critically 3. The Discipline of Literary Criticism B. Reading and Writing about Literature 1. Reading Literature 2. Writing about Literature C. Pre-Critical Responses in Literature 1. Methods of Fiction a. Understanding Fiction Verisimilitude and Donnee in James Joyce's Araby b. Plot Reversal of Plot in J.G. Ballard's Time of Passage c. Character Characterization in Katherine Mansfield's Miss Brill d. Setting The Role of Setting to the Narrative Progression of three Short Stories: A Case Study of Kate Chopin's The Storm, Tillie Olsen's I Stand Here Ironing, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wall-Paper. PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION e. Point of View Transforming the Subjective Point of View into Omniscient in Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants. f. Style, Tone, and Language A Case Study of Nature of Storytelling in Three Narratives: Margaret Atwoods There Was Once, George Bowerings A Short Story, and Tim OBriens How to Tell a True War Story g. Symbol, Allegory, and Myth Symbolism and Allegory in Shirley Jackson's The Lottery h. Theme Framing Meanings through Themes in Margaret Atwood's Happy Endings 2. Methods of Poetry a. Understanding Poetry Dehumanization in Marge Piercys The Secretary Chant b. Sound Sound and Meaning in Gerald Manleys Gods Grandeur MIDTERM EXAMINATION c. Imagery Imagery as Medium in Establishing Tone in Matthew Arnolds Dover Beach Restructuring Images to Create Parody in Anthony Hechts Dover Bitch d. Figures of Speech

Required Readings Kirszner et al.: 1-3 Perrine: 8-25 Guerin: 15-46

Kirszner et al.: 45-56

Kirszner et al.: 49-97 Gwynn: 309-325

Kirszner et al.: 134-139 & 240-247 Gwynn: 309-325 Perrine:450-452 Gillespie: 330-333, 606-612 & 338-349

Kirszner et al.: 194-201 & 268 - 275 Gwynn: 227-231

Kirszner et al.: 363-373 Gillespie: 817-823 Gwynn: 389-392 Kirszner et al.: 468-475 Meyer: 671 Kirszner et al.: 572-585 Meyer: 843 Kirszner et al.: 494-498 Meyer: 758 Kirszner et al.: 516-523 Meyer: 790

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Establishing Premise through Figurative Language in Sharon Olds Poem for the Breast e. Form Interlocking Patterns of Poem in e.e. cummings The Greedy The People Picturing Form and Meaning in Michael McFees In Medias Res D. Critical Responses in Literature 1. Historical and Biographical Approaches The Importance of Historical and Biographical Context in Extracting Meaning from Nathaniel Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown 2. Moral and Philosophical Approaches Allusions and Allegory in Nathaniel Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown SEMI-FINAL EXAMINATION 3. Formalist Approach Ambiguity as Form in the Dark, the Light, and the Pink conveyed in Nathaniel Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown 4. Structuralist Approach The Structure of Monomyth in Camerons Avatar and Warner Brothers Man of Steel 5. Feminist and Gender Approaches The Struggle of the Abused in Millennium Films Lovelace Infidelity, Love and Queer Psyche in Will Lebers The Comfort of Life The Supremacy of Women in Nick Joaquins Summer Solstice 6. Marxist Approach The Use of Power in The Hunger Games 7. Psychological Approach Sexual Imagery in Andrew Marvells To His Coy Mistress Morality over the Pleasure Principle in Alice Walkers Everyday Use 8. Mythological and Archetypal Approaches Literary Archetypes in Contemporary Fiction 9. Reader-Response Project Making FINAL EXAMINATION Submission of all requirements

Perrine: 771-789 Meyer: 671

Guerin: 51-87 Gwynn: 31-42

Guerin: 90-141 Gwynn: 31-42

Guerin: 368

Guerin: 222-268

Guerin: 15-46

Guerin: 152-180 & 182-218

5. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES Upon completing the course, students should be able to: A. Respond and interpret different literary works by exploring their meaning, structure, style and background influences. Engage in exploring a breadth of literary works and identify their features through applying concepts on linguistics and literature. Examine the relationship of grammar and style in literary works. Apply the concepts on linguistics and literature in critiquing literary texts. B. Demonstrate through written work and in-class comments their ability to apply various theories to works of literature and aspects of contemporary culture. Examine and analyze in-depth different literary or non-literary materials in various medium such as texts, films, advertisement and the like. Determine and identify literary conventions, universal themes, elements, styles and unique features of each material. Employ the tenets of different literary theories in interpreting selected literary or non-literary materials to identify the emerging ideologies and philosophies conveyed by the selected works. C. Evaluate the relevance of theories applied to a particular work by analyzing conflicting readings. Evaluate some extended readings in literary criticism.

Explore the methodologies used by various authors in analyzing both literary and non-literary text. Adapt and extend the methodology in literary criticism to resolve conflicting readings. D. Generate instructional devices that will serve as supplementary materials in teaching literary theories to secondary school students. Conceptualize and create worksheets and other instructional materials that will serve as supplementary materials in teaching literary theories to secondary school students. 6. TEACHING-LEARNING STRATEGIES AND ASSESSMENT METHODS Teaching and Learning Strategies A. Active Learning. This is includes question-posing, inquiry, and self-directed learning. B. Cooperative Learning. This allows students to work in groups and be responsible for each others learning, and each accountable for their own learning. C. Critical Explorations. This is a teaching strategy designed to promote independent learning in a literature class. Students will be assigned to read or to view texts and documentaries that will allow them to critically respond by answering a series of questions or accomplishing worksheets. They will also be allowed to consult an array of media to find relevant information that will support their responses in the given material. D. Critical Thinking. This approach to thinking emphasizes stating original claims or opinions and supporting them with reasons. Critical thinking is used expressively when students make interpretations and support them verbally or in writing. Critical thinking is used receptively when students critique other peoples arguments. E. Directed Reading Activity. This is a building-knowledge strategy for guiding the silent reading of students with comprehension-level questions; often associated with reading with stops or chunking. F. Explicit Teaching of Text Structure. Teaching the parts of different types of text and making sure students understand the text structure before reading is the primary goal of this strategy. This would include basics such as text in English is read from left to right, and also more sophisticated structures such as the structure of a narrative. G. Hands-On. This encourages the students to design activities that they are actively involved. Hands-on participation is as important as verbal participation in the activity. H. Literature Circles. Students discuss portions of books in a small group. Sometimes roles are assigned for group interaction. Students at varying levels are able to share different points about the book. I. RAFT. A writing activity usually used in the consolidation phase of a lesson in which students consider four elements: role, audience, format and topic. J. Reading and Questioning. A cooperative learning and study activity in which pairs of students read a text and write questions about the text and answers to those questions. Later they may use the questions and answers as study aids. Assessment and Evaluation Methods A. Paper Presentation. This is the major requirement in the course. Applying the concepts that they have learned from the course in literary pieces, the students will spearhead a paper presentation on their extracted issues from literary works. They will prepare multimedia presentations of their researches in Literary Criticism. B. Homework and Seatwork. Homework and seatwork are integral part of the course. This may come in various task such as group work, individual activity, research work, extended reading and the like. This will provide opportunities for the students to transfer the concepts they have learned in class to a more concrete situation and to equally participate in class discussion C. Examinations. There will be four major examinations to be administered on the date set by the department otherwise specified. These will evaluate students knowledge on the topics covered in the class. Make-up tests will only be given to a student having a valid reason for not taking the examination on the prescribed date. The instructor has the right to disapprove any explanations for absences presented without prior notice and to void opportunity for a make-up test. D. Class Engagement. Students are expected to actively participate in the various activities prepared by the instructor. To be part of the learning community, students

are required to accomplish various tasks required in the course while adhering to the set standards prescribed by the instructors. 7. COURSE POLICIES A. Refer to the University Student Handbook for the policies on Attendance, Dropping of Subject, Grading System and on Scholastic Delinquency. B. Academic Misconduct. Academic misconduct will be subject to disciplinary action. Any act of dishonesty in academic work constitutes academic misconduct. This includes plagiarism, changing or falsifying any academic documents or materials, cheating, and giving or receiving unauthorized aid in tests, examinations, or other assigned school works. Punishment for academic misconduct will vary according to the seriousness of the offense. Punishment for such offenses includes expulsion, suspension, non-credit of examination and the like. C. Regulations and Restrictions in the Classroom The students should be completely aware of their behaviour and attitude inside the class. They must avoid interrupting or distracting the class on any level. The following must be strictly observed during the class. a. The orderliness and cleanliness of the classroom must be maintained before, during and after the class. b. Any material or gadget irrelevant to the subject must be turned off and kept. c. Chatting or talking with the seatmates is prohibited unless required in the classroom activity. d. Going in and out of the room without permission from the instructor. e. Being excused by friends or peers from the class for any reason is not allowed except for emergency cases concerning family problems or administrative reasons. 8. ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE A. Textbook: Meyer, Michael. The Bedford introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. New York: Bedford St. Martins, 2002. Kirszner, Laurie G., and Mandell, Stephen R. Literature, Reading, Reacting, Writing. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt College Publishers. 2004. Guerin, Wilfred L. Labor, Earle. Morgan, Lee. and Reesman, Ieanne C. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature. 5th ed. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Perrine, Laurence. and Arp, Thomas R. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Publisher, 2008. Perrine, Laurence. and Arp, Thomas R. Story and Structure. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Publisher, 2008. B. References: Barnet, Sylvan, Berman, Morton, and Burto, William. An Introduction to Literature. Boston Toronto, USA: Little, Brown and Company, 2003. Checkoway, Julie. Creating Fiction: Instruction and Insights from Teachers of the Associate Writing Programs. United States of America: Story Press, 2003. Griffith, Kelley. Writing Essay about Literature: A Guide and Style Sheet. United States of America: Heinle & Heinle Thomson Learning, 2002. Gwynn. R.S. Fiction: A Pocket Anthology. United States of America: Penguin Academics Pearson Longman, 2005. Roberts, Edgar V. Writing Themes about Literature. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Incorporated, 2003. 9. COURSE CALENDAR Week Topics A. Understanding Literature and Literary Criticism 1. The Nature of Literature Escape and Interpretation in Connells The Most Dangerous Game and Wolfes The Child by the Tiger 2. Thinking Critically Required Readings Kirszner et al.: 1-3 Perrine: 8-25 Guerin: 15-46

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3. The Discipline of Literary Criticism B. Reading and Writing about Literature 3. Reading Literature 4. Writing about Literature C. Pre-Critical Responses in Literature 1. Methods of Fiction a. Understanding Fiction Verisimilitude and Donnee in James Joyce's Araby b. Plot Reversal of Plot in J.G. Ballard's Time of Passage c. Character Characterization in Katherine Mansfield's Miss Brill d. Setting The Role of Setting to the Narrative Progression of three Short Stories: A Case Study of Kate Chopin's The Storm, Tillie Olsen's I Stand Here Ironing, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wall-Paper. PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION e. Point of View Transforming the Subjective Point of View into Omniscient in Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants. f. Style, Tone, and Language A Case Study of Nature of Storytelling in Three Narratives: Margaret Atwoods There Was Once, George Bowerings A Short Story, and Tim OBriens How to Tell a True War Story g. Symbol, Allegory, and Myth Symbolism and Allegory in Shirley Jackson's The Lottery h. Theme Framing Meanings through Themes in Margaret Atwood's Happy Endings 2. Methods of Poetry a. Understanding Poetry Dehumanization in Marge Piercys The Secretary Chant b. Sound Sound and Meaning in Gerald Manleys Gods Grandeur MIDTERM EXAMINATION c. Imagery Imagery as Medium in Establishing Tone in Matthew Arnolds Dover Beach Restructuring Images to Create Parody in Anthony Hechts Dover Bitch d. Figures of Speech Establishing Premise through Figurative Language in Sharon Olds Poem for the Breast e. Form Interlocking Patterns of Poem in e.e. cummings The Greedy The People Picturing Form and Meaning in Michael McFees In Medias Res D. Critical Responses in Literature 1. Historical and Biographical Approaches

Kirszner et al.: 45-56

Kirszner et al.: 49-97 Gwynn: 309-325

Kirszner et al.: 134-139 & 240-247 Gwynn: 309-325 Perrine:450-452 Gillespie: 330-333, 606-612 & 338-349

Kirszner et al.: 194-201 & 268 - 275 Gwynn: 227-231

Kirszner et al.: 363-373 Gillespie: 817-823 Gwynn: 389-392 Kirszner et al.: 468-475 Meyer: 671 Kirszner et al.: 572-585 Meyer: 843 Kirszner et al.: 494-498 Meyer: 758 Kirszner et al.: 516-523 Meyer: 790

Perrine: 771-789 Meyer: 671 Guerin: 51-87 Gwynn: 31-42

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14

15

16

17

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The Importance of Historical and Biographical Context in Extracting Meaning from Nathaniel Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown 2. Moral and Philosophical Approaches Allusions and Allegory in Nathaniel Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown SEMI-FINAL EXAMINATION 3. Formalist Approach Ambiguity as Form in the Dark, the Light, and the Pink conveyed in Nathaniel Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown 4. Structuralist Approach The Structure of Monomyth in Camerons Avatar and Warner Brothers Man of Steel 5. Feminist and Gender Approaches The Struggle of the Abused in Millennium Films Lovelace Infidelity, Love and Queer Psyche in Will Lebers The Comfort of Life The Supremacy of Women in Nick Joaquins Summer Solstice 6. Marxist Approach The Use of Power in The Hunger Games 7. Psychological Approach Sexual Imagery in Andrew Marvells To His Coy Mistress Morality over the Pleasure Principle in Alice Walkers Everyday Use 8. Mythological and Archetypal Approaches Literary Archetypes in Contemporary Fiction 9. Reader-Response Project Making FINAL EXAMINATION Submission of all requirements

Guerin: 90-141 Gwynn: 31-42

Guerin: 368

Guerin: 222-268

Guerin: 15-46

Guerin: 152-180 & 182-218

Prepared by:

Mr. RICHARD M. BAEZ Program Chair, College of Teacher Education

Checked and Verified by: Dr. RUBILYN M. LATIDO Associate Dean, College of Teacher Education

Approved:

Dr. NORA G. DIMAANO Dean of Colleges