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Encryption and Decryption Pro : Help Encryption and Decryption : Help

What is Encryption and Decryption Pro?


What is the difference between EncryptionAndDecryption Pro and EncryptionAndDecryption?
I forgot my password. How can I get the data back?
How long my password should be to ensure better protection?
Is the password stored in the encrypted file?
How to encrypt text
How to decrypt text
What is the maximum length of text I can encrypt?
What is "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option?
How to encrypt files
How to decrypt files
What is the maximum size of file I can encrypt?
What kinds of files can be encrypted?
How strong is protection in Encryption and Decryption?

What is Encryption And Decryption Pro?


Encryption and Decryption Pro is strong text and file encryption software for personal and
professional security. It allows you to protect the privacy of your email messages, documents and
sensitive files by encrypting them with AES 256-bit key encryption algorithm to provide high
protection against unauthorized data access.

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What is the difference between EncryptionAndDecryption Pro and EncryptionAndDecryption?


Encryption and Decryption is text encryption freeware.
Encryption and Decryption Professional Edition is more powerful. It is text and files encryption
software.
Please click here to compare products

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I forgot my password. How can I get the data back?


Our software has no backdoors. If you forgot or lost your password, there is no way to recover the
encrypted information.
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How long my password should be to ensure better protection?


Each character you add to your password length increases its security. Your passwords should be
12 or more characters in length. The more characters your password contains, the more difficult it
can be to guess.
Password length is even more important than using different additional characters. E.g. if you use
standard English alphabet (A-Z, a-z) and digits (0-9) - total 62 characters, increasing password
length from 6 to 8 characters causes the number of possible passwords will be increased in 3844
times. While 18 additional special characters that can be used for creating passwords (total 80
characters) if password length is 6 characters, will increase the number of possible passwords only
in about 4.6 times.
Learn more about creating strong passwords

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Is the password stored in the encrypted file or text?


No, password is stored neither in the encrypted file nor in the encrypted text.
If "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option is on while encrypting:
Your password hash (not password) is stored in the encrypted text/file. The program will compare
this hash with the hash of the password you enter for decryption. If they are identical, the program
will decrypt information. Hashing is a one way action only; it is impossible to derive the password
from the hash. The hashing process is simply a way of checking that the correct password has been
input.

If "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option is off while encrypting:


To mitigate the threat of trivial Brute Force attacks on the encrypted information, you can encrypt it
the way it doesn't store password hash. If you turn off "Encrypt with password check confirmation"
option, it prevents the program from storing password hash in the encrypted text or file and makes
Brute Force attacks harder.
In this case, you enter wrong password for decryption, you won't see any error message, text or file
will be "decrypted" using wrong password and you will see abracadabra instead of the real
information.

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How to encrypt text


1. Enter the information you want to encrypt in "Text you want to encrypt" area and press "Encrypt"
button.
2. Enter password for encryption and confirm it.
3. Select if you want to use "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option or not and click "OK".
For more information about "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option click here
4. For more security you can encrypt your text multiple times. Set the necessary number of passes
for multiple encryption and click 'OK'.
5. Your text in the encrypted form appears in "Encrypted text" area.

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How to decrypt text


1. Open Encryption and Decryption Pro main window.
2. Click "Tools" button and select "Decryption" item.
3. Put the radio button next to "Text"
4. Paste the text you want to decrypt in "Encrypted text you want to decrypt" area.
5. Click the "Decrypt" button.
6. Enter password for decryption and confirm it. Note: it is the same password that was used for text
encryption
7. Decrypted text appears in the "Decrypted text" window.

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What is the maximum length of text I can encrypt?


If you use Encryption and Decryption Professional Edition:
- For Windows Vista/XP/2003/2000 max length of text you can encrypt is 524224 characters.
- For Windows 98/ME max length of text you can encrypt is 32704 characters.

If you use Encryption and Decryption (free version):


Max length of text you can encrypt is 255 characters

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What is "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option?


If "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option is on
Your password hash is stored in the encrypted text. Later, when the recipient decrypts the text, the
password he/she enters is hashed and compared with the stored password hash. And, in case, the
hash of the password the recipient enters matches the stored password hash, encrypted message
will be successfully decrypted. If the recipient enters wrong password, he/she will get an error
message "Wrong password".

If "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option is off


To mitigate the threat of trivial Brute Force attacks on the encrypted text, you can encrypt your
message the way it doesn't store password hash. If you turn off "Encrypt with password check
confirmation" option, it prevents the program from storing password hash in the encrypted text and
makes Brute Force attacks harder.
In this case, if the recipient enters wrong password for decryption, he/she won't see any error
message, text will be "decrypted" using wrong password and the recipient will see abracadabra
instead of the real text.
But don't worry - your original encrypted text is still stored in the "Encrypted text you want to decrypt"
area.

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How to encrypt files


To encrypt file:
1. Double-click on Encryption and Decryption Pro desktop icon or tray icon to open Encryption and
Decryption Pro main window.
2. Click "Tools" button and select "Encryption" item.
3. Put the radio button next to "File"
4. Select the file you want to encrypt in "File you want to encrypt" field. Note: Maximum size of the
file you can encrypt is 2 GB
5. In "Save encrypted file to ..." field select where you want to save the encrypted file. You can save
encrypted file with the same name or you can change its name.
6. Click the "Encrypt" button.
7. Enter password for encryption and confirm it. Attention! You have to remember it, because it will
be needed for decryption.
8. Select if you want to use "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option or not and click "OK".
For more information about "Encrypt with password check confirmation" option click here
9. For more security you can encrypt file multiple times. Set the necessary number of passes for
multiple encryption and click 'OK'.

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How to decrypt files


1. Open Encryption and Decryption Pro main window.
2. Click "Tools" button and select "Decryption".
3. Put the radio button next to "File"
4. Select the file you want to decrypt in "File you want to decrypt" field.
5. In "Save decrypted file to ..." field select where you want to save the decrypted file. You can save
decrypted file with the same name or you can change its name.
6. Click the "Decrypt" button.
7. Enter password for decryption and confirm it. Note: it is the same password that was used for file
encryption

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What is the maximum size of file I can encrypt?


Maximum size of the file you can encrypt is 2 GB.

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What kinds of files can be encrypted?


Using Encryption and Decryption you can encrypt any kind of file.

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How strong is protection in Encryption and Decryption?


The program uses AES 256-bit key encryption algorithm. AES provides strong encryption and was
selected by NIST as a Federal Information Processing Standard in November 2001 (FIPS-197).
Currently, there are no computers that could break the encryption key in a reasonable amount of
time (it will take millions of years). A password, or more precisely its hash (SHA 256), is used to
protect the encryption key. Neither the password nor its hash is stored anywhere. If the password is
not correct, it will be impossible to get the encryption key and consequently to decrypt information.
Encryption is the conversion of data into a form, called a ciphertext, that cannot be
easily understood by unauthorized people. Decryption is the process of converting
encrypted data back into its original form, so it can be understood.

The use of encryption/decryption is as old as the art of communication. In wartime, a cipher,


often incorrectly called a code, can be employed to keep the enemy from obtaining the contents
of transmissions. (Technically, a code is a means of representing a signal without the intent of
keeping it secret; examples are Morse code and ASCII.) Simple ciphers include the substitution of
letters for numbers, the rotation of letters in the alphabet, and the "scrambling" of voice signals
by inverting the sideband frequencies. More complex ciphers work according to sophisticated
computer algorithms that rearrange the data bits in digital signals.
In order to easily recover the contents of an encrypted signal, the correct decryption key is
required. The key is an algorithm that undoes the work of the encryption algorithm.
Alternatively, a computer can be used in an attempt to break the cipher. The more complex the
encryption algorithm, the more difficult it becomes to eavesdrop on the communications without
access to the key.
Encryption/decryption is especially important in wireless communications. This is because
wireless circuits are easier to tap than their hard-wired counterparts. Nevertheless,
encryption/decryption is a good idea when carrying out any kind of sensitive transaction, such as
a credit-card purchase online, or the discussion of a company secret between different
departments in the organization. The stronger the cipher -- that is, the harder it is for
unauthorized people to break it -- the better, in general. However, as the strength of
encryption/decryption increases, so does the cost.
In recent years, a controversy has arisen over so-called strong encryption. This refers to ciphers
that are essentially unbreakable without the decryption keys. While most companies and their
customers view it as a means of keeping secrets and minimizing fraud, some governments view
strong encryption as a potential vehicle by which terrorists might evade authorities. These
governments, including that of the United States, want to set up a key-escrow arrangement. This
means everyone who uses a cipher would be required to provide the government with a copy of
the key. Decryption keys would be stored in a supposedly secure place, used only by authorities,
and used only if backed up by a court order. Opponents of this scheme argue that criminals could
hack into the key-escrow database and illegally obtain, steal, or alter the keys. Supporters claim
that while this is a possibility, implementing the key escrow scheme would be better than doing
nothing to prevent criminals from freely using encryption/decryption.
Getting started with
encryption
To explore how encryption is used in the enterprise, here are some additional
resources:
Data encryption and classification in practical cryptography: There are many factors to
consider when it comes to data encryption and classification in practical
cryptography. In this security school lesson, administrators can learn the
importance of each and get tips on how to properly tackle both processes.
Understanding all aspects of corporate database encryption: Encrypting a corporate
database can be daunting. Get information and advice on database encryption
before attempting the task, including encryption for media protection and for
separation of duties.
Windows BitLocker: Enabling disk encryption for data protection: Windows Bitlocker disk
encryption technology can be an essential tool for organizational data protection.
Get information about what the technology can and can't do and how it can help
you to avoid a data breach.
Preventing encryption bad practices: When is comes to encryption, it seems like IT
administrators are constantly repeating bad practices. Learn how to avoid and
prevent some of the biggest encryption mistakes, such as using WEP encryption,
failing to encrypt laptops and ignoring patches and updates.
How to achieve laptop data security: For a hacker, a misplaced or stolen laptop can
serve as an open door into a world of personal data. Learn how laptop encryption
can help you achieve a strong laptop security strategy and prevent data or identity
theft.
CONTRIBUTO Robert Bauchle, Fred Hazen, John Lund, Gabe Oakley, and
RS: Frank Rundatz
LAST 14 Jan 2009
UPDATED:
Encryption is the manipulation of data, based on a password (also known as a key), for security
purposes. Once your data has been encrypted, a person can not make sense of your data without
knowing the password (or figuring it out). For example, if we take HAL and add 1 to each of the
letters, we get IBM (betcha didn't know that!). In this case, the password is simply "1". If we use
"123456" as our password, then we add 1 to the first letter, 2 to the second, ..., 6 to the sixth, then
we start over at 1 and add 1 to the seventh letter. Now our encrypted data is, "ICN". To decrypt,
the password "123456" is "subtracted" from our data.
Sophisticated software can make intelligent guesses of the password to decrypt data. One easy
way is with a database of common passwords. A more difficult way is by analyzing the encrypted
data. If you know the decrypted data starts with 20 spaces, then you subtract 20 spaces from the
data, you will get "12345612345612345612" if the password was "123456". A longer password
makes it more difficult to decrypt the data without knowing the password.
Another way security could be breached is if someone were to tap into a transmission. The
Internet is a worldwide network of computers. If you were to send unencrypted data across the
Internet, someone may be able to view the data if they operate a part of the Internet your data
must pass through. This is why you should not send credit card information over the Internet
unless you use "Secure mode". Each web browser has its own way of letting you know that it is
in secure mode. Check the help system of your web browser for more information.