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Big $aving$ in$ide The biggest show on earth 4A and 2C 5C Church profile Weekend

Big $aving$ in$ide

The biggest show on earth

4A and 2C

5C
5C
Church profile Weekend
Church profile
Weekend
biggest show on earth 4A and 2C 5C Church profile Weekend Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 Junction

Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

4A and 2C 5C Church profile Weekend Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 Junction City T he D

Junction City

The Daily Union.

Volume 153, No. 197, 3 Sections, 20 pages, 10 Inserts

www.yourDU.net

$1 • Junction City, Kansas

FORT RILEY

Rememberingthefallen

$1 • Junction City, Kansas FORT RILEY Rememberingthefallen J oshua r andy P eter o mar
$1 • Junction City, Kansas FORT RILEY Rememberingthefallen J oshua r andy P eter o mar
$1 • Junction City, Kansas FORT RILEY Rememberingthefallen J oshua r andy P eter o mar
$1 • Junction City, Kansas FORT RILEY Rememberingthefallen J oshua r andy P eter o mar
$1 • Junction City, Kansas FORT RILEY Rememberingthefallen J oshua r andy P eter o mar

Joshua

randy

Peter

omar

terry

sliverman

Billings

Bohler

Forde

gordon

By Tim Weideman W hen a Black Hawk helicopter crashed Dec. 17 in south- ern
By Tim Weideman
W hen a
Black
Hawk
helicopter crashed
Dec. 17 in south-
ern Afghanistan
killing six United
States soldiers, Fort
Riley and the First
Combat Aviation
Brigade lost more
than just five ser-
vicemen.
The crash
claimed crew
members of Aeros-
mith 35, who were
remembered by
their peers as reli-
able, supportive
and caring soldiers
with infectious
personalities dur-
More
photos on
2A and 3A
ing a memorial
service Thursday.
As about 650
people who filled
Please see Fallen,
8A
1st Infantry Division Public Affairs
A Fort Riley soldier pays his respects at a memorial ceremony at the Morris Hill Chapel.

MILFORD

Talley

continues

questioning

Colp’s

benefits

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

Former Milford City Council mem- ber James Talley still wants an expla- nation from the current council on how and why the city’s superintendent

received health insurance benefits for which he didn’t qualify. But on Thursday, Talley focused on whether officials are following their duties and responsibilities per city code. For the last few months, Talley has been questioning the

council and Milford Mayor Brad Roether

on why city Superin- tendent Randy Colp, from September 2012 to September 2013, received about $12,000 in health insurance benefits while knowing he didn’t qualify for them because of his part-time status as a city employee. At Thursday’s council meeting, Tal-

Please see Talley, 8A

Thursday’s council meeting, Tal- Please see Talley , 8A B rad r oether Not seeing red:

Brad

roether

Not seeing red: Chapman healthy to start 2014

By Chase Jordan

c,jordan@thedailyunion.net

CHAPMAN — Chapman offi- cials are pleased to begin 2014 with no red numbers. City Manager Gerald Bieker reported the overall cash bal- ance for the city was more than $1 million, with balances increas- ing in each fund. “I feel really good about 2013,” Bieker said. According to Bieker, the gen- eral fund had a balance of more

than $70,000. The proposed 2014 beginning balance was $54,391. As a result, the city has a $22,000 head start. Other positive funds include water, electric and sewer. Taking away incentive funds for a couple of projects, the 2013 ending balance is more than $667,000, which is close to $100,000 more than what they began the year with. “We’ve had a good year and we have completed a lot of projects,” Bieker said. Some of those include projects

Taking away incentive funds for a couple of projects, the 2013 ending balance is more than $667,000, which is close to $100,000 more than what they began the year with.

at the golf course, street work and the Commercial Addition. Chapman is awaiting the results of the Community Devel- opment Block Grant (CDBG) pro- gram, which provides communi- ties with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs. Funds will be used to assist

with projects such as street work, infrastructure, the Commercial Addition and the golf course. As soon as the results of the grant are known, Bieker said the city will need to pursue bonding to cover the cost of those proj- ects. Officials are also looking for- ward to selling the service sta-

tion at Interstate 70 to Dara’s Corner Market, based out of St. George.

Election set for April

One mayoral and two city coun- cil seats are up for election. The terms of Mayor Philip Weishaar and council members Dale Nelson and Ron Kabat are expiring. According to city officials, the

upcoming election is set for April

1.

The deadline to file for a posi- tion is noon Jan. 21.

After 16 years of leadership, Kite is retiring

noon Jan. 21. After 16 years of leadership, Kite is retiring B y C hase J

By Chase Jordan

c.jordan@thedailyunion.net

At Westwood Elementary School, Principal Shelley Kite spent a portion of her Friday morning addressing educational matters and signing certificates for an upcoming awards assem- bly. In less than a year, Kite no longer will look into the eyes of students and teach- ers at school gatherings. After 16 years of leading the school, Kite is saying goodbye in July. The Geary County School Board accepted her resignation during its Tuesday meet- ing. “It’s like a family,” Kite said. “That’s one of the

things people have always said about Westwood. They said that way before I got here.” For many years, Kite said she has worked to maintain that family-like atmosphere at the school. “I really have a strong connection to the Westwood community,” Kite said. “I just love this community and I love the kids. That’s the part I’ll miss.” Kite said it’s been an honor and privilege to work with the administrators, teachers and support staff. “I have learned so much from my colleagues over the years in the various positions I have assumed, and appreciate the support that I have received,” Kite said.

Although Kite has

enjoyed her time, running the school came with a few challenges.

$200,000 in damage, and renovations in 2008. “That was a good thing, but it was still challeng- ing,” Kite said about the renovations. “We had to move every-

thing out of the building, and getting all the students back in school on time was a huge situation.” Over the years, there’s been many changes in edu- cation. One of them includ- ed No Child Left Behind, a

of the Chase Jordan • The Daily Union Principal Shelley Kite spends time with students
of
the
Chase Jordan • The
Daily Union
Principal Shelley
Kite spends time
with students
Jacob Collins and
Bryanna Carll at
Westwood Ele-
mentary School.

Some

recent obstacles Kite has faced was a 2013 van- dalism incident at Westwood

Elementa-

ry, which resulted inmore t h a n

2001 federal law that revised and upgraded education standards for public ele- mentary education. Although the program was criticized by many through- out the United States, Kite said there were some posi- tive aspects. “One of the good things that came out of No Child Left Behind was the focus on all kids,” Kite said. “To think that everyone can pass a test on a particular day and time was probably unrealistic, but everybody can grow and learn.” Kite has served Unified School District 475 in many roles for about 40 years. “It’s been a very good experience,” she said. She began in 1974 as a Please see Kite, 8A

she said. She began in 1974 as a Please see Kite , 8A The Daily Union

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Today’s forecast

51

29

Sunny

Friday’s forecast

55

29

Partly sunny

forecast 51 29 Sunny Friday’s forecast 55 29 Partly sunny For news updates throughout the day,

Around JC

2A

The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

Pets

of the

Week

2A The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 Pets of the Week BROCK Brock is a

BROCK

Brock is a 2-year-old male Chi- huahua. He likes to be close to someone all the time and would make a great companion.

to someone all the time and would make a great companion. DREAMWEAVER Dreamweaver is a 1-year-old

DREAMWEAVER

Dreamweaver is a 1-year-old female Husky mix. She’s a little shy, but warms up to people after she gets to know them.

shy, but warms up to people after she gets to know them. FANTASIA Fantasia is a

FANTASIA

Fantasia is a female Himalayan mix. She is shy, but warms up to people quickly.

SADIE

Sadie is an 8-year-old female Australian Shepherd mix. She is a super sweet older girl who would love to live her remaining years in a home. She is spayed, potty-trained and gets along with other animals.

The Junction City- Geary County Animal Shelter is located at 2424 N. Jackson St. For more information, call (785) 238-1359.

FORT RILEY

St. For more information, call (785) 238-1359. FORT RILEY 1st Infantry Division Public Affairs Maj. Gen.

1st Infantry Division Public Affairs

Maj. Gen. Paul Funk, First Infantry Division and Fort Riley commanding general, salutes a memorial display during a service Thursday at Morris Hill Chapel. Five First Combat Aviation Brigade soldiers killed last month in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan were honored during the service.

December 2013weather summary

For the third consecu- tive month, temperatures and precipitation were below normal. The only thing that was above normal for Decem- ber was snowfall. In fact, December was the coldest December since 2009, so you can expect your heating bills to be a bit higher. The average daily high during December was 39.6, 1.4 degrees below normal. The average overnight low was 15.5, 5.7 degrees below normal. This gave us a monthly mean tem- perature of 27.6, 3.5 degrees below the long-term aver- age. The highest temperature for the month was 67 degrees on Dec. 3. The low- est temperature was zero

was 67 degrees on Dec. 3. The low- est temperature was zero C huCk O tte

ChuCk Otte

Weather Report

on the first full day of win- ter, Dec. 22. There was one tempera- ture record set in Decem- ber. The low of 43 on the 18 set a new record high low temperature for that date. The old record was 41 set in 1957. While it was a chilly month, it’s a long ways from the record cold month. That honor goes to December 1983 when the monthly average tempera- ture was only 13.6 degrees. The average overnight low

in December 1983 was 5.5 degrees and we went through a 72-hour period when the temperature never got above zero and hit as cold as -21 at night. On the flip side of that is the warmest December on record, which was 1957 when we had a relatively toasty warm monthly mean temperature of 40.2. December precipitation was pretty well dominated by a large snowstorm over- night on the Dec. 21 and early morning of the Dec.

22.

The National Weather Service predicted that we were in the bulls-eye for the heaviest snow, and this time they were pretty much dead on. We had8.5 inches of snow, plus another one

half inch during the day on the 22nd resulted in nine inches of snow. Fortunately, high winds did not develop so the region didn’t have to deal with severe drifting. Other precipitation events during December amounted to a few hundredths of an inch in precipitation. Milford Lake received 0.73 inches of liquid pre- cipitation during Decem- ber. Junction City received 0.64 inches. The normal for Decem- ber is 1.02 inches. The snowfall total of 9.0 inches for the month was nearly 2½ times the normal for December of 3.7 inches. Season to date (October to December) we would expect 4.7 inches of snow. The nine inches we

we would expect 4.7 inches of snow. The nine inches we received as of Dec. 31

received as of Dec. 31 is 50 percent of our annual aver- age snowfall. The snowiest December on record was in 2009 when our area received 17.2 inch- es of snow. January is our coldest month and driest. Temperatures basically bottom out about a third of the way through the month and then slowly start to warm up. Daily high tem- peratures basically stay in the upper 30s throughout the month and average overnight lows run in the mid to upper teens. Average liquid precipita- tion during January is only 0.65 inches with most of that arriving as snow. January and February are our snowiest months of the year, with an aver- age of 4.7 inches.

months of the year, with an aver- age of 4.7 inches. Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low:

Weather

months of the year, with an aver- age of 4.7 inches. Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low:
months of the year, with an aver- age of 4.7 inches. Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low:
months of the year, with an aver- age of 4.7 inches. Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low:
months of the year, with an aver- age of 4.7 inches. Weather Tonight Sunday Monday Low:
Tonight Sunday Monday Low: 27 High: 57 High: 47 Cloudy Low: 27 Low: 30 Sunny
Tonight
Sunday
Monday
Low: 27
High: 57
High: 47
Cloudy
Low: 27
Low: 30
Sunny
Sunny
Kansasforecast fortoday
NEB.
MO.
Colby
52° | 28°
Kansas City
46° | 29°
Salina
51° | 28°
Topeka
46° | 29°
Liberal
57° | 28°
Wichita
52° | 30°
Pittsburg
50° | 31°
OKLA.
© 2014 Wunderground.com
Dailyweatherrecord
MilfordLake
Water elevation
1,143.95
Precip. to 7 a.m. Friday
January to date
January average
Year to date total
Year to date average
Friday’s High
Overnight low
Temp. at 5 p.m. Wednesday
Today’s sunrise
Tonight’s sunset
.00
Conservation pool
1,144.40
.10
Release
75
.65
Water temp.
33
.10
.10
41
23
37
7:46 a.m.
5:24 p.m.
National forecast Forecast highs for Saturday, Jan. 11 Sunny Pt. Cloudy Cloudy Seattle 47° |
National forecast
Forecast highs for Saturday, Jan. 11
Sunny
Pt. Cloudy
Cloudy
Seattle
47° | 43°
Billings
Minneapolis
44° | 30°
30° | 22°
Chicago
Detroit
New York
57° | 37°
37° | 37°
San Francisco
40° | 34°
55° | 49°
Denver
46° | 30°
Washington D.C.
60° | 36°
Los Angeles
72° | 49°
Atlanta
61° | 45°
El Paso
63° | 36°
Houston
73° | 58°
Miami
81° | 73°
Fronts
Pressure
Cold
Warm Stationary
Low
High
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s
110s
Showers
Rain
T-storms
Flurries
Snow
Ice
Rain and Thunderstorms East
Showers and storms will be likely along a cold front over the
Southeast and portions of the Mid-Atlantic. Rain will be likely
along the front through the Northeast and the Appalachians. The
Northwest will have rain, with snow over the Rockies.

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Around JC

The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

3A

In brief

LibertyHill Bridge project to begin Monday

Work will begin on the Liberty Hall Road bridge replacement proj- ect Monday, according to the Geary County Public Works Department. The bridge is located on Liberty Hall Road, 0.3 mi. west of Taylor Road. The detour around the project includes Ritter Road, K-18, and Gfeller Road. The project consists of the removal and replacement of the

existing bridge, and is scheduled for

60 working days.

Chili, vegetable, and potatosouplunches

The Immanuel Lutheran Laymen

League’s annual chili, vegetable and potato soup lunch with relishes, dessert and drink will be held from

11 a.m. to 1 pm. on Jan. 18 in the

Fellowship Hall, at 630 S. Eisen- hower Drive. Proceeds will go to the scholarship fund for church workers and Open Door; there will be a free will offering. Seconds are free. In addition, matching funds from Thrivent have been applied for.

FORT RILEY

funds from Thrivent have been applied for. FORT RILEY Honoring the fallen 1st Infantry Division Public

Honoring the fallen

1st Infantry Division Public Affairs

Fort Riley soldiers salute their fallen comrades during a remembrance ceremony Thursday for five First Combat Aviation Brigade soldiers who passed away in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.

Halfhill ready for next chapter

By Chase Jordan

c.jordan@thedailyunion.net

CHAPMAN — After a few days on the job as police chief, the only nuisance Emil Halfhill has proba- bly faced so far is frigid tempera- tures and snow. “I brought in some cold weath- er,” Halfhill said with humor to the audience at the Chapman city council meeting Wednesday. “I apologize for that.” Fortunately, there were no fend- er benders, injuries or wrecks from the inclement weather — something Halfhill said he can knock on wood for. But he’ll be busier in the future. As the newest face in town, Half- hill is ready to protect and serve the community of Chapman. His official start was Jan. 2.

“I’m ready to hit the ground

running,” Halfhill said. “I’m glad the mayor and the council gave me the opportunity to be the new chief here.” Halfhill wants to become involved in the local DARE

program. “I’m looking forward to being in the schools and learning from our youth,” Halfhill said. “I want to strengthen the bond between the community and the youth in this town.” Originally from Great

Bend, Halfhill has roughly 11 years of law enforcement expe- rience, beginning as a corrections officer at Larned Correctional Mental Health Facility. Prior to Chapman, he worked for the Great Bend Police Depart-

ment as a patrolman. After moving to Dighton, he worked for the Lane County Sher- iff’s Department as a sergeant before being promoted to under- sheriff.

While at the Lane Coun- ty Sheriff’s Office, Halfhill became a certified DARE instructor and attended both Kansas Top Gun and the DEA narcotics investi- gator school. When asked why he chose a career in law enforcement, Halfhill said he’s a nosey person and

likes to talk to people. But overall, Halfhill said he likes to help individuals. “No matter what the situation is, anytime someone calls law enforcement, it’s the biggest prob- lem in their life at that moment,”

the biggest prob- lem in their life at that moment,” E mil H alfHill he said.

Emil

HalfHill

he said. Gaining the trust of Chapman residents is a challenge Halfhill said he’ll probably have to face. “Sometimes in small communi- ties, it’s hard to get the people to accept you,” Halfhill said. “So far I’ve been accepted very well.” His young age may be another factor. “Most people in my position are in their mid- to late-50s,” the 29-year-old said. “A challenge I see in an older community is becom- ing established, gaining their trust and continuing to strengthen the bond with the youth.” Halfhill has been married for more than 10 years to his wife Candace, and together they have a daughter, Cadence. In his spare time, he enjoys being outside and loves to fish and hunt.

Warrior Care and Transition Programto realign

WASHINGTON — As part of changes to the Army’s Warrior Care and Transition Program, sev- eral Warrior Transition Units will be inactivated, but Fort Riley will instead see some new faces. Instead, the Community Care Unit at Fort Riley will benefit, as the cadre from the Community Based Warrior Transition Unit (CBWTU) in Utah will transition to the Commu- nity Care Unit at Fort Riley. All nine CBWTUs will be inactivated, the Army announced, and 13 CCUs will be established at 11 Army installations. Fort Riley will be one of

those 11 installations with

a CCU; two installations

— Fort Belvoir, Va. and Fort Knox, Ky., will each have two CCUs. In addition, five Warrior Transition Units will be deactivated, those being

ones where the population

of wounded, ill and injured

soldiers is extremely low.

WTUs slated for inacti- vation include Fort Irwin, Calif.; Fort Huachuca, Ariz.; Fort Jackson, S.C.; Joint Base McGuire-Dix- Lakehurst; and the United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. Changes are expected to be implemented by Sept.

30.

“These changes reflect

our commitment to keep

the faith with our soldiers and their families,” said Brig. Gen. John Cho, Com- mander of the Western Regional Medical Com- mand. “Adapting our mis- sion to serve a declining population of wounded, ill and injured soldiers enhances the overall care we provide to our sol- diers.” Brig. Gen. David Bishop, Commander of the War- rior Transition Command and Assistant Surgeon General for Warrior Care and Transition, said that the changes are not related

to budget cuts, sequestra- tion or furloughs.

Additional MLK events scheduled

The Martin Luther King Celebration Committee has scheduled two additional events to the 2014 Dr. Mar- tin Luther King Jr. Day observances next week in Junction City. During the week of Jan. 14 - 20, artifacts from previ- ous local MLK observances, as well as personal artwork by Ruby Stevens, will be on display in the lobby of the C.L. Hoover Opera House during regular business hours. This year marks the 29th observance of MLK Day in Junction City, and Stevens, who taught Eng- lish at Junction City High School, founded the local observances of MLK Day in Junction City. Also sched-

uled is a MLK Youth Sum- mit, to be held from 10 a.m. to noon Jan. 18, also in the lobby of the C.L. Hoover Opera House. The event for middle and high school- aged students will discuss King’s legacy, keys to suc- cess, and the importance of education. The summit will feature a panel of speakers, includ- ing JCHS alumni and Kan- sas State representatives Tyrone Williams and Ron- ald Atkinson, and K-State Director of Admissions Bryon Williams. Other events planned include a performance by the Wiley College A Cappella Choir, and an MLK Commemora- tion and March.

Clark discusses Transit Administration to City Commission

By Tim Weideman

city.beat@thedailyunion.net

Regional leaders are seeking additional funding sources for ATA Bus, an area public transit service with a growing user base. To better meet its users’ needs, ATA Bus and the Flint Hills Regional Coun- cil have been attempting to tap into up to $1 million in federal urban transit funds. But because ATA Bus is not a public entity, it isn’t eligible to directly receive those funds. As a solution, the Flint Hills Regional Council wants to create the Flint Hills Regional Transit Administration, a public entity that could receive those funds and have the authority to provide them to regional transit

services through contracts

or grants.

On Tuesday, Flint Hills Regional Council Execu- tive Director William Clark told the Junction City Com- mission the funds would help ATA Bus meet the area’s growing public tran- sit needs. “In the past year, the (ATA Bus) ridership is over 250,000,” Clark said. “The demand is going up and up each year.” The City Commission appeared to be in favor of signing an interlocal agree- ment to form the group, but tabled the discussion to allow city attorney Katie Logan time to review the document. The agreement would be between six members —

“In the past year, the (ATA Bus) ridership is over 250,000. The demand is going up and up each year.”

William Clark

Flint Hills Regional Council Executive

Geary, Pottawatomie and Riley counties; Junction City, Manhattan and Kan- sas State University. ATA Bus provides services in those areas and Fort Riley. Each member would appoint one representative to sit on a governing board. Fort Riley would have a nonvoting representative. ATA Bus already is eligi- ble for federal rural transit funds. The urban transit funds now are available because of the establish- ment of the Manhattan

UrbanArea,whichincludes Junction City and Geary County. The second source of funds could help the ser- vice meet the increased demand. With more money, ATA Bus could add fixed routes in the urban area. The new administration also could have a say in what equip- ment is provided for tran- sit services, Clark said. The Kansas Department of Transportation wants to take a regional approach to

the area’s public transit needs “because you have two cities that are growing very quickly and right in the middle is the largest employer in the state of Kansas — Fort Riley, Kan- sas,” Clark said. Kansas Secretary of Transportation Mike King likes the council’s idea, Clark said. “He’s behind it,” he said. “He fully endorses it.” Clark added King is pre- pared to recommend the idea to Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt, who would need to endorse the new public body. The Flint Hills Regional Council hopes to have each jurisdiction sign the agree- ment by the end of the month.

The Daily Union (USPS 286-520) (ISSN #0745743X) is published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday except July 4, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Years Day by Montgomery Communications, Inc., 222 West Sixth St., Junction City, Ks. 66441. Periodicals postage paid at Junction City, Ks. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Daily Union, P.O. Box 129, Junction City, Ks. 66441 The Daily Union is delivered by USPS to Junction City, Ft. Riley, Grandview Plaza, Milford, Chapman, Wakefield, Ogden, Herington, Woodbine, Dwight, White City and Alta Vista. Rates for local mail delivery are $10.00 per month, $30.00 for 3 months, $60.00 for 6 months, and $111.60 for 1 year. Other mail delivery rates are $16.00 per month, $48.00 for 3 months, $96.00 for 6 months and $192.00 for a year.

No Paper? If you did not receive your newspaper, contact Customer Service 762-5000 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. (Mon-Fri).

Funeral Home.

Funeral Home. The family of Jerry Cameron would like to express their deepest gratitude for all

The family of Jerry Cameron would like to express their deepest gratitude for all of the kind expressions of sympathy following the death of our dad/grandpa. He was a story teller, our rock and a friend to many. He will be forever in our hearts. Thanks especially to Jim Luke, Ron O’Neill, Randy Nabus, the Geary County Sherriff’s Department, the Junction City Fire Department, Rick Parsons, Dr. Jimmy Jenkins and the staff of Penwell-Gable

Sincerely, The Jerry Cameron Family

Memorial Health Systemoffering scholarships

ABILENE — Memorial Health System is offering scholarships to qualified candidates pursuing health-related careers with a job opportunity following their school- ing. Scholarships are available to those studying to be a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, radiologic technologist, physical therapist, physical therapy assis- tant, medical technologist, medical laboratory technician, respiratory care technologist, or other health- related professions. Students can be eligible for up to $3,500 per year. After graduating, scholarship recipients will return to Memorial Health System to work for a year for each year they receive a scholar- ship. Memorial Health System is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Those interested should contact Memorial Health System Human Resources Assistant at (785) 263- 6635 to request an application packet.Applicants must hand-deliv- er a resume and cover letter on or before Feb. 28.

Area invited to explore creation of beekeepingclub

MANHATTAN — Sunset Zoo will host a meeting at 7 p.m. Jan. 16 to discuss the creation of an area bee- keeping club. The meeting will take place inside the Nature Exploration Cen- ter at the zoo’s entryway. Richard Marteney and Ret. Col. Gary LaGrange, both local beekeep- ers, will be present to visit with community members. The meeting is free and open to the public. There will also be a presentation Feb. 17 where LaGrange will discuss the art of beekeeping, and how the

activity can contribute to the recov-

with

PTSD. Forinformation,contactMichelle Moses at moses.cityofmhk.com or call (785) 587-2737.

ery

of

soldiers

struggling

Memorial Hospital to offer childbirth educationclass

ABILENE — Memorial Hospital’s Birthing Center will be offering a one-day childbirth education class from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 8 in the Conklin Room of Memorial Hospi- tal, at 511 NE 10th St., Abilene. Lunch will be provided. Sara Breisford, Memorial Hospi- tal RN, will teach the class.

ea rl p alida pearl Co-op association p o Chapman, Kansas 67431 January 10, 2014
ea
rl
p
alida pearl Co-op association
p
o
Chapman, Kansas 67431
January 10, 2014 Closing prices
a
o
Wheat 5.90
-13-0
Soybeans 12.21 +4-6
ap
Milo 4.03
+20-6
Corn 4.03
+20-6
C
id
Two locations to serve you
INTOTHEFUTURE
Chapman 922-6505
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Obituaries/News

4A

The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

DorothyStewart

Oct. 30, 1929 — Jan. 6, 2014

Dorothy left us peacefully on Jan. 6, 2014 at the Golden Living Center in Wakefield, to join her husband Orland of 62 years, her daughter Cheryl, her parents, and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation will be held from 6-8 p.m. Jan. 13 at the Penwell- Gabel Mass-Hinitt Funeral Chapel at 805 Caroline Ave. in Junction City. Graveside services will be held to celebrate Dorothy’s

life at 10 a.m. Jan. 14 at Prai- riedale Cemetery in Talmage. Dorothy was born on Oct. 30,

1929 in Abilene to William

Everett and Dora Mary Schroeder Birdwell. She grew up in Abilene, where she attended and graduated high school. On June 18, 1949 she married Orland Arlie Stewart in Abilene, where they lived for a year, then moved to Longford for 20 years before settling in Wakefield. Dorothy worked at the Fort Riley Post Exchange, then later worked

at Finance and Accounting, where she retired in 1992. Dorothy was preceded in death by her husband, Orland; daughter, Cheryl; both par- ents; and her brother, Wil- liam. She leaves behind to cherish her memory a daugh- ter, Theresa Stewart Thomp- son and husband Bobby of Coldspring, Texas; a grand- son, Keno Wallace and Shan- non of Salina; two great- granddaughters, Kailee and Tabitha Wallace of Milford; two great-grandsons, Jace Wallace and Tyler Heard of Salina; a sister, Rose Ann O’Dell of Missouri; and a brother, James Birdwell of Wichita. In lieu of flowers, the family would like to encour- age loved ones to leave a dona- tion in Dorothy’s memory to the Golden Living Center in Wakefield, or to the Wakefield Historical Museum. To leave an online condo- lence, please visit www.pen- wellgabeljunctioncity.com.

HaroldGlessner

Jan. 9, 1929 — Jan. 9, 2014

Funeral services for Harold “Bummie” Wayne Gless-

ner, 85, of Junction City, will be at 10 a.m. Jan. 13 at the Immanuel Lutheran Church, followed with graveside services at Highland Cemetery. Mr. Glessner passed away Jan. 9, 2014. Visitation will be at Penwell-Gabel

Johnson Funeral Chapel, 203 N Washing- ton, from 2-4 p.m. Jan. 12. The casket will remain closed. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions be made to Immanuel Lutheran Church or a charity of the donor’s choice. Harold Wayne Glessner was born on Jan. 9, 1929, in Dwight, the son of Roy William Glessner and Maude Isabel Eas-

ter. He graduated from Alta Vista High School in 1947. Bummie has been the proud owner of Harold Glessner Dirt Contracting since February 1952. He enjoyed constructing many soil conservation and civil improvements including ponds, terraces, spring developments and roads throughout Geary and sur- rounding counties. His legacy of service to this county and to the farming community will long be remembered. He was a member of the Kansas Chapter of Land Improvement Contractors of America, Fraternal Order of the Eagles, B.P.O.E. and Immanuel Lutheran Church. He was a longtime supporter of youth through the Geary County 4-H Livestock Auction.

of youth through the Geary County 4-H Livestock Auction. H arold G lessner In addition to

Harold

Glessner

In addition to being an avid crappie and walleye fish- erman, he also enjoyed hunting and barbecuing ribs for family and friends. Harold “Bummie” married Muriel Guinevere Ann Set- tgast on Oct. 10, 1954 at the Immanuel Lutheran Church in Junction City. She preceded him in death on April 3, 2007. As a hardworking father and unfaltering provider to the end, he is survived by his daughter, Kim Glessner of Belton, Mo.; son, Rodney (Kathy) Glessner of Junction City; daughter, Nanette (Vaughn) Pfeiffer of Kenton, Ohio; and son, Colin (DiJon) Glessner of Junction City. “Papo” as affectionately known by his surviving grandchildren, Talia (Allen) McMurray, Jeremie Myers, and Curtis “Brock” (Jessica) Glessner; and great-grand- children, Matthew, Aaron, Alyssa Alexander, and Lau- rel, Whitney and Joel “Bummie” Myers. Surviving siblings include sisters, Della Hoffman, and Lucille Carlton; and brother, Roy Glessner, Jr. In addition to his wife, Muriel, Bummie was preceded in death by his granddaughter, Amber–Leigh Renee Glessner; brothers, Harvey, Ward, Carl, Joseph, and Arnold; and sisters, Hester and Arlene. Pastor Alan Estby of Immanuel Lutheran Church will officiate the service, accompanied by organist LaDonna Junghans. Pallbearers will be Brock Glessner, Jeremie Myers, Allen McMurray, Randy Heldstab, Ron Strauss, and Cliff Engstrom. To leave a special message for the family please visit www.PenwellGabelJunctionCity.com.

Deathnotice

Ret. Col. Alexander JohnSajo

Ret. Col. Alexander John Sajo, 82, of Junction City, passed away on Jan. 9, 2014, at the Valley View Senior Life in Junction City. A memorial service will be conducted at 10 a.m. Jan. 16 at the First Presbyterian Church with Pastor Mat- thew Glasgow officiating. Cremation has taken place. Following the memorial ser- vice, a graveside service with full military honors

will be held at 2 p.m. at the Kansas Veterans’ Cemetery,

5181 Wildcat Creek Road in

Manhattan.

Activist poet-playwright Baraka dies at 79

By The Associated Press

Amiri Baraka, the mili- tant man of letters and tireless agitator whose blues-based, fist-shaking poems, plays and criticism made him a provocative and groundbreaking force in American culture, has died. He was 79. His booking agent, Celeste Bateman, told The Associated Press that Baraka, who had been hos- pitalized since last month, died Thursday at Newark Beth Israel Medical Cen- ter. Perhaps no writer of the

1960s and ‘70s was more radical or polarizing than the former LeRoi Jones, and no one did more to extend the political debates of the civil rights era to the world of the arts. He inspired at least one generation of poets, play- wrights and musicians, and his immersion in spo- ken word traditions and raw street language antici- pated rap, hip-hop and slam poetry. The FBI feared him to the point of flattery, identi- fying Baraka as “the per- son who will probably emerge as the leader of the

Pan-African movement in the United States.” Baraka transformed from the rare black to join the Beat caravan of Allen Ginsberg and Jack Ker- ouac to leader of the Black Arts Movement, an ally of the Black Power movement that rejected the liberal optimism of the early ‘60s and intensified a divide over how and whether the black artist should take on social issues. Scorning art for art’s sake and the pursuit of black-white unity, Barak was part of a philosophy that called for the teaching

of black art and history and producing works that bluntly called for revolu- tion. “We want ‘poems that kill,”’ Baraka wrote in his landmark “Black Art,” a manifesto published in 1965, the year he helped found the Black Arts Move- ment. “Assassin poems. Poems that shoot guns/Poems that wrestle cops into alleys/and take their weap- ons leaving them dead/ with tongues pulled out and sent to Ireland.” He was as eclectic as he was prolific: His influences

ranged from Ray Bradbury and Mao Zedong to Gins- berg and John Coltrane. Baraka wrote poems, short stories, novels, essays, plays, musical and cultural criticism and jazz operas. His 1963 book “Blues People” has been called the first major history of black music to be written by an African-American. A line from his poem “Black People!” — “Up against the wall mother f--- --” — became a countercul- ture slogan for everyone from student protesters to the rock band Jefferson Airplane.

NEWS TO KNOW

HeadlinesfromCES2014

band Jefferson Airplane. NEWS TO KNOW HeadlinesfromCES2014 Netflix app to stream 4K on new TVsimmediately By

Netflix app to stream 4K on new TVsimmediately

By The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Netflix says video streaming of its programming in ultra-high definition will work for buy- ers of new UHD sets from Sony, LG, Samsung, Vizio and others upon purchase. That’s because Ultra HD models from those makers will include the Netflix app and chips that decode signals in the so-called High Effi- ciency Video Coding stan- dard, or HEVC. The chip is required to decode signals that Netflix Inc. will compress by more than 100 times and squeeze through the Internet at a speed of 15.6 megabits per second. That’s a download speed widely available from Internet providers in the U.S. When the sets go on sale in the next few months, Netflix will be ready with Ultra HD programming, including some nature documentaries and the second season of its original series, “House of Cards.” Ultra HD streaming will be part of the standard Netflix streaming price of $8 a month, the company said. Netflix showed off stream- ing in Ultra HD, or 4K, on the sidelines of the International

CES gadget show this week. The format has four times as many pixels as standard HD and vastly improves the clar- ity of larger screens that measure 60 or more inches diagonally. Netflix videos that are available in the sharper format are labeled with the “Ultra HD 4K” sym- bol. The picture was crisp on a large Sony Bravia screen when running off hotel Inter- net that was boosted to 50 Mbps, and didn’t seem to take any longer than stan- dard Netflix video to load. Neil Hunt, Netflix’s chief product officer, said the com- pany was in a “unique place” by being able to order origi- nal programming in 4K and then being able to deliver it to the small group of early adopters while the format is still in its early stages. “People are recognizing that disc formats are yester- day’s solution,” Hunt said.

Carmakers:

Driverlesscarsneed legal framework

By The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — The future of driving is right around the corner. Hydrogen- and solar- powered vehicles are on the streets. So are cars that can get you through stop-and-

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go traffic while you sit back and send texts from behind the wheel. Cars are even using radar, ultrasonic waves and cameras to jump into the passing lane and get around slowpokes. Sure, all of these tech- nologies are still in the test- ing phase, but that hasn’t stopped car makers and technology companies from showing off a new para- digm of driving at the Inter- national CES gadget show this week. It’s a world in which you no longer grip the wheel with excitement, but instead relax with a book or movie as your car chauffeurs you to your des- tination. It’s also a future that won’t materialize, say car- makers, unless legislators around the world create a new legal framework. One simulation at CES by Delphi Automotive PLC, a provider of auto parts and technology to major manu- facturers including Ford, GM and Volvo, shows the possibilities. The scenario, using a stationary but souped-up Tesla Model S, imagines “autonomous driving lanes,” much like carpool lanes today. The company says vehicles might someday enter these lanes and then run on auto- pilot. The feat is possible today with a mixture of technology that keeps cars

inside lanes and adaptive cruise control that matches a car’s speed to the vehicle in front of it. While in the autonomous lane, the car’s window glass frosts up and functions that had been disabled for the driver — like video playing from a mini projector — turn on. The driver can pursue other activities, like surfing the Web or even taking a nap. When the driver’s exit nears, the car gets increas- ingly persistent, demand- ing that the driver take back control. First, the video player stops. Then a female voice intones, “Place both hands on the steering wheel and look ahead in the driving direction.” Finally, the seat starts vibrating and a driver-fac- ing camera ensures he or she is looking at the road. The driver taps a steering wheel knob, takes control, and drives on. The experience is similar to airline pilots who grab the controls for take-off and landing but let a com- puter do the rest. “These technologies exist now and the carmakers assure us they’re ready to go,” said Jim Travers, asso- ciate editor of autos for Consumer Reports maga- zine. “It’s really not that far off.”

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The Daily Union.

Official Geary County Newspaper Official City Newspaper Junction City • Grandview Plaza • Milford

John G. Montgomery Publisher Emeritus

Tim Hobbs

Publisher/Editor

Penny Nelson

Office Manager

Lisa Seiser

Managing Editor

Jacob Keehn Ad Services Director

Grady Malsbury

Press Supervisor

Past Publishers

John Montgomery, 1892-1936 Harry Montgomery, 1936-1952 John D. Montgomery, 1952-1973

To the Public

“W e propose to stand by the progressive movements which will benefit the

condition of the people of these United States.”

John Montgomery and E.M. Gilbert Junction City Union July 28, 1888

Anotherview

E.M. Gilbert Junction City Union July 28, 1888 Anotherview Chris Christieandthe abuse of power The following

Chris Christieandthe abuse of power

The following editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune on Friday, Jan. 10

C hris Christie is a guy you want to like, some- times despite himself. He’s just made that a lot harder to do.

Take him at his word that he knew nothing about the arrogant abuse of government power to bully a political opponent, creating a public safety risk and inconveniencing thousands of people. Take him at his word on that, and you still have this: He created an environment in which some of his most trusted people thought that was a slick trick. They reveled in it. Until they got caught. Give Christie this. His apology on Thursday was full-throated. When he said he was “embarrassed and humiliated,” you could feel it. He fired his deputy chief of staff. He didn’t dodge. He asked exactly the right question: “What did I do wrong to have these folks think it was OK to lie to me?” The pilots and owners of 16 airplanes are still waiting for an apology from former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, who abused his power, and stranded their planes, when he ordered bulldozers to carve up the runway at Meigs Field in the middle of the night a decade ago. Political arrogance tends to be more corrosive than your everyday arrogance because the power

of government is so vast. That’s what struck us here: That people would wield that power with such force, and feel so gleeful about it. You know the story by now. Aides to Christie cre- ated a roadblock in September that caused long traffic backups on Fort Lee, N.J., roads leading to the George Washington Bridge into New York City, to punish a mayor who had refused to endorse Christie’s re-election. Commuters were inconve- nienced, but the backups also delayed school buses and emergency responders. Christie initially said the backups were caused by a legitimate traffic study. But subpoenas issued by state lawmakers turned up a series of electronic messages that confirmed Christie’s government and political operatives had orchestrated the mess, and for a specific purpose. The governor’s deputy chief of staff tells a political operative: “Time for some traffic problems in Fort Lee.” “Got it,” replies the operative, David Wildstein, a childhood friend of the governor who worked at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs bridges, tunnels, airports and transit.

A couple of weeks later, two of the three local

access lanes on the New Jersey side of the bridge were shut down. Delays ran into hours. Fire, police and ambulance services were impeded. School buses full of kids stood idle. Then the gloating started. One unidentified tex- ter referenced the school-bus delays: “Is it wrong that I’m smiling?”

“No,” Wildstein wrote back. “They are the chil- dren of Buono voters.” Barbara Buono was the Democratic challenger to Christie. Christie handily won the election — he surely didn’t need any political dirty tricks to keep his career on track. But he’s going to be dogged by this for a long time. Rev up the investigations. Maybe they’ll conclude before the 2016 Iowa caucuses, maybe they won’t.

If Christie comes up with an answer to that ques-

tion — What did I do wrong? — it would serve him

well to let us all know what it is. Introspection wouldn’t be a sign of weakness, especially for the famously brash governor of New Jersey.

A good lesson for others who wield government

power: Check your arrogance. Think of it as a pre- emptive strike on looming embarrassment.

About thispage

The Opinion page of The Daily Union seeks to be a com- munity forum of ideas. We believe that the civil exchange of ideas enables citizens to become better informed and to make decisions that will better our community. Our View editorials represent the opinion and institutional voice of The Daily Union. All other content on this page represents the opinions of others and does not necessarily represent the views of The Daily Union. Letters to the editor may be sent to The Daily Union. We prefer e-mail if possible, sent to m.editor@thedailyunion. net. You may also mail letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 129, Junction City, KS 66441. All letters must be fewer than 400 words and include a complete name, signature, address and phone number of the writer for verification purposes. The Daily Union reserves the right to edit letters for length. All decisions regarding letters, including whether a name with- held letter will be honored, length, editing and publication are at the discretion of the managing editor.

opinion

The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

5A

editor. o pinion The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 5A Otherviews Afghanistan, Iraqand the Middle

Otherviews

Afghanistan, Iraqand the Middle East

By Glenn Mollette

Special to The Daily Union

W e need to pull our troops out of Afghanistan and take a com- pletely different approach to

the Middle East. Four thousand, four hundred and eighty six American soldiers were killed in Iraq between 2003 and 2012. Plus there were approximately 174,000 civilian and combatant deaths. These are horrendous numbers of death not counting the thousands who are still trying to recuperate physically and mentally from Iraq. News of hard won Fallujah being recaptured to Al Qaeda linked forces touches the nerve of service members who fought there. The average Ameri- can watching the news shakes his head at the hardships of the Iraqi people. Tragedy is written everywhere. We know about the death of our children and parents and soldiers maimed for life as they stepped on explosive mines. We have seen the news clips of a coun- try and people ravaged by war.

We left Iraq celebrating about the good we did. We claimed victory in helping Iraq progress to a better gov- ernment and a safer place to live. We turned our attention to Afghanistan and for a moment we listened to our President say, “Osama bin Laden is dead and the Taliban is on the run.” That sounded good but soon wore off. Recent months of Iraq and Afghani- stan terrorist activity only underscores they didn’t run too far. They have hidden in the rocks and caves of those Middle East countries resurfacing to fight even though the war might kill their own fathers, wives, mothers and children. They do not care. Our political leaders have decided to keep our military presence in Afghani- stan for at least another ten years. You can count on it being longer. Many gov- ernment leaders will now wish we had stayed in Iraq and we will be back there supplying weapons and military lead- ership. And what about Syria? It’s a miracle we don’t have 50,000 soldiers in Syria. The pressure to aid Syria has been phe-

nomenal. They are truly a devastated country that needs help. The big problem is we are going to crash in America trying to police the world. Egypt, Iran and Yemen are other hot spots of severe concern. How far can we go? It’s time to pull our troops out of Afghanistan and take a more realistic approach to the Middle East. We can supply military leadership and orga- nizers along with weapons, supplies and food better than we can send fifty to a hundred thousand soldiers in each country. By the way, each of these countries is wealthy in oil. They can afford to pay us for our help even if it takes them fifty years. And then we can try to repay China for all the money we’ve borrowed from them.

Glenn Mollette is an American columnist read in all 50 states. Contact him at GMollette@aol.com. Like his facebook page at www. facebook.com/glennmollette. He is the author of “American Issues” and numerous other books.

Republicans have little to offer poor

L ast week, Republicans marked the 50th anniversary of Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty by

denouncing it as an abject failure. Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Fla., performed a mathematical sleight of hand in declar- ing that “more people are living in poverty than ever before.” The National Review, the intellectual standard-bearer of movement conser- vatism, published an editorial relying on the same deceptive math. (Yes, more people are living in poverty, but the percentage is lower. The population has grown in the last half-century.) House Speaker John Boehner rushed to agree with those analyses. But the more interesting assaults came from a handful of young Turks, including Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and House Budget Committee Chair- man Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who under- stand that the GOP needs to change its image to reflect more charity and com- passion toward the less fortunate. They presented familiar criticisms of gov- ernment intervention on behalf of the poor while also promising they would introduce better solutions. If only they were sincere. As the United States — like the rest of the industrialized world — grapples with structural economic changes that are hollowing out the middle class, its lead- ers desperately need to come up with new ideas to help struggling Ameri- cans maintain a decent standard of living. Unfortunately, Republicans have next to nothing to offer. Take Rubio’s speech. His proposals were warmed-over Republican rhetoric from the last three decades, including the oft-repeated complaint that poor people are impoverished because they refuse to get married. He might as well have been Dan Qualye in 1992, railing against the fictional out-of-wedlock mother Murphy Brown.

against the fictional out-of-wedlock mother Murphy Brown. cynthiatucker Commentary “The truth is, the greatest tool

cynthiatucker

Commentary

“The truth is, the greatest tool to lift children and families from poverty is one that decreases the probability of

child poverty by 82 percent. But it isn’t

a government spending program. It’s called marriage,” he said. This argument makes me crazy. I’m

a huge fan of the institution because of the many benefits a good marriage bestows: intimacy, companionship, sta- bility. But it does not solve poverty. Suggesting it does is a logical fallacy

— confusing cause and correlation. Any survey of government data will show you that the poorest households are more likely to be headed by single mothers. But would they be any more prosperous if they were married to men who are unemployed? I don’t see how. Brookings Institution economist Isa- bel Sawhill has written, “If individuals do just three things — finish high school, work full time and marry before they have children — their chances of being poor drop from 15 percent to 2 percent.” I have little doubt of that. But where are those full-time jobs to come from? The unemployment rate among black men with high school diplomas stands at around 30 percent, more than four times higher than the national average of 7 percent, according to an analysis by Remapping Debate, a left-leaning news site. That helps explain the low marriage rates among less affluent blacks. (Joblessness is increasingly

affecting working-class whites, too, and their marriage rates are also drop- ping.) Rubio’s speech also depended heavi- ly on the conservative mythology that low taxes and less government regula- tion would create good jobs, a claim that decades of Republican rule have already shown to be a lie. If the GOP formula worked, the economy would have thrived during the tenure of George W. Bush, who famously cut taxes (leading to much of the deficit that Republicans now bemoan) and stripped away govern- ment regulations on business. The result? Economists call the Bush years a “lost decade” during which there was zero net jobs growth. Zero. Atlanta Journal-Constitution colum- nist Jay Bookman recently exposed the same nonsense at the state level. In Georgia, which has had Republican leadership since 2002, taxes have been slashed and public services scaled back. Some schools can’t even afford to stay open for the standard 180 days a year. Has poverty in Georgia decreased as a result of this GOP experiment? Hard- ly. “In 2002, Georgia had the nation’s 20th-highest poverty rate. Today we have the seventh-highest poverty rate. There is no way that can be defined as success or even as holding our own,” Bookman wrote. The sad truth is that Republicans have no workable plans for reducing poverty — just a plan to fool the politi- cal classes into thinking they care. America’s poor deserve more than that.

Cynthia tuCker, winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a visiting professor at the University of Georgia. She can be reached at cynthia@cynthiatucker.com.

Police/calendar/Business

6A

The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

JunctionCity

PoliceDepartment

The Junction City Police Depart- ment responded to 171 calls in the 48-hour period ending 6 a.m. Fri- day. The department made two arrests in the 24-hour period end- ing 6 a.m. Friday. An arrest total for Thursday wasn’t reported.

• 9:31 a.m. — Accident, 11th St.

and Jackson St.

• 2:17 p.m. — Theft, 517 W. Third

St.

• 2:57 p.m. — Accident, 410 W. 14th St.

• 3:41 p.m. — Accident, 1015

Burke Drive

• 3:57 p.m. — Accident, 211 S.

Franklin St.

• 5:16 p.m. — Burglary, 517 W.

11th St.

• 6:36 p.m. — Theft, 1810 Caro- line Ave.

• 9:15 p.m. — Domestic, 1200

block of Wildflower Drive

Thursday

• 2:26 a.m. — Domestic, 800

block of Grant Ave.

• 8:24 a.m. — Accident, 2610

Strauss Blvd.

• 12:40 p.m. — Theft, 900 N.

Eisenhower Drive

• 3:29 p.m. — Accident, 920 W. Sixth St.

erty, 1208 Marshall Drive

• 5:07 p.m. — Theft, 624 S. Wash-

ington St.

Friday

• 1:08 a.m. — Domestic, 600

block of Golden Belt Blvd.

GrandviewPlaza

PoliceDepartment

The Grandview Plaza Police Department made no arrests and

responded to eight calls in the 24-hour period ending 12 a.m.

Thursday. A report for Thursday

wasn’t received as of Friday after- noon.

JunctionCity

FireDepartment

The Junction City Fire Depart- ment made five transports and

responded to 14 calls in the 48-hour period ending 8 a.m. Friday.

GearyCounty

Sheriff’sDepartment

The Geary County Sheriff’s Department made seven arrests and responded to 147 calls in the 48-hour period ending 7 a.m. Fri- day.

Wednesday

• 5:37 p.m. — Accident, Hillside Road and US-77 Thursday • 8:31 p.m. — DUI, 1000 block of S. Washington St.

GearyCounty

DetentionCenter

The Geary County Detention Center booked the following indi- viduals during the 48-hour period ending 7 a.m. Friday.

Wednesday

• 10:55 a.m. — Jonas Brown, DUI (recommit)

• 2:30 p.m. — Elisha Pfeifer, pro- bation violation (recommit)

• 2:31 p.m. — Donavan Johnson, criminal carrying of weapon

• 11:45 p.m. — Daniel Soucie,

possession of marijuana, posses- sion of drug paraphernalia, obstructed license plate, no proof of insurance

Thursday

• 12:25 a.m. — Clara Rangel, fail- ure to appear, outside warrant

• 5:23 a.m. — Kevin Wisecup,

driving while suspended, speed- ing, illegal registration, no insur-

ance, defective tail lamps

• 7 a.m. — Robert Brown, proba-

tion violation (recommit)

• 11:27 a.m. — Philip Rainwater,

DUI, driving in violation of restric- tions, no insurance

• 2:06 p.m. — Randy Jackson,

failure to appear

• 2:33 p.m. — Michael Harris,

probation violation

• 4:15 p.m. — Brian Schultz, fail-

• 4:33 p.m. — Jeremiah Conner,

driving while license revoked

• 5:32 p.m. — Kristine Lankford,

theft (recommit)

• 7 p.m. — Renee Rhyne, proba- tion violation (2, recommit)

• 9:10 p.m. — Duane Hacker,

criminal threat, DUI, driving with- out headlights, improper driving on a laned roadway

• 9:50 p.m. — Amanda Rothfuss,

possession of controlled substance,

aggravated child endangerment

• 10:30 p.m. — Amanda Combs, domestic battery

Wednesday

• 5:06 p.m. — Damage to prop-

ure to appear

JC Calendar

5:06 p.m. — Damage to prop - ure to appear JC Calendar Sunday, Jan.12 • Noon

Sunday, Jan.12

• Noon — Doors open at JC

Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

• Noon — Alcoholics Anon-

ymous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• 1:30 p.m. — American

Legion Post 45 Auxiliary Bingo, Fourth and Franklin streets

• 8 p.m. — Narcotics Anon-

ymous, 119 W. Seventh St. Monday, Jan.13

• 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. — Exer-

cise at Senior Citizens Center

• 9:30 p.m. — Board meet-

ing at Senior Citizens Center

• Noon — Alcoholics Anon-

ymous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. — Bingo

after Lunch at the Senior Citi- zens Center

• 1 to 2:30 p.m. — Trouba-

dours of JC rehearsal at Geary County Senior Center

• 2 p.m. — Doors open at

Junction City Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

Group

Cancer Support Group, Med-

ical Arts Building II, Third Floor Conference Room,

Geary Community Hospital

• 6 p.m. — JC South Kiwan-

is meets at Valley View.

• 6:45 p.m. — Social Dupli-

cate Bridge, 1022 Caroline Ave.

• 7 p.m. — Hope Al-Anon

meeting at First United Meth-

odist Church

• 7 p.m. — Hope Al-Anon, First United Methodist

Church, 804 N. Jefferson.

• 7 p.m. — Bingo, Knights

of Columbus, 126 W. Seventh St. Doors open at 5 p.m.

7 p.m. Geary County Fish &

Game Association meeting, 3922 K-244 Spur

• 7 p.m. — JC Fraternal Order of Eagles Auxiliary meeting, 203 E. 10th St.

• 7:30 p.m. — Acacia Lodge

#91, 1024 N. Price St., Junc- tion City

Hope

and

Circle

of

St.

• Afternoon Bingo at Senior Citizens Center

• Senior Citizens Center

errands to bank and post

office

• Computer class at the

Senior Citizens Center

Tuesday, Jan.14

• 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. —

Zumba at Senior Citizens Center

• 10 to 11 a.m. — Bible

study at Senior Citizens Cen- ter

• Noon — Alcoholics Anon-

ymous, 119 W. Seventh St. • 2 p.m. — Doors open at the Junction City Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th

Squadron Civil Air Patrol, JC

airport terminal, 540 Airport Road

• 8 p.m. — Alcoholics

Anonymous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• Computer Class at the

Senior Citizens Center

• Senior Citizens Center

errands to Fort Riley Wednesday, Jan.15

• 6:30 a.m. — Alcoholics

Anonymous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• 6:45 a.m. — Breakfast

Optimist Club, Hampton Inn

• 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. — Exer-

cise at Senior Citizens Center

• 11 a.m. to Noon — Blood

pressure checks at the Senior

St.

Center

 

5 to 8 p.m. — Junction

Noon — Noon Kiwanis

City Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie and Auxiliary kitchen is open with full meals

• 6:30 p.m. — JC Fraternal

Order of Eagles Aerie Bingo, 203 E. 10th St., open to pub-

meets at Kite’s, Sixth and Washington streets

• Noon — Alcoholics Anon-

ymous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• 12:15 p.m. — Weight

Watchers, Presbyterian

the Junction City Fraternal Order of Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

• 1 to 4 p.m. — Cards at

Senior Citizens Center

• 6 to 7:45 p.m. — AWANA

Club, First Southern Baptist Church

• 6:30 p.m. — Bingo at

American Legion Post 45,

Fourth and Franklin streets

• 7:30 p.m. — Melita Chap-

ter 116, Order of the Eastern Star, Prince Hall Lodge, corner

of Price St. & East 11th St.

• 7:30 p.m. — Chapman

Rebekah Lodge #645, Chap-

man Senior Center

• 8 p.m. — Narcotics Anony-

mous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• 8 p.m. — Alcoholics Anon-

ymous, Presbyterian Church,

113 W. Fifth St. • Senior Citizens Center errands to Dillons

Thursday, Jan.16

• 9:30 a.m. — MOPS (Moth-

ers of Preschoolers), First Southern Baptist Church, child

5:30 p.m. — Friends of

• 8 p.m. — Alcoholics

lic

Church 113 W. Fifth St.

care provided

Hope Breast Cancer Support

Anonymous, 119 W. Seventh

7

p.m.

Composite

2 p.m. — Doors open at

Noon — Alcoholics Anony-

mous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• 1 p.m. — TOPS (Take Off

Pounds Sensibly), Episcopal

Church of the Covenant, 314 N. Adams St.

• 2 p.m. — Doors open at the

Junction City Fraternal Order of

Eagles, 203 E. 10th St.

• 5 to 8 p.m. — Junction City

Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie

and Auxiliary kitchen is open with full meals

• 6:30 p.m. — Bingo at Amer-

ican Legion Post 45, Fourth and

Franklin streets

• 6:30 p.m. — Flinthills

Depression and Bipolar Alli-

ance Support Group, First

Christian Church, Fifth and Humboldt, Manhattan

• 7:30 p.m. — Stated Com-

munications, Union Masonic Lodge No. 7 AF&AM

• 8 p.m. — Alcoholics Anon-

ymous, 119 W. Seventh St.

• Senior Citizens Center

errands to Walmart

Schools, government agencies invited to submit solar projects for possible funding

TOPEKA — Westar Ener- gy is inviting Kansas schools, non-profit organi- zations and government agencies to submit propos- als for solar projects, and for selected projects, the utility will partner with them by providing funds to

purchase and install the solar panels. Target projects for the program will be 10 to 30 kilowatts and must provide electricity to a facility in Kansas. Westar expects to provide funding for pur- chase and installation of

about 15-20 solar systems. Projects will be selected based on the opportunity to provide education about solar energy, the character- istics of the site, the organi- zation’s readiness to have the solar panels installed and geographic diversity.

This program is in coopera- tion with the Environmen- tal Protection Agency and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Full program details and the application are available at www.WestarEnergy.com/ solarproject. Applications

are due by March 1. In addition to the commu- nity projects, Westar is installing solar systems on several of its own buildings to study the performance of solar panels in this area. Westar is fitting its service centers in Manhattan and

Lawrence with 40 kW solar arrays, and installing a 75 kW solar system on the roof of its Shawnee Service Cen- ter. Westar will share data gathered from the installa- tions with customers to help them make informed choic- es regarding solar energy.

 

THE WEEK IN REVIEW

 

WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

 

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

   

WEEKLY DOW JONES

 

uu

NYSE

 

uu

NASDAQ

   

Wk

Wk

YTD

Wk

Wk

YTD

Name

Ex

Div Last

Chg %Chg%Chg

Name

Ex

Div Last

Chg %Chg%Chg

 

Dow Jones industrials

-44.89 105.84 -68.20

-17.98

-7.71

10,371.13 +74.36

4,174.66 +42.75

AT&T Inc AbbottLab AdobeSy AMD Alco Strs Alcoa AlphaNRs AmAirl n Amgen ApldMatl AriadP AutoData BP PLC BkofAm B iPVix rs BlackBerry Boeing BrMySq Cemex Cisco Citigroup CocaCola ColgPalm s ConAgra Corning DeltaAir DryShips DuPont eBay EMC Cp EnPro ExxonMbl Facebook FedExCp FordM GenElec GenMotors GenuPrt Goodyear Groupon HarleyD HewlettP HomeDp iShJapan iShChinaLC iShEMkts

NY

1.84

33.62

-.72

-2.1

-4.4

iS Eafe

NY

1.70

66.81

+.83

+1.3

-.4

 
HewlettP HomeDp iShJapan iShChinaLC iShEMkts NY 1.84 33.62 -.72 -2.1 -4.4 iS Eafe NY 1.70 66.81
HewlettP HomeDp iShJapan iShChinaLC iShEMkts NY 1.84 33.62 -.72 -2.1 -4.4 iS Eafe NY 1.70 66.81
HewlettP HomeDp iShJapan iShChinaLC iShEMkts NY 1.84 33.62 -.72 -2.1 -4.4 iS Eafe NY 1.70 66.81
HewlettP HomeDp iShJapan iShChinaLC iShEMkts NY 1.84 33.62 -.72 -2.1 -4.4 iS Eafe NY 1.70 66.81
HewlettP HomeDp iShJapan iShChinaLC iShEMkts NY 1.84 33.62 -.72 -2.1 -4.4 iS Eafe NY 1.70 66.81

NY

.88

39.57

+.93

+2.4

+3.2

iShR2K

NY

1.41 115.52

+.83

+0.7

+.1

Close: 16,437.05 1-week change: -32.94 (-0.2%)

 

Nasd

59.53

+.37

+0.6

-.6

Intel

Nasd

.90

25.53

-.25

-1.0

-1.6

MON

TUES

WED

THUR

FRI

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NY

4.17

+.17

+4.3

+7.8

IBM

NY

3.80 187.26

+.62

+0.3

-.2

17,000

J A S O ND J

J

A

S

O

ND

J

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Nasd

9.23

-.02

-0.2

-2.3

JDS Uniph

Nasd

12.25

-.78

-6.0

-5.7

NY

.12

10.11

-.46

-4.4

-4.9

JPMorgCh

JohnJn

NY

1.52

58.49

-.17

-0.3

+.7

16,500

VersoPap 4.15 +3.50 +538.5

InterceptP 445.83+376.66 +544.5

NY

6.21

-.83

-11.8

-13.0

NY

2.64

94.74 +2.89

+3.1

+3.4

Intrexon n

29.87 +6.37 +27.1

ConatusP n 14.25 Galectin wt 10.30

+8.07 +130.6

Nasd

29.35 +2.81

+10.6

+16.2

Kroger

NY

.66

39.46

+.36

+0.9

-.2

 

EKodk wtA 19.82

+4.07

+25.8

+5.78 +127.6

Nasd

2.44 117.99

+3.52

+3.1

+3.4

Nasd

.12

10.97

-.06

-0.5

-.6

16,000

PennVa 11.25 +2.13

Pharmerica 25.91 +4.81 Acuity 132.66 +24.51

NBGre pfA 17.34

BkIreland 17.31 +3.08 +21.6

+3.14 +22.1

+22.7

+23.4

+22.8

ChinaYida 7.24 +4.02 +125.1

Neurcrine 19.15 +9.50 +98.4

Epizyme n 40.41 +19.84

GalectinTh 15.10 +7.06 +87.8

+77.3

LiveDeal 8.65 +3.77

+96.5

Nasd

Nasd

Nasd

NY

.40

1.92

2.28

17.47

6.73

80.35

49.20 +1.33

-.04

-.42

-.38

-0.2

-5.9

-0.5

+2.8

-1.2

-1.3

-.6

+1.2

LSI Corp

LillyEli

MGM Rsts

MannKd

MktVGold

NY

NY

Nasd

NY

1.96

.19

51.93

25.36 +1.91

5.92

22.01

+.52

+.18

+.83

+1.6

+8.1

+9.6

+0.8

+1.8

+7.8

+13.8

+4.2

15,500

15,000

Yelp 82.21 +14.55 Pandora 33.47 +5.88

+21.5

Galectin un

35.00 +14.74

+72.8

NY

.04

16.77

+.36

+2.2

+7.7

MicronT

Nasd

23.71 +2.74

+13.1

+9.0

+21.3

Oramed n 28.91 +10.90

+60.5

NY

Nasd

40.84 -2.32

8.76 +1.15

-5.4

+15.1

-4.0

+17.7

Microsoft

Nasd

1.12

36.04

-.87

-2.4

-3.7

14,500

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

NY

2.92 141.90

+4.28

+3.1

+4.0

NokiaCp

NY

8.18

+.15

+1.9

+.9

   

NY

1.44

56.18 +3.33

+6.3

+5.7

OfficeDpt

NY

4.94

-.32

-6.1

-6.6

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

NY

.45

12.60 +1.07

+9.3

+6.5

Oracle

NY

.48

38.11

+.49

+1.3

-.4

 

MUTUAL FUNDS

 

GNIron

22.92 -44.15

-65.8

PrDvrsty n 3.23 YRC Wwde 13.58

-1.49 -31.6

Nasd

.68

22.22

+.24

+1.1

-.2

Pandora

NY

33.47 +5.88

+21.3

+25.8

   

Cyan n

3.56

-1.73

-32.7

-5.60 -29.2

NY

.04

54.72 +1.32

+2.5

+5.0

Penney

NY

7.34 -1.40

-16.0

-19.8

 

Total Assets

 

Total Return/Rank

Pct Min Init

hhgregg

10.62

-2.98

-21.9

ChelseaTh 2.50 -1.00 -28.6 support.cm 2.84 -1.03 -26.6

NY

1.12

40.13

-.33

-0.8

-2.9

Petrobras

NY

.27

12.84

-.28

-2.1

-6.8

Name

Obj

($Mlns)

NAV

4-wk

12-mo

5-year

Load

Invt

RadioShk

2.12

-.53

-20.0

NY

1.36

65.08

+.90

+1.4

-.2

Pfizer

NY

1.04

30.69

+.17

+0.6

+.2

Alliance Bernstein GlTmtcGC m American Funds FnInvA m American Funds GrthAmA m American Funds IncAmerA m American Funds InvCoAmA m American Funds MutualA m

WS

79

69.41

+3.4

+19.0/D +13.5/D

1.00

2,500

Dolan pfB

10.05

-2.25

-18.3

NV5 wt 2.65 -.82

-23.7

NY

1.00

33.86

+.37

+1.1

+.5

PlugPowr h

Nasd

3.65 +1.04

+39.8

+135.5

LB

41,819

51.66

+2.8

+26.7/D

+17.8/B

5.75

250

CSVLgNGs 18.54

Twitter n

USEC rs

5.12

-3.91

57.00 -12.00

-1.06

-17.4

-17.4

-17.2

ProceraN 11.57 -3.35 -22.5

ChinaNRes 8.51 -2.29 -21.2

-3.83 -20.9

NY

NY

.40

.24

+.40

31.47 +2.24

18.29

+2.2

+7.7

+2.6

+14.6

PwShs QQQ Nasd

RegionsFn

NY

.88

.12

87.30

10.48

+.66

+.61

+0.8

+6.2

-.8

+6.0

LG

MA

70,775

68,000

43.02

20.58

+3.2

+1.7

+29.5/C +18.2/D

+15.9/B

+14.4/A

5.75

5.75

250

250

NatResPtrs 16.60

7.34

Penney

-3.16

-1.40

-16.0

-16.0

FairwayG n 14.49

PacSunwr 2.88 -.76 -20.9 Brightcove 11.54 -3.03 -20.8

Nasd

NY

1.80

3.86

63.54

-.41

-.24

-9.6

-0.4

-17.9

-2.2

RexahnPh

RiteAid

Amex

NY

1.14

5.60

+.62 +117.1 +123.5

+.13

+10.7

+2.4

LB

LV

WS

55,031

20,506

36.48

34.59

+2.1

+1.5

+27.4/C +16.2/D

+24.0/D +16.2/C

+23.2/B

+17.1/B

5.75

5.75

250

250

 

Nasd

52.16 -1.10

-2.1

-4.9

SpdrDJIA

NY

3.53 164.18

-.21

-0.1

-.8

   

36,935

37.45

+2.5

5.75

250

 

NY

NY

.40

25.32

+.35

+1.4

+3.5

+.7

+2.7

 

m

 

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

59.21 +1.99

S&P500ETF

NY

3.35 184.14 +1.26

+0.7

-.3

American Funds NewPerspA American Funds WAMutInvA Davis NYVentC m Fidelity Contra Hartford HealthcarA m Hartford MidCapA m Lord Abbett AffiliatA m PIMCO TotRetIs Putnam GrowIncA m Putnam GrowOppA m Putnam InvestorA m Putnam VoyagerA m Vanguard 500Adml Vanguard InstIdxI Vanguard InstPlus Vanguard TotStIAdm Vanguard TotStIdx

m

LV

50,016

39.24

+2.1

+27.8/B

+16.8/B

5.75

250

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

NY

2.52 100.52

+1.01

+1.0

-.7

SandRdge

SiriusXM

NY

Nasd

6.06

+.12

+2.0

-.2

LB

3,395

38.96

+1.3

+26.1/D +15.6/D

1.00

1,000

BkofAm 5024892 16.77 +.36

S&P500ETF4156104184.14+1.26

SiriusXM 9541373 3.70 +.13

+1.04

PlugPowr h3607737 3.65

Nasd

NY

57.94 +3.38

+2.58

.60 142.63

+6.2

+1.8

+6.0

-.8

Sprint n

SP CnSt

NY

NY

1.02

3.70

9.46

42.40

+.13

-.48

+.03

+3.6

-4.8

+0.1

+6.0

-12.0

-1.3

LG

SH

75,076

451

96.17

31.70

+2.7

+7.4

+29.9/C +19.1/C

+48.7/B +21.4/C

NL

5.50

2,500

2,000

iShEMkts3430984 40.27 +.15

Facebook3311174 57.94 +3.38

NY

.50

16.07

+.56

+3.6

+4.1

SPDR Fncl

NY

.32

22.03

+.14

+0.6

+.8

MG

1,932

25.33

+3.8

+34.5/A +19.6/D

5.50

2,000

FordM 2565055 16.07 Alcoa 1884497 10.11

+.56

MicronT 2683183 23.71 +2.74

NY

.88

26.96

-.52

-1.9

-3.8

LV

6,129

150,959

5,231

15.48

10.76

19.88

+1.7

+26.2/C

-1.2/D

+30.7/A

+14.7/E

5.75

1,000

-.46

Microsoft 2128005

36.04 -.87

NY

40.03

+.46

+1.2

-2.1

SP Util

NY

1.46

38.22

+.95

+2.5

+.7

CI

LV

0.0

+2.8

+6.6/C

+18.2/A

NL 1,000,000

Penney 1766766 7.34 -1.40

BlackBerry2083051 8.76 +1.15

NY

2.15

83.45 +1.13

+1.4

+.3

TimeWarn

NY

1.15

66.19 -2.48

-3.6

-5.1

SPDR Fncl175485522.03

+.14

Cisco 1710649 22.22

+.24

Nasd

.20

25.99 +2.62

+11.2

+9.0

21stCFoxA

Nasd

.25

33.46 -1.74

-4.9

-4.9

5.75

0

AMD 1666632 4.17 +.17

PwShs QQQ141494487.30 +.66

Nasd

11.56

-.52

-4.3

-1.7

Twitter n

NY

57.00 -12.00

-17.4

-10.4

LG

376

24.28

+3.6

+31.9/B

+20.7/B

5.75

0

5.60

GenElec 1494781 26.96

RiteAid 1551861

+.13

-.52

Intel 1317018 25.53

-.25

NY

.84

69.62

+.71

+1.0

+.5

Vale SA

NY

.78

13.72

-.61

-4.3

-10.0

LB

1,470

19.43

+2.8

+30.4/B

+19.1/A

5.75

0

Groupon 1060703

11.56 -.52

NY

.58

27.70

-.64

-2.3

-1.0

VangEmg

NY

1.15

39.87

+.22

+0.6

-3.1

LG

3,571

31.48

+3.6

+38.8/A

+21.6/A

5.75

0

 

DIARY

   

DIARY

 

NY

1.56

82.01

+.12

+0.1

-.4

VerizonCm

NY

2.12

47.75

-.14

-0.3

-2.8

LB

82,357

169.89

+2.4

+27.8/C

+18.2/B

NL

10,000

NY

.13

12.08

+.07

+0.6

-.5

WalMart

NY

1.88

78.04

-.61

-0.8

-.8

LB

87,843

168.81

+2.4

+27.8/C

+18.2/B

NL 5,000,000

Advanced

2,073

Advanced

1,503

NY

1.02

36.43

-.23

-0.6

-5.1

WellsFargo

NY

1.20

45.94

+.60

+1.3

+1.2

LB

74,915

168.82

+2.4

+27.8/C

+18.2/B

NL200,000,000

Declined

1,132

Declined

1,183

NY

.87

40.27

+.15

+0.4

-3.6

Zynga

Nasd

4.11

+.14

+3.5

+8.2

LB

86,541

46.64

+2.8

+29.0/B

+19.1/A

NL

10,000

New Highs

411

New Highs

 

459

   

LB

105,008

46.63

+2.8

+28.9/B

+19.0/A

NL

3,000

New Lows

42

New Lows

42

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC.

n

= New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt =

Total issues

 

3,239

Total issues

2,741

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund perfor med vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.

Unchanged

Volume

34

16,887,827,164

Unchanged

Volume

55

11,043,881,678

Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or

receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables

at

left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

David D. Lauseng

David D. Lauseng   Stock Report Courtesy of   Noel Park  
 

Stock Report Courtesy of

 
David D. Lauseng   Stock Report Courtesy of   Noel Park  

Noel Park

 

514 N. Eisenhower Dr. Ste A Junction City

 

Edward Jones

 

725 N. Washington, Junction City

 

762-4440

   

238-7901

 

Financial Advisor

 

Serving Individual Investors Since 1871

 

Financial Advisor

 

The Daily Union. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014

7A