Sie sind auf Seite 1von 32

1

No-Cook

Lemon Cream Frosting, Bit-O-Mocha

Icing. Recipes on page 21.

THE BLUE BONNET MARGARINE BOOK OF CREATIVE COOKERY


INTRODUCTION CHAPTER 1 Page Margarine is an all-purpose table spread and shortening. Its fresh, sunny-sweet flavor and wholesomeness make our food tastier and more nourishing. Margarine adds a flavorful final touch to cooked vegetables, meats, pasta and pancakes. It is used for baking, broiling, frying. It is ideal as a shortening for cakes, pies and breads. It makes frostings creamy smooth, sauces richly flavored. And margarine is the nation's leading spread for bread! This booklet outlines the uses of margarine in basic cookery for the homemaker of today as well as the homemaker of tomorrow. Beginning cooks should take each chapter as it comes, starting with simple family meals and progressing up to a seated dinner for guests. Once the basic techniques are mastered, specialty foods - such as Puff Pastries - can be added to the recipe repertoire. Experienced cooks will enjoy trying the intriguing recipes, many of which include new step-saving techniques, as well as the "refresher-course" of up-to-date information on basic cookery. All recipes have been tested in the Blue Bonnet Kitchens of Standard Brands Incorporated.
4

Page CHAPTER 2 Page

3 19 CHAPTER 3 Page 22 CHAPTER 4 Page 24 CHAPTER 5 Page 27

FAMILY MEALS RECIPE INDEX

PARTY TIME TREATS Page


30

INFORMAL ENTERTAINING

FORMAL ENTERTAINING

SPECIALTIES OF THE HOUSE

Photos by Laszlo; styled by Ina Slote. Artwork by Murray Tinke/man. Booklet designed by Chas. Crozier. COVER: Apple Cream Pie, Savory Broiled Steak. Recipes on pages 21 and 16.

INTRODUCTION

partially hydrogenated and emulsified with skim milk or water. Other ingredients vary somewhat from brand to brand, but usually include salt and carotene Vitamin A (and in some cases Vitamin D). Minor ingredients are also added to contribute to the perfect blending of these elements and to improve its flavor, spreading, cooking and keeping qualities. The oils in margarine account for 80 per cent of its substance. Blue Bonnet Margarine is made from a blend of cottonseed and soybean oils.

garine consumes about two ounces per day, Blue Bonnet supplies nearly half of the minimum adult Vitamin A requirement and over 60 per cent of the amount needed by a child, and more than 50 per cent of the minimum daily requirement for Vitamin D for children and adults.

HOW SHOULD MARGARINE BE STORED?


Store margarine in unopened package or in a covered container in the refrigerator away from strong-flavored or odorous foods. Regular margarine may be stored for long periods in the freezer in its unopened package or tightly wrapped in heavy duty foil.

HISTORY
The product we know as margarine dates back to the 1860's at the time of the Franco-Prussian War. Because France was suffering from an acute shortage of fats, Emperor Napoleon III offered a prize to anyone who could make a food that was as appetizing and nourishing as butter. A chemist named Hippolyte Mege-Mouries won the prize with a table spread made of beef fat and milk which was called oleomargarine. Margarine was introduced in the United States in 1874 but was not widely used until the outbreak of World War I when an acute butter shortage developed. A similar situation existed during World War II, and since that time the popularity of margarine has steadily grown. Early margarines bore little resemblance to table spreads of today. Ingredients as well as technology have changed radically since the turn of the century. Original products were made much like butter: i.e., by a simple churning process. Today, margarine manufacture involves a series of highly complex processes performed under the watchful eyes of skilled technologists.

HOW IS MARGARINE MADE?


First step in the manufacture of margarine is the refining of the oils. Allor a portion of the pure, crystal-clear oils are then partially "hydrogenated" or hardened. After the semi-solid oils are put through a process of purification, blended and tested for quality, they are poured into mixing tanks together with the remaining ingredients. When these ingredients have been thoroughly blended or emulsified, the mixture is passed through a chilling unit which quickly solidifies the margarine, yet leaves it soft enough to spread. The margarine is shaped in a "former" and wrapped and packaged by machines. Not once during the entire manufacturing process is margarine touched by human hands!

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF MARGARINE?


It takes a big family of margarines to satisfy the specialized needs of today's homemaker. As the nation's First Family of margarines, Blue Bonnet offers a complete line of quality products: Regular Blue Bonnet is an all-purpose spread which may be used as a shortening in general cooking (pan frying, broiling, etc.), in baking and as a topping for cooked foods. It is sold in 1pound packages containing four 1j4-pound sticks. Whipped Blue Bonnet is aerated to increase its volume by 50 per cent for a lighter, more spreadable product with more servings per pound. Each 1-pound package of Whipped Blue Bonnet Margarine contains six sticks instead of the usual four to make it last "32 children further." As a topping for cooked vegetables, pasta, pancakes and waffles, whipped margarine melts faster to spread flavor quickly throughout. It makes frostings easier to mix and more spreadable. Pound for pound, whipped margarine has the same number of calories as regular margarine; however, on a volume basis (pat for pat or stick

IS MARGARINE NUTRITIOUS?
No table spread has more nutritive value than modern margarine. Its value in the daily diet has been recognized by nutrition authorities the world over. Margarine is a highly concentrated source of food energy. Blue Bonnet Margarine also provides generous and reliable amounts of both Vitamins A and D. Since the average user of mar-

WHAT IS MARGARINE?
Modern margarine is a table spread which consists of highly refined vegetable oils which are

for stick) whipped margarine has about one-third fewer calories. Because of the increased volume of this product, it cannot be substituted in equal amounts in all recipes. As a rule, if a recipe calls for 1 tablespoon of regular margarine, use 11/2 tablespoons of whipped margarine for sure success and richer flavor. Soft Blue Bonnet has a softer consistency, being hydrogenated to a lesser degree and thus retaining more of the polyunsaturated fats of the natural oils. The special softness of this product makes it easier to spread and blend - even used right from the refrigerator. In addition to its assets as a table and sandwich spread, soft margarine is an all-purpose shortening which may be used in general cooking and baking. The same amount of soft margarine can be substituted for regular margarine in recipes. Its softness is a real "plus" in certain recipes, such as refrigerator cookies, which may be stored in the freezer, then sliced immediately and baked as needed. Soft Blue Bonnet Margarine comes in two 112 -pound tubs per package. Soft Whipped Blue Bonnet combines the spread-ability of soft margarine and the extra servings of the whipped stick type. Packaged two 8-ounce tubs to the pound, Soft Whipped Blue Bonnet spreads further than ordinary margarine for real family-style economy. In addition to spreading ease, the fresh flavor and lightn.ess of soft whipped margarine makes cake frostings and fillings creamier, easier to mix. It's also an all-purpose topping for cooked vegetables, meats, hot breads and other prepared foods. Because this product is whipped, however, it cannot be substituted on a volume basis in every recipe. Generally speaking, if the recipe calls for 1 tablespoon of regular margarine, use 1112 tablespoons of soft whipped. Diet Blue Bonnet contains half the fat and calories of regular margarine. Because of its reduced fat content, this product must be labeled

as imitation margarine. Diet Blue Bonnet Margarine contains only 50 calories per tablespoon, yet has the same famous flavor of regular Blue Bonnet. Because Diet Blue Bonnet contains significantly less fat, it is not recommended for baking except in specially designed recipes. However, a softtype margarine, it offers special assets as a table spread and topping for cooked foods as well as an ingredient in sauces, cake fillings and frostings. For pan frying, Diet Blue Bonnet should be measured into a cold pan and heated slowly. Premium Blue Bonnet Soft Stick is designed to combine the best features of both soft and sticktype margarines. It spreads like soft, measures like stick, tastes like butter and stores conveniently in your refrigerator. Manufactured by a special process which keeps it spreadable - even used right from the refrigerator - soft stick margarine is firm enough to measure, perform well in baking, use as an ingredient in frostings and as a spread for bread. It is sold in 1-pound packages containing four %-pound sticks.

CHAPTER 1

PLANNING

FAMILY MEALS

HOW SHOULD MARGARINE BE MEASURED?


Good cooks know that one of the secrets of cooking success is measuring accurately. Margarine packaged in quarter-pound bars is easy to measure by following markings on the wrapper. Margarine packaged in tubs is also easy to measure in cups and spoons. To measure tablespoons, be sure to level off with a spatula or back of a knife. Margarine may also be measured by displacing water. If 2/3 cup is needed, fill an 8-ounce measuring cup 1/3 full of water, then add margarine until water reaches 1-cup mark.

Good cooking is not just skill in preparing food, but knowing how to combine various elements of a meal so that they complement each other in appearance, taste and texture. The key to success lies in the skillful use of contrasts. Bland foods like mashed potatoes should be accented by sharper flavors, and smooth textures by something crunchy. There should be hot foods and cold ones. For eye-appeal, an assortment of shapes and sizes is desirable. And color deserves special consideration, for all it takes is a sprig of parsley or a dash of paprika to transform a simple plate into an epicurean delight. Good menu planning also involves good nutrition. To make it easier, nutritionists have divided all foods into 4 basic categories: milk group, fruitvegetable group, meat group and bread-cereal group. In addition to these, fats and oils like margarine and vegetable oils have a nutritional "plus" value and should be used in food preparation and at the table. For instance, Blue Bonnet Margarine is fortified with Vitamin A and Vitamin D. Fats and oils help make a meal satisfying since they digest slowly. They also supply more food energy than other types of food.

BREAKFAST AND BRUNCH


BASIC FOUR FOOD GROUPS
1. Milk Group: Includes milk and milk products such as cheeses, ice cream, cream soups, custards and milk puddings. Use 2 or more cups of milk or its equivalent daily. Includes meats, fish, poultry and eggs. Use 2 or more servings daily. Use at least 4 servings of vegetables and fruits daily. Include 1 serving of a good source of Vitamin C such as citrus fruits or tomatoes. Includes all breads and cereals that are whole grain or enriched, such as corn meal, crackers, flour, macaroni. Use 4 or more servings daily. A good breakfast is planned to provide approximately one-third of the daily food needs. However, because the list of foods commonly served for breakfast is relatively small, it takes careful planning to insure interest and variety for this all-important first meal of the day. Brunch, usually a combination of breakfast and lunch, is a heartier meal incorporating a wider range of foods. Hot Breads Adding variety to breakfast and brunch are numerous yeast-raised breads and quick breads. Quick breads are classified into three groups according to the consistency of the unbaked mixtures: (1) batters which can be poured such as popovers, waffles and pancakes; (2) batters which are spooned or dropped into baking pan such as corn bread and muffins; (3) soft doughs which can be shaped on a floured board such as biscuits. Margarine is an important ingredient in quick breads where it adds flavor and contributes to tender texture and golden color. Yeast breads range from a simple loaf of white bread to elaborate tea rings and braids filled with all manner of fruits, nuts and spices. Margarine makes these breads tender, keeps them soft and gives a soft silky crumb. It also adds flavor and richness to the dough. Brushed on the surface of breads after baking, margarine keeps the crust soft. Hot breads go well with cereal or bacon and eggs for breakfast. Biscuits, corn bread and muffins may also be served for luncheon or dinner. With different toppings or fillings, waffles and pancakes make a luncheon or supper dish or an elegant dessert.

2. Meat Group:

3. VegetableFruit Group:

4. Bread-Cereal Group:

PLANNING $AVE$
Meals must not only provide eating satisfaction and necessary nutrients, but they must stay within the budget for food, and be reasonable in the demands they make on the homemaker's time, energy and skill. All this is not possible without advance planning. This means sitting down with pencil and paper and outlining what the family will eat for several days or a week ahead. The most practical set of plans is partially written before shopping and completed on return from the store. Pre-planning leads to wise buying; further planning after buying insures best possible use of pu rchases.

TIP: For added glamour when company comes, accompany hot breads with margarine cut into fancy shapes. See Chapter 5.
Feather-Light Waffles, Country-Style Pancakes

l>

FEATHER-LIGHT

WAFFLES

12/3 cups unsifted flour


2 tablespoons sugar 3 teaspoons baking powder 3,4 teaspoon salt 13/4 cups milk 2 eggs, separated Y3 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted Blue Bonnet Margarine Maple Syrup Sift together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt into a mixing bowl. Combine milk and egg yolks. Beat with rotary beater just until well blended. Pour over dry ingredients, then add 1/3 cup melted Blue Bonnet Margarine. Beat with rotary beater just until mixture is smooth. Beat egg whites until soft peaks form when beater is raised. Fold into prepared batter. Pour enough batter into hot greased waffle iron to spread within 1 inch from edge. Bake until steaming subsides and waffles are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately with Blue Bonnet Margarine and maple syrup. Makes 12 (41/2-inch) waffles.

turn and bake until nicely browned on underside. Makes 10 pancakes. JAM CRUNCH CAKE 3% to 3% cups unsifted flour 1 cup sugar 11/2 teaspoons salt 2 packages Fleischmann's Active Dry Yeast % cup milk % cup water 1/2 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 eggs (at room temperature) % cup chopped Planters or Southern Belle Pecans % teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 cup jam or marmalade In a large bowl thoroughly mix 11/4cups flour,

% cup sugar, salt and undissolved Fleischmann's


Active Dry Yeast. Combine milk, water and Blue Bonnet Margarine in a saucepan. Heat over low heat until liquids are warm (120-130F.). Margarine does not need to melt. Gradually add to dry ingredients and beat 2 minutes at medium speed of electric mixer, scraping bowl occasionally. Add eggs and 11/2 cups flour, or enough flour to make a thick batter. Beat at high speed 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally. Stir in enough additional flour to make a stiff batter. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour. Meanwhile, mix together chopped Planters or Southern Belle Pecans, remaining % cup sugar and cinnamon; set aside. Stir batter down. Beat vigorously, about 1/2 minute. Turn into 2 greased 8 x 1112 -inch round cake pans. Spoon jam or marmalade evenly over surface of batter. Sprinkle with sugar-nut mixture. Bake in a moderate oven (375 F.) for 35 minutes, or until done. Remove from pans and place on wire racks to cool. Makes two cakes. 6

l>

COUNTRY-STYlE PANCAKES 1 Y2 cups unsifted flour 2 tablespoons sugar 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 egg, beaten 1% cups milk 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted Sift together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Combine egg and milk; blend well. Add egg mixture and melted Blue Bonnet Margarine to dry ingredients. Stir until dry ingredients are moistened (batter will be lumpy). Pour onto hot, lightly greased griddle using 1/4cup batter for each pancake. Bake until pancakes are puffed and bubbly;

POPOVERS
3 1 1 3 eggs cup unsifted flour cup milk tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted teaspoon salt

CHIVE-CHEESE CORN BREAD


1 cup corn meal 1 cup unsifted flour V4 cup sugar 4 teaspoons baking powder % teaspoon salt 2 eggs, slightly beaten 1 cup milk V4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted 1 cup grated Cheddar cheese 3 tablespoons frozen chopped chives Sift together corn meal, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt; set aside. Combine eggs, milk and melted Blue Bonnet Margarine. Add sifted dry ingredients, cheese and chives; stir until smooth. Pour into greased 8-inch square pan. Bake in hot oven (425 F.) 20 to 25 minutes, or until done. Serve hot, cut in squares. Makes 9 servings.

In small deep mixing bowl, beat eggs slightly. Add flour, milk, melted Blue Bonnet Margarine and salt. Beat just until well blended; do not overbeat. Pour batter into 8 well-greased 5-ounce custard cups or muffin cups. Place custard cups on baking sheet. For custard cups bake in hot oven (400 F.) 45 minutes, or until done. For muffin cups, bake in moderate oven (375 F.) 50 minutes, or until done. If desired, remove popovers from oven 10 minutes before end of baking; cut slit in side of each to let steam escape. Quickly return to oven for remainder of baking time. Makes 8 popovers. 7

BLUE BONNET BASIC MUFFINS


2 cups unsifted flour V4 cup sugar 3 teaspoons baking powder % teaspoon salt V4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 egg, beaten 1 cup milk

<l

CINNAMON CRUMB CAKE 21/2 cups unsifted flour


cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine % cup sugar 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 egg, slightly beaten 1 cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Combine 1/2 cup flour, brown sugar and cinnamon. Cut in 1/4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine until crumbly; set aside. Sift together remaining 2 cups flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut in remaining 1/4 cup margarine until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add egg, milk and vanilla extract; stir just until blended. Pour mixture into a well-greased 8-inch square pan. Sprinkle with brown sugar mixture. Bake in a moderate oven (375F.) about 40 minutes, or until done. Cool in pan. Makes one cake. Popovers, Jelly Muffins

Sift together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut in Blue Bonnet Margarine until pieces are the size of small peas. Beat egg and milk together; add all at once to flour mixture. Stir quickly with fork just until dry ingredients are moistened. (Batter will be lumpy.) Fill each muffin cup 2/3 full. Bake in hot oven (400 F.) 25 minutes, or until done. Makes 12 muffins. Jelly Muffins: Fill each muffin cup 1/3 full with batter. Add 2 teaspoons jelly to each cup. Top with remaining batter. Bake in hot oven (400 F.) 25 to 30 minutes, or until done.

LUNCH
Much less custom is associated with lunch than with other meals. A wide variety of foods are popular including soups and chowders, salads, casseroles and stews, omelets, souffles and sandwiches. Whether eaten at home, at school or at work, the menu should include a pleasing combination of flavors, colors and textures, and provide approximately one-third of the day's nutrient requ irement. Sandwiches Sandwiches come in all shapes and sizes. There are small party sandwiches and giant submarines, open-face beauties and triple-decker treats, hot and cold ones on plain bread, fancy bread, toast or rolls. Good sandwiches begin with fresh bread spread to the edges with margarine to keep bread from absorbing moisture from filling. Soft and whipped margarines offer special advantages for ready spreading without tearing the freshest bread, and dividends in extra servings. Prepared spreads combining margarine and other ingredients, such as cinnamon and honey, mustard or horseradish, do double duty as "insulation" and flavoring. In sandwich fillings, anything goes! Sliced meats, cheeses, salads or prepared spreads provide an endless selection. Protein-rich foods such as meats, fish, cheeses and peanut butter are first choices for the most nourishing sandwiches. Sandwiches prepared in advance should be carefully wrapped and refrigerated. For longer storage, most sandwiches may be frozen. To freeze, seal finished sandwiches individually in plastic wrap, plastic bag or aluminum foil. A frozen sandwich, properly protected, will keep 2 weeks or longer in the freezer; in a picnic basket or lunchbox, it should defrost in 2 to 3 hours. Bread that has been frozen will dry out faster, so avoid thawing sandwiches too far in advance.
Flavored Spreads: Garlic Spread, Horseradish Mellow Mustard Spread (left to right) Spread,

flAVORED

SPREADS

!>

Garlic Spread
1 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 4 cloves garlic, minced or 2 teaspoons garlic salt or 1 teaspoon garlic powder or 1/2 teaspoon instant minced garlic

In a small bowl, blend together Blue Bonnet Margarine and garlic. Cover mixture and store in refrigerator. Use to spread roast beef, fried shrimp, lamb or bacon and tomato sandwich; spread on hamburger or hot dog rolls. Makes 1 cup.

!>
1/2

Horseradish Spread

cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened cup drained horseradish

Prepare as directed above. Use to spread roast beef, corned beef, pot roast, fried fish or ham sandwiches. Makes 3/4 cup. Mellow Mustard Spread
1 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened % cup prepared mustard

Prepare as directed above. Use to spread ham, bologna, Swiss cheese or salami sandwiches. Makes 1 cup. Cinnamon Honey Spread
1 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened % cup honey 1 V2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Prepare as directed above. Use as a sandwich spread or topping for French toast, waffles and pancakes. Makes 11/4 cups.

TOASTED PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICHES

% cup Planters Creamy Peanut Butter 12 slices (about 1/2-pound) bacon, crisp fried and crumbled 8 slices day-old white bread 2 eggs, beaten ~ cup milk 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine Blend together Planters Creamy Peanut Butter and crumbled bacon. Spread mixture over 4 bread slices; top with remaining bread. Combine beaten eggs and milk in a wide shallow bowl. Dip sandwiches into egg mixture soaking both sides. Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine on griddle over low heat. Increase temperature to moderate (375 F.). Grill sandwiches until browned on both sides. Makes 4 sandwiches.
9 CRABMEAT CHEESE GRILL tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine cup finely chopped onion tablespoons finely chopped green pepper tablespoons finely chopped pimiento 1 can (7% -ounce) crabmeat % teaspoon salt % teaspoon pepper 8 slices bread 4 slices American cheese Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 2 ~ 2 2 Melt 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine in small skillet. Add onion, green pepper and pimiento. Saute until tender. Flake crabmeat and remove bones. Add to vegetable mixture along with salt and pepper. Spread 4 slices of bread with crabmeat mixture. Place a slice of American cheese on each sandwich. Top with remaining 4 slices of bread. Spread both sides of sandwiches with softened Blue Bonnet Margarine. Grill until golden brown. Makes 4 sandwiches.

CONFETTI CHICKEN SALAD SANDWICHES 2 cups diced cooked chicken 1 hard-cooked egg, chopped V2 cup diced celery 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 2 tablespoons finely diced pimiento 2 teaspoons finely chopped capers % teaspoon salt % teaspoon pepper ~ teaspoon aromatic bitters 2/J cup mayonnaise 10 slices white bread, toasted 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine Lettuce leaves In a mixing bowl combine chicken, chopped egg, celery, parsley, pimiento, capers, salt, pepper and bitters. Toss with mayonnaise to moisten. Spread 5 slices of toast with Blue Bonnet Margarine. Spread salad mixture over remaining toast slices. Arrange lettuce leaves over salad, then top with remaining slices of toast. Slice in half to serve. Makes 5 sandwiches. SUPER SUB 1 loaf Italian bread ~ cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened % teaspoon garlic powder % teaspoon oregano, crushed V2 pound thinly sliced boiled ham 8 slices American cheese 4 slices Provolone cheese 8 slices Genoa salami 1 large tomato, thinly sliced 2 cups shredded lettuce Cut bread in half lengthwise to within % -inch of crust. Spread open; scoop out some of the bread. Combine Blue Bonnet Margarine, garlic powder and oregano; blend well. Spread on bread. Arrange ham, cheese and salami on bread. Top with sliced tomato and lettuce. Close and cut into servings. Makes 3 generous servings.

<l

<l

Confetti Chicken Salad Sandwich, Super Sub

BROILED TROPICAL HAM-WICHES 4 English muffins, split % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 2 teaspoons prepared mustard 8 slices luncheon meat or cooked ham 1 can (81/2 -ounce) crushed pineapple, drained 8 slices Swiss cheese

Thin White Sauce


1 tablespoon Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 tablespoon flour % teaspoon salt Generous dash pepper 1 cup milk

Arrange split muffins on a large baking sheet. Combine Blue Bonnet Margarine and mustard; spread on each muffin half. Place a slice of luncheon meat or a folded slice of ham on each muffin and then top with crushed pineapple. Place a folded slice of cheese on each. Broil until hot and cheese begins to bubble. Makes 4 servings.

SOUPS, STEWS AND CASSEROLES


Among the most popular luncheon and supper dishes are hearty soups, stews, casseroles and creamed mixtures served over toast or patty shells. Basis of these dishes is usually white sauce, a thickened mixture of melted margarine, flour and milk or stock.
WHITE SAUCE

In a small heavy saucepan, melt Blue Bonnet Margarine. Blend in flour, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in milk. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Makes 1 cup sauce. Use for creamed soups. Allow 1/4 to 1 cup drained cooked vegetables or other ingredients to 1 cup sauce. . Medium White Sauce
2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 2 tablespoons flour % teaspoon salt Generous dash pepper 1 cup milk

10

Once the technique of the white sauce is mastered, the beginning cook can go forward to more complicated dishes. The basic sauce is prepared in different consistencies depending on its use. Generally speaking, thin white sauce is used for cream soups, medium for creamed and scalloped vegetables, meat or fish dishes and gravies, and thick white sauce for souffles and croquettes. The foundation of the white sauce is a paste of melted margarine and flour which, when cooked together with liquid, becomes thick and creamy. For brown sauces, the basis of gravies, the flour and margarine paste is cooked until the flour turns a nut-like brown. In stews, flour is used to coat the meat which is browned in melted margarine; the sauce thickens itself during cooking.

Prepare as directed above. Use for creamed and scalloped foods. Allow 1 to 2 cups vegetables, meat or fish to 1 cup sauce. Thick White Sauce

% % %

cup Blue Bonnet Margarine cup flour teaspoon salt Generous dash pepper 1 cup milk

Prepare as directed above. Used in croquettes and souffles. See recipes pages 12 and 13.
TIP: The buttery flavor of Blue Bonnet Margarine makes it an important asset in saucery. For best results, melt margarine over low heat. Stir sauce constantly to prevent burning or scorching.

o cup
o
1% 1

CREAM OF TUNA SOUP

<l

3 2 2

%
2

Blue Bonnet Margarine cup chopped onion cup unsifted flour teaspoons salt teaspoon dry mustard teaspoon white pepper cups milk cups dairy half-and-half cans (7 ounces each) chunks of tuna, well drained cup cooked diced potato tablespoons finely diced pimiento

ually stir in milk and cream. Add spinach with its liquid. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Makes about 8 servings. SAVORY FISH PIE
teaspoon peppercorns teaspoon tarragon leaves 1 bay leaf 1'l'2 pounds flounder fillets 'l'2 pound yellow onions, sliced Water 1 tablespoon finely diced pimiento 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 tablespoons flour 2 teaspoons dry mustard 10 teaspoons salt % teaspoon pepper 3,4 cup milk 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce cup chopped parsley 3 cups prepared mashed potatoes Paprika

11

Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in a large heavy saucepan. Add onion and saute, stirring until tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Blend in flour, salt, dry mustard and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in milk and dairy half-and-half. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Stir in tuna, potato and pimiento. Heat through. Makes 6 to 8 servings. CREAM OF SPINACH SOUP

% %

<l

cup Blue Bonnet Margarine cup chopped onion cup unsifted flour 1 tablespoon salt teaspoon black pepper % teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cups milk 1 cup light cream 2 packages (10 ounces each) frozen chopped spinach, cooked in 1 cup water

In a large heavy saucepan melt Blue Bonnet Margarine. Add onion and saute until tender. Blend in flour, salt, black pepper and nutmeg. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradCream of Tuna Soup, Cream of Spinach Soup

Tie peppercorns, tarragon and bay leaf in cheesecloth. Place in large saucepan with fillets and onions. Cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer 25 minutes, or until onions are tender. Drain; reserve % cup stock. Arrange fish and onions in 2-quart oblong dish. Scatter diced pimiento over fish. Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in a small heavy saucepan. Blend in flour, dry mustard, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and stir in milk and Worcestershire sauce. Return to heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Stir in parsley; spoon sauce over fish. T6p with mashed potatoes. Sprinkle with paprika. Bake in a hot oven (400F.) for 30 to 35 minutes, or until potatoes are lightly browned and edges are bubbly. Makes 6 servings.

BEEF CROQUETTES
2 cups ground or finely chopped cooked beef cup minced onion 2 tablespoons chopped parsley % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine % cup unsifted flour 3M teaspoon salt Va teaspoon pepper 1 cup milk Fine dry bread crumbs 1 egg 2 tablespoons water Planters Peanut Oil

l>

Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in small heavy saucepan; brown mushrooms and set aside. Add onion and flour to saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring, until flour is deep brown. Remove from heat and stir in stock. Add mushrooms, salt, thyme, pepper and Worcestershire sauce. Cook, stirring, until mixture is thickened and begins to boil. Cook 1 minute longer. Makes 1 cup.

BEEF STEW WITH DUMPLINGS 1'l'2 pounds lean beef chuck, cut into 'l-inch cubes % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine

cup unsifted flour

Mix together beef, minced onion and chopped parlsey. Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in small heavy saucepan. Blend in flour, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in milk. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Blend into beef mixture. Refrigerate until well chilled, several hours or overnight. Divide mixture into 8 portions. Shape into cones or cylinders. Roll in bread crumbs. Beat egg with water. Dip croquettes into egg mixture. Roll again in bread crumbs. Deep fry or shallow fry in hot (375F.) Planters Peanut Oil until golden brown, about 2 to 3 minutes. Drain on paper towels. If desired, serve with tomato or Mushroom Sauce. Makes 4 servings.

MUSHROOM
2 1 1 2 1

SAUCE

tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine cup fresh mushroom slices tablespoon minced onion tablespoons flour cup beef stock or bouillon % teaspoon salt Va teaspoon thyme, crushed Dash pepper Dash Worcestershire sauce Beef Croquettes, Beef Stew with Dumplings

1 cup sliced onion 2 large cloves garlic, minced 2 cups water % cup chopped parsley 1 tablespoon salt Va teaspoon pepper 1 bay leaf 2 cups cubed potatoes 1'l'2 cups 1-inch carrot strips 1 cup sliced celery 'l'2 cup chopped green pepper 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms 1'l'2 cups biscut mix 'l'2 cup milk 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted Coat beef cubes with flour. Heat 1/4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine in Dutch oven or large heavy saucepan. Add meat and brown well; remove and set aside. Cook onion and garlic in margarine until onion is tender. Return meat to pan; add water, parsley. salt, pepper and bay leaf. Cover and simmer Over low heat 1 hour; stir occasionally and add water if necessary. Add potatoes, carrots, celery and green pepper. Cover and simmer 15 minutes longer. Add mushrooms. Combine biscuit mix, milk and 3 tablespoons melted Blue Bonnet Margarine; stir until just blended. Drop mixture by tablespoonfuls onto stew. Simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer. Makes 4 to 5 servings.

12

EGGS AND CHEESE Eggs make a valuable contribution to family meals-not only as breakfast foods, but for luncheon and supper as well. Eggs are good sources of protein, Vitamins A and D, riboflavin and some minerals. For a tender product, eggs should be fried or scrambled over low heat; the margarine should not brown. For baking, oven heat should be no higher than 350F. Omelets are similar to scrambled eggs except that they are not broken up during cooking. There are two types of omelets: plain (also called French) and puffy. For a plain omelet, the whole egg is beaten together. For a puffy omelet, egg whites and yolks are beaten separately then blended for a fluffier product. Both are cooked until firm over low heat in a skillet containing melted margarine. The puffy omelet is then placed in a moderate oven until the top is dry. Omelets should be served immediately. Numerous fillings of meat, vegetables and cheese may be inserted in an omelet as it is folded over; plain omelets may be topped with savory sauces. Among the most dramatic of dishes are baked souffles with their golden brown "top hats," fluffy light texture and delicate flavor. Souffles consist of a white sauce and egg yolk mixture to which flavoring ingredients (such as cheeses, vegetables, meat or fish) are added and into which stiffly beaten egg whites are gently folded. Often accompanied by special sauces, souffles may be served as appetizers, entrees or main dishes. They must be served immediately. Cheese, among the oldest foods known to man, has long been a luncheon favorite. It is also an important and economical source of protein. Popular cheese dishes include souffles, fondues, rarebits and sauces for macaroni, vegetables, fish and other prepared foods.
Cheese Souffle, California Spanish Omelet

CHEESE SOUFFLE
3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 tablespoons flour % teaspoon salt % teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 cup milk 3 egg yolks, beaten 1 cup grated sharp Cheddar cheese 5 egg whites

13

In a heavy saucepan, melt Blue Bonnet Margarine. Blend in flour, salt and cayenne pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in milk. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Remove from heat; stir into beaten egg yolks. Add grated cheese; stir until almost completely melted. Cool mixture about 5 minutes, beating occasionally with a rotary beater. Beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Carefully fold in cheese mixture. Grease bottoms of ten 6-ounce custard cups or bottom .of one 11/2quart casserole; fill with mixture. With spatula, make a slight indentation around top of each souffle, 1-inch from edge. Bake in a slow oven (325F.) 20 minutes for individual souffles, or 60 to 70 minutes for large souffle. Serve immediately. Makes 10 individual souffles or 1 large souffle.

l>

CALIFORNIA SPANISH OMELET


5 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/3 cup chopped green pepper 1 can (8-ounce) tomato sauce % cup water 1 teaspoon chili powder % teaspoon salt 8 eggs 1/2 cup milk Dash pepper

In small saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine. Saute onion and green pepper in margarine until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in tomato sauce, water, chili powder and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil; simmer, uncovered, 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, prepare omelet. Beat together eggs, milk, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper. Slowly heat a large skillet until drops of cold water sprinkled on the skillet sizzle and quickly disappear. Add remaining 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine and swirl about pan so that margarine sizzles but does not brown. Quickly add egg mixture and cook over low heat. As bottom of omelet sets, loosen and lift edge with spatula; tilt pan to let uncooked portion run underneath and cook. Continue lifting and tilting procedure until omelet is almost dry on top. Loosen omelet with spatula; fold or roll and tilt out onto plate. Serve omelet immediately with hot sauce. Makes 4 servings.

9- or 10-inch skillet, tilting pan to grease all sides. Pour in omelet mixture. Cover; place over low heat for 5 minutes, or until lightly browned on bottom. Bake, uncovered, in slow oven (325F.) 15 minutes, or until firm in center. Fold in half. Serve with Cheese Sauce. Makes 3 to 4 servings.

DINNER
Chief meal of the day, dinner takes the most planning and effort. The basic meal pattern in most homes includes one course of meat, vegetables and salad, and one of dessert. Appetizers, such as fruit, juice or soup, are all too often reserved for gala occasions.

Cheese Sauce
Melt 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine in a small heavy saucepan. Blend in 2 tablespoons flour and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in 1 cup milk. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Add 1 cup grated sharp Cheddar cheese; stir until cheese melts.

PUFFY OMELET WITH CHEESE SAUCE 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine


3 tablespoons flour 1 cup milk 4 eggs, separated 1/2 teaspoon salt % teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon Blue Bonnet Margarine In a saucepan, melt 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine. Remove from heat and stir in flour. Blend well. Gradually add milk; cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture begins to boil. Cool slightly. Beat egg whites and salt together until stiff peaks form. Beat egg yolks and pepper together until thick and lemon colored. Add egg yolks to slightly cooled sauce, stirring constantly. Fold in , beaten egg whites. Melt 1 teaspoon Blue Bonnet Margarine in a

Meat, Fish and Poultry As the main dish of the meal, special attention should be given to the preparation of meat, fish or poultry. One of the basic methods of cookery, sauteing or pan frying means to cook or brown food in a very small amount of hot fat. Blue Bonnet Margarine offers special advantages for sauteing where its butter-like qualities contribute to flavor and appetizing golden brown color. Melt margarine slowly to prevent burning. Wait until margarine is hot before adding food. Be sure food is dry - dampness will prevent proper browning. Certain meats and fish may be "fried" in a hot oven. Drizzling with melted margarine contributes to browning and "fried" flavor. Brushing with margarine also keeps baked and broiled foods moist, promotes even browning. OVEN FRIED FISH

14

cup milk

'l'2 teaspoon instant minced onion

'l'2 cup fine dry bread crumbs 1 teaspoon basil leaves 1 pound fish fillets % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted Combine milk and instant minced onion; let stand 10 minutes. Blend together crumbs and basil leaves. Dip fillets in milk mixture and then in bread crumbs. Place in greased shallow baking pan. Top with any remaining crumbs and milk. Drizzle with melted Blue Bonnet Margarine. Bake in hot oven (425 F.) about 25 minutes, or until done. Makes 3 servings.

FIESTA SHRIMP SAUTE 2 pounds raw [umbo shrimp, peeled and deveined 2 cops sliced fresh mushrooms % cup sliced scallions % cup diced green pepper 11/2 teaspoons salt Dash pepper % cup sliced pimiento 1 teaspoon lemon iuice 1 tablespoon cornstarch Hot cooked rice
Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in large skillet. Add shrimp, fresh mushrooms, scallions, green pepper, salt and pepper. Saute, stirring occasionally, until shrimp is done, about 5 minutes. Stir in pimiento and lemon juice. Heat thoroughly. Using a slotted spoon, remove shrimp to a platter; keep warm. Add cornstarch to liquid in skillet. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture starts to boil. Spoon over shrimp. Serve with hot cooked rice. Makes 4 to

% cup Blue Bonnet Margarine

FRIED FLOUNDER WITH MUSTARD SAUCE 6 large flounder fillets (about 11/2 pounds) 1 egg 2 tablespoons cold water Fine dry bread crumbs % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 2 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons prepared mustard 1/2 teaspoon salt Dash white pepper 1 egg yolk, slightly beaten 1 cup milk 1 tablespoon lemon [uice 15
Wipe fillets with damp paper towels; dry thoroughly. Beat egg with water. Dip fillets into egg mixture, then coat with bread crumbs; set aside. Melt 1/4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine in a small heavy saucepan. Stir in flour, prepared mustard, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat. Combine egg yolk and milk; gradually add to flour mixture. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Remove from heat and cover. In a large skillet melt 1/4 cup of the remaining Blue Bonnet Margarine. Add as many fillets as will fit in skillet without crowding. Fry over moderate heat until golden brown on underside, about 2 to 3 minutes. Carefully turn fillets and quickly brown other side, about 2 to 3 minutes. Repeat with remaining margarine and breaded fillets until all fillets are fried. Arrange on heated platter. Reheat mustard sauce. Add lemon juice and blend in thoroughly. Serve hot with fried fillets. Makes 4 to 6 servings.

6 servings.

NORWEGIAN MEAT BALLS 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 1/2 cup finely chopped onion 1 pound ground chuck % pound ground lean pork 1/2 cup fine dry bread crumbs 3M cup milk 1 egg, slightly beaten 2 teaspoons sugar 2% teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg % teaspoon ground allspice 3 tablespoons flour % teaspoon pepper 2% cups light cream

<J

Fiesta Shrimp Saute, Norwegian Meat Balls

Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in large skillet; add onion and cook until tender. Combine with ground chuck, ground pork, bread crumbs, milk, egg, sugar, 2 teaspoons salt, nutmeg and allspice. Shape into 1-inch meat balls. Brown meat balls in skillet, shaking pan frequently to keep meat balls round and to obtain even browning. As meat balls are cooked and browned remove from skillet and keep warm. Blend flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper into drippings in skillet. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in cream. Return to heat and bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute longer. Add meat balls and blend well. Makes 6 servings.
SAVORY BROILED STEAK

2 tablespoons grated onion 1 medium clove garlic, minced % teaspoon salt % teaspoon oregano, crushed % teaspoon marjoram, crushed % teaspoon thyme, crushed % teaspoon pepper 1 (2-pound) steak, 1-inch thick Combine Blue Bonnet Margarine, onion, garlic, salt, oregano, marjoram, thyme and pepper; blend well. Place steak on broiler rack. Broil 3 inches from heat, basting frequently with margarine mixture. Broil to desired doneness. Makes 4 to 6 servings.
SCHNITZEL A LA HOLSTEIN

% cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened

Combine flour, salt and pepper on a sheet of wax paper. Beat 1 egg and milk together. Dip veal cutlets in flour mixture, then in egg-milk mixture and finally in bread crumbs. Saute in 4 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine over moderate heat. Brown about 7 minutes on each side, or until cutlets are cooked. Remove to warm platter and keep warm. In another skillet, fry the remaining 4 eggs in 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine. When cooked, top each cutlet with eggs. If desired, garnish with anchovies and capers. Makes 4 servings.
RED FLANNEL HASH

% cup Blue Bonnet Margarine


1/3

16

1 can (12-ounce) corned beef, finely chopped (about 11/2 cups) 1 cup cooked diced potatoes 1 can (8% -ounce) sliced beets, drained and diced 1 egg 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce % teaspoon salt % teaspoon pepper Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in a large skillet. Add onion and green pepper. Saute, stirring, until vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove vegetables from skillet and combine with corned beef, potatoes, beets, egg, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly. Press into skillet and heat until mixture is hot and bottom is browned. Makes about 4 servings.

% cup chopped green pepper

cup chopped onion

% cup unsifted flour % teaspoon pepper


1 teaspoon salt 5 eggs 1 tablespoon milk 1 pound veal cutlets (4 pieces) Fine dry bread crumbs 6 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine

VEGETABLES
The use of vegetables has steadily increased since the beginning of the twentieth centuryand the trend is expected to continue. Coupled with greater awareness of their nutrient value is the availability of an ever-increasing variety of vegetables throughout the year - fresh, frozen and canned. As a group, vegetables are valued for vitamins and minerals; most are low in calories and protein. They are an appetizing addition to any menu where they provide color, flavor and texture contrast for other foods. Vegetables may be cooked alone or in endless combinations. The most popular method of preparation is boiling or steaming. To retain nutrient value of fresh and frozen vegetables, they should be cooked in a small amount of salted water until just tender when tested with a fork. Overcooking will not only rob vegetables of their nutrient value, but cause changes in texture and flavor. Canned vegetables should be heated in their own liquid; they do not require additional cooking. The right degree of seasoning is essential if vegetables are to be appetizing. A simple mixture of salt, pepper and melted margarine is all it takes to accentuate the natural flavor and moisten cooked vegetables. Herbs added to the margarine provide extra zest, as do cheese sauce, cream sauce, etc.
CORN PUDDING

17

Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in a skillet. Add onion, green pepper and pimiento. Saute until tender. Beat eggs. Add corn, bread crumbs, salt, pepper and sauteed vegetables. Pour into 1-quart casserole. Set in hot water and bake in moderate oven (350 F.) about 45 minutes, or until firm. Makes 4 servings. FESTIVE LIMAS 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 chicken bouillon cube 1 teaspoon instant minced onion 1 package (10-ounce) frozen Fordhook Lima beans 2 tablespoons chopped pimiento 1 tablespoon frozen chopped chives 2 teaspoons parsley flakes Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in a small heavy saucepan. Add chicken bouillon cube and minced onion. Cook, stirring constantly, until bouillon cube is dissolved. Add Lima beans, pimiento, chives and parsley flakes. Cook, covered, over medium heat, until beans are tender, about 12 minutes. Makes 3 servings. ALOHA YAMS 1 can (14'l'2 -ounce) sliced pineapple 6 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 tablespoons brown sugar % teaspoon salt % teaspoon pepper 2% cups hot mashed sweet potatoes

V4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine V4 cup chopped green pepper


2 tablespoons chopped pimiento 2 eggs 1 can (1-pound 1-ounce) cream style corn % cup fine dry bread crumbs 1 teaspoon salt % teaspoon pepper
'l'2 cup chopped onion

<J

Drain pineapple, reserving 2/3 cup pineapple syrup. Melt 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine in a small skillet. Stir in brown sugar and 1/3 cup pineapple syrup. Place pineapple slices in syrup and glaze until lightly browned on both sides. Remove pineapple slices to a small heated platter. Reserve brown sugar syrup. Stir remaining 4 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine, salt and pepper into hot mashed sweet potatoes. Mix until well blended. Add remaining Corn Pudding, Festive Limas

cup pineapple syrup. Spoon mashed sweet potatoes onto glazed pineapple slices. Pour reserved brown sugar syrup over mashed potatoes and serve. Makes 4 servings.
1/3

HOME FRY SCRAMBLE


4 cups sliced potatoes 1/4 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 large onion, sliced 1'l'2 teaspoons salt 1/4 cup chopped parsley

Soak sliced potatoes in cold water for 15 minutes. Drain and pat dry with paper towels. Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in large skillet. Add potatoes, onion and salt. Cover and cook until potatoes are almost tender. Remove cover and brown mixture, turning occasionally. Sprinkle with parsley. Makes 6 to 8 servings. VEGETABLE SAUCERY
Curry Sauce
1/4 1/4

cup Blue Bonnet Margarine teaspoon curry powder

<l

18

Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in a small saucepan. Stir in currvpowder. Serve over cooked Lima beans, corn or onions. Store any remaining sauce covered in refrigerator. Makes 1/4 cup.
Chive Parsley Sauce
1/4

<l

cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 tablespoon minced chives 1 tablespoon minced parsley

Prepare as directed above. Serve over cooked potatoes, zucchini. Makes 1/3 cup.
Herb Sauce

cauliflower

or

'l'2 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1/4 teaspoon crushed rosemary leaves 1/4 teaspoon thyme leaves

<l

Prepare as directed above. Serve over cooked peas, green beans or zucchini. Makes 1/2 cup.
Vegetable Saucery: Curry Sauce, Chive Parsley Sauce, Herb Sauce (left to right)

CHAPTER

PAR

Y TIME TREATS

Cream Blue Bonnet Margarine; gradually add sugar. Blend in eggs and beat until light and fluffy. Add flour and chocolate. Mix thoroughly. Stir in Planters or Southern Belle Pecans. Spread evenly in a well greased 9 x 9 x 2-inch baking pan. Bake in moderate oven (350 F.) for 25 minutes. Remove from oven; spread Praline Topping evenly over brownies and return to oven for 10 minutes. Cool in pan. Cut. Makes about 16 brownies. Praline Topping Combine % cup firmly packed light brown sugar, % cup chopped Planters or Southern Belle Pecans, 1/4cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, melted, 2 tablespoons milk and 1/2teaspoon vanilla extract. Blend thoroughly. OLO FASHIONED SUGAR COOKIES 1 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 1 cup sugar 1egg 1 teaspoon almond extract % teaspoon vanilla extract 2% cups unsifted flour 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 teaspoon baking soda Sugar In a large bowl cream together softened Blue Bonnet Margarine and 1 cup sugar. Mix in egg, almond extract and vanilla extract. In a separate bowl blend together flour, cream of tartar and baking soda. Stir into margarine mixture. Blend well. Cover with aluminum foil and refrigerate 2 hours. On a lightly floured board, roll cookie dough out to Va-inch thickness. Using a 21/2-inch round cookie cutter, cut out circles and place on greased baking sheets. Bake in a moderate oven (350 F.) about 8 minutes, or until done. Remove from baking sheets and coolon wire racks. Sprinkle with sugar while still hot. Makes about 5 dozen cookies. Soft Molasses Cookies, Brown Sugar Spritz

19

Every cook wants to put her best food forward at party time. That's why it doesn't pay to experiment on guests. Practice party foods on your own family. When you've mastered the basics and can prepare pastries and cakes with confidence, the rest is a matter of frills and furbelows.

COOKIES
Cookie baking is perhaps the best way to start learning the art of dessert-making. Cookies fall into five main categories: bar cookies such as brownies; drop cookies which are pushed from a spoon onto baking sheets; refrigerator cookies which are chilled before baking; spritz cookies which are pushed through a special press; and rolled cookies which are cut in shapes. PRALINE BROWNIES

cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 cup unsifted flour 2 squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate, melted 1 cup chopped Planters or Southern Belle Pecans

[>

SOFT MOLASSES COOKIES


cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 1/2 cup sugar % cup molasses

PIES AND TARTS


A good pastry crust is tender and flaky, its color an even golden brown. It takes practice to develop the skill of pastry making, so beginners take heart! Keep your fillings simple and devote full attention to the crust. There are a few basic rules for good pastry. To start, all materials used in making the dough should be as cold as possible. The water used to moisten the dough should be iced. Water should be used sparingly - too much will make a tough, cracker-like crust which shrinks in the pan. Blue Bonnet Margarine, which tastes like butter and bakes like butter, makes excellent pie crust that can be handled without getting tough. Pastry should be handled lightly. (For easier handling, roll out between two pieces of wax paper.) For a perfect round pastry, roll with light strokes from center to outer edges, an equal number in each direction. Seal cracks as they appear. Pastry dough may be stored for a week or more in the refrigerator wrapped in wax paper or plastic wrap; it may also be frozen. [> SOUTHERN PECAN PIE
1 cup unsifted flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/3 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 to 4 tablespoons ice water 1 cup sugar % cup light corn syrup % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 eggs, beaten 1% cups Planters or Southern Belle Pecans 1 teaspoon vanilla extract % teaspoon salt

1 egg
2% cups unsifted flour 11/2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon % teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking soda % cup water

Cream Blue Bonnet Margarine and sugar together until light and fluffy. Blend in molasses and egg; beat well. Combine flour, ginger, cinnamon and salt. Dissolve baking soda in water. Add flour and baking soda mixtures alternately to margarine mixture; blend well after each addition. Drop by tablespoons onto greased and floured baking sheets. Bake in hot oven (400 F.) for 10 minutes, or until done. Remove from baking sheets and coolon wire racks. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

20

l>

BROWN SUGAR SPRITZ


1 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 3,4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1 egg yolk 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract % teaspoon salt 2 cups unsifted flour

Cream Blue Bonnet Margarine and brown sugar together until light and fluffy. Beat in egg yolk, vanilla extract and salt. Blend in flour. Knead several times until dough is soft and pliable. Press dough through cookie press onto greased baking sheets. Decorate if desired. Bake in moderate oven (350 F.) about 8 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove from baking sheets and coolon wire racks. Makes about 8 dozen cookies.
Southern Pecan Pie

Combine flour and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a bowl. Cut in 1/3 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine with pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in ice water; mix well.

21

On lightly floured board, roll out dough to fit a 9-inch pie plate. Transfer to plate and trim edge leaving 1/2 -inch overhanging. Fold edge under and flute by placing left forefinger against inside of pastry rim and pinching outside with right thumb and forefinger. Repeat all around rim. Blend sugar, syrup and 1/2 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Blend hot mixture slowly into beaten eggs. Stir in Planters or Southern Belle Pecans, vanilla extract and 1/s teaspoon salt. Pour into pie shell. Bake in moderate oven (375 F.) about 30 minutes. Serve warm or cold, topped with vanilla ice cream, if desired. Makes one 9-inch pie. APPLE CREAM PIE 2 cups unsifted flour 1 teaspoon salt % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 6 to 7 tablespoons ice water 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 7 cups sliced pared apples 1/2 cup seedless raisins 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 1/2 cup heavy cream

Measure flour and salt into a bowl. Cut in 2/J cup Blue Bonnet Margarine with pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in ice water; mix well. On lightly floured board, roll out % dough to fit a 9-inch pie plate. Transfer to plate and trim off extra edge leaving 1/2-inch overhanging. Combine sugar and cinnamon. Mix well with apples and raisins. Pile into pie plate. Dot top with 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine. Roll out remaining 1/2pastry and cut 2-inch slits in center. Cover pie; fold edge of top pastry under edge of lower pastry and press firmly together. Make ridges around rim by pressing with tines of a fork or flute edge. To prevent excessive browning, cover edges with aluminum foil and bake on lowest rack of oven. Remove foil 15 minutes before end of baking time. If a glaze is desired on crust, brush with milk and sprinkle with sugar. Bake in hot oven (425 F.) 50 minutes. Remove pie from oven and pour cream through slits in top of pie. Bake 5 minutes longer. Makes one 9inch pie. GOLDEN PASTRY TARTS 1 cup unsifted flour teaspoon salt % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 3 to 4 tablespoons ice water
1/2

CAKE FROSTINGS
Young or old, a party just isn't a party without a cake. For a light, high cake, simply remember a few rules: measure ingredients accurately, follow mixing instructions to the letter and bake as directed. If using a packaged mix, follow directions on the package carefully. Cool cake on wire racks before frosting. First choice for frostings is Blue Bonnet Margarine with farm-fresh flavor and creamy smooth texture. Soft Blue Bonnet, which spreads instantly even used right from the refrigerator, makes frostings that spread easily without tearing the most fragile cakes. Whipped Blue Bonnet also makes fluffy light frostings. NO-COOK LEMON CREAM FROSTING 6 cups unsifted confectioners' sugar (about) % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened % cup lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel In a small deep mixer bowl, gradually cream 3 cups confectioners' sugar into softened Blue Bonnet Margarine. Blend in lemon juice, vanilla extract and grated lemon peel. Beat in enough additional confectioners' sugar to make a smooth spreadable frosting. Makes 3 cups, enough to fill and frost one 8- or 9-inch layer cake. BIT-O-MOCHA ICING 4 squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 tablespoon Chase & Sanborn Instant Coffee % teaspoon salt 1/2 cup boiling water 4% cups unsifted confectioners' sugar (about) Melt unsweetened chocolate in top of a double boiler over hot water. Blend in Blue Bonnet Margarine, Chase & Sanborn Instant Coffee, salt

Measure flour and salt into a bowl. Cut in Blue Bonnet Margarine with pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in ice water; mix well. On lightly floured board, roll out dough to about 1/s -inch thickness. Cut into 5-inch circles using cookie cutter or saucer. Press against sides and bottom of 31/2 -inch tart shells (1-inch deep). Use as unbaked shells or bake in hot oven (425 F.) about 12 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool and fill with fresh fruit, prepared pudding or other desired filling. Makes 10 tart shells.

and boiling water; allow mixture to cool. Gradually add enough confectioners' sugar to make a soft spreadable frosting; mix until well blended. Let stand about 5 minutes. Makes enough to fill and frost one 8- or 9-inch layer cake.

CHAPTER 3

CREAM PUFF PASTRIES


Cream puffs, beloved of party-goers everywhere, are hollow pastry shells filled with whipped cream, pudding or custard. They are prepared from a cooked, paste-like mixture of flour, water, margarine and eggs which swells as it bakes forming hollow puffs. Cream puffs vary in size from three to six inches in diameter. They may be filled with cheese, meat or fish for hors d'oeuvres, or with a variety of sweet mixtures for dainty desserts. CREAM PUFFS
1/2

INFORMAL

ENTERTAINING

1 cup water cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 cup unsifted flour V4 teaspoon salt

4 eggs

Heat water and Blue Bonnet Margarine in a saucepan until the water is boiling and margarine has melted. Lower heat and add flour and salt all at once. Beat vigorously until mixture leaves the sides of the pan. Remove from heat. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Continue beating until mixture is smooth. Drop mixture on a lightly greased baking sheet to form 10 puffs, dividing the mixture evenly. Bake in a hot oven (400 F.) for about 50 minutes, or until done. Remove from baking sheet and coolon wire racks. When puffs are cool, cut off tops; scoop out soft dough. To serve, fill with whipped cream, pudding or custard; replace tops. If desired, serve with chocolate or butterscotch sauce. Makes 10 puffs.

"The glory of the house is hospitality," reads a 19th century fireplace motto. As true today as when it was written, there is no more gracious way to entertain friends than in your own home. Parties, whether simple or elaborate, are a part of family living; they can also be one of the most rewarding aspects of being a homemaker. For the inexperienced hostess, buffet-style service is easy to manage and offers special advantages where space is limited. By nature informal, buffets are readily adapted to any occasion, and are flexible as to size, location, menu, hour, etc. Buffet Meals A good party needs planning, and there is nothing more soul-satisfying to the hostess than a successfully staged soiree. For buffets, the menu as well as seating, setting, decorations and serving equipment should be carefully plotted so the party will run itself.

Placement of the buffet - whether it's the dining room table, sideboard, bar or desk - should allow ample room for guests to move around and help themselves. Place it near the kitchen, if possible, for easy serving and quick refills. Consider seating of the guests, too. Each person should have a place to rest his plate: a traytable, or coffee or end table. Many hostesses like to set up card tables so guests can eat in comfort. Easy to serve and easy to eat is the rule for buffet menus. Wisest choices are foods that can be prepared in advance or cooked with a minimum of attention, so the hostess can be a hostess and mingle with her guests. Casseroles are favorites for economy when serving a crowd as well as for easy off-the-Iap eating. Keep hot foods hot in a chafing dish, warmer or electric hot tray. Cracked ice helps keep cold foods cold, relishes crisp and margarine firm. Blue Bonnet Margarines with their large-familystyle economy are a big boon to the budget when you're cooking in quantity. As a table spread, Whipped Blue Bonnet goes "32 people further."

22

INDIAN

(For 8 to 10 guests)

CURRY BUFFET

CHICKEN COOKOUT
(For any number of guests) Most efficient way to entertain during the warm summer months is in your own backyard. More economical than steak when cooking for a crowd are these foil-wrapped packages of chicken, vegetables and rice. Designed for fair weather or foul, our Meal 'n One Cookout may be cooked over coals or baked in the oven. Menu Meal'n One Cookout> Crusty Rolls Blue Bonnet Margarine Watermelon Iced Coffee or Tea *MEAL IN ONE COOKOUT For each serving:

Because they can be eaten easily without the aid of a knife, curries are popular buffet items. Curry sauce is basically a medium white sauce flavored with curry powder, a special blend of spices which gives a distinctively pungent flavor and sunny yellow color. Menu Shrimp Curry* Rice Condiments (Chopped Peanuts, Toasted Coconut, Chopped Green Pepper, Chutney and Raisins) Fresh Fruit Cup with Sherbet Tea

23

*SHRIMP CURRY 6 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine % cup chopped onion 2 cloves garlic, crushed % cup unsifted flour 2~ teaspoons curry powder 1~ teaspoons salt ~ teaspoon white pepper 3 cups chicken bouillon 1 large apple, thinly sliced with skin on 4 cups cooked, shelled and deveined shrimp Hot cooked rice
Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in Dutch oven or large heavy saucepan. Saute onion and garlic in margarine until tender, about 5 minutes. Blend in flour, curry powder, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat and gradually stir in chicken bouillon, then add apple slices. Cook mixture 5 minutes over medium heat. Stir in shrimp; heat through. Serve over hot cooked rice. Makes 8-10 servings.

1 piece quartered frying chicken 1 small tomato, halved 1 small onion, halved 2 mushroom caps 2 green pepper rings ~ cup green beans, fresh or frozen % cup instant rice ~ cup water 1 tablespoon Blue Bonnet Margarine ~ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Salt to taste Pepper to taste Paprika
Cut a 40-inch length of heavy duty aluminum foil; fold in half. Bring up sides to make a well for liquid. Place chicken, tomato, onion, mushrooms, green pepper and green beans just off center of folded foil. Add rice, water, Blue Bonnet Margarine, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and paprika. Fold foil over food; seal edges. Cook over glowing coals or bake in hot oven (425F.) about 1 % hours, or until tender. Turn package every 20 to 30 minutes. Makes 1 serving.

Shrimp Curry

(For 25 guests) Long wintry nights call for hot In' hearty meals even when you cater to a crowd. A main dish that can be prepared in advance and reheated just before serving is the obvious preference. Boeuf en Casserole is just such a dish. Hot noodles which accompany it cook in a few minutes while you toss the salad.

HOT 'N' HEARTY BUFFET

CHAPTER 4

Menu Boeuf en Casserole* Noodles Tossed Green Salad Bread Sticks Blue Bonnet Margarine Chocolate Ripple Ice Cream with Mint Sauce Coffee or Tea

FORMAL ENTERTAINING
Of all the forms of entertaining, a seated dinner is the most gracious - and most challenging for the hostess. The prompt and perfect service of a sit-down meal is not only a matter of planning, but of coordinating duties between host and hostess. The number of guests will be limited by the size of your dining table. Seating arrangements should be worked out beforehand to alternate ladies and gentlemen, and separate husbands and wives. The hostess should sit nearest the kitchen,. (directly opposite the host. Unless plates are filled in the kitchen, the host is responsible for serving the meat; the hostess serves the dessert. Dinner for company ought to be something special, but don't overdo it. Plan the meal to fit your skill in cooking. Rehearse new recipes on family .. Include only one spectacular - whether it's the main course or dessert - per menu and concentrate on it. Keep the other foods simple. Do as much as possible beforehand. Advance preparation makes for a more relaxed and happy hostess. In choosing the menu consider time available for shopping and pre-preparation; money in the food budget; space available for preparation and serving; equipment for cooking (including size of oven and refrigerator); serving pieces (casseroles, china, silver, etc.); ease of serving.

*BOEUF EN CASSEROLE 10 pounds beef chuck or round, cut in 2-inch cubes 2 cups unsifted flour 3 tablespoons salt 2 teaspoons pepper 1'l'2 cups Blue Bonnet Margarine 4 carrots, diced 4 onions, sliced 1 quart tomato juice 4 bay leaves

Dredge beef in flour seasoned with salt and pepper. Melt Blue Bonnet Margarine in Dutch oven or large heavy skillet or saucepan. Add beef, a small amount at a time, and brown well on all sides. After all the beef is browned, return to Dutch oven or skillet. Add remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer over low heat about 11/2 hours, or until tender. Makes 25 servings.

Plan the entree first since it is the main part of the meal. The largest portion of the food budget should be spent on foods served for this course. Meat, usually the featured dish, is also the most costly item, so look for good buys or use recipes that extend more expensive cuts. The first course should whet the appetite, not satisfy it. It should complement the main course. It need not be fancy or expensive. If served with pre-dinner drinks, the appetizer is usually passed on plates or trays. If it is served at the table, the first course should be in place when guests are seated. Plates may be removed or placed to one side before the entree is served. Salad may be served as a first course, Californiastyle, in which case it should be on the table when guests are seated. It may also be served with the meat course or by itself after the meat has been removed. Dessert may be served at the table by the hostess or in another room. Coffee may be poured at the table or served from a cart or tray in the living room. Following is a basic menu with recipes for a seated dinner for eight guests. If time permits, it may be prepared entirely "from scratch." However, such items as the French bread and canapes may be purchased; prepared Hollandaise Sauce may be substituted. Much of the work may be done in advance, the items re-heated just before serving.

24

Menu Stuffed Mushroom Caps Shrimp Rounds Chicken Kiev Parslied Rice Broccoli with Hollandaise Sauce French Bread Blue Bonnet Margarine Pears Helene Coffee or Tea

SHRIMP ROUNDS 'l'2 cup prepared French dressing 1 tablespoon lemon juice 24 medium-sized shrimp, cooked and cleaned % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 1 hard-cooked egg, finely chopped 2 tablespoons drained horseradish 24 toast rounds (about 13/4-inches in diameter)
Mix together French dressing and lemon juice. Stir in shrimp. Cover bowl tightly. Chill at least 1 hour. Blend together Blue Bonnet Margarine, hardcooked egg and horseradish. Spread mixture over toast rounds. Top each round with a marinated shrimp. Garnish, if desired, with small parsley sprigs or chopped parsley. Cover and chill until ready to serve. Makes 2 dozen canapes.

25

STUFFED MUSHROOM CAPS 24 medium-sized fresh mushrooms 5 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine 2 tablespoons finely chopped onion % cup fine dry bread crumbs 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 envelope instant beef broth mix Generous dash pepper 1 tablespoon heavy cream
Wash and dry mushrooms. Remove stems; chop finely. Melt 3 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine in a large skillet. Add chopped mushroom stems and chopped onion. Saute, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 5 minutes. Stir (n bread crumbs, parsley, instant beef broth mix, pepper and heavy cream. Place mixture in bowl; set aside. In same skillet, melt remaining 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine. Place mushroom caps in skillet, cup side up. Saute gently until tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Fill with prepared crumb mixture. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Before serving, place filled mushrooms ina preheated broiler, 3-inches from source of heat. Broil about 3 minutes, or until crumb mixture is browned. Makes 2 dozen.

C>

CHICKEN KIEV

Chicken Kiev has a reputation for haute cuisine despite its basic simplicity. It is prepared with boned chicken breasts which are pounded until thin, then wrapped around a mixture of herbs and margarine and fastened at all edges so filling can't escape. The rolls are then dipped in egg and crumbs and deep fried to a golden goodness. Following these directions, Chicken Kiev is relatively uncomplicated. You can save a step by purchasing boned chicken breasts. Chicken Kiev may be served plain or with mushroom sauce; it is traditionally accompanied by rice.

4 large whole breasts of chicken without wing bones attached 2/3 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine % cup chopped chives 1 teaspoon salt Dash pepper 2 eggs 2 tablespoons milk 1% cups fine dry bread crumbs Planters Peanut Oil Chicken Kiev on Parslied Rice

Cut chicken breasts in half along ridges of breast bone. Carefully skin and bone each half without cutting through flesh. Place each piece between sheets of wax paper. Pound very thin with smooth-surfaced meat hammer or rolling pin; do not tear flesh. Remove wax paper. Place 11/2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine in the center of each breast. Combine chives, salt and pepper; sprinkle over margarine. Roll each breast and overlap sides so that margarine mixture is completely enclosed; the flesh will adhere without toothpicks or skewers. Beat eggs and milk together. Roll chicken in bread crumbs, then in egg mixture and again in bread crumbs to coat evenly. Refrigerate at least 20 minutes to let coating set. Fry chicken rolls in deep hot (370 F.) Planters Peanut Oil until well browned on all sides, about 8 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Serve hot. Makes 8 servings.
PARSLIED RICE

Cook broccoli according to package directions. Meanwhile, in a heavy saucepan, beat egg yolks slightly; stir in lemon juice. Add 6 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine, place on low heat, and stir constantly until margarine is melted. Add the remaining 6 tablespoons margarine and continue stirring until margarine is melted and sauce is thickened. Drain broccoli if necessary. Arrange in serving dish and top with sauce. Makes 8 servings.
FRENCH BREAD

3 cups water 1 ~hcups rice 1/2cup finely chopped onion % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 1 V2 teaspoons salt 3/1 cup chopped parsley Combine water, rice, onion, Blue Bonnet Margarine and salt in a saucepan; stir once. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer until all the liquid is absorbed (see rice package for time). Stir in parsley and serve. Makes 8 servings.
BROCCOLI WITH HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

Among the easiest of home-baked yeast breads is this long crusty loaf of French Bread. It's prepared by the new Rapidmix Method which eliminates the tricky step of dissolving yeast in warm water. Instead, undissolved yeast is simply added with the dry ingredients. A simple batter-type dough which does not require kneading, French Bread requires only one bowl for mixing. Really no more work than a batch of biscuits!

In a large bowl thoroughly mix 1 cup flour, sugar, salt and undissolved Fleischmann's Active Dry Yeast. Add softened Blue Bonnet Margarine. Gradually add very hot tap water to dry ingredients and beat 2 minutes at medium speed with electric mixer, scraping bowl occasionally. Add 1 cup flour, or enough flour to make a thick batter. Beat at high speed for 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally. Stir in enough additional flour to make a soft dough. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap; let rest for 45 minutes. Stir dough down; turn out onto a heavily floured board. With floured hands mold into an oblong, 15 inches long. Taper ends. Carefully place on a greased baking sheet sprinkled with corn meal. Cover; let rise in a warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 40 minutes. With a sharp knife, make 5 diagonal cuts on top of loaf. Bake in a hot oven (400 F.) for 25 minutes. Brush loaf with combined beaten egg white and cold water. Return to oven; bake 15 minutes longer, or until done. Remove from baking sheet and coolon wire rack. Makes 1 large loaf.
PEARS HELENE

26

3 packages (10 ounces each) frozen broccoli

% cup lemon juice

3 egg yolks

% cup Blue Bonnet Margarine

3 to 31/2 cups unsifted flour 4 teaspoons sugar 11/2 teaspoons salt 1 package Fleischmann's Active Dry Yeast 2 tablespoons Blue Bonnet Margarine, softened 1% cups very hot tap water (120-130 F.) Corn meal 1 egg white, slightly beaten 1 tablespoon cold water

6 squares it-ounce each) semi-sweet chocolate 1/2cup light corn syrup % cup light cream 1 tablespoon Blue Bonnet Margarine % teaspoon vanilla extract 1 quart vanilla ice cream 1 can (1-pound 14-ounce) pear halves Place chocolate in top of double boiler; place over boiling water and melt. Blend in corn syrup. Remove from boiling water and stir in light cream, Blue Bonnet Margarine and vanilla extract. Pour into a small pitcher to cool. Spoon ice cream into deep dessert dishes. Place a pear half in each dish. Top with chocolate syrup. Serve at once. Makes 8 servings.

CHAPTER 5

paper to 1/4-inch thick. Refrigerate or freeze until thoroughly chilled and firm. Cut into shapes using small cookie cutters. Place cut-outs on a baking sheet and chill until serving time. Place one or two cut-outs on each bread plate. ROSES: Soften Regular Blue Bonnet Margarine. Using pastry bag fitted with plain tube, make a

small dome for the basis of each rose. Next with flower tube make a row of petals snug against the dome. Make additional rows of petals, opening them away from center as they go toward the outside of the flower. Add leaves using a leaf tube, if desired. Place roses on baking sheet and chill until serving time. Place a rose on each

27

SPECIALTIES OF THE HOUSE


Many good cooks have built their reputation on only one or two dishes. Whether it's an exotic main dish, a home-baked bread, a glamorous dessert - or just a serving trick - develop a few specialties to dazzle guests and become your trademarks. Don't worry about serving them often - guests will probably be disappointed if you don't.

MARGARINE FORMS
Margarine is usually served in sticks or tubs as it is packaged, or in the form of small pats cut from a stick. However, for special occasions, margarine may be shaped and molded into a variety of intriguing shapes: CUT-OUTS: Soften Regular Blue Bonnet Margarine. Roll out between two sheets of waxed

<l
Margarine Forms: Cut-Out, Rose, Ball (left to right)

bread plate, or arrange in a single layer over a dome of crushed ice in a bowl. BALLS: You will need a pair of special wooden paddles available in most dime stores. Use wellchilled Regular Blue Bonnet Margarine. Prepare a pan of boiling water and a bowl of ice water. Cut margarine into pats, 1/4 -inch thick. Dip the

wooden paddles into hot water then chill them in ice water. Shape pats of margarine into rough balls between the fingers then put one onto scored side of paddle. With other paddle, roll margarine around using light pressure until a rough-textured ball is formed. Repeat dipping process if margarine begins to stick to paddles.

Drop finished balls into ice water and refrigerate until ready to serve. Heap in a bowl over cracked ice to keep firm. MOLDS: These require special wooden molds containing an imprint and equipped with a plunger to release the margarine after it has been shaped. Roll out softened Regular Blue Bonnet Margarine between two sheets of wax paper to 1/2 -inch thick. Chill thoroughly. Prepare a pan of boiling water and a bowl of ice water. Dip mold in boiling water then in ice water. Pull up plunger and insert mold into margarine. Press plunger down, imprinting the design on the margarine and forcing it out of the mold. Remove any excess margarine from mold and dip in hot and cold water before proceeding. Chill margarine molds until serving time. Serve over cracked ice or place one or two molds on each bread plate. CURLS OR SHELLS: A special gadget is needed for these. Using a well-chilled stick of Regular Blue Bonnet, draw curling gadget over surface, removing margarine in a thin curl. Drop curls in ice water and chill until serving time. Serve in bowl over crushed ice.

28

PUFF PASTRIES
Flaky pastry or puff paste, the aristocrat of pastries, is the pride of many a pastry chef and home cook. It is a very rich dough made of flour, salt and ice water which (according to traditional recipes) is rolled out and folded into thirds over a large quantity of margarine, then rolled out again. This rolling-turning process is repeated six times to spread the margarine evenly in the pastry. The dough is refrigerated between rollings. When baked in a hot oven it expands rapidly, forming a thin, flaky pastry which is the basis of Napoleons, turnovers, tarts, patty shells and other sweet treats. Here, the classic puff paste has been modernized in two ways: (1) the rolling-turning proPuff Pastries

cedure has been cut down to three times, and (2) Blue Bonnet Margarine is used to provide rich buttery flavor while keeping ingredient costs well within the budget.

PUFF PASTRY TURNOVERS


2 cups unsifted flour 'l'2 teaspoon salt 1 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine 'l'2 cup ice water Jelly 2 tablespoons sugar 'l'2 teaspoon cinnamon In large bowl, combine flour and salt; cut in cup Blue Bonnet Margarine with pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add ice water; toss lightly until mixture clings together. Chill 10 minutes. Roll out on lightly floured board to 1/4 -inch thickness (15 x 10-inch rectangle). Cut remaining % cup Blue Bonnet Margarine into small pieces and sprinkle over middle third of pastry. Fold 1/3 pastry over middle; cover with remaining third. Give pastry a quarter turn; roll to 15 x 10-inch rectangle; fold as above. Cover with wax paper and chill 10 minutes. Repeat procedure of two rollings, foldings and turnings; chill 10 minutes (or overnight, if desired). Repeat procedure of two rollings, foldings and turnings; chill 10 minutes. Cut pastry in half; return half to refrigerator. Roll to 9 x 12-inch rectangle. Cut into 3-inch squares. Place 1/2 teaspoon jelly in center of each square. Fold to form triangles; seal edges. Sprinkle lightly with cinnamon-sugar combination. Remove remaining half of dough from refrigerator and repeat procedure. Place on baking sheets which have been covered with heavy brown paper. Chill 5 minutes. Bake in hot oven (425F.) 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from paper immediately; coolon wire racks. Makes 24 pastries.
1/4

29

Crepes Suzette

CREPES SUZETTE
Crepe is the French word for pancake. French pancakes are very thin and exceptionally light. When they are glazed in a hot orange sauce, doused with orange-flavored liqueur and ignited, they are called Crepes Suzette.

~--------------------------RECIPEINDEX----------------------------'
Aloha Yams Page 17 Apple Cream Pie 21 Beef Croquettes 12 Beef Stew with Dumplings 12 Bit-O-Mocha Icing 21 Blue Bonnet Basic Muffins .. . . . . . . . . .. 7 Boeuf en Casserole 24 Broccoli with Hollandaise Sauce 26 Broiled Tropical Ham-wiches 10 Brown Sugar Spritz 20 California Spanish Omelet 13 Cheese Souffle 13 Chicken Kiev 25 Chive-Cheese Corn Bread 7 Chive Parsley Sauce 18 Cinnamon Crumb Cake 7 Cinnamon Honey Spread 8 Confetti Chicken Salad Sandwiches. . . .. 9 Corn Pancakes 6 Corn Pudding 17 Country-Style Pancakes 6 Crabmeat Cheese Grill 9 Cream of Spinach Soup 11 Cream of Tuna Soup 11 Cream Puffs 22 Crepes Suzette 30 Curry Sauce 18 Feather-Light Waffles 6 Festive Limas 17 Fiesta Shrimp Saute 15 French Bread 26 Fried Flounder with Mustard Sauce 15 Garlic Spread 8 Golden Pastry Tarts 21 Herb Sauce 18 Home Fry Scramble 18 Horseradish Spread 8 . Jam Crunch Cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Jelly Muffins 7 Margarine Forms 27 Meal In One Cookout 23 Medium White Sauce 10 Mellow Mustard Spread 8 Mushroom Sauce 12 No-Cook Lemon Cream Frosting 21 Norwegian Meat Balls 15 Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies 19 Oven Fried Fish 14 Parslied Rice 26 Pears Helene 26 Popovers 7 Praline Brownies 19 Puff Pastry Turnovers 29 Puffy Omelet with Cheese Sauce 14 Red Flannel Hash 16 Savory Broiled Steak 16 Savory Fish Pie 11 Schnitzel a la Holstein 16 Shrimp Curry 23 Shrimp Rounds 25 Soft Molasses Cookies 20 Southern Pecan Pie 20 Stuffed Mushroom Caps 25 Super Sub 9 Thick White Sauce 10 Thin White Sauce 10 Toasted Peanut Butter Sandwiches 9

l>

3 eggs 1 cup milk 3/4 cup unsifted flour 1 tablespoon sugar 7;4 teaspoon salt 'l'2 cup Blue Bonnet Margarine % cup sugar 1 teaspoon grated orange peel % cup Cointreau

In a small mixing bowl beat eggs and milk together. Beat in flour, 1 tablespoon sugar and salt. Pour 2 tablespoons batter onto a lightly greased 5- or 6-inch skillet. Cook over medium heat until lightly browned and top is bubbly; turn and brown other side. Fold each crepe in quarters and set aside. In a large skillet or chafing dish melt Blue Bonnet Margarine. Add % cup sugar and grated orange peel. Continue cooking until mixture bubbles. Place folded crepes in sauce and cook 5 minutes, or until sugar starts to caramelize. Baste crepes occasionally with sauce. Pour Cointreau over top and ignite. Serve immediately. Makes 16 crepes.

30

This booklet is prepared by Standard Brands Incorporated, makers of Blue Bonnet Margarines. For additional copies, write: Standard Brands Educational Service P.O. Box 2695 Grand Central Station New York, N. Y. 10017

Standard

Brands Incorporated

MB-8911

Printed

in U.S.A. 8/70

,.,

."t',~~-r~.~' ~"..:~'~,~::rY~:st Yeast


,CIt

Fleischrnann'S

fleisc\UTl,<lf\flS-

,,!,;'~v~'i!~~ ,,:Yeast