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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer Prepared for Navy Command November 2010

David Evans

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer Prepared for Navy Command November 2010

David Evans

Alan Baxter

Contents
Introduction. ......................................................................................................1 Quadrennial Inspections consulted. ........................................................3 Asset 100 Curtain Wall...............................................................................4 Asset 101 Guard Room..............................................................................6 Asset 102 Junior Ranks Galley................................................................8 Asset 103 QM(T) 1098 Store.................................................................10 Asset 104 Junior Ranks NAAFI.............................................................11 Asset 108 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA..............................13 Asset 111 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA..............................16 Asset 111a Bike Shed...............................................................................18 Assets 113-116 Portable Accommodation Units.........................19 Asset 118 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA..............................20 Asset 118A Gun Saluting Park.............................................................22 Asset 119 Royal Chapel of St. Katherine..........................................23 Asset 120 Officers Mess.........................................................................26 Asset 121 WO & Sergeants Mess.......................................................28 Asset 122 WO & Sergeants Living Accommodation.................29 Assets 122A & 122B Bin Enclosure & Bike Shed............................31 Asset 123 QM(M) MFO Store................................................................32 Asset 125 Store..........................................................................................33 Asset 131 RHQ Accommodation........................................................34 Asset 132 QMs Stores Complex.........................................................37 Asset 134 Adult School...........................................................................38 Asset 136 Armoury...................................................................................40 Asset 138 Magazine.................................................................................41 Asset 146 Underground Hut................................................................42 Asset 147 Hut. .............................................................................................43 Asset 149 Southeast Sally Port Hut. ...................................................44 Assets 150 & 151 Disused......................................................................45 Asset 153 POL Installation.....................................................................46 Asset 154 Vehicle Ramp.........................................................................47 Asset 159 Electricity Substation & Gas Meter House..................48 Asset 160 Gun Park Garages & Office...............................................49 Asset 161 Garages & Offices.................................................................50 Asset 162 Garages & Offices.................................................................51 Asset 163 Stores & Toilets......................................................................52 Asset 164 Vehicle Washdown Area...................................................53 Asset 166 Garages....................................................................................54 Asset 167 Vehicle Brake Tester............................................................55 Asset 174 Gym...........................................................................................56 Asset 175 TA1 Training Wing...............................................................57 Asset 176 TA2 Training Wing...............................................................59 Asset 177 Welfare Facilities...................................................................61 Asset 178 Statue of George II...............................................................62 Asset 179 MT Sentry Post......................................................................63 Assets 201-233 Casemates Baths Bastion to Prince Henrys Demi-Bastion.........................................................................................64 Assets 234-238 in King Charles Curtain..............................................66 Asset 239-244 Stores/Disused.............................................................67 Asset 240A West Sally Port....................................................................68 Asset 245 Store..........................................................................................69 Asset 246 Gas Meter Room & Asset 247 Store...........................70 Asset 248 Underground Huts..............................................................71 Asset 249 Hut. .............................................................................................72 Asset 250 Greenhouse............................................................................73 Asset 340 Main North Entrance..........................................................74 Asset 344 Sentry Box...............................................................................76 Asset 380 Ramparts.................................................................................77 Asset 501 Parade Ground......................................................................79 Assets 606 & 608 LPG and Fuel Can Stores....................................80 East Sally Port.................................................................................................81 South Sally Port.............................................................................................82 Queens Battery / Southeast Sally Port................................................83 Southwest Sally Port...................................................................................84 17th Century Finials. ....................................................................................85 Sundial..............................................................................................................86 Well Head........................................................................................................87

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Contents
5

Introduction
This document is a gazetteer of the Conservation Management Plan for the Royal Citadel in Plymouth, and should be read in conjunction with the Plan. It contains detailed information on the history and significance of individual buildings in the Citadel site, and specific issues relating to DDA access and condition. For the purposes of this gazetteer, Keystone undertook site survey work and inspected the interior of significant buildings where access was possible. Their description for each asset provides a summary of the history of the buildings, as well as a detailed description of what survives today. Individual features of interest are mentioned in the description and summarised under the subheading significant features. Significant features (e.g. windows) are defined as those which retain all or some of their original elements, but individual elements (e.g. bolts, handles) are not usually mentioned separately. Bailey Partnership has summarised the findings of the recent Access Audit and Quadrennial Inspections, which constitutes the sections on access and condition issues. The Quadrennial Inspection reports state that the majority fo the buildings are in good condition, benefiting from a level of maintenance and repair appropriate to a governmentowned military complex. However, since these inspections, and due to the severity of the marine environment, significant deterioration of external elements has occurred to a number of buildings and maintenance work is urgently required to prevent further damage. At present much of these works are of a relatively minor mature, but without immediate attention could become significant. In some cases, there are only partial gazetteer entries. This generally applies when an asset is not subject to Quadrennial Inspections and so has not undergone a condition survey, or where access has not been deemed as High priority and therefore no Access Audit has been undertaken. When either of these exclusions apply, this is indicated under the appropriate heading in the assets entry.

Introduction

The level of significance assigned to each building is consistent with the analysis in the Conservation Management Plan (chapter 3) and as shown in the significance map on the following page. Generally, the assets regarded as having high significance are those which show evidence of the development of the site. These include the Citadel walls, which incorporate remnants of the 16th century fort, and the 17th century buildings, despite some subsequent alterations and modernisations. As is often the case with historic military sites, the parade ground is also classed as highly significant due to its intrinsic symbolic and commemorative value. The individual gazetteer entries give a justification of significance to explain why each building has been assigned a particular level.

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Highly Significant Significant Some Significance Neutral Detracts Significance of built structures

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Introduction
2

Quadrennial Inspections consulted


Building 101: Guardroom pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 102: Junior Ranks Galley pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 104: Junior Ranks NAAFI pdp Green Consulting Ltd, December 2008

Quadrennial Inspections Consulted

Building 108: Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 22 April 2009 Building 111: Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 118: Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA, incorporating 118A Gun Saluting Park pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 119: Royal Chapel of St. Katherine pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 120: Officers Mess pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 122: WO & Sergeants Living Accommodation pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 131: RHQ Accommodation pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Building 134: Adult School pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Asset 178: Statue of King George II pdp Green Consulting Ltd, 16 December 2008 Assets 138, 149, 150, 151, 201-247 and Sallyports: Magazines (138, 150 & 151), Hut (149), Casemates (201-247) & Sallyports Bailey Partnership & FK Consulting, December 2009-January 2010 Asset 100: Ramparts & Walls Bailey Partnership & SFK Consulting, January 2010

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 100 Curtain Wall

Cumberland battery

MT area curtain wall

Maintenance responsibility: English Heritage (historic walls); MoD (MT area wall) Current use: Curtain Wall Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4795 5398-SX 4823 5371 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 166577. Sir Bernard de Gommes plans of 1668 & 1672 indicate that southeast corner of the 16th century fort still survived. The 1677 J. R. plan is the first to show the present layout with the demi-bastion. Masonry Includes some 15921598 walling to SE (base of point of Prince Henrys demi-bastion and sides of Pipers Platform and wall running towards Fishers Nose). New curtain wall around Military Transport and Ordnance Yard constructed 198992, to E of original E wall. Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: Monument description (No.26245) Woodward, F W, Citadel, 1987, 2939

Description: Sections of wall are linked by six bastions (owing to the topography, only two are regular) and one demi-bastion. The main entrance is through the north section. The wall is pierced by sally ports, which probably numbered four or five originally; three more added later (SW 18th century, W 18th century, NE 19th century). SE and SW blocked in late 20th century, and NE introduced in late 19th century. The SE section between Cumberland Battery and Prince Henrys demi-bastion follows the approximate line which divided the upper and lower parts of the late 16th century Artillery Fort, and the line of the E wall of the earlier fort is preserved between the demibastion and Prince Edwards bastion. Wall includes gun embrasures and to exterior of S section, a tenaille, known as Queens Battery. Constructed from limestone from the ditch which was dug outside all but the SE side of the citadel and from local quarries at Tinside and Lambhay. Also from recycled stone from demolished medieval Plymouth castle. Granite is used for the cordon (semicircular moulding running around walls just below embrasures) quoins of bastions, corbels which originally supported sentry boxes (8) in the bastions, and the sides of the embrasures. Exterior: Limestone rubble. Battered plinth with moulded top. Tops of wall are turfed, except over the casemates to the south, where wall top is sloped and asphalted. This section also includes chimneys

for casemates. Foundation stones, one near west sally port and other in the salient of Baths Bastion dated 1665. Granite cordon (this continues around 20th century Lambhay extension). c.1741, three embrasures added to east wall, eight to north. In 1745 number reduced in King Charless curtain. Prince George and Prince of Wales Bastions reduced from twenty to ten. SW wall increased from three to eleven. SW coverport added c.1745. Constructed from limestone rubble. Included sally port through rampart and round-arch headed doorway with voussoirs at ground level. Original sentry boxes removed by 1813 leaving moulded granite bases projecting from the pointed ends of some bastions. Original walling to S pierced by loops in casemates. 198992 Lambhay extension wall designed to match the style of the original walls and includes tall narrow windows. Interior: An earth and stone rampart (Asset 380) is constructed against all but the top section of the inner face of the curtain wall, except the Prince of Wales Bastion. Significant features: Embrasures; sally ports (the western sally port includes the reused archway from the original outer N gateway), bases of the sentry boxes.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Asset 100 Curtain Wall


4

stonework rebuilt. The amount of water entering into the mass of the rampart is of concern as this often impacts on the face of the walls as well as the casemates. This not only causes differential staining to the stonework it also washes out lime from the core causing further staining and possibly weakening the structure. Although the dampness in the casemates is largely held back by render or hidden by dry lining the external walls which are uncovered internally show signs of dampness causing the paint finish to fail. The main concerns relate to the tops of the external walls to the rampart and curtain walls, especially immediately below the areas of soft capping. Access and close inspection is required and any loose stonework rebuilt and defective mortar pointing renewed. There are other areas of loose stonework to wall heads and immediately below embrasures which have been identified and also need urgent attention. Loose, cracked and eroded mortar pointing is also of concern especially to the eastern wall faces of the Prince of Wales Bastion, Prince Edwards Battery and Prince Henrys Demi Bastion. Vegetation growth is becoming established on most wall faces, however those areas most at risk are the south and east faces of Prince Henrys Demi Bastion, plus the Pipers Platform north and south walls. Vertical cracks to the inner face of the northern end of Prince Georges Curtain and east of the steps at the centre of the Old Saluting Battery should also be dealt with in the very near future to reduce the rate of deterioration. Of less urgency is the need to obtain a better understanding of the rate of deterioration to both the inner and outer walls caused by water ingress and subsequent exiting through the wall faces and into the front walls of the casemates. A rolling programme of repairs needs to be established urgently to maintain and keep this monument in good repair whilst significantly reducing the risks of falling stonework and pointing.

Asset 100 Curtain Wall

Ordnance Prince Henrys Demi-Bastion

Prince of Wales Bastion

Significance:
The 17th century walling is highly significant. The extension wall built in 198992 has some significance, making an aesthetic contribution to the townscape.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
General Comments on Citadel Wall and Ramparts The ramparts are massive and generally well founded onto natural bed rock which rises up from the eastern end of the Hoe. Repairs have been carried out over the years, however, it is not certain how much of this has been undertaken under the direction of the MoD or English Heritage. Large areas of repointing have been undertaken in the past, however, most has been of a high cement content and in some cases smeared onto the face of the stonework. Also the interior of the vast majority of casemates have been line either with a render or dry lined with suspended ceilings. The exposure of the site on high ground facing the open sea means that a substantial amount of water enters the fabric during each year. The structure generally accommodates the moisture, however, there is a visual impact and probably causes premature failure of the pointing mortar The wall tops below the soft capping are of concern as these areas are part covered and close inspection was not possible within the terms of the survey. These need to be closely inspected and any loose

Justification of significance:
Evidential Preserves the form of de Gommes Citadel design. Historic Major surviving element of the 1660s Citadel; a key project in the career of a major 17th century engineer, Sir Bernard de Gomme. Aesthetic and Community The walls make a distinctive contribution to the Plymouth townscape, including seen from the Hoe, which is public open space.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 101 Guard Room

Key plan

Guardhouse from south-west

Guardhouse from south-east

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Guard Room Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4804 5391 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245); Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473145) Date: 1668-1672 origins on map evidence. There is a building of this size depicted on de Gommes plan of 1672 and the J. R. plan of 1677 shows an external rear staircase. Completely rebuilt c.1745 according to the list description. Partial rebuild and conversion of first floor to lock-up room and 3 cells in 1831 from evidence of plan, which appears to indicate the intention to rebuild the whole building from below first floor level. Architect: The Ordnance Board Sources: Woodward, F W, Citadel, 1987, 31; list description, 1672 map, NMM P45; 1677 J. R. plan: BL Add Ms 5415 E.2; 1715 Lilly;1737 Sandford Mace; 1831 plan WO 55 1831; photograph of parade ground with guard house to rear 1896.

Description: A two-storey rectangular building on N-S axis by the main entrance. The Sandford Mace engraving from 1737 image shows the building one and a half storeys high, gable-ended with external rear stair. Since 1831, it is two full storeys with a hipped slate roof. Rendered stone rubble. Over the length of the front (W) elevation there is a verandah-like covered walk with its own hipped slate roof added in 1831. To the rear (E): a 20th century flat-roofed extension bordered with iron railings with an external fire escape stair, built in place of 1831 external stair. Exterior: Front (W) faade has three 8/8-pane horned sash windows at both ground and first floor levels. The front door is off-centre to the north and contains a pair of 20th century plank doors with overlight. The arcade of the covered walk consists of six round columns constructed from Portland stone blocks, all with simple plinths and capitals supporting a pitched roof with horizontal plank apron descending from the eaves. The rear (E) wall has an irregular fenestration of sash windows and small horizontal windows. S end wall features a 4/4-pane sash window at first floor level and a small segmental arch head fixed light with glazing bars at ground floor level. N end wall includes two 8/8-pane sash windows at ground floor level and two small segmental arch head multi-paned windows at first A brass plaque on the Guardhouse commemorates the asphalting

of the casemates in 1846-8. The highly-polished plaque is becoming illegible, but reads: THE RESTORATION OF THE CASEMATES AT PLYMOUTH CITADEL AND ARCHES COVERED WITH SEYSSEL ASPHALTE. Commenced 1st June 1846. Completed 12th February 1848. Estimate 8491.5.7; Actual Cost 8265.3.3; ACCOMMODATION 321 MEN. With Guard Room & Artillery Store. COLONEL OLDFIELD K.II. Aide de Camp: Queens Commanding Royal Engineer. WESTERN DISTRICT DALLINGER ST.[?] DEVPT. (From W. White (1850): History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Devonshire, and the City and County of the City of Exeter, p. 711. The Devonport engraver was Joseph Dallinger, 62 James Street, Devonport.)floor level.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Asset 101 Guard Room


6

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Extensive repairs and refurbishment in 19891992 although some areas in need of attention now, especially cosmetic decoration internally and externally to prevent further degradation of finishes. Some moisture ingress in evident internally. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of damage to the render. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. It would be desirable to remove paint from the Portland stone columns and capitals. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition with any exceptions noted within the quadrennial report. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but again regular inspection and painting is required. Where rusting is apparent, this is a matter requiring attention. Cyclical maintenance should also ensure that these are kept clean and free from obstructions. The asphalt covering to the rear access stairs is failing with blistering, tearing and spalling on the risers. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 198992. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. All valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness.

Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in a fair condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. The exceptions to this are the first floor areas, where deterioration of the paintwork to walls and ceilings was noted. Significant areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework should be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Asset 101 Guard Room

A brass plaque on the Guardhouse commemorates the asphalting of the casemates in 1846-8

Interior: Ground Floor: All visible joinery and other detail from late 20th century apart from two exposed plain square-section beams, crossbeams and connecting axial beam to rear of S bay. Adzed and sawed surfaces. Date uncertain. Supported on c.1830 cast-iron posts. First Floor: c.1830 arrangement of cells with 20th century modifications. Significant features: 17th century guardhouse footprint and possible survival of 17th century masonry. The classical verandah is an attractive element.

Significance:
Highly significant.

Access Issues
This is a key facility as it is the first point of contact for visitors to the site. It has been confirmed that access into this building for members of the public is very restricted, with the majority of services delivered through the Pass Office window hatch. As a result any future adaptations should be focused on the service delivery of permanent and temporary passes. This will only require limited works in terms of delivery of service without any major adaptations required. There are civilians currently working in the building, although any adaptations for employees are reactive duties and no works are recommended at this stage. It is hoped in the future that a new Pass Office can be provided, possibly outside the main entrance. Some early designs have already been produced, although this is currently on hold, pending funding and further discussions. Any new facility will need to be fully accessible.

Justification of significance:
Evidential and Historical The guardhouse has evidential and historical significance as a building that has remained in the same place with the same function from the first phase of the Citadel. It probably contains some late 17th century fabric but was very altered in the early 19th century. Aesthetic The guardhouse is distinguished by a classical portico-style verandah and, like the 18th century hospital, its rendered walls contrast with the other historic buildings with exposed Plymouth limestone walls.

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 102 Junior Ranks Galley

Key plan

Galley south front

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Junior Ranks Galley Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4807 5389 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473142) Date: November 1903December 1904 Sergeants Mess (NMR Historic Plans Room 234/15 Plymouth Royal Citadel Skeleton Record Plan rev. 1941); 198992 extension and conversion to Junior Ranks Galley. Architect: Uncertain, probably T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: 1887 OS WO 78/3045; 1902 Sgts Mess plans 112712 and 112713; 1901 plan WO 78/2976; photograph 1896 Citadel Parade Ground; list description Description: 1903-4 range designed as Sergeants Mess in place of a barrack block, known as Williams Range, which was one of the 17th century fortress buildings. Altered in 1989-92. Original front block survives (dining room, reading room and billiard room, but interior refurbished). Rear block of kitchen, cooks room and other service rooms incorporated into1989-92 extension (or rebuilt). 1903-4 range

is single-storey with a rectangular plan and a short gable-ended crosswing breaking forward at E end. 1989-92 rear extension of two gable-ended rectangular blocks built parallel to the earlier range but extending further to E. Exterior: Restrained baroque style. Squared and snecked grey and pink-veined Plymouth limestone. Chamfered plinth. Quoins, lintels, window and door dressings in Plymouth limestone ashlar with chiseldraughted margins. Some Portland limestone dressings. Chamfered plinth and platband at window sill level. Chimneystack of snecked limestone with a moulded cornice. The rainwater goods are cast iron with a square profile. Slate roofs. The S (show) front is similar in style to the nearby JR Club (Asset 104 q.v.) and has six tall replacement 12/12-pane horned sash windows to main range with doorway at E end. These windows continue through the eaves above a limestone transom with 12-paned fixed lights as gabled dormers. The dormers have alternately ogival (nearly semicircular) or plain gables. In the gable end of the E-end crosswing there is a large three-light mullion-and-transom window with glazing bars below a narrow ventilator slit in the gable. The round-headed front doorway at E end of main block is built of Plymouth limestone. It has an ovolo-moulded surround down to pyramid stops interrupted by projecting plain blocks. The door and frame date from the late 20th century. Gables with moulded coping to parapets. The W gable

contains a doorway with 20th century joinery and a 12/12-pane horned sash at ground floor level, with two fixed 12-pane windows at first floor level. The E end wall has a mullion-and-transom window with three-lights containing 8/8-pane sash windows. 1989-92 extension in grey blockwork with quartz pea gravel finish in alternating double and triple courses of large narrow blocks with Portland limestone ashlar dressings and quoins. 1989-92 gables with coping. Low corridors with pitched glazed roofs link the two 1989-92 blocks and the 1903-4 building. The window openings of the 198992 extension are chamfered. The windows are various shapes, often with glazing bars. The doors are glazed. A main door in the S front of the E extension has a glazed porch with a central gabled section echoing a dormer window detail from the 1903-4 building. In the E gable ends tall louvered vents follow the roof line at the top, and are a characteristic feature of this phase. Interior: The 1903-4 range has been thoroughly refurbished in 198992 as a dining hall, with galley and associated offices in the 1989-92 extension. The lower part of the roof structure of the early range is visible and indicates trusses of tiebeam construction with queen struts. The apex is hidden under a ceiling. Fittings: None surviving. Significant features: Exterior appearance.
Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 102 Junior Ranks Galley


8

coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition with any exceptions noted within the report. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but again regular inspection and painting is required. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention.

Asset 102 Junior Ranks Galley

Galley east front

Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. All valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness.

Significance:
Some significance to the front block, the rear additions have neutral significance.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Continued maintenance needed. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. Large areas of repointing have been carried out, mostly to chimneys and high-level areas. There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below

Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework should be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Illustrates provision for soldiers inside the Citadel in the late 19th/early 20th century. Historical One of a group of buildings in the Citadel erected following the Barrack Act of 1890 and reflecting improved accommodation for troops on site. Aesthetic Built to match the large Victorian buildings of the same period with references to the baroque style of de Gommes main gate.

Access Issues
This facility is solely used by military personnel, although civilian staff work in the building. There are no events for members of the public held in this facility. This building can therefore be re-graded as a Medium Priority facility.

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 103 QM(T) 1098 Store

Key plan

Store

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: QM(T) 1098 store Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 48125390 Designation: None Date: Late 20th century Architect: None Sources: Description: Four garages used as a store, built of preformed metal. Exterior: Four garages with large garage-type doorway opening to each bay. Monopitch roof. Prefabricated. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
This is a wholly utilitarian modern structure and visually intrusive.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

10

Asset 103 - QM(T) 1098 Store

Asset 104 Junior Ranks NAAFI

Asset 104 Junior Ranks NAAFI

Key plan

Front elevation

East corner

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Junior Ranks Club ILC (NAAFI) Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4811 5392 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473146) Date: June 1900July 1901 (NMR 234/15); 1989-92 extension Architect: Uncertain, probably T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: List description. 1901 plan WO 78/2976 Description: Labelled as a canteen on the 1901 plan. This is positioned to the NE, in the Prince of Wales Bastion and built on a NWSE axis. Single-storey rectangular building with a cross wing breaking forward to the east and a contemporary two-storey range making up the rear part of the crosswing. There is a 1989-92 extension to the rear in the angle between the two ranges of the original building.

Exterior: Restrained baroque style. Squared and snecked grey and pink-veined Plymouth limestone, characteristically bluish-grey with pink veins. Chamfered plinth. The face of the rubblestone is untooled and left fairly rough. Quoins, lintels, window and door dressings in Plymouth limestone ashlar with chisel-draughted margins. Some Portland limestone dressings. Chamfered plinth and platband at window sill level. Chimneystacks of snecked limestone with a moulded cornices. The rainwater goods are cast iron with a square profile. Slate roofs with earthenware ridge-tiles. The 1989-92 extension is characteristic of that phase with coursed blockwork with a quartz pea gravel finish and Portland limestone dressings. The SW front is similar in style to the nearby J R Galley (Asset 102 q.v.) and has five tall and narrow replacement 12-pane fixed-pane windows to main range with doorway at SE end. These windows continue through the eaves above a limestone transom with 6-pane fixed lights as gabled dormers. The dormers have alternately ogival (nearly semicircular) or plain gables. In the gable end of the SE-end crosswing there are two 6/6-pane horned windows and a slit ventilator above. The front entry is inside an internal porch behind a wide round arch built of Plymouth limestone. It has an ovolo-moulded surround interrupted by projecting plain blocks. The door and frame date from the late 20th century. There is a door at each end of the porch, with

replacement 20th century joinery. Gables with moulded coping to parapets. NW end wall includes a tall three-light mullioned window with a slit ventilator in the gable and a doorway containing 20th century joinery. The SE end wall has an original lean-to extension containing replacement 3/3-pane sash windows. The front wall extends back with a ramped top to shield a bin area. The two-storey rear section has a double-arched arcaded entrance with a central granite column. The windows are generally replacement horned sashes with one first floor mullioned window over the entry. The 1989-92 extension includes a window to the rear (NE) which breaks through the eaves level and has a broken gable, in 20th century imitation of the gabled dormers to the front. Interior: Thoroughly refurbished in the 20th century, although the tie and queen posts of original roof shows in front range. Fittings: None surviving. Significant features: Original door openings, windows.

11

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Significance:
Some significance to the front block, the rear extension is neutral.

Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition, some rot and peeling paint was observed and noted where appropriate. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but require re-painting. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention. Since the Quadrennial Inspection in December 2008, Debut have identified that further corrosion of parts of the guttering has occurred, with one section displaced, requiring urgent attention. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. A cherry picker inspection is recommended for an action in February/March

2009. The valleys were renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in very good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework to be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Illustrates provision for soldiers inside the Citadel in the late 19th/early 20th century. Historical One of a group of buildings in the Citadel erected following the Barrack Act of 1890 and reflecting improved accommodation for troops on site. Aesthetic Built to match the large Victorian buildings of the same period with references to the baroque style of de Gommes main gate.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Lack of cyclical maintenance is a concern to arrest any opportunity for decaying/ erosion to take hold, especially damp/ moisture ingress.

Access Issues
This building is used for public events, containing a bar, restaurant and rest/ wc areas. Some limited access improvements have been made, although these do not meet best practice design critieria. An example is the entrance ramp that has been installed. There is also a small museum with a range of exhibits on show. This comprises a single room accessed from the porch area. The museum contains a range of artefacts gathered from various deployments and operations and would be of great interest to visitors. This should be considered as a factor if any improvements are undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

12

Asset 104 Junior Ranks NAAFI

Asset 108 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Asset 108 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Key plan

Barrack block

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: J R Accommodation SLA Permanent Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4814 5384 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473147) Date: October 1897October 1901 (NMR 234/15); thoroughly refurbished 1989-92 Architect: T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: List description; Plans and elevations from The Builder, 30 July 1898 Description: Principal barrack block designed on a U-plan. Long main block on rough north-south axis, rear built on top of the rampart. Faces west with wings projecting forward from each end. Two storeys. Centre of main block built as the recreation block with barracks either side, interrupted by gabled stairblocks projecting forward. The same rhythm continued into the end wings, each of which terminates in a single-storey block, originally containing cookhouse and baths.

Exterior: Restrained baroque style. Squared and snecked Plymouth limestone rubble brought to course, with some Portland stone dressings. Chamfered plinth, platband at ground floor sill level, stringcourse at first floor sill level and moulded eaves cornice. Gables have continuous or floating flat hoods over the openings and shaped kneelers to gable parapets and ball finials. Slate roofs. Cast-iron rainwater goods embellished with fleur de lis and acanthus leaf motifs. Front (W): symmetrical design in which the long elevations interrupted by a regular series of projecting gables and chimneystacks. Central front doorway behind flat-roofed central porch flanked by two gables to central recreation block. These gables have massive stone 5light mullioned and double transomed windows, with narrower windows in similar style between. Carved datestone (1899) in chimneystack to recreation block. Elsewhere, windows are usually replacement horned 6/6-pane sashes. First floor windows in front ends of wings have curved broken pediments over. Singlestorey washhouses have round-arched arcade of Plymouth limestone springing from Tuscan columns with a return at each end. Parapet to flat roofs.

Rear (E): Long, flat regular faade with centre gables to rear of the recreation block. Ornate central doorway with round-arch head, rusticated voussoirs and keystone, with tooled edges. Doorway originally for show but opened up in 1989-92 when a flight of steps built up to it, contains double plank door hung on strap hinges with crown finials. Usual 6/6-pane horned sashes, but 5-light double transomed and mullioned windows to gable ends of central recreation block and 3-light double transomed and mullioned window in oriel above the doorway. Stone mullioned and transomed windows to first floor of this section in same style as front, but includes a 3-light oriel over the doorway surmounted by large round-arched pediment above bearing Royal Arms and datestone (1897). Interior: Transformed in 1989-92, although basic elements of the original layout remain. Significant features: Exterior appearance and architectural detail.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Barrack block

Barrack block

Significance:
Significant.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 22th April 2009 Condition Category: 1 Good Minor areas of damp internally, there is a need for general cyclical maintenance. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There are also areas of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There

Justification of significance:
Evidential Material evidence of intensive occupation of the Citadel by soldiers. Historical The building is an expression of the funds and impetus provided by the Barrack Act. Aesthetic It is the dominant building on site. It is a handsome well-designed Victorian building referencing the baroque style of de Gommes main gateway. Its style reflects a respectful historicism towards the Citadel on the part of T. Rogers Kitsell. It is built of local stone to a high standard of craftsmanship. It is an impressive and very large building.

are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition, some rot and peeling paint was observed and noted where appropriate. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. In addition, the external window seals (between the timber frames and masonry openings) have generally deteriorated and require replacement. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but require re-painting. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. Particular attention needs to be drawn to the condition of the lead tapered parapet gutter running along the length of the eastern roof, as this may be considered the most vulnerable roofing detail (subsceptible to

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

14

Asset 108 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Asset 108 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Barrack block

Stepped entrance to Regiment Medical Centre

weathering, damage or blockages). The valleys were renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: A substantial refurbishment has been carried out to the building. Hence, the internal areas are in very good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. The condition of the existing studded rubber flooring to the communal areas at ground and first floor levels is very tired. However, we understand that this is due for imminent renewal by Debut Services South West Ltd.

Due to the building being subjected to substantial refurbishment, there is little damage through general wear and tear to plasterwork, joinery etc. However, the ongoing daily use of the building means that areas/ items will become damaged and can be made good during redecoration works, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Access Issues
Although this building is primarily an accommodation block with no visitors, there is the Regiment Medical Centre at the southern end of the building on the ground floor. This is currently accessible by negotiating steps (seven risers) and a stepped threshold. There are currently no accessible facilities within the Centre. We understand the services are limited, comprising one Doctor, a Practice Manager, two treatment rooms and an enrolment health test suite. We understand that any major traumas are dealt with by the civilian ambulance service. It may be possible to access the Centre, from an internal link door. Access via this route would incur less physical adaptation of the structure, although the internal layout is very restrictive, with little scope for adaptation.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 111 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Key plan

Hospital front

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA Permanent Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4818 5378 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No.26245); Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473151) Date: Mid-18th century, built as a hospital, still serving as a hospital in 1842, converted to barracks by 1901. Architect: The Ordnance Board Sources: Woodward, F W, Citadel, 1987; list description; 1842 WO 55/805; 1901 WO 78/2976 Description: A two-storey, five-bay building built on an E-W axis facing SE. Single depth with a 1989-92 single-storey extension to the rear. Exterior: Stuccoed stone rubble with plain plinth and a Plymouth limestone platband at first floor level which returns around the two end walls. The SE faade has a symmetrical 5-window front of 6/6-

pane horned sashes in openings (all late 20th century replacements) with segmental arch heads. Central front doorway with 20th century flat-roofed rubblestone porch. There are two rendered chimneystacks at each end of the building. Hipped slate roof. The rear wall (NW) has five windows; the E ground floor window is blocked. The E end wall is blind and the W end wall has two ground floor 6/6-pane horned sash windows. The 1989-92 masonry is blockwork with quartz pea gravel finish, and Portland limestone ashlar dressings, kneelers and coping with slate roof. Interior: It was thoroughly refurbished in 1989-92. No visible evidence of earlier partitions or other features. Limited access to roof indicated king post tiebeam trusses with raking struts, perhaps 18th century. Significant features: Exterior appearance and shell of 18th century hospital.

Historical It is one of the oldest surviving military hospitals in Great Britain. Permanent barracks hospitals were not generally available until the Napoleonic Wars. Aesthetic Like the guard house, rendered externally, which is in contrast to the exposed limestone of the other historic buildings on the site.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good As with other buildings, periodic maintenance needs to be kept up to date to prevent any further deterioration some vegetation growth, failure of joints, weathering etc. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in appear to be in good condition, with the following exceptions:

Significance:
Significant

Justification of significance:
Evidential The major 18th century building on site.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

16

Asset 111 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Asset 111 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in fair condition, and require repainting. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but again regular inspection and painting is required. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. We

understand all valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework to be rectified accordingly.

Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Access Issues
Access Audit not reviewed in connection with Conservation Management Plan.

17

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 111a Bike Shed

Key plan

Bike shed

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Bike Shed Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4816 5379 Designation: None Date: 20th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Simple 20th century bike shed built against the wall of the incline up to Prince Edwards Battery behind Asset 111. Exterior: Slate roof, rear wall is retaining wall of inclined access, east wall is inner wall of rampart. West side supports roof. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Significance:
Neutral significance.

Justification of significance:
A modest structure employing traditional materials.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

18

Asset 111a Bike Shed

Assets 113-116 Portable Accommodation Units

Assets 113-116 Portable accommodation units

Key plan

The four units from the south-west

Asset 113 from east

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Portable accommodation units Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: Centre at SX 4811 5374 Designation: None Date: Installed in 2008 Architect: None Sources: None Description: 4 late 20th century pre-prefabricated cabins. Exterior: Single-storey, flat-roofed, rectangular portacabin-style units. Interior: Not inspected Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
These are temporary buildings that reduce the character and quality of the site.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 118 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Key plan

Great Store front

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: J R Accommodation SLA Permanent Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4811 5376 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245); Listed Grade II* (LBS No. 473144) Date: 1667-72 Great Store. It is shown extant on de Gommes plan of 1672, internal partition wall of 1726-27, converted to barracks 1844, thoroughly refurbished 1989-92. Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: 1672 Map NMMP45,1737 image Sandford Mace; 1844 plans a-I WO55 805; Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 31; List description Description: Large gable-ended block built on NE-SW axis, facing NW. Three storeys with a cellar at the south end. 1844 plans show the layout of Great Store. Internal evidence that 17th century walls rose to present sill level of second floor windows and M-gables to end walls (as shown in Sandford Mace engraving of 1737). Present layout is

product of 1844 rebuild and later refurbishments. Staircases each end and floors divided into barrack accommodation. 19th century gableended, single-storey carriage house at north end (see Asset 118A). Exterior: Constructed from limestone rubble, brought to course and bonded with lime mortar. Exposed masonry to NW front, other sides rendered. Granite coping of parapet and gable ends. Rendered lateral and axial stacks. Slate roof. NW front has first and second floor string courses, and symmetrical 7-window front of late 20th century replacement 8/8-pane or 6/6-pane horned sash windows under segmental arch heads. (Central narrow second floor windows added in 20th century.) Blocked central entrance has wide 17th century granite four-centred arch head with carved flowers in spandrels. Hood mould with stylized flower label stops. Jambs roll-moulded down to moulded plinths. Doorways each end with flat heads of limestone voussoirs. Centre windows blocked. Clock in blocking above central entrance and blocked opening at second floor level contains Royal Arms from 17th century Fort Majors house, demolished 1902-5. E wall to rear is rendered, containing pairs of symmetrically arranged 6/6-pane horned sash windows and single sash windows. Blocked windows in centre to first and second floors. N end wall rendered with horned sash windows and covered at ground floor level by singlestorey carriage house with pitched roof. S end wall rendered with small sash window at each level.

Interior: 19th century staircase at either end. Open string granite steps and cast iron handrail and stick balusters. Remainder of interior thoroughly refurbished in 1989-92. Roof is 19th century, a replacement of an M roof with double gable ends. 5 massive tiebeam trusses to either side of a central crosswall. Queen posts with raking struts parallel to principals, carry an upper rail which supports a central king post, jowelled at the top. Diagonal ridge and a series of purlinlike rafters clasped over shallow trenches, alternate ones supported by cleats. Roof boarded. Trusses have chiselled Roman numerals but trusses not erected in order. On the inside, the top of the 17th century wall level is clearly demonstrated where the long walls diminish in thickness at the level described, which relates to the thicker walls rising to an m-profile within the roofspace. Thinner 19th century walling rises above along the front and rear walls and to the existing gables at each end. Thus the 17th century masonry shows on the inside. Significant features: Shell of 17th century building. Re-used plaque. Some 1844 internal features.

Significance:
Highly significant

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

20

Asset 118 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Asset 118 Junior Ranks Accommodation SLA

Rear elevation

Justification of significance:
Evidential The Great Store is significant as a major 17th century storage building. Historical As a surviving component of the 17th century Citadel; major subsequent alterations are well-documented. Aesthetic The building retains its 17th century proportions.

re-rendered and limewashed. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone on the north elevation, together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. Corroding metalwork was noted within the central chimney structure and may be present in other areas. There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition, some rot and peeling paint was observed and noted where appropriate. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but again regular inspection and painting is required. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover

flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in satisfactory condition with the exceptions noted in Section 5. All valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in satisfactory condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Damp noted in the west gable wall. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework should be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Minor issues due to lack of cyclical maintenance as with other buildings on the site. No major issues to be attended to immediately. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition, with the exception of the north elevation, the building has been recently

Access Issues
Access Audit not reviewed in connection with Conservation Management Plan.

21

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 118A Gun Saluting Park

Key plan

Gun Park east front

Gun Park north end

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Gun Saluting Park Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4812 5378 Designation: None Date: c.1890s Architect: Probably T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: 1901 WO 78/2976 Description: Labelled on 1901 plan as a Gun Shed. 19th century single-storey gable-ended block, built like a carriage house. It is an extension on the north end of The Great Store/barracks (Asset 118 q.v.). Exterior: Constructed from snecked limestone masonry. Slate roof. NE side contains 4 pairs of double doors, of plank construction, hung on sturdy cast-iron strap hinges on pintels. NW and SE end walls each contain a 6/6-pane sash window under a pecked limestone lintel with

ashlar dressings. The building has a plinth, and the gable walls are coped. The end walls have a recessed triangular-headed panel either side of a central pilaster. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: Exterior appearance.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Minor issues due to lack of cyclical maintenance as with other buildings on the site. No major issues to be attended to immediately. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: See Asset 118

Significance:
Significant

Justification of significance:
Evidential One of a group of buildings added to the site in the late 19th/early 20th century. Historic Built after the Barrack Act of 1890 which prompted extensive rebuilding and additions to the Citadel. Aesthetic Modest aesthetically.

Access Issues
Access Audit not reviewed in connection with Conservation Management Plan.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

22

Asset 118A Gun Saluting Park

Asset 119 Royal Chapel of St. Katherine

Asset 119 Royal Chapel of St. Katherine

Key plan

Chapel exterior

Chapel north door

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: In use as a chapel. This includes occasional use for weddings, funerals and christenings. Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4807 5375 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473141) Date: Largely 1845 but with a late 17th century core, contemporary with the construction of the Citadel Architect: Sources: Woodward, F W, Citadel, 1987, 99-100; plaque in chapel; list description Description: Grey Plymouth limestone rubble, brought to course on the N (show) front: the E wall is roughcast. Slate roofs. The only surviving 17th century wall appears to be the rubble wall of the W end of the chapel, with later (1845) quoins on the NW corner only. All gables are coped with kneelers. Cross-shaped plan with nave, chancel and large N and S transepts. The main entrance is into the N transept,

facing the main gate to the Citadel and this elevation is treated as the show front with corner buttresses and a 3-sided stair turret to W. An organ chamber/vestry projects off S side of chancel and the S transept is linked to casemates in the S wall of the Citadel by a pent roof supported off a stone wall to W. Exterior: The enlargement of the late 17th century nave and chancel plan in 1845 involved adding the transepts which included galleries, and a gallery in the W end of the nave. The galleries are accessed by external stair turrets, one in the NW angle of the N transept is three-sided with a conical lead roof, the other stair turret in the SW angle of the S transept gives access to both S and W galleries and is plainer. The 1845 work cost 1,137 18 s 3d and increased the number of sittings from 175 to 522. Most of the external features are 1845: pointed arched windows with Y tracery; triple lancets to the transeptal galleries, 2-centred arched external doorways, some retaining original 1845 doors with cover strips. The east window is 1955, an adaptation of the 1845 window (photograph inside chapel). The main 1845 entrance, into the N transept, re-uses a fine, large granite doorway, presumed to be late 17th century and part of the de Gomme design but old-fashioned for the date. The doorway has a Tudor arched head; hoodmould; spandrels carved with a flattened geometric flower form and carved jambs with elaborate stops containing a ball motif. It matches two granite doorways into the former governors house

range, but is in better condition. It is not known whether it originates from the 17th century chapel, or has been re-cycled from elsewhere in the fort. The doorway contains a massive 2-leaf 1845 door with flush panels and original 1845 ironwork and hinges. Interior: The walls are plastered and painted, the floor covered with carpet. There is an 1845 flat ceiling of large square panels with moulded ribs. The chancel ceiling is gilded and painted with Tudor roses in the panels. There are texts in scrolls on the N and S walls, stencilled borders and angels painted on the E wall. These are reputed to have been painted by an N.C.O. in the Royal Engineers prior to World War I. The galleries are supported on quatrefoil-section cast iron columns, with iron railed balustrades. The galleries preserve 1845 flush vertical plank dados and 2-centred arched doorways with doors with cover strips. Fittings: Small 1845 Gothic stone font with blind traceried stem and octagonal bowl decorated with ogee arches. There is a 5-sided wooden pulpit of the c.1860s with blind traceried decoration. Late 19th century seating of open benches with grained square-headed ends with sunk panels and moulded rails. The seats in the galleries, with shaped ends and open railed backs, may be 1845. Simple timber chancel rail on twisted metal stanchions with leaf decoration. The stained glass was re-arranged in 1955 to accommodate glass rescued

23

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

East end interior

East end paint detail

from the garrison chapel of St. Michael and St. George, destroyed in enemy action in 1941. The design of the east window was amended in 1955 to take part of an 1892 window, probably designed by Fouracre and Watson, of Plymouth, showing characteristic pre-Raphaelite influence. Another portion of the same window was installed in the N chancel window. The previous E window, c.1870s by Clayton and Bell, was moved to the W wall of the N transept. The window in the E wall of this transept and the W window, with tiled inscription panel in the sill, also originated from the chapel of St. Michael and St. George. The installation and re-design of the stained glass (supplemented with small panes decorated with pomegranates etc. to fit the openings) was undertaken by Messrs Osborne and Phillips of York Street. There are a number of memorial wall plaques from the 19th century and 20th century, commemorating soldiers and their families associated with the Citadel and generally funded by their fellows. People commemorated include individuals killed in enemy action in Plymouth in 1941. Significant features: Painted decoration; memorials, including the stained glass.

Significance:
Highly significant

Community The chapel has communal value as a building with a civilian congregation for Sunday services, for the special commemorative aspect for the wall-plaques and for the re-use of the stained glass, which makes this building a memorial of another garrison chapel. The chapel is used for weddings, christenings and funerals. In this respect it has special significance for those who occupy, or have occupied the Citadel.

Justification of significance:
Evidential The chapel is on the same site and uses some of the walling of its late 17th century predecessor. Historic The plan, allowing for separate access to galleries and presumably reflecting the seating of different ranks, is historically interesting. It is one of a handful of Royal Chapels in England. It has major historic interest as a garrison church. Aesthetic The chapel is of modest architectural interest in itself, the 1845 enlargement in a chunky lancet style and the galleries are oldfashioned compared with civilian church architecture of the date. The chapel has a show front facing the Citadel gateway.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Cyclical maintenance items require attention as with all other buildings. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also areas of unsympathetic mortar repairs.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

24

Asset 119 Royal Chapel of St. Katherine

Asset 119 Royal Chapel of St. Katherine

Internal space demostrates good accessibility

There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. The stonework window surrounds have deteriorated in several areas. A specialist condition survey has been recommended in the Quadrennial inspection. Doors generally seem to be in a good condition. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but again regular inspection and painting is required. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover

flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. All valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in very good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework to be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These

areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Access Issues
The chapel is used regularly by members of the Public with a service held on site every Sunday. The chapel is also used for weddings, funerals and christenings. This is one of the key facilities on site that needs to be fully accessible. Visitors arrive at the gate and are checked against a pre-advised list of attendees. Visitors are directed to a cordoned off area of parking, then walk the short distance to the chapel. There is a stepped threshold on the main entrance into the chapel. Internally, space is very good with ample room for wheelchair users to manoeuvre. It is likely that an induction loop has not been installed. There is only stepped access between the chapel and the Vestry. There is also an internal step between two parts of the vestry and stepped entry into the main entrance door. There is only one small wc available for use. This is particularly restrictive and improvements should be made, especially in view of an ageing population and likely age of the congregation.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 120 Officers Mess

Key plan

Show front from north

East elevation

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Officers Accommodation and Mess, SLA Permanent. Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4804 5379 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473149) Date: August 1895December 1896 (NMR 234/15); 1895 datestone Architect: Probably T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: List description Description: L-plan Officers Mess Range and main stair, with lowerroofed, T-plan service and accommodation blocks to each end. In addition there is a central block to the W, off the N-S arm, with a second floor ante-room taking advantage of good views, with accommodation below. Three storeys with attics. Slate roofs. Exterior: Restrained baroque style. Squared and snecked Plymouth limestone rubble with quoins and Portland limestone dressings to window and door openings. The windows have limestone lintels and

sills, hollow-chamfered surrounds with alternately projecting ashlar dressings. Some windows have flat-faced transoms and mullions. Flat hood moulds. Low plinth. Coped gables with ball finials or sometimes, gable-end stacks. The show front (N) has two projecting blocks either side of the porch towards the E end. The E gable end is plain with a ball finial and the other has a projecting gable stack corbelled out from first floor level. The porch is single-storey with a parapet pierced by a pair of open round-headed arches to either side of a central plaque. There is a moulded string course. The entrance has an elliptical arch head with multiple mouldings down to facetted blocks. The outer arch and parapet are corbelled out to either side of the entrance. The main suites on the second floor have large windows, with limestone mullions and transoms and plain glass in the lower sashes. The fenestration is irregular with a variety of sash windows of varying sizes often with transoms and mullions. In the west gable section there is a large mullion and transom window with a king mullion and two smaller mullions and two transoms to the ground floor. The E elevation has a gable end to E with a gable stack with two 4/4pane horned sashes to the second floor, and one 6/6-pane sash to the other floors. The adjacent, low section to W has second floor windows breaking through the eaves as dormers with gable ends. All windows

are either 4/4- or 6/6-pane horned sashes. The higher section to the west has an assortment of pairs of sashes, single sashes and two- and three-light transom and mullion windows. The gable end to the west has a large second floor window with two mullions and transoms, and a regular arrangement of 6/6-pane horned sashes to the first two floors and a three-light window to the attic. In the corner between the east gable end and the lower section there is a single-storey porch with a parapet roof. The rear elevations to S and W are characteristic, with horned sash windows of varying sizes, some with limestone transoms and mullions. The W end of the central range has a canted lookout on the top floor, with large mullion-and-transom window, external door and steps down to the wall walk. There is a carriageway through the rear block with a round arch head at each end which have chamfered surrounds down to step stops and are protected by granite bollards. Interior: The suites are located on the second floor of the main range, including the ante-room in the central rear block. They are reached from the formal stair in the corner of the range. It is of open-well design with a closed string, turned balusters and a flat, moulded handrail. Square newel with moulded square finials. The half landings are supported on full height posts. At the head of the stair on each floor there is a glass and timber partition with double doors. The

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

26

Asset 120 Officers Mess

architectural style of the top floor suites include deep moulded cornices, dados, and skirting boards. The doors are 6-panelled, in a boxed frame with torus to astragal architraves and a pulvinated frieze. The door furniture is brass. Fireplaces are constructed from grey marble often with eared jambs, with the exception of the ante-room where it is constructed from limestone and reconstituted stone, with a bolection moulding. The service stair at the south end is a simple open-well stair constructed from oak, with slender turned balusters, square newels with turned vase finials and turned pendants. It is open string with scrolled stair brackets and a moulded flat handrail. Significant features: The entrance hall, main stair and principal mess rooms on the second floor.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Limited action on recommended repairs from quadrennial building refurbished during the period of 1989-92. Typical minor cyclical maintenance works need to be undertaken. The rubberized floors of the utility area to the ground floor are in poor condition and are representing a trip hazard. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. Large areas of repointing have been carried out, mostly to chimneys and high-level areas. There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition, some rot and peeling paint was observed and noted where appropriate. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but some corrosion and weathering of the paint surface was observed and noted.

Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. We understand all valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in very good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework should be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Asset 120 Officers Mess

Significance:
Significant.

Justification of significance:
Evidential This building is important on this site for the survival of its historic interior, evidence of the comfortable communal accommodation and possibilities for entertainment for officers. Historical Historically it is the highest status example of the Citadels group of post Barrack Act buildings. Aesthetic It is a handsome, well-designed Victorian building. It is built of local stone and is designed for entertainment as well as providing mess rooms and accommodation.

Access Issues
Various functions are held here, although all are held in the function space on the top floor of the building. The only form of assisted access is a goods lift. This has been used in the past by visitors attending an event. Access to the goods lift is achieved via a rear entrance door, with the lift opening in to the rear of the kitchen area on the top floor. Consideration should be given to providing a temporary ramp at the door entry point. Previous usage has proven that access is viable, although not ideal. There are no accessible wc facilities on the top floor and consideration should be given to providing one as a priority issue. In addition there was no evidence of a safe means of emergency egress for any disabled visitors. This needs to be carefully considered also.

27

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 121 WO & Sergeants Mess

Key plan

Front elevation

Single-level allows ease of movement internally

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Sergeants Mess Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4796 5388 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London. Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992. Description: A rectangular single-storey building with an M-roof of unequal heights. There is an enclosed courtyard to the east, and a flat roofed service building to the north. Exterior: It is constructed in blocks finished in quartz pea gravel. Quoins and dressings in Portland Stone. The gable ends have curved kneelers and coping in Portland stone. Slate roof. On the east front here are four dormer windows with broken apexes, each divided by a bold flat mullion, all breaking forward from eaves level. Each is

positioned directly above lower window and doorway opening. The main doorway is at the south end. Similar dormers on the west side. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None.

limestone and slate of the older buildings, but the design, kept low and with a pale grey finish to the walling, is clearly intended to avoid visual intrusion on the site. Community Significant community use for the Commandos.

Significance:
Neutral

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery. Aesthetic The modern materials used are less attractive than the Plymouth

Access Issues
This building is used frequently by visitors and does have some access provision, with widened openings, drop kerbs and temporary ramps. As this building is the most accessible on site, this tends to be the facility used most for functions. Internally most of the space is on one level, although there are temporary ramps available to assist internal circulation, e.g. from the conservatory into the main building. There is no form of accessible wc, although there is scope to provide one by adapting either the male or female wcs at the main entrance. Various presentations are also held here and the installation of an induction loop would be beneficial.
Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

28

Asset 121 WO & Sergeants Mess

Asset 122 WO & Sergeants Living Accommodation

Asset 122 WO & Sergeants Living Accommodation

Key plan

Main entrance to Sergeants accommodation

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: WO & Sergeants Accommodation. SLA Permanent Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 47985383 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473148) Date: September 1914December 1915 on site of old Chaplains Range (NMR 234/15) Architect: Rebuilt probably by T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: 1665 plan NMM P45; 1715 Lilly plan; Sandford Mace, 1737, BL 2140 (25); 1879 WO1 78 3045; 1906 map a WO 782976; 1936 Fig 87 NMR; Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 105; List description. Description: Lilly (1715) labels the earlier range as officers and soldiers barracks. It was known as the Chaplains range by 1879, but also described as married soldiers quarters. The same building is recorded on the 1906 map. Rebuilt as Sergeants and Warrant Officers married accommodation 1914-15. Built on NW-SE axis, facing NE, it is a long rectangular range with four gabled porches breaking forward

from the main front. Two storeys with attics and a basement, and three-storey porches providing access to stairs. Attics are mostly lit by dormers but rear has crossroofs to second floor gables behind the porches. Regular two-bay arrangement between porches and single bay at each end. Exterior: Snecked Plymouth limestone masonry with Portland stone lintels, window and door dressings. Moulded eaves cornices. Gables with shaped kneelers and coping. Rendered to rear with ashlar bands at window sill level. Dressed limestone axial and gable end stacks with moulded cornices. Slate roof 8/8-pane horned sashes to ground and first floor front with narrow horned 2/2-pane sashes to either side of porches (all 1989-92 replacements). Replacement three-light casements to upper levels of the porches (with chamfered surrounds to openings) and the dormers. Doorways in porches have four-centred arch heads and chamfered surrounds with hoodmoulds which step down to extend over narrow side-lights. Metal railings and steps down to basement. Rear gables have second floor round arch head sash windows, their openings lined with white glazed bricks. Ground and first floor have regular arrangement of 8/8-pane sashes and smaller casements. Area in front of basement extended forwards at west end and roofed over.

Interior: Refurbished in 1989-92. Limited access to interior. 1919 cast-iron stair balustrades, with stick balusters and simple hand rail, to stone steps, behind each porch. Interior may preserve elements of the c.1919 layout but most, if not all the joinery and other detail has been replaced. Significant features: Exterior appearance.

Significance:
Some significance

Justification of significance:
Evidential Illustrates provision for soldiers inside the Citadel in the late 19th/early 20th century. Historical One of a group of buildings in the Citadel erected following the Barrack Act of 1890 and reflecting improved accommodation for troops on site. Aesthetic

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Sergeants accommodation rear

There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are a few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. The render finish to the rear elevation is deteriorating and is suffering from cracking and probable delamination. The renewal of this was advised in the last Quadrennial Inspection but no work has been carried out. Windows and doors seem generally to be in fair condition, with any exceptions noted within the report. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but again regular inspection and painting is required. Where rusting is apparent, this is noted as a matter requiring attention. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being

Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in very good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework to be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Built in materials and with proportions to match the other large post Barrack Act buildings of the same period although this one has few references to the baroque style of de Gommes main gate.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good It was included in the refurbishment programme 1989-92. The only repairs required are the typical cyclical items as identified in the Quadrennial Report. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness:

Access Issues
This building is used primarily by service personnel, although there is one space for civilian/ guest use at the discretion of the RSM. However, this space constitutes only one room and is up three flights of stairs, with no alternative access. If the decision is made to provide civilian accommodation on site, then this will need to be provided in another more accessible building.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

30

Asset 122 WO & Sergeants Living Accommodation

Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. Large areas of repointing have been carried out, mostly to chimneys and high-level areas.

refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. A cherry picker inspection is recommended for an action in 2009. We understand all valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness.

Assets 122A & 122B Bin Enclosure & Bike Shed

Asset 122A & 122B Bin Enclosure & Bike Shed

Key plan

Garage store

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Bin enclosure and bike shed Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4797 5381 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: 122A is a small enclosure adjacent to 122B, a bike shed, to the rear of Asset 122. Exterior: 122A has brick pillars to front and rear. The sides are enclosed by concrete block footings supporting timber slatted fencing. 122B is larger and covered over and enclosed on the east side with preformed metal sheeting. Interior: N/A

Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts

Justification of significance:
The appearance of building 122 would be enhanced by the removal of the utilitarian structures constructed of unsympathetic materials.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 123 QM(M) MFO Store

Key plan

Garage store

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: QM(M) MFO store Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4794 5384 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: None Sources: Description: Against NW end of King Charles Curtain, three 20th century garage-like stores. Exterior: Single-storey, built of preformed metal. Three bays, each with full-size garage door. Monopitch roof. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
This is a wholly utilitarian modern structure and visually intrusive.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

32

Asset 123 QM(M) MFO store

Asset 125 Store

Asset 125 Store

Key plan

Store building

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Store Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4792 5384 Designation: None Date: 1989-92. 1844 plans for overhaul as a coach house and stables for Lieutenant Governor. 1901 plan shows stables and stalls and a meat store in the bastion. Architect: None Sources: 1844 plan WO 55805; 1901 plan WO 78/2976 Description: Interior of King Charles bastion roofed over in late 20th century. Exterior: Flat roof of preformed metal sheets. Plain 20th century doorway. Interior: Not inspected.

Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
This is a wholly utilitarian modern structure and visually intrusive.

General Management Issues Building Condition Issues


Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 131 RHQ Accommodation

Key plan

RHQ Accommodation

South doorway

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Headquarters Building Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4801 5388 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245); Listed Grade II* (LBS No. 473143) Date: Built in two phases on map evidence between 1672 and 1677. The earliest part was the northern end of a north-south range which was built as the Deputy Governors House (de Gomme plan of 1672). Secondary south end added as the Governors house (J. R. plan of 1677) and lower range projecting to rear of south end returning round west side of garden, labeled as Gunners Room. Similar arrangement confirmed in 1715 (Lilly plan) with main range occupied by the houses of the Lieutenant Governor and Governor, with Master-Gunners Range projecting to west from south end, and Gunners barracks returning to north (demolished 1900-1902). Numerous refurbishments: converted to barracks and Officers Mess c.1802, cells added to basement in 1831, refurbished October 1902August 1903 (NMR 234/15) and in 1989-92.

Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme, perhaps fitted out and finished by local masons (Saunders). Sources: Woodward, F W, Citadel, 1987, 81; list description; 1672 plan NMM P45; 1677 J. R. plan, BL Add Ms 5415 E.2; 1715 Lilly; Sandford Mace, 1737, BL 2140 (25); 1831 plans WO 55802;1896 photo of parade ground, Parker, 2002, Exeter Archaeology 02.66. Description: Two 17th century houses presenting a unified east front. Three storeys with an attic and a semi-basement. Built on N-S axis. Rectangular double-depth plan with angled S wall. Earlier (c.1672) building is 5-bay N section with central doorway and quoins to S. Later (c.1677) 3-bay house with central doorway at S end. Constructed from limestone rubble, brought to course and bonded with lime mortar. No plinth. Ground and first floor granite string courses to E front. S end wall and rear rendered. Modernised in early 20th century with new single mansard roof (and curvilinear Dutch style gables added to end walls between 17th century chimneystacks) replacing original parallel roofs with M-gables. The window openings were enlarged, the windows replaced, the tops of chimneystacks were rebuilt in red brick and the attic given new dormers. Slate roof. An original window (17th century) from this building is displayed in the Officers Mess (120). It is a 3-light timber window with ovolo-moulded mullions containing small rectangular panes of leaded glass. The central opening

casement is timber. The reveals were apparently slate hung. Inside the porch of the same building is displayed a 17th century door-leaf from the Governors Range. It has a round arch head, sturdy double-plank construction, with applied ogee moulded panelling and a top-central iron grille. Carved fleur de lis in the central panel. The archaeology of the east, west and south walls is described in Parker 2002. Exterior: E front (show): two large, granite, late 17th century doorways surviving from the de Gomme period. Saunders notes that these are old-fashioned for the date and speculates that de Gomme left the detailing to local masons. 17th century Gothic is to be found elsewhere in Plymouth, at Charles Church, Charles Cross. Each doorway has a square head with inner round-headed arch. Spandrels carved with stylized flowers. Square and round arches hollow-chamfered down to large stop, stepped on one side and scooped on other. Two 6-petalled flowers enclosing a ball below each stop. Hoodmould with square label stops missing. Flat surface under missing hood carved with 8-petalled flower design. Spandrels carved with stylized flower. Straight projecting granite lintels. Granite steps up between low rendered walls. 20th century double doors, each with two panels to upper half. Tall blockings above both doorways at first floor level. Most, if not all, of the windows are 1989-92 replacements. Ground and first floor windows are tall 6/6-pane horned sashes arranged in pairs. Second storey has pairs of 3/6-pane sash windows.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

34

Asset 131 RHQ Accommodation

Asset 131 RHQ Accommodation

Headquarters west rear

Headquarters south stair first floor

Attics have six 20th century flat-roofed dormers, each with 3-light casements with glazing bars. Basement lit by 6-pane windows. S end wall has two single light 6/6-pane horned sash windows at ground floor level, one paired sash window at first and second floor levels to rear as on the front, and a small 6/6-pane sash at attic level. 20th century monopitch store at E end. 17th century chimneys to each side of gable truncated. Front one rebuilt in brick. W wall (rear) has irregular fenestration. Windows are typically horned sashes arranged in pairs. Dormers are 20th century. Bay off-centre to south projects, with large lateral brick stack each side. Small single-storey extension under a pitched roof to north end. Three 20th century doors. Partial survival of original second floor level string course. N end wall has irregular arrangement of small two-light window with glazing bars below eaves level sting course. Attic level includes paired 9/6-pane sash windows. Two 17th century chimneys as at S end, both rebuilt in brick. Small monopitch 20th century store to rear. Interior: Account based on incomplete internal survey. 20th century refurbishment throughout, but, basic double-depth plan and an historic main stair survives from each former house. N stair, late 17th century open well with plain closed string and large square newel posts most rising through two or more storeys. Fat turned vase balusters. Some turned pendants on half landings. Wide, moulded handrail. Possible that stair has been extended to top storey; newels

have scarf joints at this level. S stair of later (early 18th century) design. Dogleg, closed string with mouldings containing alternate turned and barleytwist balusters. Moulded handrail and square newels with flat caps. Turned pendants. Possible that stair has been extended to top storey. Top flights reverts to turned balusters with only heavy vasebalusters (like those of N stair) at very top. Wainscotting on first and second floor flights, simple panels with moulded dado, possibly 20th century or maybe heavily repaired early 18th century. Significant features: Original late 17th century masonry, layout, front doorways, and good staircases (the southern one probably the product of an early 18th century refurbishment).

this was left to local builders). Historical Despite the two phases of construction from the 1670s this must be regarded as part of the original de Gomme plan. Aesthetic Later modernisations have not diminished its impressive appearance in a prominent position within the Citadel.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good

Significance:
Highly significant

Justification of significance:
Evidential The double-depth plan of both houses was advanced for the time in comparison to contemporary Devon house-plans, but the detail, as survives from the granite front doorways is old-fashioned (suggesting

Typical minor cyclical repairs required. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

All access is via stepped entrances

with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. Large areas of repointing have been carried out, mostly to chimneys and high-level areas. There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Despite the Quadrennial Inspection of 2008 identifying that most of the external timberwork is in good condition, Debut have confirmed that many of the external windows are suffering extensive rot and timber decay and require attention. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but

some corrosion and weathering of the paint surface was observed and noted. Numerous metal vent grills are corroding and discolouring the painted surfaces. Some minor cracking and salt leaching (efflorescence) was observed on the brick chimney flues to the rear (west) elevation. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. We understand all valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay. Internally: Generally the internal areas are in very good condition

with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework to be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

Access Issues
This building is used exclusively by military personnel, with only one civilian currently working in the building. All entry points are currently stepped and inaccessible. If there is a need for the Commanding Officer to accommodate any disabled visitors, this could be provided in one of the more accessible buildings. At present there is very little requirement for any adaptations to be made.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

36

Asset 131 RHQ Accommodation

Asset 132 QMs Stores Complex

Asset 132 QMs Stores Complex

Key plan

QM stores from south

QM rear elevation

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: QM Stores Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4799 5392 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London. Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992. Description: A large rectangular twostorey store with a pitched roof and coped gable ends. Exterior: In characteristic 1989-92 style with blocks finished in quartz pea gravel brought to course and interrupted by narrower bands of stone. All dressings in Portland limestone. Slate roof. Windows unusually wide with four panes. A dormer with a transom and mullion breaks through the roof line to the front above a central doorway.

Loading store doors to west end and to rear. External fire escape stair to east. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Aesthetic The modern materials used are less attractive than the Plymouth limestone and slate of the older buildings, but the design, kept low and with a pale grey finish to the walling, is clearly intended to avoid visual intrusion on the site.

Significance:
Neutral

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery.

Access Issues
There is no requirement for public access to this facility, although there are currently up to four civilian staff. Unless usage changes or a disabled member of staff is employed, then no works need to be carried out at this time.

37

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 134 Adult School

Key plan

Adult school from south-east

South door

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: The Adult School Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4802 5391 Designation: Listed Grade II (LBS No. 473150) Date: 1901-1906 on map evidence, refurbished 1989-92 Architect: Probably T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: 1901 map WO 78/2976; 1906 map WO 78/2976; list description Description: It has a compact L-plan, with a lean-to built in the angle between the main blocks. The main E block is two-storeys, originally containing a single high-ceilinged classroom on the ground floor. Short lower block projecting at right angles to rear of the S end contains the entrance hall and stair, and N rear has lean-to containing services.

Exterior: Loose Tudor/Queen Anne style. Squared and snecked rock-faced Plymouth limestone. Plymouth limestone ashlar quoins, window and door dressings. The lean-to and N elevation is rendered. Gables with soffit-moulded ashlar coping, sweeping up from the base, and with pointed finials to the E front half-dormers. Slate roofs with earthenware ridge-tiles. Chamfered plinth to S and E fronts and platband at first floor level (forming the lintel of ground floor window openings). Asymmetrical E front. There are three windows at ground floor level, two replacement 6/9-pane sash windows to the south and a three-light window to the north containing 6/9-pane sashes separated by bold rectangular limestone mullions. The first floor has two gabled half-dormers off centre to the N in the same style. They are of unequal size, the northern one a single-light and the other has two lights. They both contain sashes with glazing bars. The S elevation continues the same style. The E end includes the gable end of the main range, which has a large mullioned three-light window to the ground floor and an even larger three-light mullion-and-transom window at first floor level, both containing similar replacement sash windows. The lower stair block to the left has the main entrance doorway, now containing 1989-92 joinery. Directly above is an ashlar plaque (with ovolo-moulded frame) inscribed with Adult School in serif capitals. There is a three-light mullioned window above it at first floor level containing replacement 4/4-pane sashes.

A grey-painted K6 telephone box stands against the buildings eastern wall. Interior: 1895-1905 stair. It has a cast iron handrail with straight balusters, an open string and granite steps. It is clear that the main internal partitions were built of brick and mostly remain. The joinery and other internal detail has been replaced in 1989-92 although inserted lower ceilings in the E range might mean that originals survive above. Fittings: None surviving. Significant features: Original appearance, and internally stair, door openings and basic layout.

Significance:
Significant.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Illustrates provision for soldiers inside the Citadel in the late 19th/early 20th century.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

38

Asset 134 Adult School

Historical One of a group of buildings in the Citadel erected following the Barrack Act of 1890 and reflecting improved accommodation for troops on site. Aesthetic Built in materials and with proportions to match the other large post Barrack Act buildings of the same period although this one has few references to the baroque style of de Gommes main gate.

passage of water into the structure. The result of this can be corrosion of any steelwork and possible rot of timbers built into the walls. There are few instances where the growth of moss and algae in walls below coping joints indicate excessive moisture and failure of joints. This is the visible surface effect but it may suggest a hidden problem. Although this situation is often on walls which are permanently in the shadow (i.e. north facing) it is by no means the rule. Windows and doors seem generally to be in good condition, some rot and peeling paint was observed and noted where appropriate. It is essential that they are regularly inspected, repaired and painted. Cast iron gutters and rainwater downpipes are generally sound but some corrosion and weathering of the paint surface was observed and noted. Numerous metal vent grills are corroding and discolouring the painted surfaces. Some minor cracking and salt leaching (efflorescence) was observed on the brick chimney flues to the rear (west) elevation. Roofs: The roofs are in good condition, which is due to them being refurbished in 1989-92. Parapet walls and their copings, cover flashings and stepped abutment and chimney flashings also appear in good condition but detailed assessment was not possible. We understand all valleys have been renewed as part of the re-slating works but minor repairs may be required to the roofs to ensure their water tightness. Waterproofing of the structure is of prime importance and in this respect the roof coverings are paramount. Failure of these elements will allow water to get into the structures causing hidden corrosion and decay.

Internally: Generally the internal areas are in very good condition with only minor cracking in walls due to shrinkage and natural building movement. Minor areas of damp were noted to isolated areas within the building and may be attributed to poor maintenance of gutters, parapets, etc or rising damp. Where noted, these should be further investigated. Some areas of rusting to ironwork were also noted, including to radiators and pipework. These areas need to be treated to stop further corrosion. Any leaking pipework should be rectified accordingly. Minor damage has occurred since the last Quadrennial Inspection through general wear and tear to plasterwork and joinery etc. These areas can be made good during redecoration, which should be carried out on a regular programme.

General Management Issues:

Asset 134 Adult School

Building Condition Issues


Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good Typical minor cyclical repairs required. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness Elevations: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. Large areas of repointing have been carried out, mostly to chimneys and high-level areas. There are minor areas of concern to the joints between coping stones, cornices and other projecting ledges. The presence of moss growth at the joints indicates the mortar has failed allowing moisture retention. Copings without dpc and failure of the jointing mortar leads to the

Access Issues
This facility houses an administrative office on the top floor and the Estate and Health and Safety office on the bottom floot. The top floor administrative office is responsible for all service personnel leave, pay and movements. There is one civilian working on the top floor and one on the bottom floor. There is also a conference room which is used occasionally for meetings and this could be a good building to focus on to provide improved access to a meeting space. The building is close to the main entrance, accessible parking could easily be provided close by and provides good quality accommodation.

39

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 136 Armoury

Key plan

Armoury entrance

Armoury roof

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Armoury Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4796 5395 Designation: None Date: 1989-92, replacing coal yards shown on the 1906 map. Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London. Sources: 1906 a WO 78 2976; Western Morning News, 28th May 1992. Description: The inside of Prince Georges bastion is roofed over and enclosed to the front to provide the armoury. Exterior: The turf-covered flat roof extends to shelter the front wall of the armoury with a large flat-headed opening built of Portland ashlar. The recessed front wall includes 2 plain, but sturdy, doorways to the E side with a small projection extending forwards on the W side containing a fixed 12-pane timber window on each side.

Interior: Not inspected Significant features: None

Significance:
Neutral significance

Justification of significance:
An example of a modern function disguised with a turf roof.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

40

Asset 136 Armoury

Asset 138 Magazine

Asset 138 Magazine

Key plan

Magazine casemate

Passage to Pipers Platform

External doorway

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Magazine Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4822 5372 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No.26245). Date: Sited in the area which preserves some 16th century masonry from the 1590s bastioned fort on the site. Casemate and sally port, planned in c.1667-75, constructed in 18th century. Recorded as an artillery store in 1815, according to the brass plaque, a magazine 1847 and thereafter. Most of the documentation appears to relate this with the run of casements along the south side of the fortress (Assets 201233 q.v). Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme originally. Sources: Brass plaque dated 1815 on the Guardroom wall (Asset 101, q.v.) which describes the renovation of the southern casemates and includes an artillery store, Plan WO 55806, 1847; Copeland G.W., The Old Plymouth Society, 1949, 12; Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit, Archaeological Survey of Casemates 201-216, 1994; Report No. 94.25 & 1995, Report No.95.28.

Description: Former casemate below Prince Henrys demi-bastion, which included a sally port to Pipers Platform and Fishers Nose, which is now blocked. Converted to magazine. Exterior: Wide doorway. Unlike the southern standard casemates, this has a flat arch head of granite voussoirs. Contains 1989-92 double metal doors hung on cranked strap hinges and pintels. Interior: Interconnecting doorway with adjacent casemate now blocked with bricks. According to Copeland (1949), in the southeast corner, there is a downward passage under a vaulted roof to early sally port doorway. Significant features: Vaulted passage and carved granite doorway.

Historical The 16th century fort, known from documentation and very limited excavation, is a rare structure in England. Sir Bernard de Gomme absorbed part of it into his 1667-75 design, of which this is one element, even if not built until later. Aesthetic Part of the curtain wall and therefore an aesthetically defining element of the site.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Highly significant

Access Issues Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Evidential This is a very sensitive archaeological area which incorporates late 16th century masonry into de Gommes Citadel.

41

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 146 Underground Hut

Key plan

Underground hut

Maintenance responsibility: To be agreed Current use: Underground hut Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4799 5379 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245). Date: Late-19th century. Architect: None Sources: 1901 plan WO 78/2976 Description: An underground hut on the ramparts (Cumberland Battery), with steps down on the north side to double plank doors. Significant features: None

Significance:
Some significance.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of the Citadels defences. Historical In place by 1901. Aesthetic Solidly built structure linked with the evolution of the fortress.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

42

Asset 146 Hut

Asset 147 Hut

Asset 147 Hut

Key plan

Hut

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Hut Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 481 15371 Designation: None Date: Second half of the 20th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Hut on Cumberland Battery. Exterior: Small, single-storey hut, cement rendered, and with a plank door in the east wall, and a single-light 20th century window in the south wall. Monopitch roof. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Significance:
In the absence of any documentary evidence establishing that this hut had an historical function of interest, it is identified as detrimental to significance.

Justification of significance:
To date this appears to have no historic significance and its materials and form are visually intrusive. Should further research reveal that this hut served an historical function of interest - such as a WW2 observation shelter - it might be considered to be of some significance.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

43

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 149 Southeast Sally Port Hut

image

Key plan

Southeast Sally port hut

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Southeast sally port hut Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 48125372 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 19th century. On a 1901 plan it was labelled as a Gunnery Store. Architect: None Sources: 1901 plan WO 78/2976 Description: Hut in NW angle of Queens Battery. Exterior: Single-storey limestone rubblestone hut with monopitch roof. Doorway containing plank door in east face and windows with glazing bars in east and south sides. Interior: Not inspected.

Significant features: None

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Some significance.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Built of local Plymouth limestone. Historical Known from documentation to have been erected by 1900 and to have been a gunnery store at that date, possibly part of the post Barrack Act (1890) improvements on site. Aesthetic Modest and utilitarian but the use of local limestone makes it consistent with other much more substantial buildings on the site.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

44

Asset 149 Southeast Sally Port Hut

Assets 150 & 151 Disused

Assets 150 and 151 Disused

Key plan

Magazine on Pipers platform

Assets 150 & 151

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Disused Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: Centre at SX 4825 5371 Designation: Date: Probably late 19th century shown on 1901 plan. Labelled as an office (150) and a workshop (151) on 1906 map. Later used as magazines. Architect: Sources: 1901 map WO 78/2976; 1906 map c WO 78/2976 Description: Two small single-storey buildings with one-room plans and monopitch roofs sited next to each other on Pipers Platform, which retains masonry from the late 16th century fort in the lower courses. There is a narrow passageway between them. 150 is heated. It is built inside the older NE wall of the platform whereas 151 is built over the SW wall. Both have doorways in the NW end and windows in the outer walls.

Exterior: Both are built of snecked rock-faced Plymouth limestone, with ashlar quoins. 150 has brick dressings and segmental arch heads to NE window (blocked) opening and NW doorway (no frame or door). Red brick chimneyshaft. 151 has alternate projecting quoins and coped parapet rising at the corners. Square-headed NW doorway with ashlar surround and SW two-light window with plain limestone mullion. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Historical Known from documentation to have been erected by 1906 and to have been an office and workshop at that date, possibly part of the post Barrack Act (1890) improvements on site. Aesthetic Modest and utilitarian but the use of local limestone makes them consistent with other much more substantial buildings on the site.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Assets not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Some significance

Justification of significance:
Evidential Built of local Plymouth limestone.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

45

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 153 POL Installation

Key plan

POL installation

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: POL Installation Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4813 5391 Designation: None Date: Early 20th century Architect: None Sources: English Heritage/NMR MD 95/00923. Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Single-storey, red brick building with Portland stone lintels to openings and hipped slate roof. Similar-sized building here first appears on 1936 plan. Exterior: Symmetrical E front with door each end and two two-light casement windows with glazing bars between. Single similar two-light casement window in each end wall. Interior: Not inspected.

Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts

Justification of significance:
Although this modestly-scaled building employs traditional materials, its red brick construction is felt to be incongruous in this location.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
This facility is run by a civilian member of staff, although there is no requirement for public access and no actions currently recommended.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

46

Asset 153 POL Installation

Asset 154 Vehicle Ramp

Asset 154 - Vehicle Ramp

Key plan

Vehicle ramp

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Vehicle ramp Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4817 5385 Designation: None Date: Late 20th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. 20th century installation in the MT area to support the maintenance and repair of vehicles. Exterior: Functional structure with no architectural merit. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
This is a wholly utilitarian modern structure and visually intrusive.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

47

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 159 Electricity Substation & Gas Meter House

Key plan

Electricity and gas substation

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Electricity substation and gas meter house Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4814 5395 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London. Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992. Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Building at entrance to MTA annexe. Irregularly-shaped flat-roofed building which projects beyond the curtain wall to the northwest. Exterior: It has rock-faced Plymouth limestone masonry and granite dressings. Granite chamfered plinth and moulded cornice. Double doorway to substation to west, and smaller doorway to gas meter room to north, both with louvered timber doors.

Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Neutral

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery. Aesthetic Presumably the use of Plymouth limestone and granite is intended to avoid visual intrusion on the site.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

48

Asset 159 Electricity substation and gas meter house

Asset 160 Gun Park Garages & Office

Image

Asset 160 Gun Park Garages and Office

Key plan

Gun Park Garages

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Gun Park Garages and Office Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4813 5391 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Garages with associated offices consisting of 5 bays with large vehicle entries, 6 central bays each with doorway with a first floor over the rear half, and a further 5 bays with large vehicle entries. On site of 1901-2 Married Soldiers Quarters of red brick and slate. Exterior: Distinctive style of large vehicle entries each containing a central man-door and 9 evenly spaced flattened oval windows. The

central 6 bays have alternate man-doors and double doors, each bay with 2 flattened oval windows. The first floor includes upright flattened oval windows. The roof is of monopitch construction and covered in preformed metal sheets. The current blue and yellow colour scheme is very tired, and a different specification of yellow has been used for at least one of the doors during repair/maintenance. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery. Aesthetic Robust and unpretentious functional building. A colour scheme more sympathetic to the Citadel would enhance the appearance of these buildings.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Neutral.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

49

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 161 Garages & Offices

Key plan

Workshop

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Garages and offices Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: Centre at SX 4822 5382 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Long building of 17 workshops including offices in same style as Asset 160 (q.v.). Exterior: Large vehicle openings which occupy whole bay each. 9 flattened oval windows and man door to each entry. Office bays with man-doors and pairs of oval windows, and a first floor set back from front with upright flattened oval windows. The current blue and

yellow colour scheme is very tired, and a different specification has been used for at least one of the doors during repair/maintenance. Interior: 20th century work bays. Significant features: None

Robust and unpretentious functional building. A colour scheme more sympathetic to the Citadel would enhance the appearance of these buildings.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Neutral

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery. Aesthetic

Access Issues
Access Audit not reviewed in connection with Conservation Management Plan.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

50

Asset 161 Garages and offices

Asset 162 Garages & Offices

Asset 162 Garages and offices

Key plan

Garages

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Garages and offices Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4821 5386 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London. Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. 3 bays of offices and 7 vehicles bays. Exterior: In same style as Asset 160 (q.v.). Interior: Utilitarian. Significant features: None

Significance:
Neutral

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery. Aesthetic Robust and unpretentious functional building. A colour scheme more sympatheic to the Citadel would enhance the appearance of these buildings.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

51

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 163 Stores & Toilets

Key plan

Stores and toilets

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Stores and toilets Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4822 5388 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Two bays of store/toilet accommodation between two ranges comprising large garages. Exterior: Single-storey, flat-roofed structure in the same style as Asset 160 (q.v.). Interior: Not inspected.

Significant features: None

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Neutral

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery. Aesthetic Robust and unpretentious functional building.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

52

Asset 163 - Stores & Toilets

Asset 164 Vehicle Washdown Area

Asset 164 - Vehicle Washdown Area

Key plan

Vehicle washdown area

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Vehicle washdown area Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4824 5378 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Open space between two ranges comprising large garages. Exterior: Open space with vehicle washdown facilities. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Significance:
Neutral

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

53

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 166 Garages

Key plan

Covered vehicle park

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Garages Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4814 5383 Designation: None Date: 1989-92; exterior reconfigured and re-clad 2008 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Covered vehicle parking for 6 vehicles. The building underwent major refurbishment in 2008. It was previously just a covered parking area. The refurbishment included complete recladding to form an enclosed structure with doors to each bay. Exterior: Six bays each with large garage door containing three oval windows. Pitched roof of preformed metal sheeting.

Interior: Vehicle bays Significant features: None

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Neutral

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Robust and unpretentious functional building. Considered to be of neutral significance on account of its colour scheme and the fact that it is single storey.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

54

Asset 166 Garages

Asset 167 Vehicle Brake Tester

Asset 167 - Vehicle Brake Tester

Key plan

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Vehicle brake tester Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4818 5384 Designation: None Date: Late 20th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. 20th century installation in the MT area to support the maintenance and repair of vehicles. Exterior: Functional structure with no architectural merit. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
This is a wholly utilitarian modern structure and visually intrusive.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Alan Baxter

Asset 174 Gym

Image

Key plan

The gym entrance

All facilities are accessed via a staircase

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Gymnasium Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4826 5373 Designation: None Date: 1989-92 Architect: Derek Montefiore and Anthony J. Moore, MHM Architects, Covent Garden, London Sources: Western Morning News, 28th May 1992 Description: Rectangular plan with small entrance lobby extending forwards to north. Gymnasium built at south end of the MTA annexe with 1989-92 curtain wall to east returning round the south end. The west side is terraced into the ground. Exterior: Pitched glass roof to entrance lobby which extends forward over southern bays of Asset 162 (q.v.). Barrel-vaulted glass roof to main gymnasium.

Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Neutral

Access Issues
This is a modern building, although constructed such that all facilities are accessed via a staircase down from the entrance at ground level. There is a small stepped threshold at the entry point. Rehabilitation of injured personnel is undertaken here and the Rehabilitation assessment office is down one flight of stairs. On the next level down is a rehabilitation gym and exercise area. Down a further level is the main gym, weights room and sports hall. There is a proposal underway to provide all of these facilities at ground level in Building 162 adjacent. This would eliminate the need to negotiate steps to access all of the equipment and services.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Easily identified as one of a group of new buildings and additions to buildings erected in 1989-92 when the site was comprehensively refurbished. Historical The 1989-92 work was designed to provide more up-to-date accommodation and facilities for 29 Commando Light Regiment Royal Artillery Aesthetic The barrel-vaulted glass roof provides visual interest

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

56

Asset 174 Gym

Asset 175 TA1 Training Wing

Asset 175 TA1 Training Wing

Key plan

Main entrance from west

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Training Wing Date of inspection: 10th February 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4811 5400 Designation: None Date: 1917 Architect: T. Rogers Kitsell. His design superseded a 1913 plan by Southcombe Parker of Plymouth. Sources: 1917 Kitsell plans and elevations on display in HQ building (Asset 131 q.v.). Description: Large building made up of three main blocks facing W and built down a slope to the north. Neo-classical style. Two storeys. Square porch tower in centre with 4-bay ranges each side. N range breaks forward from porch and S range at lower level. Front doorway to stairhall and large classrooms and offices at first floor level. To the rear E, a service block and to the S a 20th century extension. Exterior: Flemish bond red brick with some Portland stone dressings.

S rear block in stretcher bond. Slate roofs with earthenware ridge tiles. W front: Central porch rises tower-like with clasping buttresses and parapet over corbelled cornice. Limestone platband at first floor level. Large entry up steps to first floor level of lower N range. The entrance has a graduated segmental arch head, with projecting limestone keystone. Limestone springers and red brick voussoirs alternating with upended black brick, red brick canted jambs on a Portland plinth. Battered brick projections to either side of the entrance with limestone detailing. Contains a double 6-panel door and overlight. Above, a 2-light casement in a similar opening to doorway but without black brick detail. Limestone apron below window descends below platband and interrupted by scrolled band. N & S ranges in same style with first floor platband and parapet over corbelled cornice. Ground floor level banded with recessed courses in black brick. S range has regular 4-window front. Semi-circular ground floor windows (now blocked) with limestone keystones and the banding diverted into the voussoirs. First floor windows have tall narrow openings with segmental arch heads (recessed) and keystones. They contain simple timber mullion-and-transom frames with glazing bars and casements. Hipped roof. N range gable-ended in same style, but has prominent projecting chimneystack and 3 windows. Roundheaded ground floor windows taller and narrower than those to S, and first floor ones similar.

N end wall: Same style as W. Front two ground floor windows in style of first floor windows but with segmental arch heads containing mullion-and-transom frames. First floor has large, Venetian window of Portland limestone with pilaster columns, and containing casements with glazing bars. S end wall in same style. Contains one large window with glazing bars at first floor. Rear similar but plainer. Windows often metal with flat brick voussoirs and projecting limestone keystone or semicircular heads with keystone. Interior: Although refurbished in late 20th century original layout remains. Original open well stair with moulded ramped handrail and solid sides. No ornamentation. Significant Features: Part of Edwardian group with the Offices (Asset 176 q.v.) in a Conservation Area.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Significance:
Some

Aesthetic Designed to be sympathetic in style to the baroque Citadel gateway. The red brick is in striking contrast to the grey limestone of most of the Citadel buildings including the barrack block known to be designed by T. Rogers Kitsell.

Justification of significance:
Evidential The building is part of a pair which illustrate the scale of activities at the Citadel in World War I and the relationship between the TA and troops garrisoned inside the Citadel. Historical Association with the Territorial Army. Local units were mobilised here after the outbreak of World War I. The TA completed the Citadel garrison (Woodward, 1987, 84). Association with T. Rogers Kitsell, known to have been involved with the design of the big barrack block inside the Citadel and likely to have been responsible for all the late Victorian/early Edwardian buildings there.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

This building is used for training of full-time and territorial military personnel, with no public access. There is the possibility of level access on the upper floor to the east end, south facing elevation, although this accesses directly into a lecture room. Internally there are three principal levels, with stepped access between. There are no accessible wc facilities.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

58

Asset 175 TA1 Training Wing

Access Issues

Asset 176 TA2 Training Wing

Asset 176 TA2 Training Wing

Key plan

Offices from east

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Offices Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4810 5392 Designation: None Date: 26th October 1912 on date plaque; 20th century extension. Architect: T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: 1917 Kitsell plans and elevations on display in HQ building (Asset 131 q.v.). Description: Built as Territorial Army HQ. A square-plan, double-depth building, two storeys high in neo-classical style. To the rear (E) there is a single-storey 20th century extension. To the N a 20th century projecting 2-storey section links to Asset 177, the Cottage (q.v.).

Exterior: Red brick (Flemish bond) with Portland limestone details and dressings. Slate roof. Limestone plat bands at ground and first floor window levels around all 1912 elevations. W front: Symmetrical, 3-bays wide with centre bay occupied by projecting 2-storey castellated porch containing the dramatic main entrance in central 2-storey tower projection. Round-headed doorway with projecting limestone keystone and block voussoirs interrupting a moulding carried round the head, then breaking to horizontal over rectangular side lights. Panelled jambs down to an ashlar plinth. This is framed by bold Corinthian pilasters which support a pulvinated frieze and moulded entablature. Inscribed plaques in top corners. Doorway now contains late 20th century double doors each with 6 fielded panels with fanlight above. Fixed windows in sidelights. First floor is red brick with limestone ashlar quoins up to the parapet, which rises merlonlike in the corners and in the centre. The coping projects with bold soffit mouldings. The corner upstands include ramps whilst the centre has a semicircular head above a carved crown and the royal arms in a plaque dated 1912. First floor 3-light window in the form of a shallow oriel with flat limestone mullions and contains sash windows with glazing bars. In the single bay either side of porch the centre of the wall breaks forward very slightly to contain paired 6/6-pane sashes in limestone frames including a plain flat central mullion. Recessed frames interrupted by two projecting blocks each side. Between the

windows is an ornamental panel comprising a bolection moulded rectangular frame with extruded corners containing rosettes. The panel itself is plain brick. Boarded eaves and hipped roof. S return in same style as W front: single light windows (first and ground) to W. At E end a projecting bay rising to a curvilinear gable with limestone coping and central ball finial. It contains paired sashes at ground and first floor levels. N wall has similar projection and each floor contains paired sashes. Late 20th century single-storey extension has a parapet wall, black brick plinth and quartz pea gravel finish stone plat band. Contains 20th century windows and double door to E. To N, a basement with two semicircular arch head openings springing from limestone ashlar blocks. Flat-roofed round store on the NE corner. Interior: Refurbished in 20th century but basics of original layout remain. Stair is original. Dog leg with open string. Straight wrought iron balusters with scroll and flattened oval between. Scrolled detail to newel post. Flat, moulded handrail. Significant Features: Part of Edwardian group with the Training Wing (Asset 175 q.v.) in a Conservation Area.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Stairs leading to various offices

Significance:
Some significance

Aesthetic Designed to be sympathetic in style to the baroque Citadel gateway. The red brick is in striking contrast to the grey limestone of most of the Citadel buildings including the barrack block known to be designed by T. Rogers Kitsell.

Justification of significance:
Evidential The building is part of a pair which illustrate the scale of activities at the Citadel in World War I and the relationship between the TA and troops garrisoned inside the Citadel. Historical Association with the Territorial Army. Local units were mobilised here after the outbreak of World War I. The TA completed the Citadel garrison (Woodward, 1987, 84). Association with T. Rogers Kitsell, known to have been involved with the design of the big barrack block inside the Citadel and likely to have been responsible for all the late Victorian/early Edwardian buildings there.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
This building is now used as offices, with the ground floor occupied by civilian facilities management personnel. There is no requirement for public access into the facility. The main entrance is approached via a stepped threshold with various offices leading from the lobby area. Internally there are no accessible wc facilities. Due to the layout of the building there is limited potential for adaptation.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

60

Asset 176 TA2 Training Wing

Asset 177 Welfare Facilities

Asset 177 Welfare Facilities

Key plan

The cottage

The sites topography makes access improvements difficult

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Cottage Date of inspection: 10th February 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4811 5399 Designation: None Date: 20th century Architect: Unknown Sources: None Description: A small 2-storey cottage attached to Asset 176 (q.v.). Red brick (stretcher bond). Gable-ended block to rear on N-S axis and small 2-storey hipped roof extension to front. Slate roof. Exterior: W: 20th century door to S with simple porch on scrolled brackets. 3-light window with glazing bars to ground floor. 4-light window at first floor. E: steps up to 20th century back door, part glazed. 2-light first floor window. N: 2-light first floor window and 3-light ground floor window.

Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Access Issues
This building is used as the Welfare Office for service personnel and their dependants. As a result there are occasional visits by families with young children and pushchairs etc. Adaptations should be undertaken to improve access for these regular visits, although due to the topography of the site any access improvements will be limited in nature. The main entrance is accessed via a stepped threshold with an internal layout on domestic scale.

Significance:
Neutral

Justification of significance:
The stretcher bond indicates that this is a post-Kitsell rebuilding.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 178 Statue of George II


Historical The donation of the statue by an individual commander reflects a sense of possession of the site by its users. This is not the only surviving lead statue of George II. There is a gilded one in St. Helier on Jersey. This is an early statue of the king, and predates his leading troops into battle. Aesthetic The statue has modest aesthetic value, but its existence is an ornament to the otherwise institutional interior of the Citadel and provides a particular sense of historic importance.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Key plan George II statue

Last Quadrennial Inspection: 16th December 2008 Condition Category: 1 Good

Maintenance Responsibility: English Heritage Current use: Sculpture ornamenting the interior of the Citadel Date of inspection: 11th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4803 5382 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 1728, repaired after bomb damage of 1941. Architect: Sources: Woodward, F W, Citadel, 1987, 99-100 Description: A lead statue of George II in the dress of a Roman emperor sited outside the Officers Mess. Woodward records that this was erected in 1728 by Robert Pitt at the expense of Captain Louis Dufour, who commanded one of the independent companies of invalids based at the Citadel. Granite and freestone steps and plinth. Lead inscription panels with arms are attached to two sides of the plinth. A dedication in English on the pedestal includes all the titles of the Governor. Two Latin inscriptions on stone plaques are now (2009) displayed in the Officers Mess. Woodward states that it was erected

originally in the middle of the parade ground but in 1898 it was described as having been re-erected in the centre of the quadrangle from the site of what was then the new Officers Mess block. It is said to have been moved in front of the Officers Mess in 1903. In 1941 a stick of bombs landed close by and severed the right arm of the statue. The statue was taken down and kept in a casemate for the rest of the war but was restored afterwards. The statue stands in an area defined by chains hanging from bollards. These include re-used late 17th century granite pinnacles in the form of obelisks. The origin of these pinnacles is unknown, perhaps they came from the demolished outer gateway on the north side of the Citadel.

No works carried out for some considerable time. Summary of Finishing and General Soundness: The elevations in total are in good condition. There are some minor areas of erosion and weathering of stone together with limited areas of failure to the mortar pointing. There is also a comparatively small amount of unsympathetic mortar repairs. However, this is not considered to be much more than cosmetic at this stage. There is evidence of rust to the armature of the statue and the lead cladding may be considerably reduced in thickness. This could lead to further deterioration if not addressed as lead statues eventually collapse if the armature is not looked after.

Significance:
Highly significant

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Evidential In a general sense the presence of the statue reflects the relationship of the military to the crown. The rendition of the King as a Roman Emperor is one example of an 18th century classical fashion.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

62

Asset 178 Sculpture ornamenting the interior of the Citadel.

Asset 179 MT Sentry Post

Image

Asset 179 MT Sentry Post

Key plan

Portacabin acting as sentry post

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: MT Sentry Post Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4813 5394 Designation: None Date: Late 20th century Architect: None Sources: Description: Small portacabin which replaces Asset 179, a larger sentry post. Exterior: Portacabin Interior: Portacabin Significant features: None

Significance:
Detracts from significance.

Justification of significance:
This is a temporary building that reduces the character and quality of the site.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Key plan

207-216 casemates

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Storage and Office Accommodation Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: Centre at approx SX 481 15373 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Planned in 1667-75 but not completed until 1750s. 1815 repairs, with Seyssel Asphalt commemorated in a plaque on the front wall of Guard Room (Asset 101q.v.) to provide accommodation for 321 men, a guard room and artillery store. 1845 drawings of intended repair includes plan of casemates under the Cumberland Battery and document recording the repairs of 35 casemates to provide accommodation for 305 men (WO 55/806). Late 19th century modernisations (with alternative uses listed on maps). 1989-92 repaired and modernised. Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: Woodward, Citadel, 1987,45, 68; WO 55/806; Exeter

Museums Archaeological Field Unit, Archaeological Survey of Casemates 201-216, 1994; Report No. 94.25 & 1995, Report No.95.28 Description: Designed as barracks by de Gomme. Generally of two types: a stone-vaulted rectangular room with rubblestone walls, a thinner masonry front wall with brick arch on inside face. Corner casemates have stone vaulted ceilings supported by central pier, thicker front walls and no brick arch. A couple of casemates have loopholes in outer wall e.g. 204 & 221. Standard casemates e.g. 201-216, have a central doorway in inner wall flanked by a window each side. Others are less regular and with 20th century alterations to exterior. Former 1754 southwest sally port (adjacent to No.225) blocked since 1989-92. This gave access to cover port and stairs to lower Ligoniers battery. Exterior: Windows and doorways have flat granite lintels grooved and mortared to appear as voussoirs, and granite dressings. 19th century plank doors usually with overlights. 20th century doors without. Typical 2-light 6/6-pane casements, some smaller, some with iron grilles on the outside. Ventilation grilles to each casement in inner wall, usually under window. Flues for inserted fireplaces on the parapet. Exterior to southwest sally port door is constructed from

Portland limestone ashlar. Inner arch is round-headed springing from plain rectangular blocks on tapering columns down to rectangular plinths. There is a projecting keystone. Simple moulded entablature with a curved pediment rising to a central flat capped finial. Woodward (1987) describes this doorway as having a grotesque lions head over it. Interior: Some casemates have adjoining rooms, with or without interconnecting doors. Fixtures and fittings include early-mid18th century cleats for small firearms, lantern brackets (later) and racking from c.1860s. Corner fireplaces probably introduced to most casemates in 1750s, adapted again in 1840s. Self-ventilating grates introduced in late 19th century and gas fires in 20th century. 20th century modernisation includes new ceilings introduced to many and some suspended timber floors. Significant features: Early fittings and form.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

64

Assets 201-233 Casemates Baths Bastion to Prince Henrys Demi Bastion

Assets 201-233 Casemates Baths Bastion to Prince Henrys Demi-Bastion

Assets 201-233 Casemates Baths Bastion to Prince Henrys Demi Bastion

Significance:
Highly significant

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
General Comments on Casemates Externally: Generally, the external walls are showing signs of damp staining throughout. In several areas, the pointing to the stonework has deteriorated and in some cases plant growth is evident. The capping to the top of the wall above the entrances to the casemates is becoming loose in several locations. The cast iron rainwater hoppers and downpipes are showing signs of corrosion, particularly around the joints. Painted timber windows and frames and painted timber doors are all showing signs of deterioration and in some cases, rot has set in.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Material evidence of the accommodation for soldiers and its evolution over time. Historical Part of the 17th century design of the Citadel, if not built until later. Aesthetic Solidly built utilitarian structures intimately tied in with the evolution of the fortress.

Internally: The casemates are being occupied for a variety of uses such as storage areas and offices. In one instance a casemate is being used as the Magazine. In most cases, the casemates appear to have suffered from limited cyclical maintenance. Many of the casemates have been lined internally with plasterboard and suspended ceilings. The condition of the walls and roofs behind the linings is believed to be in a poor state decoratively due to damp penetration. Because of ongoing problems with damp, the casemates would benefit from the removal of internal linings and suspended ceilings. Other casemates are still in their original condition with stone and brick walls with arched brick or stone ceilings, generally in a fair condition but in some cases are in a very poor decorative order with mould and plant growth, water ingress and structural cracking. The worst affected casemates are in the southwestern corner of the site and are numbered 234-238.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Assets 234-238 in King Charles Curtain

Key plan

234-238 west casemates

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Stores/disused Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: Centre at SX 4796 5381 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 1793-1815 Architect: Sources: NMR No. 26245, 1844 plan and 1901 plan WO 78/2976; Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 68 Description: Six open-fronted stores or rooms below ramparts. Some of the stores could have been constructed as expense magazines. Four casemates with large openings of varying sizes under semicircular arch heads to east and two casemates with central door and a window each side to the west. They could be the urinals and ashpits referred to on the 1844 plan.

Exterior: Limestone rubble with pecked and tooled Plymouth limestone voussoirs and dressings. All openings have semicircular arch heads apart from the two narrow windows flanking the door of casemate 238, which have segmental arch heads. Interior: Barrel vaulted in brick. Plymouth limestone band under arch springing. Significant features: Exterior appearance.

Aesthetic Solidly built utilitarian structures intimately tied in with the evolution of the fortress.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
See Asset 201-233, General Comments on Casemates.

Significance:
Highly significant

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Material evidence of the accommodation for troops on the site, a particularly interesting feature of the Plymouth Citadel. Historically Historically part of de Gommes original design, even if not completed in the 17th century.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

66

Assets 234-238 in King Charles Curtain

Asset 239-244 Stores/Disused

Asset 239-244 Stores/disused

Key plan

241-244 north casemates

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Stores/disused Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: Centre at SX 4793 5387 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 1793-1815 Architect: Sources: Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 68; Exeter Archaeology Report No. 01.54, 2001, 3, Figs. 9 & 10 Description: Six rooms or stores within the rampart of Prince Georges Curtain. It is possible that three of them are expense magazines built in the early 19th century and converted later to WCs and /or a petrol store. Asset 239, which is the most southerly in this section, has a tall and narrow doorway without flanking windows, which may have given access to a water tank housed in the rampart and shown on an 1879 plan (2001, Fig. 9). Asset 240 has a central doorway and a narrow window each side, both of which are blocked. This may have

been converted to a petrol store shown on a 1936 plan (2001, Fig. 10). Asset 241 has a wide opening and no windows. Assets 242-244 have side passages leading to an inner room or linked rooms; each lit by a window and formerly heated by a fireplace. They are shown as WCs on the 1936 plan. There is a blocked doorway just to the south of 241. Purpose unknown. Exterior: Limestone rubble with pecked and tooled Plymouth limestone ashlar voussoirs and dressings. Most openings have semicircular arch heads; the narrow windows of 240 have segmental arch heads. Windows to 242-244 are wider with triple lights or louvres. There are four chimneys, one over each window, exiting on the parapet. Interior: Brick walls and barrel vaulted roofs. The side passages to 242244 are narrow with rooms off the south side. 243 has a door to the rear of the passage. The area behind was not accessible. Significant features: None

Justification of significance:
Evidential Rooms/stores that are an integral part of the ramparts. Historical The history of these rooms/stores is not well-understood. They may have had a magazine function. Aesthetic Solidly built utilitarian structures intimately tied in with the evolution of the fortress.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
See Asset 201-233, General Comments on Casemates.

Significance:
Highly significant.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 240A West Sally Port

Key plan

West sally port exterior

Maintenance responsibility: English Heritage Current use: Sally port Date of inspection: 11th November 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4795 5389 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Sally port probably created c.1750, when fortifications outside W rampart improved under General Ligonier. Outer face appears to have been altered in 1880s when outworks removed and a c.1670 gateway from N ravelin entrance was re-erected here. Architect: The architect of the outer gateway of c.1670 was Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: Copeland, G.W., 1949, 12; Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 47, 6365, 75; Scheduled Monument No.26245; Exeter Archaeology report No 01.54, 2001, 3. Description: Simple semicircular arches with ashlar jambs flush with limestone rubble curtain walls and connecting vaulted passageway under ramparts. Outer side has grand c.1670 reused gateway.

Exterior: Inner face: round-arch head of Plymouth limestone voussoirs with tooled edges. Plymouth limestone ashlar jambs with same detailing. Double doors of plank construction hung on large strap hinges on pintels. Outer face: a Portland limestone arch head probably c.1880s. Jambs are irregular blocks of limestone which could be c.1750. Moulded granite string course rises over arch. Doorway contains a pair of ornate wrought iron gates with arrow finials, one with an undecorated crest. To either side, a simple drain spout for egress of water. Framed by a c.1670 reset gateway which was evidently designed for larger carriageway. Portland limestone ashlar very similar to inner arch of main doorway (Asset 340 q.v.) large roundheaded arch (with projecting keystone enriched with a carved crown) and carved Royal Arms arch with initials of Charles II over entablature, flanked by ball finials on square pedestals. Interior: Vaulted passageway. Significant features: Reused ornamental c.1670 gateway surviving architectural fragment from the 17th century outer entrance.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Reflects one example of recycling architectural features and a respect for the past in the development of this site. Historical Part of the first phase design of the Citadel by Sir Bernard de Gomme, and illustrates the development of the Citadel fortifications in the 18th century. Aesthetic The re-cycled gateway is a modest example of Baroque.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Highly significant.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

68

Asset 240A West Sally Port

Asset 245 Store

Image

Asset 245 Unknown

Key plan

Casemate in north rampart wall

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Unknown Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4799 5393 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 19th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Casemate in inner rampart wall. Exterior: Doorway with metal door and a slatted vent to the window. Segmental arch heads to both openings, with tooled and pecked Plymouth limestone voussoirs and dressings. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: None

Significance:
Highly significant

Justification of significance:
Evidential Rooms/stores that are an integral part of the ramparts. Aesthetic Solidly built utilitarian structures intimately tied in with the evolution of the fortress.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
See Asset 201-233, General Comments on Casemates.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

69

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 246 Gas Meter Room & Asset 247 Store

Image

Key plan

Gas meter room

Store room

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: 246 Gas Meter Room, 247 store Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: 246 at SX 4802 5392 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Probably c.1670 Architect: Probably part of Sir Bernard de Gommes original design. Sources: 1830 plan WO 55802. Description: 246, and 247 are to either side of the main north gateway in Prince of Wales Curtain. 246 was formerly a guardroom/ porters lodge, now a gas meter room and is lit by a window within the entry carriageway. 247 in same style but use not known before the 19th century when used as a solitary confinement cell. Exterior: 246 and 247 have small, but prominent, granite doorways using alternately projecting granite voussoirs and jambs. Oval opening above each doorway (louvered 246 and blocked over 247 in Portland stone).

Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: Smarter than usual doorways each side of inside of main entry.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Highly Significant

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of the original gateway arrangements. Historical Part of the first phase design of the Citadel by Sir Bernard de Gomme. Aesthetic In the French Baroque style of the main gate.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

70

Asset 246 Gas Meter Room & Asset 247 unknown function

Asset 248 Underground Huts

Asset 248 Underground huts

Key plan

Underground huts

Maintenance Responsibility: To be agreed Current use: Underground huts Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4801 5374 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Late 19th century Architect: None Sources: 1901 plan WO 78/2976 Description: Partially buried underground double hut below officers enclosure on the Saluting Battery. Steps down to either side with opening into hut facing onto parapet wall. Exterior: Turf roof, brick walls, double doors in centre with moulded granite surround and rebate for doors. Plank doors. Blocked opening (in brick) in west side. Interior: Brick walls and vaulted roof.

Significant features: None

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Some significance

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of the Citadels defences. Historical In place by 1901. Aesthetic Solidly built structures linked with the evolution of the fortress.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

Alan Baxter

Asset 249 Hut

Key plan

Hut exterior

Hut interior

Maintenance responsibility: To be agreed Current use: Hut Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4799 5379 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Late 19th century Architect: None Sources: 1901 plan WO 78/2976 Description: A hut on the ramparts (King Charles curtain), with steps down on the east side to double plank doors. Exterior: Red brick sides, granite surround, granite coping, turf roof, small double doors to east hung on strap hinges and pintles. Interior: Red brick walls and vaulted roof. Significant features: None

Significance:
Some significance

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of the Citadels defences. Historical In place by 1901. Aesthetic Solidly built structure linked with the evolution of the fortress.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

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Asset 249 Underground hut

Asset 250 Greenhouse

Asset 250 Greenhouse

Key plan

Greenhouse

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Greenhouse Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4798 5380 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Masonry upstand along parapet, possibly as part of a store for sidearms (Schedule description), perhaps built 1807-8, when, according to Woodward, a garde-fou (or safety wall was built in the inside of the ramparts.) The 1901 plan shows that the arrangement of 249 and 250 was paired with an identical but handed arrangement to the west, where the rectangular building is indistinctly named PIONEERS. Marked as a greenhouse on the 1941 revision of NMR 234/15 Architect: None Sources: Scheduled Ancient Monument description, Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 68

Description: On rampart wall abutting a rubblestone upstand with Plymouth limestone ashlar quoins and limestone coping to the wall top, with a hard standing immediately to the front, which is the floor of the greenhouse. Exterior: Timber and glass construction with a monopitch roof. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Aesthetic Of no aesthetic value.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Significance:
The wall is of some significance;

Justification of significance:
Evidential An example of a structure associated with arming the Citadel being adapted for a leisure pursuit - although the present decaying 1970s[?] greenhouse is of negligible significance. Historical Illustrates the development of the Citadels defences.

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Asset 340 Main North Entrance

Key plan

North gate exterior

North gate interior detail

Maintenance responsibility: English Heritage Current use: Main north entrance Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4803 5393 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Date plaque of 1670. Architect: Identified in some sources as Sir Thomas Fitch, associate of Sir Christopher Wren, but Andrew Saunders, biographer of Sir Bernard de Gomme, considers de Gomme responsible for the design, which was probably based on a model. Sources: Saunders, 2004, 116; Sandford Mace, 1737, BL 2140 (25); Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 44, 45, 63; Scheduled Monument description; SJ Reed, Archaelogical evaluation of proposed resurfacing works at the main gate, Royal Citadel Plymouth, Exeter Archaelology report 96.67 (October 1997). Description: Portland limestone ashlar two-storey outer entrance and lower inner entrance with vaulted passageway between. It had a

gatehouse with a pitched roof above originally (possibly dismantled in 1745 according to Woodward). In its place a curved roof has been constructed over the barrel vault of the passage below. Originally led to a bridge or bridges over a ditch to a ravelin with further gateways beyond (one now erected over west sally port). These outworks were dismantled in 1888. Exterior: Outer entrance. Two storeys (the upper storey a faade since the removal of the guardroom). The lower stage has a central roundheaded arch with a keystone carved as the Grenville Arms and rising into the entablature. Moulded stringcourse at impost level interrupted each side by two Ionic pilasters with a carving of martial trophies between, above the stringcourse, and a lion mask below. More lions masks above pilasters where the entablature breaks forward. In the upper stage the centre part breaks forward a little with a large carving of martial trophies each side. Central round-headed niche which originally housed a statue of Charles II, but now holds a small pile of cannon balls placed on the original pedestal. Its surround is of facetted blocks enriched with scrolls and garlands. Flanking half-engaged Corinthian columns support the entablature, which contains the date 1670 and an inscribed plaque. Directly above rises a semicircular pediment carved with the Carolingian Royal Arms. The projecting moulded coping is surmounted by a central ball and flanking crown finials. Either side is a carved lion and a unicorn on pedestals.

Inner entrance: Same style as the outer front, but smaller and less decorative. Also must be regarded as a design with the fronts of the flanking casemates (Assets 246 & 247 q.v.). Single-stage gateway. The plain round-headed arch springs from moulded imposts and has projecting keystone surmounted by a carved crown. Moulded stringcourse above supporting a central pediment with angular head, containing the Royal Arms with the initials CR. It and pedestal finials each side have ball finials. It is very similar to the outer gateway to the west sally port (q.v.). The double doors are of plank-and-frame construction with ovolomoulded applied panelling. The eastern leaf contains a small wicketdoor with a grille. The doors are hung on huge wrought-iron strap hinges hung on pintles. The timber double doors were replaced in the current 17th century style by the Ministry of Works in 1949-50 (NMR Historic Plans Room 234/7 existing gates May 1949, 234/8 proposed new gates May 1949, 234/9 proposed wrought-iron grille for gate 9 June 1950, Gateway north elevation December 1953). Interior: Vaulted passageway. The old drawbridge chains are still in place inside the outer entrance. The adjacent guardroom to the west in the rampart wall is lit by a two-light window in the passage, with a granite lintel. The central carriageway was lowered by 250mm in 1997.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

74

Asset 340 Main north entrance

Significant features: Probably the best example of baroque architecture in Devon. Complete with original inner doors and chains to drawbridge.

best-known 17th century military engineer working in England. Documentation lists some of the craftsmen who worked on the gateway: Nicholas Abraham was paid for the Directing and making of the ffront of the stone Gate in the Curtaine (Saunders, 2004, 116-117). Aesthetic The Citadel gateway is the most substantial element of baroque architecture in Devon and is a fine design, showing, as Pevsner notes, the influence of France. The original outer gateway with its painted gates, the north ravelin and drawbridge, the statue of Charles II and the gilding recorded by 17th century commentators had diminished some of its original aesthetic and symbolic qualities. The style of gate influenced the architecture of the group of buildings erected inside the Citadel walls after the Barrack Act of 1890 and the TA buildings adjacent to the ravelin, designed by T. Rogers Kitsell. These employed modest baroque elements out of respect for the antiquity and style of the main gate.

Community The great gateway is now an impressive architectural element at the NE end of the Hoe, which is public open space.

Significance:
Highly Significant

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential The principal gateway, defensive and facing the town, is material evidence that the prime purpose of the Citadel was the control of a town which had supported Parliament and not the Crown in the Civil War. Historical The gateway is the major ornamental architectural feature of Sir Bernard de Gommes Citadel and a major work in the opus of the

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Asset 340 Main north entrance

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Alan Baxter

Asset 344 Sentry Box

Key plan

Main gate sentry box

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Sentry box Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4030 5394 Designation: None Date: 20th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Timber sentry box, with opening to east. Exterior: Of plank construction, with flat roof. Triangular-headed doorway with projecting hood and brattished timber cornice. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Significance:
Neutral

Justification of significance:
This is an unobtrusive utilitarian shelter for the soldier guarding the main entrance to the Citadel.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

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Asset 344 Sentry box

Asset 380 Ramparts

Asset 380 Ramparts

King Charles Bastion

Maintenance responsibility: English Heritage (Casemates separately described MoD). Ordnance Royal Armouries leased to Unit Current use: Ramparts Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: Circuit around citadel roughly centred at SX 4030 5386 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 1667-77. Parts of the scheme were not completed until 18th century. Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: Monument description; Woodward, Citadel, 1987; Sandford Mace, 1737, BL 2140 (25). Description: A wide earth and stone-revetted rampart to the rear of the curtain wall with sloping inclines for access from within the Citadel. It has a retaining wall with parapet or garde fou (added in the 1807-8; Woodward, Citadel, 1987, 68) on inner side. 18th century

casemates (planned in 17th century) are built within the rampart to the S, with a smaller number of 19th century casemates to W and N. Pierced by sally ports. Embrasures have been added, changed or blocked between the 17th century and 20th century. Asset 108 (Barracks q.v.) was built on top of the rampart to the E between 189799. The rampart has been removed from within the NE bastion (Prince Charles). Exterior: Inner retaining wall and parapet constructed from limestone rubble with pitched coping. The parapet includes several rectangular masonry upstands with limestone coping (some with recessed brick bands to take the roof) with granite and concrete platforms immediately to the front. The scheduling description suggests that they were the back of sheds used for storage of sidearms. One, Asset 250 (q.v.) is now a greenhouse. The top of the rampart is finished with a combination of turf and tarmacadamed walkways, with a drain constructed from granite sets alongside. The gun platforms to behind the embrasures in the outer wall (Asset 100 q.v.) are granite-paved and slope towards the curtain wall. There have low ramped retaining rubblestone walls to either side of each gun platform. The Saluting Battery is heavily paved in granite. These and King Charles Bastion also include the remains of the tracks mounted on granite for guns which could be swung through 180 degrees. Prince Henrys demi-bastion contains a gun platform with the most complete example of this type.

On the SW corner there are semi-underground huts/ small magazines to the inner side of the ramparts (Assets 248 & 249 q.v., and one without an asset number). Interior: The interior face of the rampart along the S side includes the doors and windows of casemates and also several to W and N. There are two large buttresses along the wall on the inner side of Queens Battery. Significant features: Important component of the Citadel and includes a range of historic ordnance (owned and recorded by the Royal Armouries).

Significance:
Highly Significant

Justification of significance:
Evidential The surviving ramparts are part of the design of de Gommes bastioned fort. Historical The earth ramparts are an integral part of the first phase design of the

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Alan Baxter

Prince Georges Bastion

Saluting battery

Saluting battery

Citadel by Sir Bernard de Gomme. The Sandford Mace engraving of 1737 shows substantial internal ramps for moving guns and troops up onto the ramparts. In 1888 the outer ramparts were acquired by the City and partly demolished to extend the Hoe. Aesthetic The ramparts are impressive earth architecture. Community The acquisition and demolition of parts of the outer ramparts by Plymouth City in 1888 was a function of the development of Plymouth in the late 18th century when the Hoe was developed and beautified as a municipal park.

however, most has been of a high cement content and in some cases smeared onto the face of the stonework. Also the interior of the vast majority of casemates have been line either with a render or dry lined with suspended ceilings. The exposure of the site on high ground facing the open sea means that a substantial amount of water enters the fabric during each year. The structure generally accommodates the moisture, however, there is a visual impact and probably causes premature failure of the pointing mortar The wall tops below the soft capping are of concern as these areas are part covered and close inspection was not possible within the terms of the survey. These need to be closely inspected and any loose stonework rebuilt. The amount of water entering into the mass of the rampart is of concern as this often impacts on the face of the walls as well as the casemates. This not only causes differential staining to the stonework it also washes out lime from the core causing further staining and possibly weakening the structure. Although the dampness in the casemates is largely held back by render or hidden by dry lining the external walls which are uncovered internally show signs of dampness causing the paint finish to fail. The main concerns relate to the tops of the external walls to the rampart and curtain walls, especially immediately below the areas of soft capping. Access and close inspection is required and any loose

stonework rebuilt and defective mortar pointing renewed. There are other areas of loose stonework to wall heads and immediately below embrasures which have been identified and also need urgent attention. Loose, cracked and eroded mortar pointing is also of concern especially to the eastern wall faces of the Prince of Wales Bastion, Prince Edwards Battery and Prince Henrys Demi Bastion. Vegetation growth is becoming established on most wall faces, however those areas most at risk are the south and east faces of Prince Henrys Demi Bastion, plus the Pipers Platform north and south walls. Vertical cracks to the inner face of the northern end of Prince Georges Curtain and east of the steps at the centre of the Old Saluting Battery should also be dealt with in the very near future to reduce the rate of deterioration. Of less urgency is the need to obtain a better understanding of the rate of deterioration to both the inner and outer walls caused by water ingress and subsequent exiting through the wall faces and into the front walls of the casemates. A rolling programme of repairs needs to be established urgently to maintain and keep this monument in good repair whilst significantly reducing the risks of falling stonework and pointing.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
General Comments on Citadel Wall and Ramparts The ramparts are massive and generally well founded onto natural bed rock which rises up from the eastern end of the Hoe. Repairs have been carried out over the years, however, it is not certain how much of this has been undertaken under the direction of the MoD or English Heritage. Large areas of repointing have been undertaken in the past,

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

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Asset 380 Ramparts

Asset 501 Parade Ground

Asset 501 Parade Ground

Key plan

Parade ground; helicopter landing pad in foreground

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Parade ground; helicopter landing pad Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4030 5383 Designation: None but ground below is a Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Sources: None Description: The parade ground has existed on this site since the creation of the Cidadel in the late 17th century. Now covered in tarmac, the central section is marked out as a helicopter landing pad.

Significance:
Highly significant

Justification of significance:
The parade ground is a highly significant space, both because of its intrinsic symbolic and commemorative value, but also because it forms the setting to the principal faades of the listed buildings which surround it and is on such an impressive scale. As the venue for the hugely popular Music of the Night event, the parade ground also has some communal value. The helicopter landing pad marking is an ephemeral feature of the modern military presence on an historic site.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Alan Baxter

Assets 606 & 608 LPG and Fuel Can Stores

Key plan

LPG store

Fuel can store

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: LPG store (606); Fuel can store (608) Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4818 5381 (606); SX 4818 5381 (608) Designation: None Date: Late 20th century Architect: None Sources: None Description: Located outside the walls of the 17th century Citadel. Steel mesh storage cages. Exterior: Functional structures with no architectural merit. Interior: N/A Significant features: None

Significance:
Detract from significance.

Justification of significance:
These are wholly utilitarian modern structures and are visually intrusive.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

80

Assets 606 & 608 - LPG and Fuel Can Stores

East Sally Port

East Sally Port

Key plan

Maintenance responsibility: English Heritage Current use: Sally port to Military Transport and Ordnance Yard. Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4812 5390 Designation: Scheduled Ancient monument (No. 26245) Date: c.1897-99 Architect: Probably T. Rogers Kitsell Sources: 1901 plan WO 78/2976; Exeter Archaeology, Report No 99.53, 1999, The Builder, 30 July 1898. Description: Inserted into the limestone rubble of south wall of Prince of Wales Bastion when Asset 108 (q.v) was built and the older east sally port blocked. On inner side (N), ramp edged by brick walls and iron railings leads to sally port. Exterior: Inner and outer arches have round heads with Plymouth limestone voussoirs, pecked and tooled to one edge. Jambs have same detailing. To S, doorway stands proud of rampart wall with

limestone weathering. Plank and frame door held on strap hinges with crown finials. Interior: Brick vault to passageway. Significant features: Part of the building of the Kitsell barrack block.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Significance:
Significant as part of the design of the Kitsell barrack block.

Justification of significance:
Evidential This is essentially a late 19th century archaeological marker of the older sally port that was blocked when the barracks was built. Historical This is an historical feature of the site, illustrating Kitsells wish to respect the antiquity of the Citadel, as he describes in his article in The Builder. Aesthetic The sally port is deliberately antique in style.

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Alan Baxter

South Sally Port

Key plan

Sally port interior

Sally port exterior

Maintenance responsibility: English Hertitage Current use: Sally port Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4811 5370 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 1667-75 Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: 1677 J. R. plan (B.L Add 5415.E) Description: Under Cumberland battery, originally to lower Fort. Shown extant on the 1677 plan Exterior: Inner entrance: Square-head with inner round-headed arch. Spandrels carved with stylized flowers. Square and round arches hollow-chamfered down to large stop, stepped on one side and scooped on other, above moulded plinth. Hood mould with square label stops carved with 8-petalled flowers. Flat surface under hood carved with 8-petalled flower design. Double stud and panel doors.

Outer entrance: as inner, but with worn stops and fleur de lis carvings on label stops. Interior: Not inspected. Guardroom in adjoining casemate. Significant features: Carved granite doorframes.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Significance:
Highly significant.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of the first phase of the Citadel by Sir Bernard de Gomme. Historical One of a set of sally ports. Aesthetic Conservative style for the date.

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Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

82

South Sally Port

Queens Battery / Southeast Sally Port


Southeast Sally Port

Queens Battery

Southeast Sally Port

Key plan

Outer doorway

Inner doorway

Maintenance responsibility: English Heritage Current use: Sally port. Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 481 65373 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Planned 1667-75 and modified c.1753-4 Architect: Sir Bernard de Gomme Sources: Woodward 1987, 66; 1677 plan J.R (B.L Add 5415.E). Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit, Archaeological Survey of Casemates 201-216, 1994. Description: Originally linked Citadel to lower fort, and the 1677 plan shows the outer doorway in the angle of the tenaille. In c.1753-4, according to Woodward, the sally port was modified to give access to the battery platform. Exterior: Inner entrance: 17th century granite Tudor with carved spandrels, hoodmould and label stops carved with fleurons. Contains

20th century timber gate. Outer entrance: similar to inner entrance. There is a probably 18th century carved lions head above. Interior: Vaulted passageway with doorways off adjacent casemates. Loops from casemates into passage blocked with bricks. Significant features: 17th century granite doorways.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Significance:
Highly significant

Justification of significance:
Evidential Part of the first phase of the Citadel by Sir Bernard de Gomme. Historical One of a set of sally ports, the modification of this one illustrates the development of the Citadel in the 18th century. Aesthetic Conservative style for the date.

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Alan Baxter

Southwest Sally Port

Key plan

Outer doorway

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Blocked access to Ligoniers Battery. Date of inspection: 25th November 2009 OS grid reference: SX 4808 5372 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Created 1753-5 Architect: Sources: Woodward 1987, 64-6; Adams plan of 1813 WO.78/1728. Description: Access to Ligoniers Battery which was designed to strengthen the western defences. The passageway, comprising a stairway through a de Gomme casemate (Asset 225) gave access to cover port and stairs to lower Ligoniers Battery. The former sally port has been blocked since 1989-92. Exterior: Exterior to southwest sally port door is constructed from Portland limestone ashlar. Inner arch is round-headed springing from plain rectangular blocks on tapering columns down to rectangular

plinths. There is a projecting keystone. Simple moulded entablature with a curved pediment rising to a central flat capped finial. Woodward (1987) describes this doorway as having a grotesque lions head over it. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: Outer doorway.

Aesthetic The arch onto the battery displays contemporary 18th century decoration.

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Significance:
Highly significant

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Material evidence of the evolution of the Citadel defenses under threat of war. Historical The major surviving element of Ligoniers mid-18th century improvements to the defences of the Citadel.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

84

Southwest Sally Port

17th Century Finials

17th Century Finials

Key plan

Example of a finial

Maintenance responsibility: To be agreed Current use: Used as supports for a chain fence around cannon in front of Officers Mess. Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4040 5380 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: 1667-75 Architect: Unknown Sources: None Description: Granite finials, probably from 17th century buildings within the Citadel. Exterior: One is in the form of a turned baluster. The others are clearly finials tapering towards the top, with crudely crocketted corners. Interior: Significant features:

Significance:
Some significance

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Material evidence of probably 17th century buildings on the site. Historical The origin of these finials is unknown. They might have come from the outer north gateway, demolished in the 1880s, or perhaps from the chapel before it was rebuilt in 1844. Aesthetic These are ornamental details from superior 17th century buildings.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Alan Baxter

Sundial

Key plan

Sundial

Maintenance Responsibility: MoD Current use: Ornamental Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4040 5380 Designation: None Date: Face of sundial 1803, stonework could be earlier. Architect: None Sources: None Description: Sundial set on pedestal. Exterior: Stone bulbous pedestal with moulded bowl-shaped head Brass plaque and gnomon. Inscription includes date and Tempus Fugit. Interior: None Significant features: Appearance

Significance:
Some significance

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential Material evidence of the non-military life on the site. Historical Historical significance is difficult to assess without knowing who had the sundial erected. Aesthetic This is an attractive object made more so by its military surroundings.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

Alan Baxter

Royal Citadel, Plymouth Gazetteer / November 2010

86

Sundial

Well Head

Well Head

Key plan

Well Head

Maintenance responsibility: MoD Current use: Disused well Date of inspection: 20th January 2010 OS grid reference: SX 4010 5375 Designation: Scheduled Ancient Monument (No. 26245) Date: Datestone of 1675 Architect: None Sources: None Description: Well head against inner rampart wall. Exterior: Granite lintel to opening in inner rampart wall. Rectangular well enclosure just in front of opening constructed from granite blocks and some limestone blocks, with a slab of slate closing the top. Granite coping includes the stubs of iron fittings each side. Interior: Not inspected. Significant features: Datestone

Significance:
Highly significant

General Management Issues:


Building Condition Issues
Asset not subject to Quadrennial Inspections.

Justification of significance:
Evidential An early example of the crucial need for water inside any fortification. It is known that limestone caves exist in the rocky promontory on which the Citadel is built. There are records of extensive underground water tanks. Historical Dated 1675 in convincing 17th century numbers, this appears to be a first phase water supply. Aesthetic Modest aesthetic value.

Access Issues
Access Audit not undertaken.

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Alan Baxter

Alan Baxter
Prepared by Keystone (Jo Cox, John Thorp); Exeter Archaeology (Sandra Turton); Alan Baxter (Lucy Markham, Anthony Hoyte, William FilmerSankey, Gemma Bryant); David Evans; Bailey Partnership (Jeremy Mears); Ambios Ecology (David Fee) Reviewed by James Weeks Drafts Issued March 2010, May 2010, September 2010 Final Report Issued November 2010

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