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Lahore University of Management Sciences

SOC 462 Divided Cities Spring 2013

Instructor Room No. Office Hours Email Telephone Secretary/TA TA Office Hours Course URL (if any)

Nida Kirmani 240, HSS New Wing TBA Nida.kirmani@lums.edu.pk

COURSE BASICS Credit Hours Lecture(s) Recitation/Lab (per week) Tutorial (per week)

4 Nbr of Lec(s) Per Week Nbr of Lec(s) Per Week Nbr of Lec(s) Per Week

Duration Duration Duration

COURSE DESCRIPTION The city has long been the subject of sociological (and more recently anthropological) enquiry as a site of cooperation between multiple groups of people as well as contestation over multiple boundaries related to space, resources, and identity. This course aims to study the city as a site of continuous boundary marking through multiple social processes, in the ways in which space itself is delineated and produced, through every day practices, as well as through exceptional acts of violence. This course will examine the boundaries within the city and the city itself as something that is actively produced by various subjects. This is an interdisciplinary course that will combine sociological, anthropological and geographical approaches to understanding cities. While most of the case studies will be drawn from relatively recent research, we will strive to also understand the evolution of cities in historical context. The first part of the course will provide a theoretical foundation for understanding cities, drawing largely from urban anthropology, geography, and of course sociology. The bulk of the course will be dedicated to examining ethnographies of particular cities and localities in detail. The course will focus heavily on three regions, the United States, where the greatest amount of detailed research on cities has been produced, South America, and Brazil in particular where Rio has been the site of several detailed ethnographies, and finally South Asia, and India and Pakistan in particular, where a growing number of excellent studies are being conducted on the major metropolises. Readings will examine multiple forms of marginalization and boundarymarking within the city including those related to religion, ethnicity/race, class, caste and gender.

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COURSE PREREQUISITE(S) SOC100 Introduction to Sociology ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology COURSE OBJECTIVES Through the lectures, reflection papers, essays, tests, and presentations, students will engage intensively and critically with key theoretical perspectives on development, and a range of historical and contemporary case studies. In terms of the learning goals identified by the department of humanities and social sciences, the course aims to achieve goals 1, 3, and 4 as outlined in the LOA document. Through class participation, presentation, reflection papers, and the essay, students will demonstrate the ability to summarize, analyze, critique, and compare the key concepts, bodies of knowledge, and perspectives used in sociology and political economy. In this case, the focus will be on the concepts and perspectives related to development, as well as the empirical details of the various case studies. (Goal # 1 of LOA) Through the group projects, students will demonstrate their ability to apply the key concepts, methodologies, and perspectives learnt in the course to the Pakistani milieu. They will design a theme-based project and choose the appropriate tools, locations, research strategies, and medium for representation for this purpose in consultation with the instructor. (Goal # 3 of LOA) Through the review essay and the final exam, students will demonstrate the ability to engage with and reflect on arguments in a critical manner, develop their own arguments systematically, and present the comparative and/or critical arguments in the appropriate manner of academic writing. (Goal # 4 of LOA) COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING The course will be comprised of 26 sessions of 100 minutes each. The course will combine lectures with student-led presentations and group discussion. Therefore, attendance and class participation is critical for student learning and performance. Students are also responsible for material covered in class that may not be part of the readings, and for doing the readings on their own. This is a reading intensive course. Students will be assigned an average of 50 pages of reading per session along with optional additional readings. Failure to attend classes will strongly influence class participation and performance in the course. Students are also expected to abide by the appropriate decorum during class attendance and avoid disruptions. From session 6 onwards, two students will co-present a reading related to the city under study during the second half of class. Students will also write one 500-word reflection on one of the assigned readings per week, which will critically reflect on the reading, summarizing its main points as well as pointing to its strengths and weaknesses. Two of these reflections can alternatively focus on one of the films shown throughout the course of the semester. There will be ten reflections in total produced over the course of the semester. Reflections must be submitted as a typed document before the reading concerned is discussed. Late submissions will not be accepted. Finally, the students will produce a final project, which will be based either on primary or secondary research, and which can take the form of 3,000-3,500 word essay or alternately, could be a creative piece employing various types of media (photography, film, art work). The final project should engage meaningfully with issues dealt with throughout the course of the semester. Class participation: 10% Attendance: 5% Presentation on reading: 5% Reading summaries: 50% (5% each x 10) Presentation on Final Project: 5%

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Final project: Grading Scale: A+ 95 and above A 90-94 A85-89 B+ 80-84 B 75-79 B70-74 C+ 65-69 C 60-64 C55-59 D 50-54 Fail Below 50 STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES Attend the lectures and participate in the discussions: You will lose 5% of your total class participation mark for every missed class after 3. Be in class on time. If you are more than ten minutes late in the beginning of class or after the break, or if you leave class before it is over without prior permission from the instructor, you will get an absent for that class. Do the readings: It is essential for you to do all the assigned readings in order to actively participate in group discussions. The starred reading(s) listed for each session is required. Others are supplementary. Turn your cell phones OFF before entering the classroom. Use of cell phones can result in being marked absent. 25%

Course Ethics: The strength of the university depends on academic and personal integrity. Students are expected to abide by the rules of academic and personal honesty. Serious ethical violations include cheating, plagiarism, reuse of essays, improper use of the Internet and electronic services, unauthorized collaboration, alteration of graded essays, forgery, lying, and unfair competition. For more information on ethics, please refer to the student handbook and the plagiarism document distributed by the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. Specific instructions for the essay and the projects will be circulated prior to the submission.

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COURSE OVERVIEW Session 1: Introduction to Understanding the City Low, Setha (1996) The Anthropology of the City: Imagining and Theorizing the City, in Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 25, pp. 383-409. Simmel, Georg, The Stranger and The Metropolis and Mental Life in The Sociology of Georg Simmel, pp. 402-424. (on LMS) Sennett, Richard (2001) A Flexible City of Strangers, in Le Monde Diplomatique, http://mondediplo.com/2001/02/16cities Hansen, Thomas Blom and Oskar Verkaaik (2009) IntroductionUrban Charisma, in Critique of Anthropology, Vol. 29(1), pp. 5-26. Session 2: The Chicago School and the Foundations of Urban Sociology Park, Robert (1936) Human Ecology, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 83-90. Burgess, Ernest (1925) The Growth of the City, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 91-99. Dear, Michael (2005) Los Angeles and the Chicago School: Invitation to a Debate, in Cities and Society, by Nancy Kleniewski (ed.), Malden: Blackwell, pp. 54-71. Wirth, Louis (1938) Urbanism as a Way of Life in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 32-41. Hannerz, Ulf (1980) Chicago Ethnographers, in Exploring the City: Inquiries toward an Urban Anthropology, New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 19-58. Session 3: Geographical Approaches to the City: Space and Place Pacione, Michael (2005) Concepts and Theory in Urban Geography (Chapter Two) in Urban Geography: A Global Perspective, Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 22-44. Cresswell, Tim (2004) Place: A Short Introduction. Malden: Blackwell Publishing. Chapter 2, The Genealogy of Place, pp. 15-51. Session 4: Divided Cities and Gender Massey, Doreen (1994) Space, Place and Gender, in The City Cultures Reader, by Malcolm Miles and Tim Hall with Iain Borden (eds.), London: Routledge, pp. 177-211. Spain, Daphne (2005) Space and Status, in Cities and Society, by Nancy Kleniewski (ed.), Malden: Blackwell, pp. 43-53. Delhi: http://jagori.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/IS-THIS-OUR-CITY.pdf Session 5: Who Controls the City? Foucault, Michel (2010) Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, in The Blackwell City Reader, pp. 221-227. Harvey, David (2003) The Right to the City, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 429-432. Harvey, David (1978) The Urban Process under Capitalism: A Framework for Analysis, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 100-108. Davis, Mike (2005) Fortress LA, in Cities and Society, pp. 467-483. Caldeira, Teresa (1996) Fortified Enclaves: The New Urban Segregation, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 405-413. http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2012/04/do-gated-communities-threaten-society/1737/ http://critical-theory.com/david-harvey-interview-class-struggle-urban-spaces/ Session 6: Segregation, Race/Ethnicity and the City Wacquant, Loic and William Julius Wilson (1989) The Cost of Racial and Class Exclusion in the Inner City, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 182-191.

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Massey, Douglas and Nancy Denton (1993) Segregation and the Making of the Underclass, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 192-201. Olzak, Susan and Joane Nagel (1986), The Immigrant Enclave: Theory and Empirical Examples, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 202-213. Lin, Jan (2005) Community, Ethnicity and Urban Sociology, in Cities and Society, pp. 100-108. Vithayathil, Trina and Gayatri Singh (2012) Spaces of Discrimination, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. XLVII, No. 37, pp. 60-66. Session 7: Globalisation, Cosmopolitanism and the City Massey, Doreen (1994) A Global Sense of Place, in Space, Place and Gender, Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press, pp. 146-156. Sassen, Saskia (1996) Whose City Is It? Globalization and the Formation of New Claims, in The Urban Sociology Reader, pp. 308-315. Appadurai, Arjun (1996) Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, Chapter 9, The Production of Locality pp. 178-199. Smart, Alan and Josephine Smart (2003) Urbanization and the Global Perspective, Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 32, pp. 263-285.

Part Two: The United States Session 8: New York Bourgois, Phillipe (1995) In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chapters Introduction, 1, and 2) Session 9: New York Bourgois, Phillipe (1995) In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chapters 3 and 4) Session 10: Bourgois, Phillipe (1995) In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chapters 5 and 6) Session 11: Film: Do the Right Thing (1989) (14/3) Session 12: Chicago/Paris (26/3) Wacquant, Loic (2008) Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced Marginality, Cambridge: Polity Press. (pp. 1-39 and 257-279) Session 13: Chicago/Paris Wacquant, Loic (2008) Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced Marginality, Cambridge: Polity Press. (pp. 1-39 and 257-279) South America/Caribbean Session 14: Rio Goldstein, Donna (2003) Laughter out of Place: Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Chapters Introduction and 1) Session 15: Rio Goldstein, Donna (2003) Laughter out of Place: Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Chapters 2 and 3) Session 16: Rio

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Goldstein, Donna (2003) Laughter out of Place: Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown, Berkeley: University of California Press. (Chapters 4 and 5) Film: City of God (out of class) Session 17: Kingston Jaffe, Rivke (2012) The Popular Culture of Illegality: Crime and the Politics of Aesthetics in Urban Jamaica, Anthropological Quarterly, Vol. 85(1), pp. 79-102. South Asia Session 18: Bombay Hansen, Thomas Blom. Wages of Violence: Naming and Identity in Postcolonial Bombay. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2002. (Chapters 2 and 4) Session 19: Bombay Hansen, Thomas Blom. Wages of Violence: Naming and Identity in Postcolonial Bombay. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2002. (Chapter 5) Khan, Sameera. Negotiating the Mohalla: Exclusion, Identity and Muslim Women in Mumbai, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 42(17), April 28, 2007, pp. 1527-33. Film: Salaam Bombay (out of class) Session 20: Delhi Kirmani, Nida (2013) Questioning the Muslim Woman: Space, Identity, and Insecurity in an Urban Locality, New Delhi: Routledge. (Chapters 1, 2, and 3) Session 21: Delhi Kirmani, Nida (2013) Questioning the Muslim Woman: Space, Identity, and Insecurity in an Urban Locality, New Delhi: Routledge. (Chapters 4, 5, and 6) Tarlo, Emma (1995) From Victim to Agent: Memories of the Emergency from a Resettlement Colony in Delhi, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 30(46), pp. 2921-2928. Session 22: Karachi Gayer, Laurent (2012) Political Turmoil in Karachi: Production and Reproduction of Ordered Disorder, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. XLVII(31), pp. 76-84. Khan, Nichola (2007) Mobilisation and Political Violence in the Mohajir Community of Karachi, Economic and Political Weekly, pp. 2435-2443. Session 23: Karachi Gayer, Laurent (2013) Karachi: Ordered Disorder and the Struggle for the City, Hurst. (Chapters 5 and 8). Film: Vice Guide to Karachi (out of class) Session 24: Discuss final projects Session 25: Discuss final projects Additional Readings Karachi Gayer, Laurent (2007) Guns, Slums, and Yellow Devils: A Genealogy of Urban Conflicts in Karachi, Pakistan, Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 41(3), pp. 515-544. Khan, Nichola (2007) Mobilisation and Political Violence in the Mohajir Community of Karachi, Economic

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and Political Weekly, pp. 2435-2443. Ali, Kamran (2009) Men and Their Problems, in Comparing Cities: The Middle East and South Asia, pp. 4964. Ring, Laura (2006) Zenana: Everyday Peace in a Karachi Apartment Building, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Ahmadabad Jasani, Rubina. A Potted History of Neighbours and Neighbourliness in Ahmedabad, in The Idea of Gujarat: History, Ethnography and Text by Edward Simpson and Aparna Kapadia (eds.), New Delhi: Orient Blackswan, 2010, pp. 153-167. Kanpur Froystad, Kathinka (2006) Anonymous Encounters: Class Categorisation and Social Distancing in Public Places, in The Meaning of the Local: Politics of Place in Urban India by Geert de Neeve and Henrike Donner (eds.), London: Routledge, pp. 159-181. Hyderabad Verkaaik, Oskar (2004). Migrants and Militants: Fun and urban Violence in Pakistan. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Saudi Arabia Brunn, Stanley (2006) Gate Minds and Gated Lives as Worlds of Exclusion and Fear, GeoJournal, Vol. 66(1/2), pp. 5-13. Glasze, Georg (2006) Segregation and Seclusion: the Case of Compounds for Western Expatriates in Saudi Arabia, GeoJournal, Vol. 66 (1/2), pp. 83-88 Jerusalem Abowd, Thomas (2007) National Boundaries, Colonized Spaces: The Gendered Politics of Residential Life in Contemporary Jerusalem, Anthropological Quarterly, Vol. 80(4), pp. 997-1034. Hasson, Shlomo (2001) Territories and Identities in Jerusalem, in GeoJournal, Vol. 53(3), pp. 311-322. Johannesburg Landman, Karina (2006) Privatising Public Space in Post-Apartheid South African Cities through Neighbourhood Enclosures, GeoJournal, Vol. 66(1/2), pp. 136-146. Durban Hansen, Thomas (2012) Melancholia of Freedom: Social Life in an Indian Township in South Africa, Princeton: Princeton University Press. Durington, Matthew (2006) Race, Space and Place in Suburban Durban: An Ethnographic Assessment of Gated Community Environments and Residents, GeoJournal, Vol, 66(1/2), pp. 147-160. Belfast: Doherty, Paul and Michael Poole (1997) Ethnic Residential Segregation in Belfast, Northern Ireland, 19711991, Geographical Review, Vol. 87, No. 4, pp. 520-536. London: Reed, Adam (2002) City of Details: Interpreting the Personality of London, in Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 8(1), pp. 127-141. Massey, Doreen (2007) World City, Cambridge: Polity Press. Istanbul: Secor, Anna (2004) There is an Istanbul That Belongs to Me: Citizenship, Space and Identity in the City, Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Vol. 94(2), pp. 352-368. Mills, Amy (2005) Narratives and City Landscapes: Cultural Identity in Istanbul, Geographical Review, Vol. 95(3), pp. 441-462. Websites:

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http://urbanculturalstudies.wordpress.com/category/georg-simmel/ http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2010/09/stranger-studies-101-cities-as-interactionmachines/62315/ http://favelissues.com/ http://lsecities.net/media/objects/articles/worlds-set-apart