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Grades 16

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TOOL KIT


For

the Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Program of Studies

!

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TOOL KIT


For the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Program of Studies

Division 1 and Division 2

ALBERTA LEARNING CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA


Alberta. Alberta Learning. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch. Classroom assessment tool kit for the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) program of studies : grades 16. ISBN 0778525317 1. Educational tests and measurements Alberta. 2. Grading and marking (students). 3. Educational evaluation Alberta. I. Title. LB3051.A333 2003 371.26

For further information, contact: Learning and Teaching Resources Branch 44 Capital Blvd 10044 108 St. NW, Suite 800 Edmonton, AB T5J 5E6 Telephone: 7804272984 in Edmonton or toll-free in Alberta by dialing 3100000 Fax: 7804220576

This resource is intended for: Teachers Technology Coordinators Administrators Parents Stakeholders Others 3 3 3

Copyright 2003, the Crown in Right of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Learning. Alberta Learning, 44 Capital Blvd, 10044 108 St. NW, Suite 800, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 5E6. Every effort has been made to provide proper acknowledgement of original sources. If cases are identified where this has not been done, please notify Alberta Learning so appropriate corrective action can be taken. Permission is given by the copyright owner for any person to reproduce this resource, or any part thereof, for educational purposes and on a nonprofit basis, except for thos e parts for which Alberta Learning does not hold copyright .

Acknowledgements
Alberta Learning wishes to acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals:

Alberta Learning
Pat Redhead, Project Chair Bonnie Brooks Joe Friesenhan Raja Panwar Phil Campbell Teddy Moline Denise Stocco Document Production Unit Stakeholder Technology Branch Stakeholder Technology Branch Information and Technology Management Curriculum Branch Learner Assessment Branch Learning and Teaching Resources Branch French Language Services Branch Learning and Teaching Resources Branch

Writing Team
Doug Knight, Project Manager Barry Allen Carol Caulfield Barry Edgar Dave Erickson Elizabeth Fargey Jennifer MacLean Kyla Popik Martina Schmidt Cliff Sosnowski Priscilla Theroux Joni Turville Sandra Unrau Evie Van Scheik Nancy Weber Knight Research and Consulting Services Chinooks Edge School Division No. 73 Parkland School Division No. 70 Edmonton School District No. 7 Peace River School Division No. 10 Red Deer School District No. 104 Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. 7 Foothills School Division No. 38 Science Alberta Charter School Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. 7 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 St. Albert Protestant Separate School District No. 6 Calgary School District No. 19 Wolf Creek School Division No. 72 Edmonton School District No. 7

Revision Team
Robert Hogg, Coordinator Dale Armstrong, Coordinator Sherry Bennett Alanna Cellini Carol French Linda Glasier Bette Gray Donna Griffin Laurie Hawley Gary Heck Sharon Horne Carol Anne Inglis Dean Jarvey Jaime Johansson Daylene Lauman Tanis Marshall Kathy McCabe Anne Mulgrew Robert Smith Priscilla Theroux Joni Turville Ron Tyler Anna Wong Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC) J.D. Armstrong Consulting S.R. Bennett Consulting Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Parkland School Division No. 70 Elk Island Public Schools Regional Division No. 14 Parkland School Division No. 70 Heck Leadership and Consulting Services, Inc. Golden Hills School Division No. 75 Edmonton School District No. 7 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 Integrity Consulting Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Parkland School Division No. 70 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 St. Albert Protestant Separate School District No. 6 Chinooks Edge School Division No. 73 Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education

Table of Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. Guiding Principles ........................................................................................................................ Principle 1: Assessment should be continuous ...................................................................... Principle 2: Assessment should be collaborative .................................................................... Principle 3: Assessment should be comprehensive ................................................................ Principle 4: Assessment should include criteria ...................................................................... Components ................................................................................................................................ Curriculum and Assessment Matrices .................................................................................... ICT Performance Assessments ............................................................................................. Developing Your Own Performance Assessments .................................................................. Criteria for Designing Performance Assessment Tasks ........................................................... Criteria for Designing Rubrics ................................................................................................ Student Self-reflection ........................................................................................................... Sample Student Profile ......................................................................................................... Communicating Student Learning .......................................................................................... Appendices A. Sample English Language Arts Assessment Task ............................................................. Single Rubric Combining ELA and ICT Outcomes ........................................................ Separate Rubrics for ELA and ICT Outcomes .............................................................. Evaluation Tools for ICT Outcome Categories F and P .................................................. Division 1 .................................................................................................................. Division 2 .................................................................................................................. Sample Performance Assessment Tasks and Rubrics for ICT Outcome Category C ......... Division 1 .................................................................................................................. Division 2 .................................................................................................................. 23 26 27 29 30 32 35 35 67 1 7 7 8 8 8 11 11 12 14 17 18 19 21 22

B.

C.

D. E.

Sample Student Self-reflection Tools ................................................................................ 115 Student Profiles .............................................................................................................. 119

Glossary ...................................................................................................................................... 127 References .................................................................................................................................. 129 This tool kit with blackline masters of student assessment tasks, rubrics, worksheets and other assessment tools is also available at <http://www.learning.gov.ab.ca/k_12/curriculum/bysubject/ict/>.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Table of Contents / i 2003

ii / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Introduction
Learning is enhanced when assessment strategies match the learner outcomes and are aligned to instruction assessment is integrated with instruction (unit and lesson planning) assessment relates new concept(s) to previous learning students are involved with their own assessment students get immediate, meaningful feedback students of all ability levels are able to demonstrate what they know and what they can do assessment engages and motivates students.
Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), 2000, p. 2

Teachers play a central role in the assessment and evaluation of student learning. Their authority and responsibility is established in the School Act (RSA 2000) (s18(e)) that states, Teachers regularly evaluate students and periodically report the results of the evaluation to the students, the students parents and the board. Technology is defined as the processes, tools and techniques that alter human activity the employment of tools, machines, materials and processes to do work, produce goods, perform services or carry out other useful activities (Alberta Learning, 20002003, p. 47). The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competencies outlined in the ICT program of studies are basic life skills for a digital world that enable students to function in a knowledge-based economy and an information-rich society. These skills are no longer optional or complementary. They are an essential component of a students preparation for life and the world of work. The ICT curriculum is not intended to stand alone, but to be integrated within the programs of study for language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Selected ICT outcomes are blended with core learner outcomes within a common context, such as a project, lesson or activity. The long-range goal is for ICT learner outcomes to be included and contextualized within core and other programs of study.

While schools play a variety of important social, custodial and organizational roles in communities, we assume that their primary obligation should be to help students to learn how to recognize and solve problems, comprehend new phenomena, construct mental models of those phenomena, and, given a new situation, set goals and regulate their own learning (learn how to learn).
Jonassen, Peck and Wilson, 1999, p. 7

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Introduction / 1 2003

The Information and Communication Technology Program of Studies articulates a set of learner outcomes to be achieved over 12 grades of schooling. In making decisions about instructional planning and assessment, these outcomes: are sequenced for each of the four divisions (Grades K3, 46, 79 and 1012) can be placed into a scope and sequence that specifies which outcomes are taught in particular courses and grade levels (see www.learning.gov.ab.ca/ict for a document describing how to adapt a scope and sequence framework, and for sample frameworks) may be introduced at any time within the division, but are to be achieved no later than the third, sixth, ninth and twelfth grade levels, respectively are to be assessed and evaluated within the language of learning can be assessed and evaluated formatively or summatively when ICT learner outcomes and other learner outcomes remain separate but are part of a common assessment task; and can be reported to students, parents and others as separate marks are to be assessed and evaluated formatively and summatively when ICT learner outcomes are included and contextualized within core or other programs of studies; and are to be reported to students, parents and others as part of the subject mark (see Appendix A, pages 2328 for an English language arts sample with ICT outcomes included and contextualized).

Figure 1, on the following page, illustrates the relationship between the ICT program of studies and other programs of study. Figure 2, on page 4, is a general model of classroom assessment that shows the relationship between assessing, evaluating and reporting student learning. A glossary of educational terms used throughout this document can be found on page 127.

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Figure 1

MATHEMATICS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ICT
SOCIAL STUDIES OTHER

SCIENCE

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Introduction / 3 2003

Figure 2 1

Classroom Assessment

Assessment methods or strategies (collect information on student achievement and performance to improve student learning)

Evaluation methods or strategies (judgement regarding the quality, value or worth of a response)

Communication (reporting) methods or strategies (inform the student, parents and others about what has been accomplished and what the next steps are in the learning process)

Formative

Not reported as part of a grade (informal)

Student profile Personal communication Home response journal Individualized program plan (IPP) Portfolio Student self-reflection Open classroom Celebration of learning Student-led conference

Summative

Reported as part of a grade (formal)

Report card

1. From the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC) (Edmonton, AB, 2001).

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

The purpose of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit is to assist teachers in selecting and developing classroom assessment strategies for evaluating C category learner outcomes (Figure 3) in the context of other core subjects and courses. C category (Communicating, Inquiring, Decision Making and Problem Solving) learner outcomes involve the ability to use a variety of processes to critically assess information, manage inquiry, solve problems, do research and communicate with a variety of audiences. Students are expected to apply their knowledge and skills in real-life situations (Alberta Learning, 20002003, p. 2). C category learner outcomes are best assessed using performance assessments that are meaningful, authentic, engaging, interesting, and age- and curriculum-appropriate. According to the literature, performance assessment is a closer measure of students abilities to achieve aspirations, than are conventional forms of testing (Eisner 1999). Performance assessment tasks and rubrics for evaluating some C category outcomes are available in Appendix C, pages 35113.

Figure 3
Communicating, Inquiring, Decision Making and Problem Solving
C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. Students will seek alternative viewpoints, using information technologies. Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning.

1
C2

2
C3

3
C4

4
C5

5
C6

6
C7

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Introduction / 5 2003

F category (Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts) and P category (Processes for Productivity) learner outcomes are an important support for students to demonstrate C category outcomes. Checklists and rating scales appropriate for evaluating some F and P category outcomes are available in Appendix B, pages 2933.

Figure 4
Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of technology. Students will understand the role of technology as it applies to self, work and society. Students will demonstrate a moral and ethical approach to the use of technology. Students will become discerning consumers of mass media and electronic information. Students will practise the concepts of ergonomics and safety when using technology. Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of the operating skills required in a variety of technologies.

F6

Processes for Productivity


P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 Students will compose, revise and edit text. Students will organize and manipulate data. Students will communicate through multimedia. Students will integrate various applications. Students will navigate and create hyperlinked resources. Students will use communication technology to interact with others.

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Guiding Principles
Assessment, evaluation and communication of student achievement and growth are essential parts of the teaching and learning process. Each part of the teaching and learning process should be a positive experience for students and promote personal growth. Practices should be carried out in such a way that they support continuous 2 learning and development. To assist students in meeting the aim of the ICT program of studies, assessment should be a continuous, collaborative and comprehensive process that includes clearly identified and communicated criteria. The following principles, adapted from the Physical Education Guide to Implementation (Alberta Learning, 2000), are essential for effective assessment and evaluation of ICT learner outcomes: Principle 1: Principle 2: Principle 3: Principle 4: Assessment should be continuous Assessment should be collaborative Assessment should be comprehensive Assessment should include criteria.

Principle 1: Assessment should be continuous

Assessment practices should be carried out in such a way that they support and enhance ongoing student learning and development. Assessment practices should: require demonstration of both core subject and ICT learner outcomes promote student learning be part of instruction in a variety of contexts, using varied methods and instruments that match learner outcomes be part of an ongoing process rather than a set of isolated events focus on both process and product provide information about students prior learning provide ongoing feedback about the effectiveness of instruction enable students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills provide opportunities for students to revise their work in order to set goals and improve their learning provide a status report on how well students can demonstrate learner outcomes at that time.

2. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), A Framework for Student Assessment (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1997), p. 14.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Guiding Principles / 7 2003

Principle 2: Assessment should be collaborative

Students benefit when they are involved in the assessment process. Assessment practices should help and encourage students to: be responsible for their own learning and develop a positive attitude toward the use of technology in meaningful, real-world situations be involved in establishing criteria for evaluating their products or performances work together to learn and achieve outcomes feel competent and successful using technology set goals for further improvements.

Principle 3: Assessment should be comprehensive

Assessment practices should address learner outcomes and include a variety of strategies that meet the diverse learning needs of students. Assessment practices should: be developmentally appropriate, age-appropriate, genderbalanced, and consider students cultural and special needs be constructive, build on student strengths, and encourage further learning by creating positive atmospheres and self-images enable students to demonstrate ICT proficiencies: in many different contexts and subjects in meaningful, real-life situations enable students to demonstrate that ICT proficiency is transferable across contexts and subjects include multiple sources of evidence (formal and informal) provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do.

Principle 4: Assessment should include criteria

Assessment practices should identify and clearly define the critical aspects of performance for demonstrating student learning. Assessment practices should: involve students in identifying and/or creating criteria communicate the criteria used to evaluate student work before students begin tasks so they can plan for success provide students with rubrics to indicate performance levels be communicated to students so that they understand expectations related to learner outcomes. Achievement is based on demonstration of learner outcomes rather than comparing one students performance to anothers. Comparing one students proficiencies to anothers does not motivate students to achieve and frequently has the reverse effect. Meaningful, relevant and realistic criteria for achieving learner outcomes can motivate students to take responsibility for their own learning and develop a lifelong desire to use technology wisely.

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

A good assessment instrument can be a learning experience. But more to the point, it is extremely desirable to have assessment occur in the context of students working on problems, projects or products that: genuinely engage them hold their interest motivate them to do well. Such exercises may not be as easy to design as the standard multiple -choice entry, but they are far more likely to elicit a students full repertoire of skills and to yield information that is useful for subsequent advice and placement.
Gardner, 1993, p. 178

[Assessments should] measure learning outcomes of indisputable importance.


Popham, 2001, p. 105

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Guiding Principles / 9 2003

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components
Curriculum and Assessment Matrices
The learner outcomes of the ICT program of studies identify sets of competencies that are best demonstrated in meaningful activities and projects, rather than as discrete and isolated mini-skills. Several outcomes can be assessed within one activity. Also, more reliable information on student achievement can be collected through several activities or projects. The sample matrix below illustrates how activity codes are assigned to sample assessment tasks. For example, performance assessment task ELA201.01 is an activity code meaning English Language Arts 20, assessment task number 1 for this course. This assessment task will evaluate ICT learner outcomes C3 and C7. C3.4.1 assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information C3.4.2 demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic C7.4.1 use appropriate strategies to locate information to meet personal needs C7.4.2 analyze and synthesize information to determine patterns and links among ideas

Sample Division 4
Assessment ICT Outcomes <Title> PM20.01 <Title> BIO20.01
C1.4.1

<Title> ELA201.01

<Title> CHEM20.01
C1.4.2

<Title> PHYS20.02

C1
Access, use and communicate information

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C3.4.1

C3.4.1, C3.4.2

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.3, C6.4.4 C7.4.1, C7.4.2

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.4 C7.4.3

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.4 C7.4.3

C7
Use electronic research techniques

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 11 2003

ICT Performance Assessments

This Classroom Assessment Tool Kit provides sample assessment tasks in Appendix C for Grades 3 and 6 level courses. The sample assessment tasks incorporate outcomes from one or more of the core subject areas. These tasks are provided as illustrations and are but one component of a quality classroom assessment program. These examples are intended to demonstrate: how ICT outcomes can be assessed and evaluated how ICT and core subject outcomes can be incorporated in the same assessment task yet provide distinct information about each set of outcomes what good performance assessment tasks look like. Each sample assessment has four parts: 1. learner outcomes 2. criteria for assessing student products and performances 3. student assessment tasks 4. rubrics to evaluate student performance.

Tasks
Tasks are meaningful activities designed to reveal whether students are able to demonstrate the learner outcomes of the ICT program of studies and of one or more core subjects in a real-life context. The tasks require that students have had relevant learning experiences and instruction prior to undertaking the assessment tasks. These task activities are examples only. Teachers are encouraged to modify them to meet the needs and circumstances of their students. The availability of resources, such as software, computers and Internet connections, will determine which tasks are most appropriate. Student interest and readiness should also be taken into consideration.

Rubrics
Rubrics further clarify what is expected of students by describing task assessment criteria and levels of task performance. Two rubrics are provided for each task. As these tasks are principally designed to measure ICT learner outcomes, the rubrics provide only those criteria that match the specific outcomes and criteria listed in the ICT rubric. Core subject rubrics are also provided for the evaluation of learner outcomes. Prior to using the rubrics in Appendix C, teachers should ensure that students understand the language used in each rubric. It is essential to discuss the rubric so that the language becomes understandable to students. This is a great opportunity to help students expand their vocabulary and clarify what is expected of them. When student work is judged limited or insufficient, teachers need to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help students improve. One possibility is for teachers and students to work together to establish learning goals. All students can benefit from setting learning goals. (See Student Learning Goals at the end of each rubric and in the Sample Student Profile on page 21.) Other sources of performance assessment information are included in the reference section of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit and on Web sites, such as www.aac.ab.ca and www.2Learn.ca. 12 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003 Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)
Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

The following provides an explanation of each performance level of a rubric.

Level 4 Excellent

Meaning The student meets the standard of excellence for the grade, demonstrates exemplary performance or understanding, shows creativity.

Commentary This is a Wow!

3 Proficient

The student meets the acceptable standard for the grade by demonstrating solid performance or understanding.

This is a Yes.

2 Adequate

The student just meets the acceptable standard for the grade. Performance and understanding are emerging or developing, some errors are being made, grasp is not thorough. The student is not yet meeting the acceptable standard for the grade and has serious errors, omissions or misconceptions.

This is a Yes, but

1 Limited*

This is a No, but there is some basis for making improvement. The teacher needs to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Insufficient/ Blank*

No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

This is a No judgement can be made. The teacher must decide: if the student should redo the task if more time should be provided to complete the task if a different task at the students ability level should be assigned if further instruction leading to reassessment should be provided if the task is inappropriate for the student and should be scrapped.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, teachers need to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help students improve.

3. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 4849.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 13 2003

Developing Your Own Performance Assessments

The following are suggestions for developing and using performance assessments. Collect examples of performance assessment tasks and rubrics. Have ongoing discussions with colleagues about assessment tasks and rubricswhats working and whats not. Work with others in your school or department to develop common language about assessments and grading. Develop a plan of action for including more products or performances in your assessment program. Add one self-reflective activity during the week. Add one performance assessment with criteria and scoring rubric per grading period. Visit Web sites that provide examples of performance assessment tasks and rubrics.

When developing performance assessments, begin by selecting subject and ICT learner outcomes. Three to five learner outcomes for each is an appropriate goal. Once students have completed a task, they should be given an opportunity to reflect on their performance and set goals for future learning. This allows teachers and students to link assessment results to teaching and learning. A sample planning template is provided below.

Sample Performance Assessment Template


Grade

TITLE <Insert overview of assessment task here>


<SUBJECT> OUTCOMES No. Description

ICT OUTCOMES No. Description

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will:

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

The following templates are for developing student assessment tasks and rubrics.

<TITLE> Student Assessment Task <description of task>


Student ___________________________________

<SUBJECT> RUBRIC <TITLE>


Level Criteria

4
Excellent

3
Proficient

2
Adequate

1
Limited*

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate
interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 15 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC <TITLE>


Level Criteria

4
Excellent

3
Proficient

2
Adequate

1
Limited*

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Criteria for Designing Performance Assessment Tasks4


The following analytic rating scale provides a guide to ensure that important elements are included in performance assessments. It also provides an indicator of the extent to which each element is present.
To what extent does the performance assessment: a. establish clear criteria for assessing student learning related to specified learner outcomes these criteria form the basis for evaluating and communicating student learninginvolving students in developing criteria is encouraged assess student performance on high priority and relevant outcomes what is important for a student to know and be able to do is based on student learning needs and interests together with the priorities of the community, school and jurisdiction establish a meaningful, real-life context (based on issues, problems, themes and/or student interests) require the application of a range of thinking skills or processes contain age- and grade-appropriate activities that are sufficiently challenging provide students with a meaningful/real-life role call for products or performances directed to a specific audience allow for more than one right answer elicit responses that reveal levels of performance rather than simply correct or incorrect answers provide for students of varying ability levels to successfully complete tasks provide for purposeful integration of subject areas provide clear directions for students Fully Partially Not at all

b.

c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l.

m. engage students so their interest and enthusiasm will be sustained n. o. p. merit the time and energy required to complete it provide an evaluation rubric matched with the criteria provide students with the criteria and opportunities to reflect on, selfevaluate and improve their performance?

4. Adapted with permission from the Maryland Assessment Consortium, Performance Task Rubric (Linthicum, MD: Maryland Assessment Consortium, 1994).

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 17 2003

Criteria for Designing Rubrics


The following analytic rating scale provides a guide to ensure that important elements are included in rubrics. It also provides an indicator of the extent to which each element is present. Rarely, if ever

Fully Do the rubric descriptors: a. state criteria in specific terms using action verbs b. address expected learner outcomes c. describe what students are to know and do d. address the same criteria, in the same order and number at each level e. describe measurable qualities of a performance or product (not quantities) f. use age-appropriate, helpful, understandable and succinct language g. use parallel language at each level h. clearly distinguish one performance or product level from the others?

Partly

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Self-reflection

Students do better when they understand the goal, see models and know how their performance compares to learner outcomes. Sample Student Self-reflection Tools are provided in Appendix D, pages 115117, to encourage students to think about how they have performed, review what has been learned and set goals for further 5 learning.

Rationale5
Learning increases when students are involved in the assessment process. Underlying the various approaches [to improving classroom assessment] are assumptions about what makes for effective learningin particular that students have to be actively involved [in the assessment process].
Black and Wiliam, 1998, p. 5

Learner outcomes are clarified when students assist in describing the criteria used to evaluate the performance. Students can reach any target they know about and that holds still for them.
Stiggins, in Davies, 2000, p. 19

Students are motivated to learn when they are involved in determining performance criteria and setting goals. Rubrics offer a means for educators to motivate students through classroom assessment. Students, who are given a voice in their grading, also are given a clear understanding of what is expected from them and the assurance that their accomplishments will be recognized. Thus, the process creates a safe environment for students to take creative risks.
Stix, 1996, p. 51

Students understand how they learn when they assess their own learning. When students assess themselves they develop insights into their own learning.
Gregory, Cameron and Davies, 2000b, p. 10

Strategies to involve students in assessment5


Continual self-reflection throughout performance assessment enables students to assess progress, identify areas of difficulty, define learning and reassess goals. Self-reflection is the key to continued, powerful learning.

5. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 3032.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 19 2003

Developing criteria and/or rubrics Students can help:

identify and determine important criteria for a task (use brainstorming and discussions that analyze student samples to develop a critical elements list) write descriptors in student-friendly language create their own rubrics for open-ended tasks (begin by having students write criteria for simple things, like the ideal birthday party, being a good friend or expected classroom behaviours) generate or choose samples that demonstrate or reflect each performance level.
5

Initiating teacherstudent communication As teachers move about classrooms during the administration of performance assessments, they should: provide continual feedback to students observe student progress encourage students to continuously self-assess assist students with difficulties.
5

Using Pause-and- Think Have students pause briefly to think about their work and what they have learned. The reflection should be guided and specific. Students could reflect on their progress, their learning, what they did not understand, what comes next or changing goals. After Pause-and-Think, students could complete the following activities. Share Turn to a partner and describe what they learned. Look for proofSelect and comment on a work sample that demonstrates an aspect of their learning. Connect to criteriaExplain how they have met the criteria. Relate the learningConnect current concepts to past learning or find examples of the concepts in other contexts. Self/Peer assessment Use the rubric to evaluate their own or another students product or performance, and suggest what works, what doesnt and whats missing.

5. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 3032.

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Sample Student Profile

A profile of the various levels of achievement on general ICT outcomes, in the context of core subjects, provides a visual and ongoing record of student performance. Student profiles are rating scales that may be used to record and communicate students levels of performance based on C category ICT learner outcomes. This information could be taken from an ICT scope and sequence developed by the school or jurisdiction. (See www.learning.gov. ab.ca/ict for a document describing how to adapt a scope and sequence framework, and for sample frameworks.)

ICT OUTCOMES: Sample Profile, Division 1


Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date: Jamie Doe English Language Arts 3 November 15, 2002

Division 1

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome

Date:

C1
Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.1.1 access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry

October 2002 (Grade 3)

June 2002 (Grade 2)

C3
Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.1.1 compare and contrast information from similar types of electronic sources Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Finding information that I need from the Internet Action June 2002By October 2002, I will successfully access and retrieve relevant information from the Internet, independently. Strength to enhance: My ability to use a variety of technologies to access information Action January 2002I want to find new ways to access information; e.g., discussion forums.

January 2002 (Grade 2)

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 21 2003

Communicating Student Learning

Information and communication technology learner outcomes can be assessed formatively or summatively. Effective communication informs students, parents and others about the outcomes accomplished and the next steps in the learning process. Student Profiles are provided in Appendix E, pages 119125. The greater the role students are given in this process, the richer the information that is shared and the greater the impact on future student learning. Communication of student learning should: celebrate and improve learning enhance the home and school partnership involve a variety of strategies reflect a schools philosophy about learning be based on curriculum outcomes. Information on student progress is required for reporting clearly to students, parents and others. This information is essential in order for teachers to change or refine instructional plans to ensure learning activities are appropriate for all students. The information is also required to evaluate program effectiveness and revise programs to improve student learning (Alberta Learning 2002).

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A
Sample English Language Arts Assessment Task
This English Language Arts (ELA) task identifies both ELA and ICT outcomes. Many of these ICT outcomes can be contextualized within the ELA program of studies. This assessment sample uses an integrated rubric (page 26) to assess both the ICT and the ELA outcomes. Note : If ICT outcomes are not included and contextualized with another core curriculum, the ICT and core subject outcomes need to be evaluated separately. Two distinct rubrics would be used because the English language arts subject outcomes could be demonstrated without the application of ICT outcomes. The sample rubrics on pages 2728 illustrate how ICT outcomes and English language arts outcomes can be evaluated separately.

Grade 6: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Students will write a new version of a story incorporating elements found in at least two versions of the story. Students will then create a multimedia version of the new story.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Outcomes No. 2.4.2 2.4.3 Description Elaborate on the expression of ideas use literary devices, such as imagery and figurative language, to create particular effects Structure texts determine purpose and audience needs to choose forms, and organize ideas and details in oral, print and other media texts / express the same ideas in different forms and genres; compare and explain the effectiveness of each for audience and purpose Determine information needs decide on and select the information needed to support a point of view Plan to gather information develop and follow own plan for accessing and gathering ideas and information, considering guidelines for time and length of investigation and presentation Use a variety of sources locate information to answer research questions, using a variety of sources, such as printed texts, bulletin boards, biographies, art, music, community resource people, CD-ROMs and the Internet Access information skim, scan and read closely to gather information Organize information organize ideas and information using a variety of strategies and techniques, such as comparing and contrasting, and classifying and sorting according to subtopics and sequence Record information quote information from oral, print and other media sources

3.1.2 3.1.3

3.2.1

3.3.1

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 23 2003

English Language Arts Outcomes (contd) No. 3.4.1 4.1.3 Description Share ideas and information select appropriate visuals, print and/or other media to inform and engage the audience Enhance legibility experiment with a variety of software design elements, such as spacing, graphics, titles and headings, and font sizes and styles, to enhance the presentation of texts Attend to spelling edit for and correct commonly misspelled words in own writing, using spelling generalizations and the meaning and function of words in context ICT Outcomes No. C1.2.1 C1.2.2 Description access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing retrieve data from available storage devices, such as shared folders, to which groups have contributed use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

4.2.2

C4.2.2 C5.2.1 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information organize information create a storyboard compose a story use conventions present a story. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. The following Web sites can be pertinent to this task. http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/storfolk.html Folklore, Myth & Legend (from the Childrens Literature Web Guide) http://www.cln.org/themes/fairytales.html Stories, Folklore, and Fairy Tales Theme Page (from the Community Learning Network) http://www.qesn.meq.gouv.qc.ca/folklore/index.htm Teaching with Folklore

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


People are storytelling creatures. We make sense of our experience of the world through the stories we tell, and we are drawn to the stories of others. As a young storywriter, you have been hired by a publishing company to create a new version of a story and prepare it for publication. To accomplish this, find and read at least two versions of a myth, folktale or legend that you find engaging. (Use print or Web sources.) Genres you may choose from include: Greek myths Chinese folktales forest lore space folklore and myths myths and folklore about flight. Your job is to: use a graphic organizer (web, chart, Venn diagram) to compare the two story versions of the myth, folktale or legend you have found select elements from these two versions incorporate these elements into a well-written new story by: using a storyboard to plan your new version of the tale creating a multimedia version presenting your story to representatives from the publishing company.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 25 2003

Single Rubric Combining ELA and ICT Outcomes


Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS and ICT RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES
Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1, C1.2.1, C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (3.3.1, C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Creates storyboard (3.1.2, C1.2.2, C7.2.1)

Creates an original, interesting storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre

Creates a storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Composes story (2.4.2, 2.4.3)

Composes original, compelling story with rich supporting details

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes simple, predictable story with few supporting details

Composes incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story

Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of the piece; errors are hardly noticeable Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors, but these do not interfere with writers intended meaning Creates a multimedia presentation that communicat es to the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and significantly interfere with writers intended meaning Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

Presents story (3.4.1, 4.1.3, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve. Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

26 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Separate Rubrics for ELA and ICT Outcomes


Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from sources provided

1 Limited*
Acces ses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (3.3.1)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using a graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using a graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using a graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using a graphic organizer

Creates storyboard (3.1.2)

Creates an original, interesting storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre

Creates a storyboard using the requirements of the selec ted genre

Completes a storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Composes story (2.4.2, 2.4.3)

Composes original and compelling story with rich supporting details Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of the piece; errors are hardly noticeable Presents story that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes simple and predictable story with few supporting details Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Composes incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and significantly interfere with writers intended meaning Presents story that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors, but these do not interfere with writers intended meaning Presents story that communicates to the audience

Presents story (3.4.1, 4.1.3)

Presents story that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 27 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1, C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer Creates an electronic storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using an electronic graphic organizer Completes an electronic storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Creates storyboard (C1.2.2, C7.2.1)

Creates an original, interesting electronic storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience through the effective use of sound and graphics

Completes an electronic storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

28 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B
Evaluation Tools for ICT Outcome Categories F and P
Since F, P and C ICT learner outcomes measure different skills, the tools used to assess and evaluate these outcomes are also different F outcomes are concerned with social, moral and safety issues, and P outcomes are primarily skillbased, therefore assessment strategies that give students opportunities to demonstrate their skills either as a finished product or as a process are appropriate. Rubrics, analytic rating scales and checklists are efficient tools for judging the quality of student performance and promoting successful learning because clear explanations are provided to students. To be effective, it is essential that these evaluation tools be shared with students before they start assessment tasks. Analytic rating scales and rubrics are comparable to dimmer switchesthere are various degrees of illumination just as there are degrees of quality of performance. Checklists, on the other hand, are more like simple toggle switchesthey are either on or off. Checklists provide teachers with opportunities to reveal to students whether specific criteria are present or absent. Checklists are two-point scalesyes or not yet. The sample checklists in this appendix are based on F and P learner outcomes.
6

6. Adapted from Alberta Education, Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 1 to Grade 6 (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998), pp. 8, 12, 13, 19, 24, 26, 30, 40, 50, 57, 61, 7475.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B / 29 2003

Division 1 F and P Outcomes Checklist


Student ___________________________________ A. BASIC PROCEDURES
Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student can: power up and down a computer and/or log on or off a network (F6.1.1) access programs and move between programs (F6.1.1) create files (F6.1.1) save and retrieve files (F1.1.1, F6.1.1) edit, cut and paste files (P1.1.2) move between files (F6.1.1) delete files (F6.1.1) print files (F6.1.1) insert, eject disks (F6.1.1) describe particular technologies being used for specific purposes (F2.1.2) click on an icon to launch an application (F6.1.1) use pull-down menus (F6.1.1)

B. TEXT-DATA ENTRY PROCEDURES


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student demonstrates proper keyboarding techniques for: home row keys and space bar (F6.1.2) insertion-point arrow keys (F6.1.2) delete, backspace (F6.1.2) shift keys, return/enter, tab (F6.1.2)

C. COMPUTER WORKSTATION COMPONENTS


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student identifies and explains use of hardware architecture, configurations, peripherals: input systems; e.g., keyboard, mouse (F1.1.2) output devices; e.g., monitor, printer (F1.1.2) storage mediumsfloppy disk, hard drive, network, CD (F1.1.2)

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Observation of Student YES NOT YET

Work Station Routines The student: uses appropriate communication etiquette (F2.1.5) demonstrates safe behaviours when using technology (F5.1.2) maintains good body position (F5.1.1) demonstrates courtesy and follows classroom procedures when making appropriate use of computer technologies (F3.1.1) demonstrates appropriate care of technology equipment (F3.1.3)

D. PROCESSES FOR PRODUCTIVITY


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

To support communication, the student can: create an original text using word processing software (P1.1.1) edit complete sentences using word processing features (P1.1.2) access images, such as clip art (P3.1.1) create visual images using such tools as paint and draw programs (P3.1.2) access sound clips and recorded voice (P3.1.3) integrate and balance text and graphics for visual effect (P4.1.1, P4.1.2) navigate and create hyperlinked resources (P5.1.1, P5.1.2) compose electronic messages sent to other people outside the classroom (P6.1.1, P6.1.2)

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B / 31 2003

Division 2 F and P Outcomes Checklist


Student ___________________________________ A. BASIC PROCEDURES
Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student can: power up and down various technologies and peripherals correctly, and/or log on or off a network (F6.2.1) create, use, save, copy, paste and delete files and directories correctly (F6.2.2) use peripherals, including printers and scanners (F6.2.3) open a text file and save as a different file type (P1.2.3) select and use the technology appropriate to a given communication situation (P6.2.1) enter and manipulate data by using such tools as spreadsheets or databases for a specific purpose (P2.2.1) edit and format text within a word processor (P1.2.2) use of thesaurus find/change function text alignment font size and style create and navigate a multi-link document (P5.2.1)

B. TEXT-DATA ENTRY PROCEDURES


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student demonstrates proper keyboarding techniques for: alphabetical keys (F6.2.4) basic punctuation keys (.,;:?) (F6.2.4) shift keys, return/enter, delete (F6.2.4)

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

C. COMPUTER WORKSTATION COMPONENTS


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student identifies and explains use of hardware architecture, configurations, peripherals: input systems; e.g., keyboard, mouse, voice (F1.2.1) operating platforms/systems; e.g., MAC, DOS, WINDOWS (F1.2.1) output devices; e.g., monitor, printer (F1.2.1) communication devices; e.g., modem (F1.2.1) storage mediumsfloppy disk, hard drive, network, CD (F1.2.1)

Observation of Student YES NOT YET

Work Station Routines The student: appropriately adjusts monitor, keyboard, desk, chair and other equipment to ensure workstation is ergonomically appropriatecomfortable, healthy, safe and efficient (F5.2.1) observes ethical, legal and security measures in handling software and hardwarecopyright, privacy, confidentiality (F3.2.5, F3.2.6, F3.2.7) complies with school acceptable use policy (F3.2.1)

D. PROCESSES FOR PRODUCTIVITY


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

To support communication, the student can: create and revise original text (P1.2.1) edit and format text to clarify and enhance meaning using word processing features (P1.2.2) enter and manipulate data using such tools as spreadsheets or databases (P2.2.1) display data electronically using graphs and charts (P2.2.2) create a multimedia presentation (P3.2.1) integrate a spreadsheet, or graphics generated by a spreadsheet, into a text document (P4.2.1)

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B / 33 2003

34 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C
Sample Performance Assessment Tasks and Rubrics for ICT Outcome Category C
The sample ICT assessment tasks focus on C category learner outcomes. C category tasks subsume outcomes from the F and P categories of the ICT outcomes. The result is a comprehensive assessment that requires the completion of fewer assessment tasks. This appendix provides sample performance tasks and scoring rubrics for mathematics, science, social studies and English language arts representing some of the C category outcomes. There is a Curriculum and Assessment Matrix for Division 1 and Division 2 indicating the activity code assigned to the sample performance assessment task and the ICT learner outcomes that the task assesses. For each assessment task, students are given a real-life, meaningful context with a definite role and audience. As these are simulations, the audience may consist of teachers, parents, support staff or classmates. The samples may also include Web link references that were active at the time of publication and will be updated from time to time in the online edition of this tool kit. Teachers should determine and communicate to students whether assessment tasks will be evaluated on an individual or group basis.

Division 1 Curriculum and Assessment Matrix


Assessment ICT Outcomes C1
Access, use and communicate information Create a Movie Review Create a Pizza Menu Spend One Thousand Dollars Toxic Noise Zoo Animals Family Treasures of the Past

ELA.01 C1.1.1

MA.01

MA.02 C1.1.1, C1.1.2

SC.01 C1.1.1

SC.02 C1.1.1, C1.1.2

SS.01

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C3.1.1

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C4.1.1

C4.1.3

C4.1.3

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C5.1.1

C5.1.1

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.1.3

C6.1.2, C6.1.3 C7.1.3

C6.1.2

C6.1.2, C6.1.3

C6.1.3

C6.1.3

C7
Use electronic research techniques

C7.1.3

C7.1.3

C7.1.4

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 35 2003

Grade 3: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA.01)

CREATE A MOVIE REVIEW


Students will create a movie review using text, sound and visual images.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No.
2.2.1 2.2.2 2.2.3 4.3.2

Description
Experience various texts tell or write about favourite parts of oral, print and other media texts Construct meaning from texts summarize the main idea of individual oral, print and other media texts Appreciate the artistry of texts express feelings related to words, visuals and sound in oral, print and other media texts Enhance presentation use print and nonprint aids to illustrate ideas and information in oral, print and other media texts

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.1.1 C4.1.1 C6.1.3

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry follow a plan to com plete an inquiry use technology to support and present conclusions

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information follow a plan summarize main ideas describe favourite parts express feelings illustrate opinion present information and support a viewpoint. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Explain to students that movie reviewers influence moviegoers decisions about which movies they want to see. Newspapers have writers whose job it is to write reviews of movies. Movie reviewers can have an enormous impact on ticket sales.

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Students must have had experience constructing a storyboard, using an electronic graphic organizer and organizing a multimedia presentation prior to undertaking this assessment task. A graphic organizer is available through Inspiration Software Inc. and Strategic Transitions at $30 per licence based on a minimum of five licences through an agreement with Alberta Learning. There are many online sources of entertainment information. Most major newspapers have Web sites and entertainment sections. Guide students to appropriate materials by looking at examples of movie reviews from newspapers, TV or Web sites and noting the type of information they provide. Identify and discuss rating systems used to review movies.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 37 2003

Student Assessment Task

CREATE A MOVIE REVIEW


As a movie reviewer who wants to be hired by a local newspaper, prepare a multimedia presentation to show the newspaper editor that you know how to develop and present an online newspaper review. Use an electronic graphic organizer to build a storyboard for your movie review. Develop your movie review using text, sound and visual images. Your review needs to: indicate the genre (type) of the movie summarize the main idea describe your favourite parts express your feelings about the movie give it a rating. Use visual aids, such as multimedia presentation software, to present your opinion.

38 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC CREATE A MOVIE REVIEW


Level Criteria
Summarizes main idea (2.2.2)

4 Excellent
Summarizes main idea concisely and insightfully

3 Proficient
Summarizes main idea completely and clearly

2 Adequate
Summarizes main idea partially and superficially

1 Limited*
Unable to summarize main idea, makes sketchy retelling

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Describes favourite parts (2.2.1)

Thoroughly describes favourite parts

Clearly describes favourite parts

Partially describes favourite parts

Description of favourite parts is sketchy and incomplete

Expresses feelings (2.2.3)

Expresses feelings eloquently and with conviction

Expresses feelings clearly

Expresses feelings incompletely

Expresses few, if any, feelings

Illustrates opinions (4.3.2)

Chooses visuals and sounds that effectively and completely support opinions

Chooses visuals and sounds that reasonably support opinions

Chooses visuals and sounds that provide partial support for opinions

Chooses visuals and sounds that offer little or no support for opinions

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 39 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC CREATE A MOVIE REVIEW


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.1.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant informat ion from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Follows a plan (C4.1.1)

Follows a plan to thoroughly prepare a detailed, comprehensive review Applies communication technology to present information in an engaging, persuasive way to effectively support a viewpoint

Follows a plan to systematically prepare a complete review

Follows a plan to simplistically prepare a partial review

Has difficulty following a plan and prepares a sketchy review

Presents information and supports a viewpoint (C6.1.3)

Applies communication technology to clearly present information to reasonably support a viewpoint

Applies communication technology to present information to partially support a viewpoint

Applies communication technology to present little, if any, information to support a viewpoint that is unclear

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

40 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 3: MATHEMATICS (MA.01)

CREATE A PIZZA MENU


Students will conduct a survey to determine the most popular pizza topping. Data collected will be entered into a class database. Students will use an electronic graphic organizer to display the compiled data and use the data to develop a pizza menu.
MATHEMATICS OUTCOMES: Statistics and Probability (Data Analysis) No.
SO1 SO2 SO3 SO4

Description
collect data, using measuring devices and printed/technology resources display data, using rank ordering display the same data in more than one way make predictions and inferences when solving similar problems

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C6.1.2 C6.1.3 C7.1.3

Description
use technology to organize and display data in a problem -solving context use technology to support and present conclusions draw conclusions from organized information

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: collect data organize and display data draw conclusions make a recommendation support conclusions. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Begin by reviewing different types of graphs and what they can be used for. Use examples previously completed in class. More than one way of displaying data must be evident to evaluate the task. Discuss and demonstrate how students can use data to rank order and display findings in more than one way; e.g., tallies, charts, graphs, tables. Assign groups of students to different classrooms to ensure a variety of students are surveyed. Have students use a software program to create and print a graphic organizer to present findings.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 41 2003

Student Assessment Task

CREATE A PIZZA MENU


A new pizza place is opening near your school! As an advisor to the pizza company, you have been asked to recommend a menu of popular pizzas so the new company can make a profit. Base your recommendations on information you collect from students in your school. Brainstorm a list of possible pizza toppings and record them on a tally sheet. Collect data on favourite toppings from students in different classes. Rank your data from the most to least popular. Give information you collect to your teacher to enter into a class database on popular pizza toppings. Examine the information and decide which pizzas will be the most popular so you can recommend a menu to the owners of the pizza company. Use more than one way to present your data; e.g., rank order, graph, including an electronic graphic organizer. Create a menu to present to your classmates. Support your choices.

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Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC CREATE A PIZZA MENU


More than one way of displaying data must be evident. Level Criteria
Collects data (SO1)

4 Excellent
Collects precise and pertinent data and enters it accurately on the tally sheet

3 Proficient
Collects relevant data and completes tally sheet correctly

2 Adequate
Collects appropriate data, but tally sheet contains some errors

1 Limited*
Collects little data and produces an incomplete tally sheet

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes and displays data (SO2, SO3)

Accurately displays data using rank ordering and skillful organization, and data is easy to interpret Uses data to make a thorough recommendation about pizza menu preferences

Accurately displays data using rank ordering and data is interpretable

Displays data using rank ordering wi th some errors, but data is interpretable

Displays data unclearly or in a confusing way

Makes recommendation (SO4)

Uses data to make a logical recommendation about pizza menu preferences

Makes a recommendation about pizza menu preferences that is partially supported by data

Makes a recommendation about pizza menu preferences that is not based on data

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 43 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC CREATE A PIZZA MENU


Level Criteria
Displays data (C6.1.2)

4 Excellent
Uses technology to effectively display data that is accurate and easy to interpret

3 Proficient
Uses technology as required to display data that is accurate and interpretable

2 Adequate
Uses technology to display compiled data, but presentation is muddled or contains errors

1 Limited*
Uses technology to present incomplete data that does little to assist in solving the problem

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Draws conclusions (C7.1.3)

Uses technology to create a menu that represents an insightful interpretation of the data

Uses technology to create a menu that represent s a thoughtful interpretation of the data

Uses technology to create a menu that generally reflects the data

Uses technology to create a menu that has little, if anything, to do with the data

Supports conclusions (C6.1.3)

Uses data to provide convincing support for conclusions

Uses data to support conclusions

Uses data to provide partial support for conclusions

Draws conclusions that are not related to data

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

44 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

CREATE A PIZZA MENU


TALLY SHEET

Name of Topping

Tally

Total

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 45 2003

Student ___________________________________

CREATE A PIZZA MENU


BAR GRAPH SHEET

Topping

46 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

CREATE A PIZZA MENU


RANK ORDERING SHEET

Rank Order

Topping

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 47 2003

Grade 3: MATHEMATICS (MA.02)

SPEND ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS


Students will recommend playground equipment by collecting information about the availability and costs of a variety of types of playground equipment. The information will be used to write a $1000 grant proposal.
MATHEMATICS OUTCOMES: Statistics and Probability (Data Analysis) No.
SO1 SO3 SO5

Description
collect data, using measuring devices and printed/technology resources display the same data in more than one way obtain new information by performing arithmetic operations on the data

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.1.1 C1.1.2 C3.1.1 C4.1.3 C5.1.1 C6.1.2 C7.1.3

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry process information from more than one source to retell what has been discovered compare and contrast information from similar types of electronic sources organize information from more than one source share information collected from electronic sources to add to a group task use technology to organize and display data in a problem -solving context draw conclusions from organized information

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information share information with group members organize information display data perform arithmetic operations make recommendation. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Safety guidelines for physical education should be discussed prior to, or as an extension of, this task. As an extension or enrichment activity, students could revise their proposal to reflect a grant of $3000. They could make decisions as to whether the type or amount of equipment would differ. Because groups complete the assessment task and group scores will be awarded, the task lends itself to formative assessment. Student self-reflection is important.

48 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

SPEND ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS


The students in your school would like a greater variety of activities for recess, but there is not enough playground equipment. Your class has the opportunity to recommend equipment for the school. The principal has asked you and your classmates to help your teacher write a proposal for a $1000 grant for playground equipment. Your proposal must include a list of what equipment to buy, costs of the equipment and reasons why this would be the best equipment to buy. You will work in small groups to investigate the types of equipment available, compare prices and make a list of recommendations. In your small groups you will: brainstorm what playground equipment to buy collect and organize information about the costs include at least two electronic sources; e.g., Web sites, telephone quotes, television advertisements include print sources, such as newspapers, catalogues, flyers stay within the $1000 limit select various ways to organize and display your data; e.g., bar graphs, pie chart, tables provide explanations for your choices present your groups recommendation to the class. After listening to your classmates presentations, discuss and debate the choices.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 49 2003

Student ___________________________________

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC SPEND ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS


Level Criteria
Collects data (SO1)

4 Excellent
Collects pertinent and meaningful data about equipment costs, and records information in an accurate, systematic way

3 Proficient
Collects relevant data about equipment costs, and records information clearly and correctly

2 Adequate
Collects and records appropriate data about equipment costs; minor errors are present

1 Limited*
Collects minimal data about equipment costs and records information in a confusing way

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Displays data (SO3)

Accurately and effectively displays collected data using a wide variety of display formats

Correctly and clearly displays collected data using a range of display formats

Appropriately displays collec ted data using predictable display formats

Display formats misrepresent collected data; uses inappropriate display formats

Performs arithmetic operations (SO5)

Performs efficient and accurate calculations to verify equipment purchase recommendation

Performs accurate calculations to verify equipment purchase recommendation

Minor errors in calculations reduce the effectiveness of the recommendation

Significant errors in calculations severely limit the effectiveness of the recommendation

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

50 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC SPEND ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.1.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant informat ion from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Shares information (C5.1.1)

Shares significant information collected from electronic sources that effectively facilitates groups recommendation

Shares information collected from electronic sources that contributes to groups recommendation

Shares information collected from electronic sources that is generally helpful in groups recommendation

Shares information collected from electronic sources that does little to assist in groups recommendation

Organizes information (C1.1.2, C4.1.3, C6.1.2)

Uses technology to effectively organize and display collected information in a manner that is accurate and easy to interpret

Uses technology to organize and display collected information in a manner that is accurate and clear

Uses technology to organize and display collected information, however presentation is muddled or contains errors

Uses technology to organize and display collected information that contains many errors and is hard to interpret

Makes recommendation (C3.1.1, C7.1.3)

Makes an astute recommendation on equipment purchases by insightfully comparing information collected from electronic sources

Makes a logical recommendation on equipment purchases by comparing information collected from electronic sources

Makes a defensible recommendation on equipment purchases that is partially supported by information collected from electronic sources

Makes a recommendation on equipment purchases that is not supported by the information collected

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 51 2003

Grade 3: SCIENCE (SC.01)

TOXIC NOISE
Students will design a multimedia presentation to educate others about harmful sounds in the school and/or community, and recommend ways to protect hearing.
SCIENCE OUTCOMES (Topic D: Hearing and Sound) No.
39.3 39.10 39.11

Description
recognize that there are ways of measuring the loudness of sounds and that loud sounds pose a danger to the ear recognize that certain sounds have characteristics that cause them to be interpreted as pleasant or unpleasant describe changes in hearing that result from continued exposure to loud noise and from the natural process of aging

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.1.1 C6.1.2 C6.1.3

Description
accesses and retrieves appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry use technology to organize and display data in a problem -solving context use technology to support and present conclusions

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information measure sound levels classify sounds describe dangers of loud sounds organize and display data support and present conclusions. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. This assessment is most appropriate for the end of unit when students have had the opportunity to explore and understand how sounds are made, how the ear works and how damage can occur. If teachers have access to a sound meter, students could use it to record actual decibel levels as opposed to estimating. Software or any program that enables students to create slide shows or Web pages can be used for multimedia presentations. As an extension to the assessment experience, students could present their multimedia presentations to other classes, schools, parent councils or community groups.

52 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

TOXIC NOISE
As an audiologist (an expert in hearing and sound), you have been asked by a school council to prepare an interesting and informative presentation to educate others about harmful sounds in the school and/or community that can damage the human ear, and recommend ways to protect hearing. You will: explore your school and/or community, and record data about sounds you hear on a sound collection chart collect information from a variety of sources about the effects of loud sounds on hearing create a multimedia presentation summarizing the information you find and recommend ways to protect hearing from damaging sounds.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 53 2003

Student ___________________________________

SCIENCE RUBRIC TOXIC NOISE


Level Criteria
Measures sound levels (39.3)

4 Excellent
Measures sound accurately and uses information effectively in the presentation

3 Proficient
Measures sound accurately and uses information in the presentation

2 Adequate
Measures some sounds inaccurately, provides partially correct information in the presentation

1 Limited*
Measures sound inaccurately, errors interfere with the presentation

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Classifies sounds (39.10)

Accurately classifies characteristics of sound and uses them creatively in the presentation

Accurately classifies characteristics of sound and uses them meaningfully in the presentation

Makes some errors in the classification of sound, uses information predictably in the presentation

Makes many errors in the classification of sound, does not make effective use of information in the presentation

Describes dangers of loud sounds (39.11)

Describes the dangers of loud sounds with detail in an insightful, skillful way

Clearly describes the dangers of loud sounds

Briefly describes the dangers of loud sounds

Presentation does not include an adequate description of how loud sounds can damage hearing

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

54 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC TOXIC NOISE


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.1.2)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes and displays data (C6.1.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation and uses data collected in a highly organized, creative way that effectively addresses the problem Uses multimedia presentation to support and present conclusions in a clear and convincing manner

Creates a multimedia presentation that uses data collected to reasonably address the problem

Creates a multimedia present ation that addresses the problem somewhat, with partial use of data collected

Creates a singledimension presentation that does not address the problem and is confusing

Supports and presents conclusions (C6.1.3)

Uses multimedia presentation to present conclusions supported with plausible reasons

Uses multimedia presentation but does not support conclusions effectively

Uses multimedia presentation in a way that does not communicate or support conclusions

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 55 2003

Student ___________________________________

SOUND COLLECTION CHART


Explore your classroom and/or community. Record: the kinds of sounds you hear whether they are pleasant or unpleasant to you actual or estimated decibels (use the decibel chart as a guide) whether you believe the sound is safe or dangerous your ranking of each sound, with 1 being the loudest sound you hear.
Pleasant or Unpleasant Estimated or Actual Decibels Safe or Dangerous

Sound

Ranking

56 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

DECIBEL (dB) CHART


Sound is measured in units called decibels (dB) on a scale from zero to 180. Prolonged exposure to sounds over 90 decibels can cause hearing loss. Sounds in the painful range have the potential to cause immediate damage. Sound7 Rifle Jet engine Propeller aircraft Amplified music Chain saw Lawn mower Computer print room Noisy restaurant Heavy traffic Conversation Quiet office or library Quiet whisper Buzzing insect Rustle of a leaf 155 dB 140 dB 120 dB 110 dB 100 dB 90 dB 80 dB 70 dB 70 dB 60 dB 40 dB 30 dB 20 dB 10 dB Decibels 7 Painful Painful Extremely loud Extremely loud Extremely loud Very loud Very loud Loud Loud Moderate Moderate Faint Faint Faint Intensity

7. Reproduced with permission from West General LLC, Acoustics 101Decibel Chart, 2002, http://www.westgeneral.com/acoustical/acoustics101_big.html (Accessed February 3, 2003)

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 57 2003

Grade 3: SCIENCE (SC.02)

ZOO ANIMALS
Students will research and present information about the characteristics of, and a suitable habitat for, a specific animal.
SCIENCE OUTCOMES (Topic E: Animal Life Cycles) No. 310.1 310.6 311.10 Description classify a variety of animals, based on observable characteristics; e.g., limbs, teeth, body covering, overall shape, backbone demonstrate awareness that animals require different habitats in order to meet their basic needs of food, water, shelter and space demonstrate knowledge of the needs of animals studied, and demonstrate skills for their care

ICT OUTCOMES No. C1.1.1 C1.1.2 C5.1.1 C6.1.3 C7.1.3 Description access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry process information from more than one source to retell what has been discovered share information collected from electronic sources to add to a group task use technology to support and present conclusions draw conclusions from organized information

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information describe animal characteristics process information demonstrate knowledge of animals needs demonstrate awareness of animal habitats contribute to class presentation present and support conclusions. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Prior to doing the assessment task, brainstorm observable characteristics of, and habitats for, each animal. Students need to be able to match animal characteristics and habitats.

58 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

The class multimedia presentation could be structured by setting up a template with a separate page for each animal. Each student prepares a one-page presentation about his or her animal and inserts that information into the file. The end result is one multimedia presentation for the entire class about animal differences and similarities, and how these relate to an animals habitat. A graphic organizer is available through Inspiration Software Inc. and Strategic Transitions at $30 per licence based on a minimum of five licences through an agreement with Alberta Learning.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 59 2003

Student Assessment Task

ZOO ANIMALS
The local zoo has just been involved in a rescue operation and has been asked to care for several new animals. As one of the zookeepers, you need to help place the new animals into proper habitats in the zoo. Your teacher will provide you with the name and/or picture of your rescued animal. Determine the characteristics of your animal so that you can select a suitable habitat. Gather information about your animal from a variety of sources, including electronic sources. Your information will be included as part of a class presentation to the zoo board. Be sure to include the following: a picture of your animaluse clip art, images from the Internet or scanned images a description of the observable characteristics of your animal a description and/or illustrations of the typical habitat of your animal an explanation of how the particular habitat will satisfy the needs of your animal a description of how you, as the zookeeper, would care for your animal. Insert your information into the class presentation using technology.

60 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

SCIENCE RUBRIC ZOO ANIMALS


Level Criteria
Describes animal characteristics (310.1)

4 Excellent
Includes a wide variety of observable characteristics that provide an accurate and comprehensive description of the animal

3 Proficient
Includes many observable characteristics that provide a clear description of the animal

2 Adequate
Includes a narrow range of observable characteristics that provide a general description of the animal

1 Limited*
Includes a few observable characteristics that partially describe the animal

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Demonstrates awareness of animal habitats (310.6)

Provides an in-depth description of a suitable habitat that accounts for the unique characteristics of the animal Thoroughly explains how to help the animal meet its basic needs within its habitat

Provides a detailed description of a suitable habitat that accounts for the characteristics of the animal Describes how to help the animal meet its basic needs within its habitat

Provides a superficial description of a habitat that takes into consideration some characteristics of the animal Makes a few suggestions on how to help the animal meet its basic needs within its habitat

Lists few features of a suitable habitat with little evidence relating the habitat to animal characteristics

Demonstrates knowledge of animals needs (311.10)

Provides little or no information that connects to the animals basic needs

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 61 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC ZOO ANIMALS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.1.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Processes information (C1.1.2, C7.1.3)

Uses significant information from a variety of electronic sources to place animal in a suitable habitat Makes significant contribution to class presentation by sharing information collected from electronic sources

Uses meaningful information from electronic sources provided to place animal in a suitable habitat Makes meaningful contribution to class presentation by sharing relevant information collected from electronic sources Uses electronic data to support conclusions

Uses reasonable information from electronic sources provided to place animal in a habitat

Restates information from electronic sources provided about animal habitats

Contributes to class presentation (C5.1.1)

Makes a reasonable contribution to class presentation by sharing appropriate information collected from electronic sources Uses electronic data to provide partial support for conclusions

Makes a minimal contribution to class presentation

Supports and presents conclusions (C6.1.3)

Uses electronic data to provide convincing support for conclusions

Draws conclusions that are not related to data

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

62 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 3: SOCIAL STUDIES (SS.01)

FAMILY TREASURES OF THE PAST


Students will find information about their family histories and create presentations using technology to share their findings.
SOCIAL STUDIES OUTCOMES (Topic A: My Community in the Past, Present and Future) No.
Process Skills

Description Locating/Organizing/Interpreting Information identify possible sources and location of information; e.g., print, nonprint, interviews, surveys acquire information by listening to or reading simple historical accounts collect information through direct observation in the community and by interviewing parents and/or community resource people arrange events, facts and/or ideas in sequence Analyzing/Synthesizing/Evaluating predict future changes in the community write a diary entry, journal entry and/or make an audiotape recording; e.g., about an important individual in your communitys past, and/or predicting life in the future ICT OUTCOMES

Communication Skills

No.
C4.1.3 C6.1.3 C7.1.4

Description organize information from more than one source use technology to support and present conclusions make predictions based on organized information

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: identify sources and location of information collect information organize information support and present conclusions make a prediction present ideas. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Virtual museum tours can be accessed from the TELUS 2Learn Web site: www.2Learn.ca.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 63 2003

Student Assessment Task

FAMILY TREASURES OF THE PAST


As an historian, select a family treasure; e.g., photo, object, story, recipe, item of clothing. Research this family treasure to discover its history by interviewing a family member. Keep a record of this interview by tape recording it or taking notes. You may also research the treasure by reading about it in a family record, such as a diary, Web site or history book. How does this treasure represent a change from the past to the present? Use technology to create a presentation to share your findings with the local museum board. Your presentation should include: a representation of your treasure its history an explanation of the change in society it represents a prediction of how it might change in appearance and use in the future. Suggested materials and equipment: tape recorder digital camera scanner software.

64 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

SOCIAL STUDIES RUBRIC FAMILY TREASURES OF THE PAST


Level Criteria
Identifies sources and location of information (Process Skills)

4 Excellent
Identifies pertinent sources and exact location of information

3 Proficient
Identifies relevant sources and specific location of information

2 Adequate
Identifies possible sources and general location of information that may not be relevant or useful

1 Limited*
Identifies a possible source of information

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Collects information (Process Skills)

Collects pertinent and diverse information from a wide variety of sources

Collects relevant information from many sources

Collec ts appropriate information from sources provided

Collects little, if any, information from sources provided

Makes prediction (Process Skills)

Makes an insightful prediction based on significant information

Makes a reasonable prediction based on a variety of information

Makes a questionable prediction that is based on some information

Makes a random prediction without reference to information

Presents ideas (Communication Skills)

Explains ideas clearly and precisely

Explains ideas in a logical, sequential way

Partially explains ideas

Has difficulty explaining ideas

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 1 / 65 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC FAMILY TREASURES OF THE PAST


Level Criteria
Organizes information (C4.1.3)

4 Excellent
Uses technology to effectively organize and display collected information in a manner that is accurate and easy to interpret

3 Proficient
Uses technology to organize and display collected information in a manner that is accurate and interpretable

2 Adequate
Uses technology to organize and display collected information, however presentation is muddled or contains errors

1 Limited*
Uses technology to organize and display collected information that contains many errors and is hard to interpret

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Supports and presents conclusions (C6.1.3)

Uses technology in a skillful, effective way to support and present conclusions in a clear and convincing manner Makes an insightful prediction based on significant information

Uses technology to present conclusions supported with plausible reasons

Uses technology to present conclusions, but does not support conclusions effectively

Uses technology in a way that does not communicate or support conclus ions

Makes prediction (C7.1.4)

Makes a reasonable prediction based on a variety of information

Makes a questionable prediction that is not based on the information

Makes a random prediction without reference to information

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

66 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Division 2 Curriculum and Assessment Matrix


Assessment ICT Outcomes C1
Access, use and communicate information Advertising Campaign Colonizing Mars Dealing with Public Issues Its Time for a Vacation Peak Performance

ELA.01
C1.2.1, C1.2.2

ELA.02
C1.2.1, C1.2.2

MA.01
C1.2.2

MA.02
C1.2.1, C1.2.2

SC.01
C1.2.1

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C2.2.1

C3
Critically assess information

C3.2.2

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C4.2.2

C4.2.2

C4.2.2

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C5.2.1, C5.2.2

C5.2.3 C6.2.2, C6.2.4, C6.2.5, C6.2.6 C7.2.2 C7.2.1, C7.2.2

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.2.2, C6.2.3, C6.2.4 C7.2.1

C6.2.4, C6.2.5

C7
Use electronic research techniques

Assessment ICT Outcomes C1


Access, use and communicate information

Managing Our Forests

Virtual Journey

Deciding to Trade with Canada

Who Done It?

SC.02
C1.2.1, C1.2.2

SS.01
C1.2.1, C1.2.2

SS.02
C1.2.1, C1.2.2

ELA.SC.01

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C2.2.1

C2.2.1

C3
Critically assess information

C3.2.1

C3.2.2

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C4.2.2

C4.2.1, C4.2.2

C4.2.1

C4.2.2

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C5.2.1 C6.2.2, C6.2.3, C6.2.5, C6.2.7 C7.2.1, C7.2.2

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.2.2

C6.2.2, C6.2.3

C6.2.1, C6.2.5

C7
Use electronic research techniques

C7.2.1, C7.2.2

C7.2.1, C7.2.2

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 67 2003

Grade 6: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA.01)

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN
Students will create a new ad campaign for a major international company and present a portfolio in a multimedia format that will convince clients that the campaign will work, resulting in large sales of their product.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No. 1.1 Description Experiment with language and forms experiment with a variety of forms of oral, print and other media texts to discover those best suited for exploring, organizing and sharing ideas, information and experiences Combine ideas use talk, notes, personal writing and representing, together with texts and the ideas of others, to clarify and shape understanding Enhance presentation emphasize key ideas and information to enhance audience understanding and enjoyment Cooperate with others identify and participate in situations and projects in which group work enhances learning and results

1.2

4.3 5.2.2

ICT OUTCOMES No. C1.2.1 C1.2.2 Description access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes retrieve data from available storage devices, such as shared folders, to which groups have contributed record group brainstorming, planning and sharing of ideas by using technology

C5.2.1 C5.2.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: clarify and shape ideas in a group participate in and contribute to group work create an advertisement communicate key ideas and information access and retrieve information organize information electronically create a multimedia presentation.

68 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. This task would be an effective culmination to a unit on advertising. Students, as members of an advertising team, begin by brainstorming marketing ideas. Each student creates an electronic folder and a multimedia presentation that will be evaluated. For this project, it would be beneficial for students to have access to a video camera as well as a variety of artist supplies. The following Web site can be pertinent to this task. The Emergence of Advertising in America (for teacher background information): http://www.memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ncdhtml/eaahome.html

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 69 2003

Student Assessment Task

ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN
Advertisements appear in many different forms and through a variety of mediums, such as TV, magazines, posters, billboards, radio and the Internet. New multimedia technologies have enabled ad agencies to expand their creative talents and design ads that were never before possible. You are a member of an advertising team. Your current assignment is to create a new ad campaign for a major international company (one of your choosing), using print, television and online (Internet) ads. As a group, develop an effective advertising strategy for selling a product of your choice. Your group needs to decide on: a product to develop the campaign around; for example, a soft drink, clothing line, fast food product, computer game or new movie the target audience techniques that may work for selling your product to that audience. Then, each member of the group will create a campaign based on the above strategy. Collect examples of ads that are directed to your target audience, and study their form and structure carefully. Each group member will create an electronic folder so that group members can access each others examples. Choose where you want your ads to appear. Think about specific television shows, magazines, newspapers, Web sites, etc. Create a portfolio of ads that will appear in print, on television and online.

Present your portfolio to the client (the company that is paying you to create the ads) in a multimedia format providing reasons for your choice of ads. Your presentation should convince the client that your campaign will result in large sales of their product.

70 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN


Level Criteria
Clarifies and shapes ideas in a group (1.2)

4 Excellent
Clarifies and shapes understanding through effective and extensive collaboration with others

3 Proficient
Clarifies and shapes understanding through helpful and ample collaboration with others

2 Adequate
Extends understanding through sufficient collaboration with others

1 Limited*
Develops incomplete understanding through minimal collaboration with others

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Participates in and contributes to group work (5.2.2)

Contributes enthusiastically and invites suggestions from other group members to develop an effective advertising strategy

Contributes to group and accepts others ideas to develop an interesting advertising strategy

Contributes to group to develop a simple advertising strat egy

Participates only when encouraged, makes minimal contribution to the development of an advertising strategy

Creates advertisements (1.1)

Produces a wide variety of advertisements to clearly and persuasively sell the product based on the advertising strategy

Produces several different advertisements that sell the product based on the advertising strategy

Produces similar advertisements to sell the product based on the advertising strategy

Produces advertisements that are lacking in persuasion and originality, and are not necessarily based on the advertising strategy

Communicates key ideas and information (4.3)

Communicates key ideas and information convincingly during the presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audienc e

Communicates ideas and information effectively during the presentation that holds the interest of the audience

Communicates some ideas and information during the presentation that does not sustain audience interest throughout

Communicates few ideas during the presentation that neither suits the needs or interest of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 71 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Creates folder and organizes information (C1.2.2, C5.2.2)

Organizes information efficiently in an electronic folder enabling easy access by group members

Organizes information in an electronic folder enabling access by group members

Information is somewhat disorganized within an electronic folder making it awkward for group members to access it Creates a multimedia presentation that uses some visual images, sounds or animated images to sell the product to a particular audience

Information is disorganized within an electronic folder making it difficult for group members to access it

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C5.2.1)

Creates a multimedia presentation that skillfully features a variety of visual images, sounds and animated images to persuasively sell the product to a particular audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that features meaningful visual images, sounds or animated images that show conviction in selling the product to a particular audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that uses few, if any, visual images, sounds or animated images to sell the product and does not necessarily consider the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

72 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 6: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA.02)

COLONIZING MARS
Students will compose and present a science fiction story using a multimedia presentation.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No.
1.2.2

Description
Combine ideas use talk, notes, personal writing and representing, together with texts and the ideas of others, to clarify and shape understanding Use prior knowledge combine personal experiences, and the knowledge and skills gained through previous experiences with oral, print and other media texts, to understand new ideas and information Experience various texts make connections between own life, and characters and ideas in oral, print and other media texts; discuss common topics or themes in a variety of oral, print and other media texts Generate ideas choose life themes encountered in reading, listening and viewing activities, and in own experiences, for creating oral, print and other media texts Structure texts determine purpose and audience needs to choose forms, and organize ideas and details in oral, print and other media texts Use a variety of sources locate information to answer research questions, using a variety of sources, such as printed texts, bulletin boards, biographies, art, music, community resource people, CD-ROMs and the Internet Share ideas and information select appropriate visuals, print and/or other media to inform and engage the audience Attend to spelling edit for and correct commonly misspelled words in own writing, using spelling generalizations and the meaning and function of words in context

2.1.1

2.2.3

2.4.1

2.4.3

3.2.1

3.4.1 4.2.2

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.2.1 C1.2.2

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C4.2.2 C7.2.2

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 73 2003

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information organize information compose a story use conventions present a story using multimedia. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. The following Web sites can be pertinent to this task. http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/index.html (NASA Human Space Flight) http://www.stemnet.nf.ca/CITE/ss_mars.htm (a Canadian site devoted to Mars) http://www.seds.org/nineplanets/nineplanets/mars.html (Students for the Exploration and Development of Spacefounded in 1980 at MIT and Princeton University)

74 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

COLONIZING MARS
It is the nature of many species to migrate to other places. For more than a century, science fiction writers have imagined colonizing Mars. Lately, exploration of the Martian surface has brought the science fiction vision closer to reality! As a young author, imagine what happens as the first Earth people arrive on Mars, ready to start a colony. Although they have brought essential provisions, they have only a one-way ride to Mars and cannot return to Earth. Compose a science fiction story about what happens to the colony and create a multimedia presentation for young children. 1. Conduc t background research. Since good science fiction is always based on good science, you will need to gather information before writing your story. For example, you will need to learn about the surface and environment of Mars in order to create a convincing setting. You also need to explore current ideas and debates about how a Martian colony might work. As you think about the characters and the problems they are bound to face, consider the struggles and conflicts they may encounter because they are human. Also consider the kinds of problems that the new environment will cause. 2. Compose a science fiction story. Remember that members of the colony will encounter many challenges that are completely new to our species. And remember that they cannot leave! Your plot might include problems that arise as the colonists strive to live together and survive. 3. Create a multimedia presentation based on your science fiction story that incorporates words, images and sound to enhance the story.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 75 2003

Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC COLONIZING MARS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant inf ormation from several sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from several sources

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information f rom sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (1.2.2, 2.1.1, 2.2.3)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using a graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using a graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using a graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into preset categories using a graphic organizer

Composes story (2.4.1, 2.4.3)

Composes original and compelling story with rich supporting details

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes simple and predictable story with few supporting details

Com poses incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story

Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of story; errors are hardly noticeable

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors and these do not interfere with writers intended meaning

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and interfere significantly with writers intended meaning

Presents story (3.4.1)

Presents story that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Presents story that communicates to the audience

Presents story that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Presents story that does not suit the needs or interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

76 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC COLONIZING MARS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insu fficient/ Blank*


No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into preset categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience through the effective use of words, images and sounds to enhance the story

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audienc e; incorporates words, images and sounds to support the story

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout; uses words, images and sounds that do little to support the story

Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience; fails to use words, images and sounds to support the story

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 77 2003

Grade 6: MATHEMATICS (MA.01)

DEALING WITH PUBLIC ISSUES


Students will develop and implement a plan for the collection and display of data gathered from a survey about a controversial issue, and make recommendations using a multimedia presentation.
MATHEMATICS OUTCOMES: Statistics and Probability (Data Analysis) No.
SO1 SO2 SO3 SO4 SO5 SO6 SO8 SO9

Description
formulate questions for possible investigation, given a context identify appropriate data sources: first-hand, second-hand and combination select and use appropriate methods of collecting data: designing and using structured questionnaires, experiments, observations, electronic networks select and defend the choice of an appropriate sample or population to be used to answer a question discuss how collected data are affected by the nature of the sample, the method of collection, the sample size and biases display data by hand or by computer in a variety of ways, including: histograms, double bar graphs, stem and leaf plots describe the general distribution of data using: smallest and largest value, frequency, value in the middle, patterns and quartiles analyze sets of data to make comparisons

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.2.2

Description
organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used extend the scope of a project beyond classroom collaboration by using communication technologies, such as the telephone and e-mail use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems solve problems, using numerical operations and such tools as calculators and spreadsheets solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology solve issue-related problems, using such communication tools as word processors or e-mail to involve others in the process use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C2.2.1 C3.2.2 C5.2.3 C6.2.2 C6.2.4 C6.2.5 C6.2.6 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

78 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: formulate questions access and retrieve information organize data display data analyze data create multimedia presentation present findings. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Prior to beginning the assessment task, students will choose an issue that is important to their school, community or province. Some issues that could be investigated by students include the following. Should your school have a dress code? Should school uniforms be mandatory? If your school does have a dress code, should the code be changed? Should corporate advertising be allowed in schools? Should alcohol and tobacco companies be permitted to support sporting or cultural events in your community? Should convenience stores be able to limit the number of students allowed inside at one time? Should a community be allowed to impose a nighttime curfew for young people?

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 79 2003

Student Assessment Task

DEALING WITH PUBLIC ISSUES


Governing agencies are often asked to make decisions about controversial issues. Before they take action, they try to explore as many different sides of the issue as possible and solicit opinions from a wide variety of sources. Careful data collection and analysis help people make informed decisions. The local school board or municipal council is concerned about a controversial issue and has contracted you, as a pollster, to conduct a sur vey of school and community members. Research the issue thoroughly and use the data you collect to support your recommendations. 1. Identify an issue within your community. Clarify your own opinion on the issue. 2. Design a survey, questionnaire or interview to gather information on the issue. Before asking for input, record your personal opinions. Formulate questions that elicit clear and specific responses. 3. Obtain answers for your survey, questionnaire or interview. Tools, such as the Internet, e-mail, telephones or fax machines, will help you gather information. Or, pose questions to at least three different communities or groups. 4. Organize and analyze your data. Using a spreadsheet, display the results in a format that is appropriate for the data. Analyze the data to determine all points of view on the issue. 5. Reflect upon your original opinion. On the basis of what you have learned, make recommendations to the school board or municipal council in a convincing manner, using a multimedia presentation. Include supporting documentation.

80 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC DEALING WITH PUBLIC ISSUES


Level Criteria
Formulates questions (SO1)

4 Excellent
Formulates relevant research questions that lead to the gathering of insightful information

3 Proficient
Formulates reasonable research questions that lead to the gathering of helpful information

2 Adequate
Formulates simple research questions that lead to gathering of basic information

1 Limited*
Formulates incomplete or vague questions that lead to the gathering of little, if any, helpful information

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Accesses and retrieves information (SO2, SO3, SO4, SO5)

Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from a representative sample that contributes to the preparation of bias free, astute recommendations

Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from a sufficient sample that contributes to the preparation of logical recommendations

Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from an insufficient sample that contributes to the preparation of general recommendations

Accesses and retrieves little, if any, information from an inappropriate sample that does not necessarily contribute to the preparation of recommendations

Displays data (SO6)

Displays collected data in a manner that is accurat e and easy to interpret

Displays collected data in a manner that is accurate and interpretable

Displays collected data in a manner that is unorganized and has minor errors, but is interpretable

Displays data that misrepresents information collected and is not interpretable

Analyzes data (SO9)

Interprets findings accurately and insightfully to support valid and significant recommendations

Interprets findings accurately to support reasonable recommendations

Interprets findings to provide partial support for recommendations

Interprets findings in a way that does not support recommendations

Presents findings (SO8)

Explains and discusses clearly, precisely and convincingly, data collection methods, findings and recommendations

Explains and discusses data collection methods, findings and recommendations

Describes data collection methods, findings and recommendations, but includes some errors

Identifies some data collection methods, findings and recommendations but includes many errors

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 81 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC DEALING WITH PUBLIC ISSUES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C2.2.1, C3.2.2, C5.2.3, C6.2.6)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves significant information (noting inherent biases) from a variety of suitable authorities, using a variety of communication technologies Uses spreadsheet to effectively organize significant data from a variety of viewpoints that is clearly summarized for accurate problem solving Creates a multimedia presentat ion that skillfully uses a variety of techniques to answer the research questions, and that engages and holds the interest of the audience

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves appropriate information (noting biases exist) from suitable authorities, using selected communication technologies Uses spreadsheet to organize detailed data from a variety of viewpoints that is interpretable for accurate problem solving

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves information (may recognize biases) from provided resources, using given communication technologies

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information (fails to recognize biases) from provided resources

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes data (C1.2.2, C6.2.2, C6.2.4, C6.2.5, C7.2.1)

Uses spreadsheet to organize some data from a variety viewpoints for problem solving

Uses spreadsheet to organize little or no data from a few viewpoints that does not assist with problem solving

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that answers the research questions and communicates to the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that answers some of the research questions and communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Creates a singledimension presentation that answers few, if any, of the research questions, suiting neither the needs nor interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

82 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 6: MATHEMATICS (MA.02)

ITS TIME FOR A VACATION


Students will create three detailed proposals showing possible itineraries for a seven-day trip. Each proposal will be within a specified budget and will take into account a number of factors. Students will organize this information in such a way as to allow easy comparison by a client.
MATHEMATICS OUTCOMES No.
SO3 SO9 SO12 SO14

Description
Statistics and Probability: Data Analysis select and use appropriate methods of collecting data: designing and using structured questionnaires, experiments, observations, electronic networks analyze sets of data to make comparisons Number: Number Operations solve problems that involve arithmetic operations on decimals to thous andths, using appropriate technology (2-digit whole number multipliers and dividers) use a variety of methods to solve problems with multiple solutions

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.2.1 C1.2.2

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems use graphic organizers, such as mind mapping/webbing, flow charting and outlining, to present connections among ideas and information in a problem -solving environment solve problems, using numerical operations and such tools as calculators and spreadsheets use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information

C4.2.2 C6.2.2 C6.2.3 C6.2.4 C7.2.1

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information/data organize information perform calculations interpret results design and communicate findings.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 83 2003

TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Three proposals may be too many for your class. Consider two if this task is unmanageable. The amount available for client spending may need to be adjusted to reflect current costs. In order to enhance this task, provide sample travel brochures, itineraries and pre-determined Web sites. To assist students in completing the performance task, emphasize that it is essential to determine the age and gender of the people involved, because age and gender impact entertainment and recreational activities.

84 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

ITS TIME FOR A VACATION


A client of your travel agency and a friend want to go on a seven-day vacation. They want the best value for the dollar! Be sure to consider the age and gender of the client and friend when planning entertainment and recreational activities. They have provided you with the following criteria: $2000 each to spend on the entire seven-day trip, including the cost of transportation the destination must have a December daytime average temperature of +25 Celsius or higher they want to be able to choose from at least three different packages. 1. Create three proposals without going over the spending limit. Each proposal must include: a detailed itinerary; e.g., destination, travel dates, flights, accommodation transportation costs to and from the destination total cost of accommodations for six nights a selection of affordable restaurants and a food budget for six days transportation costs at the destination; e.g., car rental, public transportation major recreational and entertainment activities available in the area and their costs. 2. Organize and present the information so that your client can easily compare the three proposals. Recommend one of the three proposals and provide reasons for your choice.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 85 2003

Student ___________________________________

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC ITS TIME FOR A VACATION


The specified number of proposals must be provided. Level Criteria
Collects data (SO3)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves pertinent information from a wide variety of sources

3 Proficient
Accesses and retrieves relevant information from many sources

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves appropriate inf ormation from sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses and retrieves little appropriate information from sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Performs calculations (SO3, SO12)

Calculates total costs accurately using a variety of operations and tools that follow client criteria

Calculates costs accurately using given formulas and operations that follow client criteria

Calculates costs using given formulas and operations; does not necessarily follow client criteria, errors exist

Makes significant errors and gives little attention to client criteria

Interprets results (SO9, SO14)

Provides logical and insightful recommendations that are persuasive and supported by the data

Provides logical recommendations that are supported by the data

Provides reasonable recommendations that are partially supported by the data

Provides recommendations that are not supported by the data

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

86 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC ITS TIME FOR A VACATION


The specified number of proposals must be provided. Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1, C6.2.2)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Uses technology to organize significant information

Uses technology to organize information

Uses technology to place information into pre-set categories

Uses technology to place some information into preset categories

Performs calculations (C6.2.4)

Performs necessary calculations accurately and purposefully

Performs necessary calculations accurately

Performs calculations; errors exist

Significant calculation errors are present

Designs and communicates findings (C7.2.1, C6.2.3)

Uses a variety of electronic tools to design and display creative, purposeful proposals that can be easily compared

Uses several electronic tools to design and display proposals that can be compared

Uses electronic tools provided to design and display incomplete proposals, but comparisons are still possible

Uses electronic tools provided to design and display simple and incomplete proposals that may make comparison difficult

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 87 2003

Grade 6: SCIENCE (SC.01)

PEAK PERFORMANCE
Students will build and test a paper glider. Data from test flights will be recorded on a spreadsheet and used as a basis for modifying the glider to achieve better performance.
SCIENCE OUTCOMES No.
65.7

Description
Topic A: Air and Aerodynamics recognize that streamlining reduces drag, and predict the effects of specific design changes on the drag of a model aircraft or aircraft components Topic B: Flight conduct tests of glider designs, and modify a design so that a glider will go further, stay up longer or fly in a desired way; e.g., fly in a loop, turn to the right recognize the importance of stability and control to aircraft flight, and design, construct and test control surfaces

66.3

66.4

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.2.1 C4.2.2 C6.2.4 C6.2.5

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing solve problems, using numerical operations and such tools as calculators and spreadsheets solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information make predictions design and carry out a plan conduct tests organize data identify alternatives and evaluate effects. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. The following aeronautic Web sites can be pertinent to this task. Students will need to access and retrieve whatever information they feel is appropriate prior to the task. Beginners Guide to Aerodynamics (prepared at NASA): http://www.lerc.nasa.gov/WWW/K12/airplane/bga.html Aeronautics Principles of Flight: http://www.allstar.fiu.edu/aero/princ1.htm Principles of Aeronautics (various reading levels): http://wings.avkids.com/Book/index.html Science Fun with Airplanes (from Ohio State University): http://www.ag.ohio-state.edu/~flight/

88 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Particular flight characteristics can be emphasized in this task. Students need to be told the specific characteristic; e.g., longest flight by distance, longest flight by duration, greatest right or left turn, which is to be addressed by the task so they can make appropriate design changes. Students should also know about statistical modelling and have experience with prediction. This can relate to work students may have already done in the Mathematics Grade 6 Strand: Statistics and Probability (Data Analysis).

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 89 2003

Student Assessment Task

PEAK PERFORMANCE

You are a design engineer for a paper glider for a toy company. Your job is to design a paper glider that performs according to a specific performance characteristic. As you design and fly your glider, you will need to determine which design characteristics; e.g., shape of the wing, fuselage, vertical and horizontal stabilizers, elevators, ailerons, rudder, should be changed in order to allow your glider to attain peak performance. Your teacher will indicate which performance characteristic; e.g., flies far, flies for a long time, makes large left or right turns, you will be addressing. To complete the task, you will: access information on various design characteristics and their impact on flight clarify the problem by making testable predictions about the performance characteristic to be enhanced create a paper glider using letter-sized paper and paperclips fly this glider and, on a spreadsheet, keep track of your data modify the design to accomplish a desired performance change continue flight-testing and add data to the spreadsheet analyze spreadsheet data and make predictions regarding further design changes.

90 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

SCIENCE RUBRIC PEAK PERFORMANCE


Level Criteria
Makes predictions (66.4, 65.7)

4 Excellent
Shows insightful understanding of the problem by making pertinent predictions that can be researched and tested

3 Proficient
Shows clear understanding of the problem by making reasonable predictions that can be researched and tested

2 Adequate
Shows partial understanding of the problem by making predictions that may be difficult to research or test

1 Limited*
Shows minimal understanding of problem by making predictions that cannot be tested

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performanc e based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Designs and carries out a plan (65.7)

Sets up and carries out a procedure that provides complete, relevant and accurate data, and a workable model Conducts exhaustive trials to provide complete, valid and accurate data about the effects of adaptations

Sets up and carries out a procedure that prov ides accurate data and a model

Sets up and carries out a procedure that provides incomplete data, but a workable model

Sets up and carries out a procedure that provides little data and an unworkable model

Conducts experiments (66.3)

Conducts sufficient trials for a fair test, and provides relevant and accurate data about the effects of adaptations

Conducts simple tests that provide incom plete data about the effects of adaptations

Conducts tests that provide little data about adaptations

Identifies alternatives and evaluates effects (66.4)

Uses data and observations to provide a clear, logical explanation of which design adaptations led to peak performance

Uses data and observations to provide a reasonable explanation of which design adaptations led to peak performance

Uses data and observations to provide a partial explanation of which design adaptations led to peak performance

Does not use data or observations to explain design adaptations

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 91 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC PEAK PERFORMANCE


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes data (C4.2.2, C6.2.4, C6.2.5)

Makes efficient use of a spreadsheet tool to organize alternatives for glider design

Makes use of a spreadsheet tool to organize alternatives for glider design

Accesses a simple spreadsheet format to organize alternatives for glider design

Accesses a simple spreadsheet format, but is unable to organize alternatives for glider design

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

92 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 6: SCIENCE (SC.02)

MANAGING OUR FORESTS


Students will examine forest management issues and perspectives, and identify and support a policy recommendation for the effective use of a forested area.
SCIENCE OUTCOMES (Topic E: Trees and Forests) No.
610.1 610.5 610.9 610.10 Skills

Description
identify reasons why trees and forests are valued identify human use of forests, and compare modern and historical patterns of use identify human actions that enhance or threaten the existence of forests identify an issue regarding forest use, identify different perspectives on that issue, and identify actions that might be taken Problem Solving through Technology: Reflect and Interpret identify positive and negative impacts that may arise and potential risks that need to be monitored

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.2.1 C1.2.2

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media identify and distinguish points of view expressed in electronic sources on a particular topic organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems use graphic organizers, such as mind mapping/webbing, flow charting and outlining, to present connections among ideas and information in a problem -solving environment solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology generate alternative solutions to problems by using technology to facilitate the process use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C2.2.1 C3.2.1 C4.2.2 C6.2.2 C6.2.3 C6.2.5 C6.2.7 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 93 2003

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information identify and describe perspectives evaluate alternatives and recommend action solve a problem communicate findings. TEACHER NOTE Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information.

94 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

MANAGING OUR FORESTS


Species and ecosystems are being destroyed at a rapid pace, and future climate changes will accelerate these losses. Fortunately, by reforestation and other strategies to protect biodiversity, we can also help to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions (by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). Kofi Annan, Secretary General of the United Nations

A local lumber company wants to expand their operations into a large forested area near your community. This would provide many jobs and bring more revenue into your community. However, local environmental groups, campers, hunters and hikers are objecting to the proposal. The provincial government has set up a task force to look into the issue. As a member of the task force, your job is to prepare a report for the government that recommends a policy for this forest. You must provide supporting documentation that will convince the government to adopt the recommended policy. You should consider the viewpoints of each groupenvironmentalists, forest industry and recreational usersin preparing your report by consulting an authority from each group. Your report is required to: identify a forestry issue list opposing perspectives for each group of stakeholders and describe each one provide documentation to support each perspective present your recommended policy regarding utilization of this forest area using tools, such as pictures, graphs or charts.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 95 2003

Student ___________________________________

SCIENCE RUBRIC MANAGING OUR FORESTS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (Skills)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from a wide variety of sources representing diverse perspectives about forestry management

3 Proficient
Accesses and retrieves relevant information from several sources representing perspectives about forestry management

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves relevant information from a few sources representing more than one perspective about forestry management

1 Limited*
Accesses and retrieves information from few sources representing a singular perspective about forestry management

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Identifies and describes perspectives (610.1, 610.5, 610.9, 610.10)

Identifies a variety of perspectives and describes each one in detail

Identifies different perspectives and describes each one

Identifies few perspectives and describes each one

Identifies a single perspective and describes it

Evaluates alternatives and recommends action (610.10)

Evaluates, comprehensively and insightfully , implications of actions on individuals, society and the environment, and makes a recommendation

Evaluates significant implications of actions on individuals, society or the environment and makes a recommendation

Describes implications of actions on individuals, society or the environment and makes a recommendation

States implications of actions on individuals, society or the environment and makes an incomplete or irrelevant recommendation

Communicates recommendation (Skills)

Presents a persuasive argument to support an insightful, logical recommendation

Presents a logical argument to support a recommendation

Presents an argument to support a recommendation

Presents little or no argument for a recommendation

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

96 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC MANAGING OUR FORESTS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1, C2.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Solves problem (C3.2.1, C4.2.2, C6.2.2, C6.2.3, C6.2.5, C6.2.7, C7.2.1)

Insightfully , accurately and effectively provides solution to forestry management problem by sorting, organizing and classifying data, using a technology tool Uses technology effectively to create a highly visual, practical recommendation that is persuasive and engages the audience

Provides solution to forestry management problem by sorting, organizing and classifying data, using a technology tool

Provides partial solution to forestry management problem by sorting, organizing and classifying data, using a technology tool

Provides an incomplete or indefensible solution to forestry management problem by sorting, organizing and classifying data, using a technology tool

Communicates recommendation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Uses technology to create a readable recommendation with visuals that appeal to the audience

Uses technology to create a recommendation that conveys information in a straight -forward manner with little audience appeal

Uses technology to create a recommendation that provides little, if any, information about forestry management and lacks audience appeal

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 97 2003

Grade 6: SOCIAL STUDIES (SS.01)

VIRTUAL JOURNEY
Students will create a multimedia presentation to promote tourism that examines values, beliefs and ideas of Ancient Greece.
SOCIAL STUDIES OUTCOMES (Topic B: Greece: An Ancient Civilization) No.
Knowledge Process Skills

Description
demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which physical, social and psychological needs are met, have varied over time and from place to place locate information on each topic or question researched, using more than one source analyze how the values, ideas and beliefs of Greek civilization affect us today use computer programs to collect and organize information, using a database and to write a paragraph or report locate information in an encyclopedia by using key words, letters on volume, index and cross-reference collect information on a clearly defined topic and organize the information into a short report write a summary of main points encountered in oral, written or viewed presentations

Communication Skills

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C4.1.2 C1.2.1 C1.2.2

Description
formulate new questions as research progresses (This Division 1 outcome is applicable to the task.) access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan, as necessary organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C4.2.1 C4.2.2 C6.2.2 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: design and follow a plan formulate research questions access and retrieve information organize and synthesize information create a multimedia presentation demonstrate understanding.

98 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Teachers may want to provide a shared folder containing information about the topic. The following Web sites can be pertinent to this task. http://www.ancient-greece.com http://www.entrenet.com/~groedmed/greekm/myth.html http://digcaesarea.org/

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 99 2003

Student Assessment Task

VIRTUAL JOURNEY
To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history? Marcus Tullius Cicero

Many contemporary ideas or practices can be traced to Ancient Greece. As a marketing agent for Greek Tourism, your task is to prepare a virtual travelogue to encourage tourists from Alberta to visit Greece. Select one or more of the following themes for your virtual journey, and demonstrate the values, ideas and beliefs of Ancient Greek civilization. Suggested themes are: democracy, architecture, Olympics, literature. Develop research questions that address your theme and revise them as required. Create a plan and schedule to guide the inquiry process. Gather information from the Internet using URLs and/or other electronic sources, such as CD-ROMs. Synthesize and organize information using a spreadsheet, database or graphic organizer. Use the information to complete an engaging multimedia presentation for prospective travellers.

100 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

SOCIAL STUDIES RUBRIC VIRTUAL JOURNEY


Level Criteria
Locates information (Process Skills)

4 Excellent
Selects and organizes specific, comprehensive information related to the theme

3 Proficient
Selects and organizes information related to the theme

2 Adequate
Selects and organizes information partially related to the theme

1 Limited*
Selects irrelevant or inaccurate information related to the theme and organizes it in an illogical manner

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Synthesizes information (Process Skills and Communication Skills)

Synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas to effectively present the theme

Synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas to present the theme

Partially synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas to present the theme

Partially synthesizes information to present an incomplete theme

Demonstrates understanding (Knowledge)

Demonstrates a thorough, insightful understanding of the chosen theme and comprehensively explains historical significance using relevant facts

Demonstrates a clear understanding of the chosen theme and explains historical significance using relevant facts

Demonstrates partial understanding of the chosen theme and explains historical significance using generalities

Demonstrates little or no understanding of the chosen theme with an unclear explanation of historical significance

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 101 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC VIRTUAL JOURNEY


Level Criteria
Designs and follows a plan (C4.2.1)

4 Excellent
Designs an efficient, flexible plan and schedule making revisions as needed based on insightful research questions that clarify and focus on a specific theme of Ancient Greek civilization Formulates insightful research questions that clarify and focus on a specific theme of Ancient Greek civilization; questions are revised and improved during the project to reflect new learning Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Designs and follows a workable plan and schedule making revisions as needed based on relevant research questions focused on Ancient Greek civilization

2 Adequate
Designs a general plan and schedule focused on Ancient Greek civilization

1 Limited*
Designs an incomplete or impractical plan based on vague questions that is difficult to follow

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Formulates new questions as research progresses (C4.1.2)

Formulates relevant research questions focused on Ancient Greek civilization; questions are revised or improved during the project to reflect new learning

Formulates research questions that are partially incomplete or insufficient; questions may not be revised or improved during the project

Formulates vague questions that do not guide the process; questions are not revised or improved during the project

Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1)

Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Organizes and synthesizes information (C1.2.2, C4.2.2, C6.2.2, C7.2.1)

Organizes and synthesizes significant information into logical categories using an electronic organizer

Organizes and synthesizes information into categories using an electronic organizer

Places information into pre-set categories using an electronic organizer

Places minimal information into preset categories using an electronic organizer

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that skillfully uses a variety of techniques to answer the research questions, and that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that answers the research questions and communicates to the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that answers some of the research questions and communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Creates a singledimension presentation that answers few, if any, of the research questions, suiting neither the needs nor interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

102 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 6: SOCIAL STUD IES (SS.02)

DECIDING TO TRADE WITH CANADA


Students will examine the social issues that may arise from China venturing to trade with Canada and prepare a multimedia presentation for Chinese businessmen.
SOCIAL STUDIES OUTCOMES (Topic C: China: A Pacific Rim Nation) No.
Knowledge Process Skills

Description
demonstrate understanding that nations in the world are becoming increasingly interdependent. acquire information by reading, listening and viewing select pertinent information from a variety of sources compare information on a topic drawn from two or more sources to recognize agreement or disagreement compare and contrast the way people in Canada and China meet their needs analyze how traditions and customs in China influence the way the people meet their basic needs, by identifying and describing the values held analyze the effect of communication and technology on the way the Chinese meet their basic needs express an opinion, either orally or in writing, using specific examples, about aspects of Chinese society that might be beneficial for Canadians to adopt or aspects of Canadian society that might be beneficial for Chinese to adopt collect and organize information on a clearly defined topic, using a simple outline, webbing, etc. in a final product, apply the skills of revising and editing by considering content, organization, vocabulary, sentence structure and mechanics of writing

Communication Skills

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.2.1 C1.2.2

Description
access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan as necessary use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems use graphic organizers, such as mind mapping/webbing, flow charting and outlining, to present connections among ideas and information in a problem -solving environment use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C2.2.1 C3.2.2 C4.2.1 C6.2.2 C6.2.3 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 103 2003

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: design and follow a plan access and retrieve information organize and synthesize information evaluate information create a multimedia report. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. The following Web sites can be pertinent to this task. http://www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus/infonation/e_infonation.htm Select countriesan easy-to-use, two-step database that allows you to view and compare the most up-to-date statistical data for the member states of the United Nations (includes economic, population, geographical and social indicators) http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ch.html CIAWorld Factbook http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/China/index.html Six Paths To China6 Strategies For Using The Web For Learning http://www.chinaembassycanada.org/eng/c3098.html Embassy of the Peoples Republic of China in CanadaIncludes links to the Chinese Consulate General in Calgary with phone/fax numbers and address http://www.tcm-mec.gc.ca/China/menu-e.asp Department of Foreign Affairs and International TradeTeam Canada 2001 (Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong)

104 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

DECIDING TO TRADE WITH CANADA


Modern China has been reluctant to open its borders to western cultures. In order to preserve their family structure, cultural traditions and economic systems, the people of China ha ve tried to minimize what they see as the detrimental influences of western consumerism and democracy. However during the 1990s, western business people and government representatives, such as Team Canada, have made several trade missions to China to develop relationships with Chinese businesses and people. China is now interested in establishing more communication and trade with Canada, but there are still concerns about the impact on Chinese society. As a member of the next Canada-China Trade Mission, prepare a presentation for the inaugural meeting with Chinese businessmen. This report is intended to encourage the Chinese people to engage in a positive trading relationship with Canada. Provide an analysis of the following social issues that may arise from Chinas venture into trading with Canada. How might Chinese society be affected by increases in trade and communication with Canada and Pacific Rim countries? What can China learn from Canada through increased trade and interaction, and vice-versa? How will increased communication and trade between Canada and China influence the lifestyles and traditions of both countries?

Gather information on each issue using a variety of sources, such as experts in the field, print publications and telecommunication sources; e.g., Internet, e-mail, telephone and fax, to help you understand all sides of each issue. Present your findings through a multimedia presentation.

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 105 2003

Student ___________________________________

SOCIAL STUDIES RUBRIC DECIDING TO TRADE WITH CANADA


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (Process Skills)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves specific, comprehensive information related to the issue

3 Proficient
Accesses and retrieves information related to the issue

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves information partially related to the issue

1 Limited*
Accesses and retrieves irrelevant or inaccurate information related to the issue

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Synthesizes information (Process Skills and Communication Skills)

Synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas to effectively present the issue

Synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas to present the issue

Partially synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas to present the issue

Partially synthesizes information to present an incomplete issue

Demonstrates understanding (Knowledge)

Demonstrates thorough, insightful understanding of the issue and comprehensively explains the impact of trade with Canada on Chinese society using relevant facts

Demonstrates clear understanding of the issue and explains the impact of trade with Canada on Chinese society using relevant facts

Demonstrates partial understanding of the issue and explains the impact of trade with Canada on Chinese society using relevant generalities

Demonstrates little or no understanding of the issue with an unclear explanation of the impact of trade with Canada on Chinese society

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

106 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC DECIDING TO TRADE WITH CANADA


Level Criteria
Designs and follows a plan (C4.2.1)

4 Excellent
Designs an efficient, flexible plan and schedule, making revisions as needed

3 Proficient
Designs a workable plan and schedule, making revisions as needed

2 Adequate
Designs a general plan and schedule making few, if any, revisions

1 Limited*
Designs an incomplete or impractical plan

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1, C2.2.1)

Efficiently accesses and retrieves information from several electronic sources

Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Organizes and synthesizes information (C1.2.2, C6.2.2, C6.2.3, C7.2.1)

Organizes and synthesizes significant information into logical categories using an electronic organizer

Organizes and synthesizes information into categories using an electronic organizer

Places information into pre-set categories using an electronic organizer

Places little, if any, information into preset categories using an electronic organizer

Evaluates information (C3.3.2)

Evaluates the authority, reliability and relevance of sources through effective application of criteria

Evaluates the authority, reliability and relevance of sources through accurate application of criteria

Evaluates the authority, reliability and relevance of sources through superficial application of criteria

Evaluates sources through little or no application of criteria

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that skillfully uses a variety of techniques, and engages and holds the interest of the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Creates a singledimension presentation, suiting neither the needs nor interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C, Division 2 / 107 2003

Grade 6: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS and SCIENCE (ELA.SC.01)

WHO DONE IT?


Students will create an original story describing a crime that has been committed without revealing who the criminal is and present the story to other writers, challenging them to identify the criminal from a database.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No.
2.4.2 2.4.3

Description
Elaborate on the expression of ideas use literary devices to create particular effects Structure texts determine purpose and audience needs to choose forms, and organize ideas and details in oral, print and other media texts Determine information needs decide on and select the information needed to support a point of view Organize information organize ideas and information using a variety of strategies and techniques, such as comparing and contrasting, and classifying and sorting according to subtopics and sequence Evaluate information evaluate the appropriateness of information for a particular audience and purpose Enhance presentation emphasize key ideas and information to enhance audience understanding and enjoyment

3.1.2 3.3.1

3.3.3 4.3.2

SCIENCE OUTCOMES No.


6.1 6.2 6.8

Description
design and carry out an investigation in which variables are identified and controlled recognize the importance of accuracy in observation and measurement; and apply suitable methods to record, compile, interpret and evaluate observations apply observation and inference skills to recognize and interpret patterns

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C4.2.2 C5.2.1 C6.2.1 C6.2.5

Description
organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing retrieve data from available storage devices, such as shared folders, to which groups have contributed select and use technology to assist in problem solving solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology

108 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Div. 1 and Div. 2)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: identify information organize and evaluate information design a strategy record data interpret evidence solve a problem create a story present a story. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. A sample class database for this activity can be accessed at the following Web site: http://www.tlt.ab.ca/projects/Div2/Grade6/catchthecrook/ftp.sample.hqx Prior to beginning the assessment task, the class needs to build a database. Suggested class activity: brainstorm physical characteristics which can be used to pinpoint individuals; e.g., gender, age, eye colour, hair characteristics, height, weight, fingerprints, handwriting, etc. help build a class database which contains the characteristics mentioned above individually determine personal physical characteristics and enter these characteristics within a record in the class database, using a pseudonym. Once the stories are read, you may want to post a list of criminals from the database to help Crime Writers Guild members select the criminal.

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Appendix C, Division 2 / 109 2003

Student Assessment Task

WHO DONE IT?


Every man at the bottom of his heart believes that he is a born detective. British author and statesman John Buchan (1875 1940), quoted in The Power-House, Chapter 2, 1916

As a writer of fascinating crime stories, create an original story describing a crime that has been committed, without revealing who the criminal is. Use clues from the class database to write your story. You must be careful to make sure that only one criminal profile (record) within the class database matches the criminal described within yo ur written story. Present your story to other writers in the Crime Writers Guild, challenging them to identify the criminal from the database.

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Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC WHO DONE IT?


Level Criteria
Identifies information (3.1.2)

4 Excellent
Identifies information required to present an idea; adds information to enhance this idea

3 Proficient
Identifies information required to present an idea

2 Adequate
Identifies most information required to present an idea

1 Limited*
Identifies little, if any, information required to present an idea

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes and evaluates information (3.3.1, 3.3.3)

Uses a wide variety of literary techniques creatively to organize complex ideas that are appropriate for and engage the audience

Uses a variety of literary techniques to organize ideas that are appropriate for the audience

Uses some literary techniques to organize simple ideas that consider the audience

Uses few, if any literary techniques to organize ideas that do not consider the audience

Creates story (2.4.2, 2.4.3)

Uses a wide variety of literary devices to skillfully create particular effects; ideas and details within the text are clearly written and complete Presents story that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Uses a variety of literary devices; ideas and details within the text are clearly written

Uses some literary devices; som e ideas and details within the text are evident and clear

Uses few, if any, literary devices; ideas and details are unclear or missing

Presents story (4.3.2)

Presents story that communicates to the audience

Presents story that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Presents story that does not suit the needs or interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix C, Division 2 / 111 2003

Student ___________________________________

SCIENCE RUBRIC WHO DONE IT?


Level Criteria
Designs strategy (6.1)

4 Excellent
Designs an efficient, workable strategy that identifies and controls all variables

3 Proficient
Designs a workable strategy that identifies and controls most variables

2 Adequate
Designs a workable strategy that identifies and controls some variables

1 Limited*
Designs a strategy that is impractical, and identifies and controls few, if any, variables

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Records and organizes data (6.2)

Organizes data that is accurate and easy to interpret

Organizes data that is interpretable

Organizes data with some inconsistencies, but is interpret able

Organizes data that has many errors and is not interpretable

Interprets evidence (6.8)

Provides an insightful explanation that is logical and supported by the evidence

Provides an explanation that is supported by the evidence

Provides an explanation that is partially supported by the evidence or does not make reference to the evidence

Provides an incomplete or unreasonable explanation that is not supported by the evidence

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC WHO DONE IT?


Level Criteria
Retrieves information (C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Retrieves complete and relevant information from class database

3 Proficient
Retrieves most relevant information from class database

2 Adequate
Retrieves some information from class database

1 Limited*
Retrieves little or no information from class database

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes data (C4.2.2)

Organizes data electronically that is accurate and easy to interpret

Organizes data electronically that is interpretable

Organizes data electronically that has minor errors, making interpretation difficult

Organizes data electronically that has many errors and is not interpretable

Records data (C6.2.1)

Consistently records data in an organized, skillful, accurate manner

Records data in an organized, accurate manner

Records data, but organization is lacking and inaccuracies are evident Provides a partial solution to a problem requiring the sorting, organizing and classifying of data, using a database tool

Records little, if any relevant data

Solves problem (C6.2.5)

Insightfully, accurately and effectively provides a solution to a relevant problem requiring the sorting, organizing and classifying of data, using a database tool

Provides a solution to a relevant problem requiring the sorting, organizing and classifying of data, using a database tool

Provides an incomplete or indefensible solution to a problem requiring the sorting, organizing and classifying of data, using a database tool

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix C, Division 2 / 113 2003

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Appendix D
Sample Student Self-reflection Tools
7

The following tools can be used to encourage students to self-reflect. Select one to use with your students.

Progress Self-reflection Name ______________________ Date ___________________ Task _______________________________________________


The steps I have completed in this task include

The steps I still have to complete include

Stumbling Blocks Self-reflection Name ____________________ Date ___________________ Task _____________________________________________


Something I did not understand about this task was

7. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), p. 35.

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Appendix D / 115 2003

Now What? Self-reflection Name ______________________ Date _________________ Task _____________________________________________


Something I am going to change/correct/add/remove from this task is

Learning Self-assessment Name _______________________ Date ________________ Task _____________________________________________


One concept I have learned from this task is

This piece of work demonstrates that I can Check (list the criteria) (list the criteria) (list the criteria) I can improve my work by

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My Changing Goals Self-assessment Name ______________________ Date __________________ Task _____________________________________________


After reviewing this task, I would now like to achieve (define revised goals).

I would like to do this because (explanation).

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Appendix D / 117 2003

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Appendix E
Student Profiles
Division 1
Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date: Division 1 Level 4 Excellent (Wow!) ICT Learner Outcome C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.1.1 access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry C1.1.2 process information from more than one source to retell what has been discovered C2 Students will seek alternative viewpoints, using information technologies. C3 Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.1.1 compare and contrast information from similar types of electronic sources Date: Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date: Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date: Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix E, Division 1 / 119 2003

Division 1

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C4 Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. C4.1.1 follow a plan to complete an inquiry C4.1.2 formulate new questions as research progresses C4.1.3 organize information from more than one source C5 Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. C5.1.1 share information collected from electronic sources to add to a group task C6 Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. C6.1.1 identify a problem within a defined context C6.1.2 use technology to organize and display data in a problem-solving context C6.1.3 use technology to support and present conclusions

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Division 1

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C7 Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning. C7.1.1 develop questions that reflect a personal information need C7.1.2 summarize data by picking key words from gathered information and by using jottings, point form or retelling C7.1.3 draw conclusions from organized information C7.1.4 make predictions based on organized information

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix E, Division 1 / 121 2003

Division 2
Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date: Division 2 Level 4 Excellent (Wow!) ICT Learner Outcome C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.2.1 access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) C1.2.2 organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes C2 Students will seek alternative viewpoints using information technologies. C2.2.1 seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media Date: Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date: Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date: Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Division 2

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C3 Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.2.1 identify and distinguish points of view expressed in electronic sources on a particular topic C3.2.2 recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used C4 Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. C4.2.1 design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan as necessary C4.2.2 organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing C4.2.3 reflect on and describe the processes involved in completing a project

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix E, Division 2 / 123 2003

Division 2

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C5 Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. C5.2.1 retrieve data from available storage devices, such as shared folders, to which groups have contributed C5.2.2 record group brainstorming, planning and sharing of ideas by using technology C5.2.3 extend the scope of a project beyond classroom collaboration by using communication technologies, such as the telephone and e-mail C6 Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. C6.2.1 select and use technology to assist in problem solving C6.2.2 use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems C6.2.3 use graphic organizers, such as mind mapping/webbing, flow charting and outlining, to present connections between ideas and information in a problem-solving environment

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Division 2

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C6 (continued) Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. C6.2.4 solve problems, using numerical operations and such tools as calculators and spreadsheets C6.2.5 solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology C6.2.6 solve issue-related problems, using such communication tools as word processors or e-mail to involve others in the process C6.2.7 generate alternative solutions to problems by using technology to facilitate the process C7 Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning. C7.2.1 use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information C7.2.2 use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix E, Division 2 / 125 2003

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Glossary
Achievement Assessment Contextualize Evaluation Formative Assessment Performance Performance Assessment Reliability Rubric Standard Student Profile Summative Assessment Validity
a students demonstration of knowledge, skills and attitudes relative to grade level curriculum standards collecting information on student achievement and performance to improve student learning to include ICT learner outcomes in another program of studies, such as language arts, by rephrasing the outcome to suit the context of the subject judgement regarding the quality, value or worth of a response ongoing assessment providing information to guide instruction and improve student performance the quality of a students demonstration of the learner outcomes a meaningful, real-life task that enables students to demonstrate what they know and can do in situations like those they will encounter outside the classroom as well as in situations that simulate how people do their work consistency of assessment results a fixed measurement scale and list of criteria that describe the quality of products or performances used to evaluate a students performance expected level of performance in relation to a specified curriculum outcome for a division or grade a chart that illustrates both the outcomes that have been taught and the students level of performance culminating assessment for a unit, grade level or course of study providing a status report on mastery or degree of proficiency according to identified learner outcomes appropriateness, adequacy and truthfulness of interpretations made from assessment information based on learner outcomes

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Glossary / 127 2003

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References
Alberta Assessment Consortium. A Framework for Student Assessment . Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1997. Alberta Assessment Consortium. A Framework for Communicating Student Learning. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1999. Alberta Assessment Consortium. How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 1 to Grade 6. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998a. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 7 to Grade 9. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998b. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 10 to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998c. Alberta Learning. Physical Education Guide to Implementation, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 2000. Alberta Learning. Information and Communication Technology Program of Studies . Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 20002003. Alberta Learning. Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 2002. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Redirecting Assessment. Educational Leadership 46, 7 (1989). Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Teaching for Authentic Student Performance. Educational Leadership 54, 4 (1996). Black, Paul and Dylan Wiliam. Inside the Black Box. London, UK: Kings University, 1998. Davies, Anne. Making Classroom Assessment Work. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000. Eisner, Elliot W. The Uses and Limits of Performance Assessment. Phi Delta Kappan 80, 9 (1999), pp. 658660. Gardner, Howard. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. New York, NY: BasicBooks, 1993. Goodrich, Heidi. Understanding Rubrics. Educational Leadership 54, 4 (1996), pp. 1417. Gregory, Kathleen, Caren Cameron and Anne Davies. Knowing What Counts, Book OneSetting and Using Criteria: For Use in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000a. Gregory, Kathleen, Caren Cameron and Anne Davies. Knowing What Counts, Book TwoSelfAssessment and Goal Setting: For Use in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000b.

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References / 129 2003

Guskey, Thomas R. Reporting on Student Learning: Lessons from the PastPrescriptions for the Future. In Thomas R. Guskey (ed.), Communicating Student Learning: 1996 ASCD Yearbook (Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1996), pp. 1324. Joint Advisory Committee on Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada. Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Research in Applied Measurement and Evaluation, University of Alberta, 1993. Jonassen, David H., Kyle L. Peck and Brent G. Wilson. Learning With Technology: a constructivist perspective. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999. Popham, W. James. The Truth About Testing: An Educators Call to Action. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2001. Stiggins, Richard J. Student-Centered Classroom Assessment (Second Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1997. Stiggins, Richard J. Student-Involved Classroom Assessment (Third Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2001. Stix, Andi. Strategies for Student-Centered Assessment . New Rochelle, NY: The Interactive Classroom, 1996. Wiggins, Grant and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1998.

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Grades 79

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TOOL KIT


For

the Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Program of Studies

2003

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TOOL KIT


For the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Program of Studies

Division 3

ALBERTA LEARNING CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA


Alberta. Alberta Learning. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch. Classroom assessment tool kit for the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) program of studies : grades 79. ISBN 0778525333 1. Educational tests and measurements Alberta. 2. Grading and marking (students). 3. Educational evaluation Alberta. I. Title. LB3051.A333 2003 371.26

For further information, contact: Learning and Teaching Resources Branch 44 Capital Blvd 10044 108 St. NW, Suite 800 Edmonton, AB T5J 5E6 Telephone: 7804272984 in Edmonton or toll-free in Alberta by dialing 3100000 Fax: 7804220576

This resource is intended for: Teachers Technology Coordinators Administrators Parents Stakeholders Others 3 3 3

Copyright 2003, the Crown in Right of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Learning. Alberta Learning, 44 Capital Blvd, 10044 108 St. NW, Suite 800, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 5E6. Every effort has been made to provide proper acknowledgement of original sources. If cases are identified where this has not been done, please notify Alberta Learning so appropriate corrective action can be taken. Permission is given by the copyright owner for any person to reproduce this resource, or any part thereof, for educational purposes and on a nonprofit basis, except for those parts for which Alberta Learning does not hold copyright.

Acknowledgements
Alberta Learning wishes to acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals:

Alberta Learning
Pat Redhead, Project Chair Bonnie Brooks Joe Friesenhan Raja Panwar Phil Campbell Teddy Moline Denise Stocco Document Production Unit Stakeholder Technology Branch Stakeholder Technology Branch Information and Technology Management Curriculum Branch Learner Assessment Branch Learning and Teaching Resources Branch French Language Services Branch Learning and Teaching Resources Branch

Writing Team
Doug Knight, Project Manager Barry Allen Carol Caulfield Barry Edgar Dave Erickson Elizabeth Fargey Jennifer MacLean Kyla Popik Martina Schmidt Cliff Sosnowski Priscilla Theroux Joni Turville Sandra Unrau Evie Van Scheik Nancy Weber Knight Research and Consulting Services Chinooks Edge School Division No. 73 Parkland School Division No. 70 Edmonton School District No. 7 Peace River School Division No. 10 Red Deer School District No. 104 Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. 7 Foothills School Division No. 38 Science Alberta Charter School Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. 7 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 St. Albert Protestant Separate School District No. 6 Calgary School District No. 19 Wolf Creek School Division No. 72 Edmonton School District No. 7

Revision Team
Robert Hogg, Coordinator Dale Armstrong, Coordinator Sherry Bennett Alanna Cellini Carol French Linda Glasier Bette Gray Donna Griffin Laurie Hawley Gary Heck Sharon Horne Carol Anne Inglis Dean Jarvey Jaime Johansson Daylene Lauman Tanis Marshall Kathy McCabe Anne Mulgrew Robert Smith Priscilla Theroux Joni Turville Ron Tyler Anna Wong Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC) J.D. Armstrong Consulting S.R. Bennett Consulting Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Parkland School Division No. 70 Elk Island Public Schools Regional Division No. 14 Parkland School Division No. 70 Heck Leadership and Consulting Services, Inc. Golden Hills School Division No. 75 Edmonton School District No. 7 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 Integrity Consulting Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Parkland School Division No. 70 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 St. Albert Protestant Separate School District No. 6 Chinooks Edge School Division No. 73 Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education

Table of Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. Guiding Principles ........................................................................................................................ Principle 1: Assessment should be continuous ...................................................................... Principle 2: Assessment should be collaborative .................................................................... Principle 3: Assessment should be comprehensive ................................................................ Principle 4: Assessment should include criteria ...................................................................... Components ................................................................................................................................ Curriculum and Assessment Matrices .................................................................................... ICT Performance Assessments ............................................................................................. Developing Your Own Performance Assessments .................................................................. Criteria for Designing Performance Assessment Tasks ........................................................... Criteria for Designing Rubrics ................................................................................................ Student Self-reflection ........................................................................................................... Sample Student Profile ......................................................................................................... Communicating Student Learning .......................................................................................... Appendices A. Sample English Language Arts Assessment Task.............................................................. Single Rubric Combining ELA and ICT Outcomes ...................................................... Separate Rubrics for ELA and ICT Outcomes ............................................................ Evaluation Tools for ICT Outcome Categories F and P .................................................. Sample Performance Assessment Tasks and Rubrics for ICT Outcome Category C ......... Sample Student Self-reflection Tools ................................................................................ Student Profiles .............................................................................................................. 23 26 27 29 31 61 65 1 7 7 8 8 8 11 11 12 14 17 18 19 21 22

B. C. D. E.

Glossary ...................................................................................................................................... References .................................................................................................................................. This tool kit with blackline masters of student assessment tasks, rubrics, worksheets and other assessment tools is also available at <http://www.learning.gov.ab.ca/k_12/curriculum/bysubject/ict/>.

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Introduction
Learning is enhanced when assessment strategies match the learner outcomes and are aligned to instruction assessment is integrated with instruction (unit and lesson planning) assessment relates new concept(s) to previous learning students are involved with their own assessment students get immediate, meaningful feedback students of all ability levels are able to demonstrate what they know and what they can do assessment engages and motivates students.
Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), 2000, p. 2

Teachers play a central role in the assessment and evaluation of student learning. Their authority and responsibility is established in the School Act (RSA 2000) (s18(e)) that states, Teachers regularly evaluate students and periodically report the results of the evaluation to the students, the students parents and the board. Technology is defined as the processes, tools and techniques that alter human activity the employment of tools, machines, materials and processes to do work, produce goods, perform services or carry out other useful activities (Alberta Learning, 20002003, p. 47). The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competencies outlined in the ICT program of studies are basic life skills for a digital world that enable students to function in a knowledge-based economy and an information-rich society. These skills are no longer optional or complementary. They are an essential component of a students preparation for life and the world of work. The ICT curriculum is not intended to stand alone, but to be integrated within the programs of study for language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Selected ICT outcomes are blended with core learner outcomes within a common context, such as a project, lesson or activity. The long-range goal is for ICT learner outcomes to be included and contextualized within core and other programs of study.

While schools play a variety of important social, custodial and organizational roles in communities, we assume that their primary obligation should be to help students to learn how to recognize and solve problems, comprehend new phenomena, construct mental models of those phenomena, and, given a new situation, set goals and regulate their own learning (learn how to learn).
Jonassen, Peck and Wilson, 1999, p. 7

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Introduction / 1 2003

The Information and Communication Technology Program of Studies articulates a set of learner outcomes to be achieved over 12 grades of schooling. In making decisions about instructional planning and assessment, these outcomes: are sequenced for each of the four divisions (Grades K3, 46, 79 and 1012) can be placed into a scope and sequence that specifies which outcomes are taught in particular courses and grade levels (see www.learning.gov.ab.ca/ict for a document describing how to adapt a scope and sequence framework, and for sample frameworks) may be introduced at any time within the division, but are to be achieved no later than the third, sixth, ninth and twelfth grade levels, respectively are to be assessed and evaluated within the language of learning can be assessed and evaluated formatively or summatively when ICT learner outcomes and other learner outcomes remain separate but are part of a common assessment task; and can be reported to students, parents and others as separate marks are to be assessed and evaluated formatively and summatively when ICT learner outcomes are included and contextualized within core or other programs of studies; and are to be reported to students, parents and others as part of the subject mark (see Appendix A, pages 2328 for an English language arts sample with ICT outcomes included and contextualized).

Figure 1, on the following page, illustrates the relationship between the ICT program of studies and other programs of study. Figure 2, on page 4, is a general model of classroom assessment that shows the relationship between assessing, evaluating and reporting student learning. A glossary of educational terms used throughout this document can be found on page 69.

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Figure 1

MATHEMATICS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ICT
SOCIAL STUDIES OTHER

SCIENCE

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Introduction / 3 2003

Figure 2 1

Classroom Assessment

Assessment methods or strategies (collect information on student achievement and performance to improve student learning)

Evaluation methods or strategies (judgement regarding the quality, value or worth of a response)

Communication (reporting) methods or strategies (inform the student, parents and others about what has been accomplished and what the next steps are in the learning process)

Formative

Not reported as part of a grade (informal)

Student profile Personal communication Home response journal Individualized program plan (IPP) Portfolio Student self-reflection Open classroom Celebration of learning Student-led conference

Summative

Reported as part of a grade (formal)

Report card

1. From the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC) (Edmonton, AB, 2001).

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The purpose of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit is to assist teachers in selecting and developing classroom assessment strategies for evaluating C category learner outcomes (Figure 3) in the context of other core subjects and courses. C category (Communicating, Inquiring, Decision Making and Problem Solving) learner outcomes involve the ability to use a variety of processes to critically assess information, manage inquiry, solve problems, do research and communicate with a variety of audiences. Students are expected to apply their knowledge and skills in real-life situations (Alberta Learning, 20002003, p. 2). C category learner outcomes are best assessed using performance assessments that are meaningful, authentic, engaging, interesting, and age- and curriculum-appropriate. According to the literature, performance assessment is a closer measure of students abilities to achieve aspirations, than are conventional forms of testing (Eisner 1999). Performance assessment tasks and rubrics for evaluating some C category outcomes are available in Appendix C, pages 3160.

Figure 3
Communicating, Inquiring, Decisi on Making and Problem Solving
C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. Students will seek alternative viewpoints, using information technologies. Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning.

1
C2

2
C3

3
C4

4
C5

5
C6

6
C7

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Introduction / 5 2003

F category (Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts) and P category (Processes for Productivity) learner outcomes are an important support for students to demonstrate C category outcomes. Checklists and rating scales appropriate for evaluating some F and P category outcomes are available in Appendix B, pages 2930.

Figure 4
Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of technology. Students will understand the role of technology as it applies to self, work and society. Students will demonstrate a moral and ethical approach to the use of technology. Students will become discerning consumers of mass media and electronic information. Students will practise the concepts of ergonomics and safety when using technology. Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of the operating skills required in a variety of technologies.

F6

Processes for Productivity


P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 Students will compose, revise and edit text. Students will organize and manipulate data. Students will communicate through multimedia. Students will integrate various applications. Students will navigate and create hyperlinked resources. Students will use communication technology to interact with others.

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Guiding Principles
Assessment, evaluation and communication of student achievement and growth are essential parts of the teaching and learning process. Each part of the teaching and learning process should be a positive experience for students and promote personal growth. Practices should be carried out in such a way that they support continuous 2 learning and development. To assist students in meeting the aim of the ICT program of studies, assessment should be a continuous, collaborative and comprehensive process that includes clearly identified and communicated criteria. The following principles, adapted from the Physical Education Guide to Implementation (Alberta Learning, 2000), are essential for effective assessment and evaluation of ICT learner outcomes: Principle 1: Principle 2: Principle 3: Principle 4: Assessment should be continuous Assessment should be collaborative Assessment should be comprehensive Assessment should include criteria.

Principle 1: Assessment should be continuous

Assessment practices should be carried out in such a way that they support and enhance ongoing student learning and development. Assessment practices should: require demonstration of both core subject and ICT learner outcomes promote student learning be part of instruction in a variety of contexts, using varied methods and instruments that match learner outcomes be part of an ongoing process rather than a set of isolated events focus on both process and product provide information about students prior learning provide ongoing feedback about the effectiveness of instruction enable students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills provide opportunities for students to revise their work in order to set goals and improve their learning provide a status report on how well students can demonstrate learner outcomes at that time.

2. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), A Framework for Student Assessment (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1997), p. 14.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


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Guiding Principles / 7 2003

Principle 2: Assessment should be collaborative

Students benefit when they are involved in the assessment process. Assessment practices should help and encourage students to: be responsible for their own learning and develop a positive attitude toward the use of technology in meaningful, real-world situations be involved in establishing criteria for evaluating their products or performances work together to learn and achieve outcomes feel competent and successful using technology set goals for further improvements.

Principle 3: Assessment should be comprehensive

Assessment practices should address learner outcomes and include a variety of strategies that meet the diverse learning needs of students. Assessment practices should: be developmentally appropriate, age-appropriate, genderbalanced, and consider students cultural and special needs be constructive, build on student strengths, and encourage further learning by creating positive atmospheres and self-images enable students to demonstrate ICT proficiencies: in many different contexts and subjects in meaningful, real-life situations enable students to demonstrate that ICT proficiency is transferable across contexts and subjects include multiple sources of evidence (formal and informal) provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do.

Principle 4: Assessment should include criteria

Assessment practices should identify and clearly define the critical aspects of performance for demonstrating student learning. Assessment practices should: involve students in identifying and/or creating criteria communicate the criteria used to evaluate student work before students begin tasks so they can plan for success provide students with rubrics to indicate performance levels be communicated to students so that they understand expectations related to learner outcomes. Achievement is based on demonstration of learner outcomes rather than comparing one students performance to anothers. Comparing one students proficiencies to anothers does not motivate students to achieve and frequently has the reverse effect. Meaningful, relevant and realistic criteria for achieving learner outcomes can motivate students to take responsibility for their own learning and develop a lifelong desire to use technology wisely.

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A good assessment instrument can be a learning experience. But more to the point, it is extremely desirable to have assessment occur in the context of students working on problems, projects or products that: genuinely engage them hold their interest motivate them to do well. Such exercises may not be as easy to design as the standard multiple -choice entry, but they are far more likely to elicit a students full repertoire of skills and to yield information that is useful for subsequent advice and placement.
Gardner, 1993, p. 178

[Assessments should] measure learning outcomes of indisputable importance.


Popham, 2001, p. 105

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Guiding Principles / 9 2003

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Components
Curriculum and Assessment Matrices
The learner outcomes of the ICT program of studies identify sets of competencies that are best demonstrated in meaningful activities and projects, rather than as discrete and isolated mini-skills. Several outcomes can be assessed within one activity. Also, more reliable information on student achievement can be collected through several activities or projects. The sample matrix below illustrates how activity codes are assigned to sample assessment tasks. For example, performance assessment task ELA201.01 is an activity code meaning English Language Arts 20, assessment task number 1 for this course. This assessment task will evaluate ICT learner outcomes C3 and C7. C3.4.1 assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information C3.4.2 demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic C7.4.1 use appropriate strategies to locate information to meet personal needs C7.4.2 analyze and synthesize information to determine patterns and links among ideas

Sample Division 4
Assessment ICT Outcomes <Title> PM20.01 <Title> BIO20.01
C1.4.1

<Title> ELA201.01

<Title> CHEM20.01
C1.4.2

<Title> PHYS20.02

C1
Access, use and communicate information

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C3.4.1

C3.4.1, C3.4.2

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.3, C6.4.4 C7.4.1, C7.4.2

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.4 C7.4.3

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.4 C7.4.3

C7
Use electronic research techniques

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


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Components / 11 2003

ICT Performance Assessments

This Classroom Assessment Tool Kit provides sample assessment tasks in Appendix C for Grade 9 level courses. The sample assessment tasks incorporate outcomes from one or more of the core subject areas. These tasks are provided as illustrations and are but one component of a quality classroom assessment program. These examples are intended to demonstrate: how ICT outcomes can be assessed and evaluated how ICT and core subject outcomes can be incorporated in the same assessment task yet provide distinct information about each set of outcomes what good performance assessment tasks look like. Each sample assessment has four parts: 1. learner outcomes 2. criteria for assessing student products and performances 3. student assessment tasks 4. rubrics to evaluate student performance.

Tasks
Tasks are meaningful activities designed to reveal whether students are able to demonstrate the learner outcomes of the ICT program of studies and of one or more core subjects in a real-life context. The tasks require that students have had relevant learning experiences and instruction prior to undertaking the assessment tasks. These task activities are examples only. Teachers are encouraged to modify them to meet the needs and circumstances of their students. The availability of resources, such as software, computers and Internet connections, will determine which tasks are most appropriate. Student interest and readiness should also be taken into consideration.

Rubrics
Rubrics further clarify what is expected of students by describing task assessment criteria and levels of task performance. Two rubrics are provided for each task. As these tasks are principally designed to measure ICT learner outcomes, the rubrics provide only those criteria that match the specific outcomes and criteria listed in the ICT rubric. Core subject rubrics are also provided for the evaluation of learner outcomes. Prior to using the rubrics in Appendix C, teachers should ensure that students understand the language used in each rubric. It is essential to discuss the rubric so that the language becomes understandable to students. This is a great opportunity to help students expand their vocabulary and clarify what is expected of them. When student work is judged limited or insufficient, teachers need to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help students improve. One possibility is for teachers and students to work together to establish learning goals. All students can benefit from setting learning goals. (See Student Learning Goals at the end of each rubric and in the Sample Student Profile on page 21.) Other sources of performance assessment information are included in the reference section of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit and on Web sites, such as www.aac.ab.ca and www.2Learn.ca. 12 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003 Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)
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The following provides an explanation of each performance level of a rubric.

Level 4 Excellent

Meaning The student meets the standard of excellence for the grade, demonstrates exemplary performance or understanding, shows creativity.

Commentary This is a Wow!

3 Proficient

The student meets the acceptable standard for the grade by demonstrating solid performance or understanding.

This is a Yes.

2 Adequate

The student just meets the acceptable standard for the grade. Performance and understanding are emerging or developing, some errors are being made, grasp is not thorough. The student is not yet meeting the acceptable standard for the grade and has serious errors, omissions or misconceptions.

This is a Yes, but

1 Limited*

This is a No, but there is some basis for making improvement. The teacher needs to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Insufficient/ Blank*

No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

This is a No judgement can be made. The teacher must decide: if the student should redo the task if more time should be provided to complete the task if a different task at the students ability level should be assigned if further instruction leading to reassessment should be provided if the task is inappropriate for the student and should be scrapped.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, teachers need to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help students improve.

3. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 4849.

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Components / 13 2003

Developing Your Own Performance Assessments

The following are suggestions for developing and using performance assessments. Collect examples of performance assessment tasks and rubrics. Have ongoing discussions with colleagues about assessment tasks and rubricswhats working and whats not. Work with others in your school or department to develop common language about assessments and grading. Develop a plan of action for including more products or performances in your assessment program. Add one self-reflective activity during the week. Add one performance assessment with criteria and scoring rubric per grading period. Visit Web sites that provide examples of performance assessment tasks and rubrics.

When developing performance assessments, begin by selecting subject and ICT learner outcomes. Three to five learner outcomes for each is an appropriate goal. Once students have completed a task, they should be given an opportunity to reflect on their performance and set goals for future learning. This allows teachers and students to link assessment results to teaching and learning. A sample planning template is provided below.

Sample Performance Assessment Template


Grade

TITLE <Insert overview of assessment task here>


<SUBJECT> OUTCOMES No. Description

ICT OUTCOMES No. Description

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will:

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The following templates are for developing student assessment tasks and rubrics.

<TITLE> Student Assessment Task <description of task>


Student ___________________________________

<SUBJECT> RUBRIC <TITLE>


Level Criteria

4
Excellent

3
Proficient

2
Adequate

1
Limited*

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate
interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


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Components / 15 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC <TITLE>


Level Criteria

4
Excellent

3
Proficient

2
Adequate

1
Limited*

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Criteria for Designing Performance Assessment Tasks4


The following analytic rating scale provides a guide to ensure that important elements are included in performance assessments. It also provides an indicator of the extent to which each element is present.
To what extent does the performance assessment: a. establish clear criteria for assessing student learning related to specified learner outcomes these criteria form the basis for evaluating and communicating student learninginvolving students in developing criteria is encouraged assess student performance on high priority and relevant outcomes what is important for a student to know and be able to do is based on student learning needs and interests together with the priorities of the community, school and jurisdiction establish a meaningful, real-life context (based on issues, problems, themes and/or student interests) require the application of a range of thinking skills or processes contain age- and grade-appropriate activities that are sufficiently challenging provide students with a meaningful/real-life role call for products or performances directed to a specific audience allow for more than one right answer elicit responses that reveal levels of performance rather than simply correct or incorrect answers provide for students of varying ability levels to successfully complete tasks provide for purposeful integration of subject areas provide clear directions for students Fully Partially Not at all

b.

c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l.

m. engage students so their interest and enthusiasm will be sustained n. o. p. merit the time and energy required to complete it provide an evaluation rubric matched with the criteria provide students with the criteria and opportunities to reflect on, selfevaluate and improve their performance?

4. Adapted with permission from the Maryland Assessment Consortium, Performance Task Rubric (Linthicum, MD: Maryland Assessment Consortium, 1994).

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 17 2003

Criteria for Designing Rubrics


The following analytic rating scale provides a guide to ensure that important elements are included in rubrics. It also provides an indicator of the extent to which each element is present. Rarely, if ever

Do the rubric descriptors: a. state criteria in specific terms using action verbs b. address expected learner outcomes c. describe what students are to know and do d. address the same criteria, in the same order and number at each level e. describe measurable qualities of a performance or product (not quantities) f. use age-appropriate, helpful, understandable and succinct language g. use parallel language at each level h. clearly distinguish one performance or product level from the others?

Fully

Partly

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Student Self-reflection

Students do better when they understand the goal, see models and know how their performance compares to learner outcomes. Sample Student Self-reflection Tools are provided in Appendix D, pages 6163, to encourage students to think about how they have performed, review what has been learned and set goals for further 5 learning.

Rationale5
Learning increases when students are involved in the assessment process. Underlying the various approaches [to improving classroom assessment] are assumptions about what makes for effective learningin particular that students have to be actively involved [in the assessment process].
Black and Wiliam, 1998, p. 5

Learner outcomes are clarified when students assist in describing the criteria used to evaluate the performance. Students can reach any target they know about and that holds still for them.
Stiggins, in Davies, 2000, p. 19

Students are motivated to learn when they are involved in determining performance criteria and setting goals. Rubrics offer a means for educators to motivate students through classroom assessment. Students, who are given a voice in their grading, also are given a clear understanding of what is expected from them and the assurance that their accomplishments will be recognized. Thus, the process creates a safe environment for students to take creative risks.
Stix, 1996, p. 51

Students understand how they learn when they assess their own learning. When students assess themselves they develop insights into their own learning.
Gregory, Cameron and Davies, 2000b, p. 10

Strategies to involve students in assessment5


Continual self-reflection throughout performance assessment enables students to assess progress, identify areas of difficulty, define learning and reassess goals. Self-reflection is the key to continued, powerful learning.

5. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 3032.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 19 2003

Developing criteria and/or rubrics Students can help:

identify and determine important criteria for a task (use brainstorming and discussions that analyze student samples to develop a critical elements list) write descriptors in student-friendly language create their own rubrics for open-ended tasks (begin by having students write criteria for simple things, like the ideal birthday party, being a good friend or expected classroom behaviours) generate or choose samples that demonstrate or reflect each performance level.
5

Initiating teacherstudent communication As teachers move about classrooms during the administration of performance assessments, they should: provide continual feedback to students observe student progress encourage students to continuously self-assess assist students with difficulties.
5

Using Pause-and- Think Have students pause briefly to think about their work and what they have learned. The reflection should be guided and specific. Students could reflect on their progress, their learning, what they did not understand, what comes next or changing goals. After Pause-and-Think, students could complete the following activities. Share Turn to a partner and describe what they learned. Look for proofSelect and comment on a work sample that demonstrates an aspect of their learning. Connect to criteriaExplain how they have met the criteria. Relate the learningConnect current concepts to past learning or find examples of the concepts in other contexts. Self/Peer assessment Use the rubric to evaluate their own or another students product or performance, and suggest what works, what doesnt and whats missing.

5. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 3032.

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Sample Student Profile

A profile of the various levels of achievement on general ICT outcomes, in the context of core subjects, provides a visual and ongoing record of student performance. Student profiles are rating scales that may be used to record and communicate students levels of performance based on C category ICT learner outcomes. This information could be taken from an ICT scope and sequence developed by the school or jurisdiction. (See www.learning.gov. ab.ca/ict for a document describing how to adapt a scope and sequence framework, and for sample frameworks.)

ICT OUTCOMES: Sample Profile, Division 1


Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date: Jamie Doe English Language Arts 3 November 15, 2002 Division 1 Level 4 Excellent (Wow!) ICT Learner Outcome Date: Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date: Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date: Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

C1
Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.1.1 access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry

October 2002 (Grade 3)

June 2002 (Grade 2)

C3
Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.1.1 compare and contrast information from similar types of electronic sources Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Finding information that I need from the Internet Action June 2002By October 2002, I will successfully access and retrieve relevant information from the Internet, independently. Strength to enhance: My ability to use a variety of technologies to access information Action January 2002I want to find new ways to access information; e.g., discussion forums.

January 2002 (Grade 2)

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Components / 21 2003

Communicating Student Learning

Information and communication technology learner outcomes can be assessed formatively or summatively. Effective communication informs students, parents and others about the outcomes accomplished and the next steps in the learning process. Student Profiles are provided in Appendix E, pages 6568. The greater the role students are given in this process, the richer the information that is shared and the greater the impact on future student learning. Communication of student learning should: celebrate and improve learning enhance the home and school partnership involve a variety of strategies reflect a schools philosophy about learning be based on curriculum outcomes. Information on student progress is required for reporting clearly to students, parents and others. This information is essential in order for teachers to change or refine instructional plans to ensure learning activities are appropriate for all students. The information is also required to evaluate program effectiveness and revise programs to improve student learning (Alberta Learning 2002).

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Appendix A
Sample English Language Arts Assessment Task
This English Language Arts (ELA) task identifies both ELA and ICT outcomes. Many of these ICT outcomes can be contextualized within the ELA program of studies. This assessment sample uses an integrated rubric (page 26) to assess both the ICT and ELA outcomes. Note : If ICT outcomes are not included and contextualized with another core curriculum, the ICT and core subject outcomes need to be evaluated separately. Two distinct rubrics would be used because the English language arts subject outcomes could be demonstrated without the application of ICT outcomes. The sample rubrics on pages 2728 illustrate how ICT outcomes and English language arts outcomes can be evaluated separately.

Grade 6: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Students will write a new version of a story incorporating elements found in at least two versions of the story. Students will then create a multimedia version of the new story.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No. 2.4.2 2.4.3 Description Elaborate on the expression of ideas use literary devices, such as imagery and figurative language, to create particular effects Structure texts determine purpose and audience needs to choose forms, and organize ideas and details in oral, print and other media texts / express the same ideas in different forms and genres; compare and explain the effectiveness of each for audience and purpose Determine information needs decide on and select the information needed to support a point of view Plan to gather information develop and follow own plan for accessing and gathering ideas and information, considering guidelines for time and length of investigation and presentation Use a variety of sources locate information to answer research questions, using a variety of sources, such as printed texts, bulletin boards, biographies, art, music, community resource people, CD-ROMs and the Internet Access information skim, scan and read closely to gather information 3.3.1 Organize information organize ideas and information using a variety of strategies and techniques, such as comparing and contrasting, and classifying and sorting according to subtopics and sequence Record information quote information from oral, print and other media sources

3.1.2 3.1.3

3.2.1

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 23 2003

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES (contd) No. 3.4.1 4.1.3 Description Share ideas and information select appropriate visuals, print and/or other media to inform and engage the audience Enhance legibility experiment with a variety of software design elements, such as spacing, graphics, titles and headings, and font sizes and styles, to enhance the presentation of texts Attend to spelling edit for and correct commonly misspelled words in own writing, using spelling generalizations and the meaning and function of words in context

4.2.2

ICT OUTCOMES No. C1.2.1 C1.2.2 Description access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing retrieve data from available storage devices, such as shared folders, to which groups have contributed use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C4.2.2 C5.2.1 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information organize information create a storyboard compose a story use conventions present a story. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. The following Web sites can be pertinent to this task. http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/storfolk.html Folklore, Myth & Legend (from the Childrens Literature Web Guide) http://www.cln.org/themes/fairytales.html Stories, Folklore, and Fairy Tales Theme Page (from the Community Learning Network) http://www.qesn.meq.gouv.qc.ca/folklore/index.htm Teaching with Folklore

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Student Assessment Task

USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


People are storytelling creatures. We make sense of our experience of the world through the stories we tell, and we are drawn to the stories of others. As a young storywriter, you have been hired by a publishing company to create a new version of a story and prepare it for publication. To accomplish this, find and read at least two versions of a myth, folktale or legend that you find engaging. (Use print or Web sources.) Genres you may choose from include: Greek myths Chinese folktales forest lore space folklore and myths myths and folklore about flight. Your job is to: use a graphic organizer (web, chart, Venn diagram) to compare the two story versions of the myth, folktale or legend you have found select elements from these two versions incorporate these elements into a well-written new story by: using a storyboard to plan your new version of the tale creating a multimedia version presenting your story to representatives from the publishing company.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 25 2003

Single Rubric Combining ELA and ICT Outcomes


Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS and ICT RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES
Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1, C1.2.1, C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (3.3.1, C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Creates storyboard (3.1.2, C1.2.2, C7.2.1) Composes story (2.4.2, 2.4.3)

Creates an original, interesting storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre

Creates a storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard templat e by placing events and ideas randomly

Composes original, compelling story with rich supporting details

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes simple, predictable story with few supporting details

Composes incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story

Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of the piece; errors are hardly noticeable Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors, but these do not interfere with writers intended meaning Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and significantly interfere with writers intended meaning Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

Presents story (3.4.1, 4.1.3, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve. Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Separate Rubrics for ELA and ICT Outcomes


Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (3.3.1)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using a graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using a graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using a graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant inf ormation into pre-set categories using a graphic organizer

Creates storyboard (3.1.2)

Creates an original, interesting storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre Composes original and compelling story with rich supporting details Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of the piece; errors are hardly noticeable Presents story that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Creates a storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre Composes simple and predictable story with few supporting details Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Completes a storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Composes story (2.4.2, 2.4.3)

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and significantly interfere with writers intended meaning Presents story that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors, but these do not interfere with writers intended meaning Presents story that communicates to the audience

Presents story (3.4.1, 4.1.3)

Presents story that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 27 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1, C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer Creates an electronic storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using an electronic graphic organizer Completes an electronic storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Creates storyboard (C1.2.2, C7.2.1)

Creates an original, interesting electronic storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience through the effective use of sound and graphics

Completes an electronic storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

28 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B
Evaluation Tools for ICT Outcome Categories F and P
Since F, P and C ICT learner outcomes measure different skills, the tools used to assess and evaluate these outcomes are also different. F outcomes are concerned with social, moral and safety issues, and P outcomes are primarily skillbased, therefore assessment strategies that give students opportunities to demonstrate their skills either as a finished product or as a process are appropriate. Rubrics, analytic rating scales and checklists are efficient tools for judging the quality of student performance and promoting successful learning because clear explanations are provided to students. To be effective, it is essential that these evaluation tools be shared with students before they start assessment tasks. Analytic rating scales and rubrics are comparable to dimmer switchesthere are various degrees of illumination just as there are degrees of quality of performance. Checklists, on the other hand, are more like simple toggle switchesthey are either on or off. Checklists provide teachers with opportunities to reveal to students whether specific criteria are present or absent. Checklists are two-point scalesyes or not yet. The sample checklists in this appendix are based on F and P learner outcomes.
6

6. Adapted from Alberta Education, Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 7 to Grade 9 (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998), pp. 12, 18, 21, 23, 28, 29, 34, 36, 42, 51, 61, 66.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B / 29 2003

F and P Outcomes Checklist


Student ___________________________________ A. BASIC PROCEDURES
Observation of Student YES NOT YET

The student can: connect and use audio, video and digital equipment (F6.3.1) perform routine data maintenance and management of personal files (F6.3.2) upload and download text, image, audio and visual files (F6.3.3) control devices electronically (F6.3.4) describe the steps in loading software (F6.3.5) identify and apply safety procedures, including anti-virus scan, virus checks and troubleshoot technical problems (F6.3.6, F1.3.7)

B. COMPUTER WORKSTATION COMPONENTS


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

Work Station Routines The student: appropriately adjusts monitor, keyboard, desk, chair and other equipment to ensure workstation is safe and ergonomically appropriatecomfortable, healthy, safe and efficient (F5.3.2) observes ethical, legal and security measures in handling software and hardwarecopyright, privacy, confidentiality (F3.3.5, F3.3.6) uses time and resources wisely (F3.3.1)

C. PROCESSES FOR PRODUCTIVITY


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

To support communication, the student can: design a document, using style sheets and with attention to page layout (P1.3.1) use advanced word processing menu features to accomplish a task (P1.3.2) revise text documents based on feedback (P1.3.3) design, create and modify a database (P2.3.1) design, create and modify a spreadsheet using functions like SUM, PRODUCT, QUOTIENT and AVERAGE (P2.3.2) use a graphing calculator or computer to solve problems using rational numbers (P2.3.4) create multimedia presentations (P3.3.1, P3.3.2) integrate and emphasize information from a database into a text document (P4.3.1, P4.3.2, P4.3.3) create a multiple-link web page (P5.3.1) interact with targeted audiences using networks and communication technologies (P6.3.1)

30 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C
Sample Performance Assessment Tasks and Rubrics for ICT Outcome Category C
The sample ICT assessment tasks focus on C category learner outcomes. C category tasks subsume outcomes from the F and P categories of the ICT outcomes. The result is a comprehensive assessment that requires the completion of fewer assessment tasks. This appendix provides sample performance tasks and scoring rubrics for mathematics, science, social studies and English language arts representing some of the C category outcomes. Below is a Curriculum and Assessment Matrix indicating the activity code assigned to the sample performance assessment task and the ICT learner outcomes that the task assesses. For each assessment task, students are given a real-life, meaningful context with a definite role and audience. As these are simulations, the audience may consist of teachers, parents, support staff or classmates. The samples may also include Web link references that were active at the time of publication and will be updated from time to time in the online edition of this tool kit. Teachers should determine and communicate to students whether assessment tasks will be evaluated on an individual or group basis.

Curriculum and Assessment Matrix


Assessment ICT Outcomes C1
Access, use and communicate information

E-Zine Review

Evaluating Sources of Information

School Newspaper Journalist

Survey on Marketing

ELA.01
C1.3.1, C1.3.6

ELA.02
C1.3.1, C1.3.2, C1.3.4, C1.3.5 C2.3.1, C2.3.2, C2.3.3 C3.3.1, C3.3.2

ELA.03
C1.3.4, C1.3.5, C1.3.6

MA.01
C1.3.5, C1.3.6

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C2.3.1, C2.3.2, C2.3.3

C3
Critically assess information

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C4.3.1

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.3.1, C6.3.2 C7.3.2

C7
Use electronic research techniques

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 31 2003

Assessment ICT Outcomes C1


Access, use and communicate information

Air-Quality Indicators

Future Communication Technologies and Quality of Life

SC.01
C1.3.1, C1.3.3, C1.3.5, C1.3.6

SS.01
C1.3.1, C1.3.2, C1.3.3, C1.3.5, C1.3.6

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.3.1, C6.3.2, C6.3.3 C7.3.2 C7.3.1, C7.3.2

C7
Use electronic research techniques

32 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 9: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA.01)

E-ZINE REVIEW
Students will create a plan for accessing a variety of opinions on a specific book or movie of interest to teenagers, use the plan to conduct a search for this information and write a review for posting on a Web site.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No.
3.1.1

Description
Focus attention synthesize ideas and information from a variety of sources to develop own opinions, points of view and general impressions Determine information needs select types and sources of information to achieve an effective balance between researched information and own ideas Use a variety of sources obtain information reflecting multiple perspectives from a variety of sources, such as expository essays, graphs, diagrams, online catalogues, periodical indices, film libraries, electronic databases and the Internet, when conducting research Record information choose specific vocabulary, and use conventions accurately and effectively to enhance credibility Share ideas and information communicate ideas and information in a variety of oral, print and other media texts, such as media scripts, multimedia presentations, panel discussion and articles

3.1.2

3.2.1

3.3.2 3.4.1

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.3.1 C1.3.6

Description
plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for content, audience and purpose access diverse viewpoints on particular topics by using appropriate technologies assemble and organize different viewpoints in order to assess their validity use information technology to find facts that support or refute diverse viewpoints

C2.3.1 C2.3.2 C2.3.3

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: plan and conduct a search locate and organize information synthesize information communicate findings.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 33 2003

TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. To facilitate this activity, teachers may wish to discuss options for planning and conducting the search using information technology. It would also be beneficial to discuss ways to organize differing opinions within the review. There are several e-zine sites on the Internet. Examples can be found at: http://www.2Learn.ca/ http://www.wired.com/news/school/ http://www.surf-site.com/i.x/Kids_and_Teens/Teen_Life/Magazines_and_E-zines/. It is important to preview sites before recommending them to students.

34 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

E-ZINE REVIEW
Entertainment is part of life, and so is sharing personal opinions. What we see and read becomes more meaningful when we share ideas and opinions, and reflect on our differences. Written reviews are effective ways to share a variety of opinions about sources of entertainment, such as books and movies. Reading reviews allows us to experience a variety of ideas, and writing them allows us to reconsider our ideas by comparing, revising or elaborating on them. Electronic reviews, such as those found in an e-zine, allow us to share such information with a wide audience. You are a book or movie critic. You have been asked to create a plan for accessing a variety of opinions on a specific book or movie, and use the plan to conduct a search for this information. Evaluate your information, selecting facts from the book or movie to support or refute the opinions you have collected. Organize these facts and opinions, along with your own, into a book or movie review targeted to teenagers, to be posted on a Web site. Revise and edit your work carefully.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 35 2003

Student

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC E-ZINE REVIEW


Level Criteria
Plans for information retrieval (3.2.1)

4 Excellent
Develops a clear, practical plan for accessing information that reflects multiple perspectives from an extensive variety of sources

3 Proficient
Develops a workable plan for accessing information that reflects multiple perspectives from a variety of sources

2 Adequate
Develops a workable plan for accessing information from a few sources

1 Limited*
Develops an impractical plan that makes gathering information difficult

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Selects information (3.1.2)

Selects types and sources of information to create an effective balance between information gathered and own ideas

Selects types and sources of information to create a balance between information gathered and own ideas

Selects sources of information to supplement own ideas

Provides little or no evidence of balance between information gathered and own ideas

Synthesizes information (3.1.1)

Organizes and synthesizes information from a variety of sources to create a comprehensive review

Organizes and synthesizes information from a variety of sources to create a review

Organizes and synthesizes information from a few sources to create a review

Organizes information from few, if any, sources to create an incomplete review

Communicates findings (3.4.1, 3.3.2)

Communicates ideas and information effectively, using specific vocabulary and correct language conventions that engage the audience

Communicates ideas and information clearly, using appropriate vocabulary and correct language conventions that hold the attention of the audience

Communicates ideas and information using vocabulary and language structures that do not interfere with the flow of communication

Communicates ideas and information using limited vocabulary and inconsistent or incorrect language conventions that interfere with the flow of communication

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

36 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC E-ZINE REVIEW


Level Criteria
Plans and conducts a search (C1.3.1)

4 Excellent
Develops an efficient and complete plan that focuses on gathering meaningful material from a wide range of electronic sources, representing diverse opinions

3 Proficient
Develops a plan that focuses on gathering material from electronic sources, representing several opinions

2 Adequate
Develops a plan that uses material from electronic sources, representing a few opinions

1 Limited*
Develops an unworkable or impractical plan that uses material from electronic sources

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Locates and organizes information (C2.3.1, C2.3.2, C2.3.3)

Locates and organizes evidence electronically that effectively supports or ref utes different viewpoints

Locates and organizes evidence electronically that supports or refutes different viewpoints

Locates and organizes evidence electronically that partially supports or refutes different viewpoints

Locates and organizes little, if any, evidence electronically

Communicates findings (C1.3.6)

Applies communication technology to clearly present comprehensive evidence in an engaging, persuasive way to support a viewpoint

Applies communication technology to clearly present evidence to support a viewpoint

Applies communication technology to present evidence to support a viewpoint that is unclear

Applies communication technology to present little, if any, evidence to support a viewpoint that is unclear

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 37 2003

Grade 9: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA.02)

EVALUATING SOURCES OF INFORMATION


Students will complete a review of relevant and current research on the environmental issue of waste management, and prepare an annotated bibliography citing a wide variety of electronic sources, indicating their validity and the method of evaluating the information gathered.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No.
3.1.1

Description
Focus attention synthesize ideas and information from a variety of sources to develop own opinions, points of view and general impressions assess adequacy, accuracy and appropriateness of text details to support or further develop arguments, opinions or points of view Plan to gather information select information sources that will provide effective support, convincing argument or unique perspectives Use a variety of sources obtain information reflecting multiple perspectives from a variety of sources, such as expository essays, graphs, diagrams, online catalogues, periodical indices, film libraries, electronic databases and the Internet, when conducting research Access information distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and determine the usefulness of each for research purposes follow up on cited references to locate additional information Evaluate sources evaluate sources for currency, reliability and possible bias of information for a particular research project

3.1.3

3.2.1

3.2.2

3.2.3

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.3.1 C1.3.2 C1.3.4 C1.3.5 C2.3.1 C2.3.2 C2.3.3 C3.3.1 C3.3.2

Description
plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources refine searches to limit sources to a manageable number access and retrieve information through the electronic network analyze and synthesize information to create a product access diverse viewpoints on particular topics by using appropriate technologies assemble and organize different viewpoints in order to assess their validity use information technology to find facts that support or refute diverse viewpoints evaluate the authority and reliability of electronic sources evaluate the relevance of electronically accessed information to a particular topic

38 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information identify criteria for evaluating information evaluate information synthesize information. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. To help ensure student success, teachers may want to provide one or more effective examples of annotated bibliographies and explain how they are created and used. A class discussion on criteria for judging the validity and appropriateness of information prior to having students create their own list of criteria would also be beneficial. Note: The task suggests a review of material on the issue of waste management, however alternative issues may be substituted.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 39 2003

Student Assessment Task

EVALUATING SOURCES OF INFORMATION


Todays researchers recogni ze that the Internet is a powerful and important research tool to be used alongside other, more traditional sources of information; e.g., books, magazines, interviews. One challenge is to evaluate the information sources for authority, currency, reliability and possible bias. Determining point of view and bias when reviewing information found on the Internet or in other sources is an important information-management skill. You have been hired by the local municipal council to complete a review of relevant and current research on the environmental issue of waste management. Stakeholders, such as corporations, environmentalists and politicians, have sponsored many scientific studies. Prepare an annotated bibliography citing a wide variety of electronic sources. Indicate their validity and your method of evaluating the information gathered.

40 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC EVALUATING SOURCES OF INFORMATION


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1)

4 Excellent
Selects a variety of information sources that provide effective support and evidence, or a unique perspective, for a specific issue

3 Proficient
Selects a variety of information sources that provide support and evidence, or a unique perspective, for a specific issue

2 Adequate
Selects information sources that provide support or evidence for a specific issue

1 Limited*
Selects information sources that may or may not be related to a specific issue

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Evaluates information (3.2.2, 3.2.3)

Evaluates information gathered for its usefulness, based on effective application of criteria for adequacy, accuracy, currency and appropriateness Synthesizes information using a logical and sophisticated organizational structure

Evaluates information gathered for its usefulness, based on application of criteria for adequacy and currency

Evaluates information gathered based on application of predetermined criteria

Evaluates information gathered based on superficial application of criteria

Synthesizes information (3.1.1)

Synthesizes information using a logical organizational structure

Synthesizes information using an organizational structure

Synthesizes information using an unclear or unsuitable organizational structure

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 41 2003

Student

ICT RUBRIC EVALUATING SOURCES OF INFORMATION


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.3.1, C1.3.2, C1.3.4)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves information from a variety of electronic sources representing diverse points of view

3 Proficient
Accesses and retrieves information from several electronic sources representing diverse points of view

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves information from few electronic sources representing more than one point of view

1 Limited*
Accesses and retrieves information from a few electronic sources representing a singular point of view

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Identifies criteria for evaluating information (C2.3.1, C2.3.2, C2.3.3)

Clearly identifies meaningful criteria for evaluat ing sources and applies criteria with efficient use of technology

Identifies useful criteria for evaluating sources and applies criteria with assistance of technology

Identifies credible criteria for evaluating sources, including some use of technology

Identifies criteria for evaluating sources that are illogical or irrelevant

Evaluates information (C3.3.1, C3.3.2)

Evaluates the authority, reliability and relevance of sources through effective application of criteria

Evaluates the authority, reliability and relevance of sources through accurate application of criteria

Evaluates the authority, reliability and relevance of sources through superficial application of criteria

Evaluates sources through little or no application of criteria

Synthesizes information (C1.3.5)

Effectively analyzes and synthesizes sources and their validity in a clear, sophisticated format

Analyzes and synthesizes sources and their validity in an efficient, organized format

Gathers and records sources in an organized format

Gathers and records sources in an unorganized manner

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

42 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 9: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA.03)

SCHOOL NEWSPAPER JOURNALIST


Students will write a feature article for the school newspaper or Web site about a famous student or teacher from another school. Each student will develop a plan and conduct an interview with the selected student or teacher. Students can use e-mail to conduct the interview or obtain biographical information from online sources.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No.
3.1.3

Description
Plan to gather information select information sources that will provide effective support, convincing argument or unique perspectives Record information use own words to summarize and record information in a variety of forms, paraphrase and/or quote relevant facts and opinions, reference sources choose specific vocabulary, and use conventions accurately and effectively to enhance credibility Share ideas and information integrate appropriate visual, print and/or other media to reinforce overall impression or point of view and engage the audience Revise and edit revise to ensure effective introductions, consistent points of view, effective transitions between ideas and appropriate conclusions Enhance legibility identify and experiment with some principles of design that enhance the presentation of texts Attend to grammar and usage use a variety of strategies to make effective transitions between sentences and paragraphs in own writing Attend to spelling demonstrate the deliberate, conscientious and independent application of a variety of editing and proofreading strategies to confirm spellings in own writing Use effective oral and visual communication integrate a variety of media and display techniques, as appropriate, to enhance the appeal, accuracy and persuasiveness of presentations

3.3.2

3.4.1

4.1.2

4.1.3 4.2.1

4.2.2

4.3.3

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.3.4 C1.3.5 C1.3.6

Description
access and retrieve information through the electronic network analyze and synthesize information to create a product communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for content, audience and purpose create a plan for an inquiry that includes consideration of time management

C4.3.1

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 43 2003

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: create a plan access and retrieve information organize and summarize information analyze and synthesize information enhance an article use conventions communicate findings incorporate principles of visual design. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Students may experience difficulty getting respondents to answer their questions. As an alternative, consider having students use online sources of biographical information.

44 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

SCHOOL NEWSPAPER JOURNALIST


As a journalist for your school newspaper, your editor has asked you to interview a student or a teacher from another school who has just become somewhat famous for: an athletic accomplishment, such as an Olympic medal or a medal at the PanCanadian Summer Games an academic award, such as the Canadian Geography or Math Competition recording his or her first music CD and being featured on MuchMusic winning the Canadian Science Fair competition developing a hot, new computer game signing a major modelling contract. Your article is due on the editors desk in one week. Because of time constraints and the inability to meet face to face, you decide that you must conduct your interview using e-mail. Create a plan for conducting your e-mail interview that includes the: process you will use timelines you will follow type of information you will need and the questions you will ask to obtain that information. Use the information from your interview to write a feature article that will appear in the next school newspaper or on the schools Web site. Present your article in an effective newspaper layout, including appropriate graphics, such as a photograph of the featured individual. The materials that you hand in for evaluation should include: an interview plan indicating your process, timelines and interview questions an initial draft of your article prior to editing a digital copy of your feature article that will provide your readers with an interesting and perceptive portrait of the individual you interviewed.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 45 2003

Student

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC SCHOOL NEWSPAPER JOURNALIST


Level Criteria
Creates plan (3.1.3)

4 Excellent
Creates a logical, detailed, step-by -step plan that will result in desired information

3 Proficient
Creates a logical plan with sufficient details

2 Adequate
Creates a plan with basic information but that is somewhat illogical

1 Limited*
Creates a plan that includes few, if any, related details, does not follow any logical order

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes and summarizes information (3.3.2)

Information from interview is wellorganized; meaningful, relevant quotes are included and ideas clearly summarized

Information from interview is organized; relevant quotes are included and ideas summarized

Information from interview is recorded but lacks organization; quotes are included and ideas summarized

Information from interview is haphazardly organized; quotes may not be present and information partially summarized

Enhances article (3.4.1, 4.1.2, 4.1.3)

Article is revised to include an effective introduction, effective transitions and an appropriate conclusion, based on feedback Article is essentially error-free in terms of spelling and grammar

Article is revised to include an introduction, transitions and a conclusion, based on feedback

Article is revised but lacks clearly defined introduction, transitions and conclusion

Few, if any, revisions are evident based on feedback

Uses conventions (4.2.1, 4.2.2)

Few errors in spelling and grammar are present but do not reduce clarity of communication

Errors in spelling and grammar reduce clarity of communication

Numerous errors in spelling and grammar significantly reduce clarity of communication

Communicates findings (4.3.3)

Combines text and visuals in a manner that enhances and emphasizes information, and engages the audience

Combines text and visuals in a manner suitable to the presentation that holds the attention of the audience

Combines text and visuals in functional presentation that is uninteresting to the audience

Combines text and visuals with little concern for layout and/or visual appeal that fails to hold the attention of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

46 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC SCHOOL NEWSPAPER JOURNALIST


Level Criteria 4 Excellent
Develops a precise and focused plan for inquiry which includes the process, timelines and insightful questions

3 Proficient
Develops a plan for inquiry which includes the process, timelines and questions

2 Adequate
Develops a general plan for inquiry whereby the process and timelines established are functional

1 Limited*
Develops plan that suggests inadequate and/or inappropriate process, timelines and questions

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Creates plan (C4.3.1)

Accesses and retrieves information (C1.3.4) Analyzes information (C1.3.5)

Uses an efficient process to access and retrieve comprehensive information using e-mail Provides an insightful, detailed analysis of information obtained from the interview

Uses a process to access and retrieve information using e-mail

Uses a guided process to access and retrieve information using e-mail

Uses a process that demonstrates a lack of awareness of basic procedures for accessing and retrieving e-mail Provides an inaccurate, illogical analysis that has little or no bearing on the information obtained during the interview

Provides a complete and reasonable analysis of the information obtained from the interview

Provides a questionable analysis of the information obtained from the interview

Communicates findings (C1.3.6)

Uses technology to create an article that is engaging and considers both purpose and audience

Uses technology to create an article that is interesting, has a purpose, and holds the attention of the audience

Uses technology to create an article that is functional but uninteresting, purpose may not be clear

Uses technology to create an article that is neither persuasive nor engaging, with little or no evidence of purpose

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 47 2003

Grade 9: MATHEMATICS (MA.01)

SURVEY ON MARKETING
Students will report on the consumption of soft drinks in their school by designing and conducting a survey to determine the preferred soft drink among students, and prepare and present a written or visual report, including a discussion of the survey design, a graph, slogan and results of the survey.
MATHEMATICS OUTCOMES No.
SO1

Description
Patterns and Relations use logic and divergent thinking to present mathematical arguments in solving problems Statistics and Probability (Data Analysis) design, conduct and report on an experiment to investigate a relationship between two variables determine the lines of best fit from a scatter plot for an apparent linear relationship, by using technology (equations are not expected) assess the strengths, weaknesses and biases of samples and data collection methods Statistics and Probability (Chance and Uncertainty) recognize that decisions based on probability may be a combination of theoretical calculations, experimental results and subjective judgements

SO1 SO4 SO6 SO8

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.3.5 C1.3.6

Description
analyze and synthesize information to create a product communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for content, audience and purpose articulate clearly a plan of action to use technology to solve a problem identify the appropriate materials and tools to use in order to accomplish a plan of action make connections among related, organized data, and assemble various pieces into a unified message

C6.3.1 C6.3.2 C7.3.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: design and conduct a survey generate a graph manipulate the graph solve a problem communicate findings. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. In order to facilitate this activity, teachers may want to spend time discussing graphs for depicting the type of data being collected; i.e., line graph vs. bar graph, and which type is most suited to the task. As well, they may wish to spend time reviewing the appropriate labelling of axis, titles, legends and scales to prepare students for success. 48 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003 Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)
Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

SURVEY ON MARKETING
Being able to collect and analyze information is a critical skill for many occupations, including research, advertising and market analysis. Data collected through surveys can be graphically depicted and analyzed with the aid of spreadsheets. Imagine that you are the marketing and communications researcher for a particular soft drink company, and you have been asked to report on the consumption of soft drinks at a school. The results of your research will be shared with the companys stockholders and will hopefully confirm that their soft drink is the most popular choice in schools today. Design and conduct a survey to determine the preferred soft drink among students in your school. Ensure that the survey is given to a representative sample of students, allowing you to generalize to the whole school population. Consider how you can ensure that a high percentage of surveys will be returned and completed in a useful manner. Create a spreadsheet to tabulate the data collected from the completed surveys. Using the data in the spreadsheet, generate a graph that depicts the sales of soft drinks in the school. Without making modifications to the actual data, manipulate the graph; i.e., by adjusting scale, size, so that it most favourably represents the soft drink company. Compose a catchy slogan to include with the graph. Use technology to prepare a written or visual report for your presentation to the stockholders. Include a discussion of the survey design, the graph, slogan and results.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 49 2003

Student

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC SURVEY ON MARKETING


Level Criteria
Designs survey (SO1, Statistics and probability, data analys is)

4 Excellent
Creates a sophisticated survey to investigate the relationship between soft drink sales and preferences from an accurate, representative sample

3 Proficient
Creates a practical survey to investigate the relationship between soft drink sales and preferences from a representative sample

2 Adequate
Creates a viable survey to investigate soft drink sales and preferences from a sample

1 Limited*
Creates an impractical survey to investigate soft drink sales and preferences from a sample

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Generates graph (SO4, Statistics and probability, data analysis)

Uses technology efficiently to create an accurate graphical representation of a linear relationship between two welldefined variables

Uses technology practically to create an accurate graphical representation of a linear relationship

Uses technology to create a graphical representation of a linear relationship

Uses basic technology to create a graph

Manipulates graph (SO6, SO8 Statistics and probability, data analysis/chance and uncertainty)

Manipulates graph to present data favourably, recognizing strengths, weaknesses and biases of samples and collection methods, and subjective judgement

Manipulates graph to present data favourably, recognizing bias of samples and subjective judgement

Manipulates graph to present data favourably, with some recognition of bias and subjective judgement

Fails to manipulate graph or manipulates data itself, does not recognize bias or subjective judgement

Solves problems (SO1, Patterns and relations)

Uses logic and divergent thinking effectively to present an accurate, effective mathematical solution

Uses logic and divergent thinking to present a workable mathematical solution

Uses logic and divergent thinking to present an unworkable mathematical solution

Does not use logic or divergent thinking in attempts to present a mathematical solution

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

50 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC SURVEY ON MARKETING


Level Criteria
Plans and retrieves information (C6.3.1, C6.3.2)

4 Excellent
Creates and applies a sophisticated survey design for collecting statistically accurate, valid and reliable data

3 Proficient
Creates and applies a practical survey design for collecting statistically accurate, valid and reliable date

2 Adequate
Creates and applies a survey design for collecting statistically accurate data

1 Limited*
Creates and applies a survey design for collecting data which may not be statistically accurate, valid or reliable

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Generates graph (C1.3.5, C7.3.2)

Thoroughly analyzes, synthesizes and graphs collected data, manipulating the graph to present data in a highly favourable way

Accurately analyzes, synthesizes and graphs collected data, making attempts to present data in a favourable way

Analyzes, synthesizes and graphs data in a practical way , making attempts to present data in a favourable way

Graphs data without sufficient analysis or synthesis, making few, if any, adjustments to present data in a favourable way, or manipulates data

Communicates findings (C1.3.6)

Communicates information regarding the survey and its analysis in a highly persuasive, engaging report, using technology effectively and efficiently

Communicates information regarding the survey and its analysis in an interesting, coherent report, using technology

Communicates information regarding the survey and its analysis in a report, using technology

Does not communicate information from the survey coherently or accurately, or use technology effectively

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 51 2003

Grade 9: SCIENCE (SC.01)

AIR-QUALITY INDICATORS
Students will identify air-quality indicators for asthma and report on high-risk areas in Alberta.
SCIENCE OUTCOMES (6: Environmental Quality) No.
A1 S1 C2.1 C2.6 C3.4

Description
develop awareness of effects that environmental quality has on the health and well-being of living things identify issues and concerns regarding environmental quality identify abiotic factors in an environment that might affect the health and distribution of living things in that environment; e.g., available oxygen in water, presence of solids in air or water identify indicators of air quality; e.g., presence of polluting gases, presence of particulates describe concentration of materials in micrograms per liter, milligrams per liter or in parts per million

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.3.1 C1.3.3 C1.3.5 C1.3.6

Description
plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources access and operate multimedia applications and technologies from stand-alone and online sources analyze and synthesize information to create a product communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for content, audience and purpose articulate clearly a plan of action to us e technology to solve a problem identify the appropriate materials and tools to use in order to accomplish a plan of action evaluate choices and progress in problem solving, then redefine the plan of action as appropriate make connections among related, organized data, and assemble various pieces into a unified message

C6.3.1 C6.3.2 C6.3.3 C7.3.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: identify and retrieve information identify indicators evaluate and select indicators synthesize information demonstrate awareness of environmental effects. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. To facilitate this activity, teachers may wish to spend time discussing possible options for planning and conducting the required research using information technology. Suggested materials for the project include an Alberta map master, a sample Web site address for information about air-quality indicators and information about compiling an effective scientific report. A useful Web site containing relevant information and links to other sites is http://www3.gov.ab.ca/env/air.html.

52 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

AIR-QUALITY INDICATORS
People with asthma are affected by the quality of the air, so it is important to make airquality information readily available to the public. The Alberta Lung Association wishes to provide this information and has asked you, as an environmental researcher, to identify and report on high-risk areas in the province. To complete this project, you will use the most current sources to determine which airquality indicators are relevant to people with asthma, and which indicators are most important. Identify the prevalence of these indicators in various locations around Alberta. Devise a way to rank each area; e.g., low-risk, medium-risk or high-risk, and prepare a map of Alberta showing the ranking of each area. Finally, you will present your findings to the Alberta Lung Association.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 53 2003

Student

SCIENCE RUBRIC AIR-QUALITY INDICATORS


Level Criteria
Identifies indicators (S1, C2.1, C2.6)

4 Excellent
Selects relevant and comprehensive indicators of airquality control

3 Proficient
Selects relevant indicators of airquality control

2 Adequate
Selects an incomplete list of airquality control indicators

1 Limited*
Selects indicators of air-quality control that are irrelevant or unimportant

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Evaluates and selects indicators (C3.4)

Devises and applies a method to compare air-quality indicators to make an optimal choice of the most significant indicators

Devises and applies a method to compare air-quality indicators to make a choice of significant indicators

Devises and applies a method to compare air-quality indicators to make a choice of indicators

Devises and applies a method that makes it difficult to make a clear choice of indicators

Demonstrates awareness of environmental effects (A1)

Insightfully demonstrates awareness of the effects of air quality on the health and well-being of people with asthma

Clearly demonstrates awareness of the effects of air quality on the respiratory health of people with asthma

Demonstrates awareness of the effects of environmental factors on individuals with respiratory difficulties

Demonstrates little, if any, evidence of awareness that air quality affects the health of individuals with respiratory difficulties

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

54 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC AIR-QUALITY INDICATORS


Level Criteria
Identifies and retrieves information (C1.3.1, C6.3.1, C6.3.2)

4 Excellent
Retrieves insightful information needed to prepare a presentation

3 Proficient
Retrieves information needed to prepare a presentation

2 Adequate
Retrieves partial information needed to prepare a presentation

1 Limited*
Retrieves little or no information needed to prepare a presentation

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Evaluates and selects sources (C6.3.3, C1.3.5, C1.3.3)

Evaluates and selects sources and types of information highly relevant to the research task

Selects sources and types of information appropriate to the research task

Selects information which is somewhat relevant to the research task

Selects information irrelevant to the research task

Synthesizes information (C1.3.5, C7.3.2)

Organizes and synthesizes information from a variety of sources to create a comprehensive report

Organizes and synthesizes information from a variety of sources to create a report

Organizes and synthesizes information from few sources to create a report

Organizes and synthesizes information from few, if any, sources to create an incomplete report

Presents findings (C1.3.6)

Uses technology effectively to communicate information in an engaging, persuasive manner

Uses technology to communicate information in an understandable manner

Uses technology to communicate information in an incomplete or confusing manner

Uses technology to communicate little, if any, information

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 55 2003

Grade 9: SOCIAL STUDIES (SS.01)

FUTURE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND QUALITY OF LIFE


Students will create a persuasive multimedia presentation that provides a vision of communication in the future.
SOCIAL STUDIES OUTCOMES (Topic C: Canada: Responding to Change) No. Description
Demonstrate an understanding that economic growth and technological change affect quality of life Technology has affected our way of life and will continue to affect our future: utilization: tertiary industries innovation: computers, information revolution implications: social, economic, political In a mixed economy, economic decisions are made by both the public and private sectors: role of business, labour, government, consumers labour-management relations public sector private sector Quality of life is affected by changes in technology Locating, interpreting, organizing information identify and define topic identify possible sources and location of information acquire information to find answers through listening, observing, reading and utilizing community resources Analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating information draw conclusions about technological change and its effect on quality of life categorize information to develop concepts technology, mixed economy, quality of life make generalizations by stating relationships among concepts about technological change and its effect on quality of life

K1

K2

K3 Process Skills

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.3.1 C1.3.2 C1.3.3 C1.3.5 C1.3.6

Description
plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources refine searches to limit sources to a manageable number access and operate multimedia applications and technologies from stand-alone and online sources analyze and synthesize information to create a product communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for content, audience and purpose identify patterns in organized information make connections among related, organized data, and assemble various pieces into a unified message

C7.3.1 C7.3.2

56 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: locate, organize and interpret information analyze, synthesize and evaluate information develop a vision explain the effect of technological change develop a multimedia presentation. TEACHER NOTE Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 57 2003

Student Assessment Task

FUTURE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND QUALITY OF LIFE


As the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of a major communications company, you will be presenting a general vision of communication in Canadas future to board members. This vision should discuss the impact of communication technologies on quality of life in the future. Create a persuasive multimedia presentation that provides a vision of communication in the future. Support the vision with trends of communication techno logy from current and past innovations. You will need to gather information about the history of communication, current use of communication technologies, predictions of future communication technologies, and how this has affected and/or will affect Canadian society and quality of life.

58 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

SOCIAL STUDIES RUBRIC FUTURE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND QUALITY OF LIFE


Level Criteria
Locates, organizes and interprets information (Skills)

4 Excellent
Locates information from several sources, efficiently organizes and interprets relevant information

3 Proficient
Locates information from sources, organizes and interprets relevant information

2 Adequate
Locates information from sources, organizes and interprets information without determining relevancy

1 Limited*
Locates information from sources but cannot organize or interpret information, or determine relevancy

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Analyzes, synthesizes and evaluates information (Skills)

Analyzes, synthesizes and evaluates information in an effective, logical manner

Analyzes, synthesizes and evaluates information

Analyzes, synthesizes and e v aluates information in a illogical manner

Cannot analyze, synthesize or evaluate information in a manner suitable for the assignment

Develops a vision (K1, K2)

Develops an insightful vision addressing advantages and concerns regarding future communication technologies Demonstrates a thorough understanding of the effect of technological change on quality of life

Develops a logical vision addressing advantages and concerns regarding future communication technologies

Develops a vision addressing few advantages and concerns regarding future communication technologies

Develops a weak vision which does not address advantages or concerns regarding future communication technologies

Explains effect of technological change (K3)

Demonstrates a f unctional understanding of the effect of technological change on quality of life

Demonstrates understanding of how technology changes, but does not address effects on quality of life

Does not demonstrate understanding of technological change or its effec t on quality of life

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 59 2003

Student

ICT RUBRIC FUTURE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND QUALITY OF LIFE


Level Criteria
Locates information (C1.3.1, C1.3.2)

4 Excellent
Plans and conducts an efficient search using a wide variety of electronic sources

3 Proficient
Plans and conducts an organized search using electronic sources

2 Adequate
Conducts a search using electronic sources

1 Limited*
Conducts a search, using few, if any, electronic sources

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Analyzes, synthesizes and evaluates information (C1.3.5, C7.3.1, C7.3.2)

Interprets and effectively organizes information into relevant patterns using electronic organizers

Interprets and organizes information into patterns using electronic organizers

Interprets and organizes information using electronic organizers

Is unable to interpret or organize information using electronic organizers

Develops multimedia presentation (C1.3.3, C1.3.6)

Creates a multimedia presentation with a unified message that is persuasive and engaging

Creates a multimedia presentation with a clear message that is persuasive but has few engaging elements

Creates a multimedia presentation with an unclear message that has few persuasive elements and is not engaging

Creates a singledimension presentation with an unclear message that is neither persuasive nor engaging

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

60 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix D
Sample Student Self-reflection Tools 7
The following tools can be used to encourage students to self-reflect. Select one to use with your students.

Progress Self-reflection Name ______________________ Date ___________________ Task _______________________________________________


The steps I have completed in this task include

The steps I still have to complete include

Stumbling Blocks Self-reflection Name ____________________ Date ___________________ Task _____________________________________________


Something I did not understand about this task was

7. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), p. 35.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix D / 61 2003

Now What? Self-reflection Name ______________________ Date _________________ Task _____________________________________________


Something I am going to change/correct/add/remove from this task is

Learning Self-assessment Name _______________________ Date _________________ Task _____________________________________________


One concept I have learned from this task is

This piece of work demonstrates that I can Check (list the criteria) (list the criteria) (list the criteria) I can improve my work by

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

My Changing Goals Self-assessment Name ____________________ Date ___________________ Task _____________________________________________


After reviewing this task, I would now like to achieve (define revised goals).

I would like to do this because (explanation).

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix D / 63 2003

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix E
Student Profiles
Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date:
Division 3 Level 4 Excellent (Wow!) ICT Learner Outcome C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.3.1 plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources C1.3.2 refine searches to limit sources to a manageable number C1.3.3 access and operate multimedia applications and technologies from standalone and online sources C1.3.4 access and retrieve information through the electronic network C1.3.5 analyze and synthesize information to create a product C1.3.6 communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for content, audience and purpose Date: Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date: Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date: Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix E / 65 2003

Division 3

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C2 Students will seek alternative viewpoints using information technologies. C2.3.1 access diverse viewpoints on particular topics by using appropriate technologies C2.3.2 assemble and organize different viewpoints in order to assess their validity C2.3.3 use information technology to find facts that support or refute diverse viewpoints C3 Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.3.1 evaluate the authority and reliability of electronic sources C3.3.2 evaluate the relevance of electronically accessed information to a particular topic

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

66 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Division 3

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C4 Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. C4.3.1 create a plan for an inquiry that includes consideration of time management C4.3.2 develop a process to manage volumes of information that can be made available through electronic sources C4.3.3 demonstrate the advanced search skills necessary to limit the number of hits desired for online and offline databases; for example, the use of "and" or "or" between search topics and the choice of appropriate search engines for the topic C5 Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. C5.3.1 access, retrieve and share information from electronic sources, such as common files C5.3.2 use networks to brainstorm, plan and share ideas with group members

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix E / 67 2003

Division 3

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C6 Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. C6.3.1 articulate clearly a plan of action to use technology to solve a problem C6.3.2 identify the appropriate materials and tools to use in order to accomplish a plan of action C6.3.3 evaluate choices and progress in problem solving, then redefine the plan of action as appropriate C6.3.4 pose and test solutions to problems by using computer applications, such as computer-assisted design or simulation/modelling software C6.3.5 create a simulation or a model by using technology that permits the making of inferences C7 Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning. C7.3.1 identify patterns in organized information C7.3.2 make connections among related, organized data, and assemble various pieces into a unified message

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

68 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Glossary
Achievement Assessment Contextualize Evaluation Formative Assessment Performance Performance Assessment Reliability Rubric Standard Student Profile Summative Assessment Validity
a students demonstration of knowledge, skills and attitudes relative to grade level curriculum standards collecting information on student achievement and performance to improve student learning to include ICT learner outcomes in another program of studies, such as language arts, by rephrasing the outcome to suit the context of the subject judgement regarding the quality, value or worth of a response ongoing assessment providing information to guide instruction and improve student performance the quality of a students demonstration of the learner outcomes a meaningful, real-life task that enables students to demonstrate what they know and can do in situations like those they will encounter outside the classroom as well as in situations that simulate how people do their work consistency of assessment results a fixed measurement scale and list of criteria that describe the quality of products or performances used to evaluate a students performance expected level of performance in relation to a specified curriculum outcome for a division or grade a chart that illustrates both the outcomes that have been taught and the students level of performance culminating assessment for a unit, grade level or course of study providing a status report on mastery or degree of proficiency according to identified learner outcomes appropriateness, adequacy and truthfulness of interpretations made from assessment information based on learner outcomes

Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Glossary / 69 2003

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

References
Alberta Assessment Consortium. A Framework for Student Assessment . Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1997. Alberta Assessment Consortium. A Framework for Communicating Student Learning. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1999. Alberta Assessment Consortium. How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 1 to Grade 6. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998a. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 7 to Grade 9. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998b. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 10 to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998c. Alberta Learning. Physical Education Guide to Implementation, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 2000. Alberta Learning. Information and Communication Technology Program of Studies . Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 20002003. Alberta Learning. Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 2002. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Redirecting Assessment. Educational Leadership 46, 7 (1989). Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Teaching for Authentic Student Performance. Educational Leadership 54, 4 (1996). Black, Paul and Dylan Wiliam. Inside the Black Box. London, UK: Kings University, 1998. Davies, Anne. Making Classroom Assessment Work. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000. Eisner, Elliot W. The Uses and Limits of Performance Assessment. Phi Delta Kappan 80, 9 (1999), pp. 658660. Gardner, Howard. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. New York, NY: BasicBooks, 1993. Goodrich, Heidi. Understanding Rubrics. Educational Leadership 54, 4 (1996), pp. 1417. Gregory, Kathleen, Caren Cameron and Anne Davies. Knowing What Counts, Book OneSetting and Using Criteria: For Use in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000a. Gregory, Kathleen, Caren Cameron and Anne Davies. Knowing What Counts, Book TwoSelfAssessment and Goal Setting: For Use in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000b.

Information and Communication Technology (Divi sion 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

References / 71 2003

Guskey, Thomas R. Reporting on Student Learning: Lessons from the PastPrescriptions for the Future. In Thomas R. Guskey (ed.), Communicating Student Learning: 1996 ASCD Yearbook (Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1996), pp. 1324. Joint Advisory Committee on Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada. Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Research in Applied Measurement and Evaluation, University of Alberta, 1993. Jonassen, David H., Kyle L. Peck and Brent G. Wilson. Learning With Technology: a constructivist perspective. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999. Popham, W. James. The Truth About Testing: An Educators Call to Action. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2001. Stiggins, Richard J. Student-Centered Classroom Assessment (Second Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1997. Stiggins, Richard J. Student-Involved Classroom Assessment (Third Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2001. Stix, Andi. Strategies for Student-Centered Assessment . New Rochelle, NY: The Interactive Classroom, 1996. Wiggins, Grant and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1998.

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 3)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grades 1012

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TOOL KIT


For

the Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Program of Studies

2003

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TOOL KIT


For the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Program of Studies

Division 4

ALBERTA LEARNING CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA


Alberta. Alberta Learning. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch. Classroom assessment tool kit for the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) program of studies : grades 1012. ISBN 077852535x 1. Educational tests and measurements Alberta. 2. Grading and marking (students). 3. Educational evaluation Alberta. I. Title. LB3051.A333 2003 371.26

For further information, contact: Learning and Teaching Resources Branch 44 Capital Blvd 10044 108 St. NW, Suite 800 Edmonton, AB T5J 5E6 Telephone: 7804272984 in Edmonton or toll-free in Alberta by dialing 3100000 Fax: 7804220576

This resource is intended for: Teachers Technology Coordinators Administrators Parents Stakeholders Others 3 3 3

Copyright 2003, the Crown in Right of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Learning. Alberta Learning, 44 Capital Blvd, 10044 108 St. NW, Suite 800, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 5E6. Every effort has been made to provide proper acknowledgement of original sources. If cases are identified where this has not been done, please notify Alberta Learning so appropriate corrective action can be taken. Permission is given by the copyright owner for any person to reproduce this resource, or any part thereof, for educational purposes and on a nonprofit basis, except for those parts for which Alberta Learning does not hold copyright.

Acknowledgements
Alberta Learning wishes to acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals:

Alberta Learning
Pat Redhead, Project Chair Bonnie Brooks Joe Friesenhan Raja Panwar Phil Campbell Teddy Moline Denise Stocco Document Production Unit Stakeholder Technology Branch Stakeholder Technology Branch Information and Technology Management Curriculum Branch Learner Assessment Branch Learning and Teaching Resources Branch French Language Services Branch Learning and Teaching Resources Branch

Writing Team
Doug Knight, Project Manager Barry Allen Carol Caulfield Barry Edgar Dave Erickson Elizabeth Fargey Jennifer MacLean Kyla Popik Martina Schmidt Cliff Sosnowski Priscilla Theroux Joni Turville Sandra Unrau Evie Van Scheik Nancy Weber Knight Research and Consulting Services Chinooks Edge School Division No. 73 Parkland School Division No. 70 Edmonton School District No. 7 Peace River School Division No. 10 Red Deer School District No. 104 Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. 7 Foothills School Division No. 38 Science Alberta Charter School Edmonton Catholic Separate School District No. 7 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 St. Albert Protestant Separate School District No. 6 Calgary School District No. 19 Wolf Creek School Division No. 72 Edmonton School District No. 7

Revision Team
Robert Hogg, Coordinator Dale Armstrong, Coordinator Sherry Bennett Alanna Cellini Carol French Linda Glasier Bette Gray Donna Griffin Laurie Hawley Gary Heck Sharon Horne Carol Anne Inglis Dean Jarvey Jaime Johansson Daylene Lauman Tanis Marshall Kathy McCabe Anne Mulgrew Robert Smith Priscilla Theroux Joni Turville Ron Tyler Anna Wong Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC) J.D. Armstrong Consulting S.R. Bennett Consulting Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Parkland School Division No. 70 Elk Island Public Schools Regional Division No. 14 Parkland School Division No. 70 Heck Leadership and Consulting Services, Inc. Golden Hills School Division No. 75 Edmonton School District No. 7 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 Integrity Consulting Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Edmonton School District No. 7 Parkland School Division No. 70 Calgary Roman Catholic Separate School District No. 1 St. Albert Protestant Separate School District No. 6 Chinooks Edge School Division No. 73 Student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education

Table of Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. Guiding Principles ........................................................................................................................ Principle 1: Assessment should be continuous ...................................................................... Principle 2: Assessment should be collaborative .................................................................... Principle 3: Assessment should be comprehensive ................................................................ Principle 4: Assessment should include criteria ...................................................................... Components ................................................................................................................................ Curriculum and Assessment Matrices .................................................................................... ICT Performance Assessments ............................................................................................. Developing Your Own Performance Assessments .................................................................. Criteria for Designing Performance Assessment Tasks ........................................................... Criteria for Designing Rubrics ................................................................................................ Student Self-reflection ........................................................................................................... Sample Student Profile ......................................................................................................... Communicating Student Learning .......................................................................................... Appendices A. Sample English Language Arts Assessment Task ............................................................. Single Rubric Combining ELA and ICT Outcomes ...................................................... Separate Rubrics for ELA and ICT Outcomes ............................................................ Evaluation Tools for ICT Outcome Categories F and P .................................................. Sample Performance Assessment Tasks and Rubrics for ICT Outcome Category C ......... Sample Student Self-reflection Tools ................................................................................ Student Profiles .............................................................................................................. 23 26 27 29 31 71 75 1 7 7 8 8 8 11 11 12 14 17 18 19 21 22

B. C. D. E.

Glossary ...................................................................................................................................... References .................................................................................................................................. This tool kit with blackline masters of student assessment tasks, rubrics, worksheets and other assessment tools is also available at <http://www.learning.gov.ab.ca/k_12/curriculum/bysubject/ict/>.

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Introduction
Learning is enhanced when assessment strategies match the learner outcomes and are aligned to instruction assessment is integrated with instruction (unit and lesson planning) assessment relates new concept(s) to previous learning students are involved with their own assessment students get immediate, meaningful feedback students of all ability levels are able to demonstrate what they know and what they can do assessment engages and motivates students .
Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), 2000, p. 2

Teachers play a central role in the assessment and evaluation of student learning. Their authority and responsibility is established in the School Act (RSA 2000) (s18(e)) that states, Teachers regularly evaluate students and periodically report the results of the evaluation to the students, the students parents and the board. Technology is defined as the processes, tools and techniques that alter human activity the employment of tools, machines, materials and processes to do work, produce goods, perform services or carry out other useful activities (Alberta Learning, 20002003, p. 47). The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competencies outlined in the ICT program of studies are basic life skills for a digital world that enable students to function in a knowledge-based economy and an information-rich society. These skills are no longer optional or complementary. They are an essential component of a students preparation for life and the world of work. The ICT curriculum is not intended to stand alone, but to be integrated within the programs of study for language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Selected ICT outcomes are blended with core learner outcomes within a common context, such as a project, lesson or activity. The long-range goal is for ICT learner outcomes to be included and contextualized within core and other programs of study.

While schools play a variety of important social, custodial and organizational roles in communities, we assume that their primary obligation should be to help students to learn how to recognize and solve problems, comprehend new phenomena, construct mental models of those phenomena, and, given a new situation, set goals and regulate their own learning (learn how to learn).
Jonassen, Peck and Wilson, 1999, p. 7

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Introduction / 1 2003

The Information and Communication Technology Program of Studies articulates a set of learner outcomes to be achieved over 12 grades of schooling. In making decisions about instructional planning and assessment, these outcomes: are sequenced for each of the four divisions (Grades K3, 46, 79 and 1012) can be placed into a scope and sequence that specifies which outcomes are taught in particular courses and grade levels (see www.learning.gov.ab.ca/ict for a document describing how to adapt a scope and sequence framework, and for sample frameworks) may be introduced at any time within the division, but are to be achieved no later than the third, sixth, ninth and twelfth grade levels, respectively are to be assessed and evaluated within the language of learning can be assessed and evaluated formatively or summatively when ICT learner outcomes and other learner outcomes remain separate but are part of a common assessment task; and can be reported to students, parents and others as separate marks are to be assessed and evaluated formatively and summatively when ICT learner outcomes are included and contextualized within core or other programs of studies; and are to be reported to students, parents and others as part of the subject mark (see Appendix A, pages 2328 for an English language arts sample with ICT outcomes included and contextualized).

Figure 1, on the following page, illustrates the relationship between the ICT program of studies and other programs of study. Figure 2, on page 4, is a general model of classroom assessment that shows the relationship between assessing, evaluating and reporting student learning. A glossary of educational terms used throughout this document can be found on page 79.

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Figure 1

MATHEMATICS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ICT
SOCIAL STUDIES OTHER

SCIENCE

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Introduction / 3 2003

Figure 2 1

Classroom Assessment

Assessment methods or strategies (collect information on student achievement and performance to improve student learning)

Evaluation methods or strategies (judgement regarding the quality, value or worth of a response)

Communication (reporting) methods or strategies (inform the student, parents and others about what has been accomplished and what the next steps are in the learning process)

Formative

Not reported as part of a grade (informal)

Student profile Personal communication Home response journal Individualized program plan (IPP) Portfolio Student self-reflection Open classroom Celebration of learning Student-led conference

Summative

Reported as part of a grade (formal)

Report card

1. From the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC) (Edmonton, AB, 2001).

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The purpose of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit is to assist teachers in selecting and developing classroom assessment strategies for evaluating C category learner outcomes (Figure 3) in the context of other core subjects and courses. C category (Communicating, Inquiring, Decision Making and Problem Solving) learner outcomes involve the ability to use a variety of processes to critically assess information, manage inquiry, solve problems, do research and communicate with a variety of audiences. Students are expected to apply their knowledge and skills in real-life situations (Alberta Learning, 20002003, p. 2). C category learner outcomes are best assessed using performance assessments that are meaningful, authentic, engaging, interesting, and age- and curriculum-appropriate. According to the literature, performance assessment is a closer measure of students abilities to achieve aspirations, than are conventional forms of testing (Eisner 1999). Performance assessment tasks and rubrics for evaluating some C category outcomes are available in Appendix C, pages 3169.

Figure 3
Communicating, Inquiring, Decision Making and Problem Solving
C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. Students will seek alternative viewpoints, using information technologies. Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning.

1
C2

2
C3

3
C4

4
C5

5
C6

6
C7

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Introduction / 5 2003

F category (Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts) and P category (Processes for Productivity) learner outcomes are an important support for students to demonstrate C category outcomes. Checklists and rating scales appropriate for evaluating some F and P category outcomes are available in Appendix B, pages 2930.

Figure 4
Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of technology. Students will understand the role of technology as it applies to self, work and society. Students will demonstrate a moral and ethical approach to the use of technology. Students will become discerning consumers of mass media and electronic information. Students will practise the concepts of ergonomics and safety when using technology. Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of the operating skills required in a variety of technologies.

F6

Processes for Productivity


P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 Students will compose, revise and edit text. Students will organize and manipulate data. Students will communicate through multimedia. Students will integrate various applications. Students will navigate and create hyperlinked resources. Students will use communication technology to interact with others.

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Guiding Principles
Assessment, evaluation and communication of student achievement and growth are essential parts of the teaching and learning process. Each part of the teaching and learning process should be a positive experience for students and promote personal growth. Practices should be carried out in such a way that they support continuous 2 learning and development. To assist students in meeting the aim of the ICT program of studies, assessment should be a continuous, collaborative and comprehensive process that includes clearly identified and communicated criteria. The following principles, adapted from the Physical Education Guide to Implementation (Alberta Learning, 2000), are essential for effective assessment and evaluation of ICT learner outcomes: Principle Principle Principle Principle 1: 2: 3: 4: Assessment should be continuous Assessment should be collaborative Assessment should be comprehensive Assessment should include criteria.

Principle 1: Assessment should be continuous

Assessment practices should be carried out in such a way that they support and enhance ongoing student learning and development. Assessment practices should: require demonstration of both core subject and ICT learner outcomes promote student learning be part of instruction in a variety of contexts, using varied methods and instruments that match learner outcomes be part of an ongoing process rather than a set of isolated events focus on both process and product provide information about students prior learning provide ongoing feedback about the effectiveness of instruction enable students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills provide opportunities for students to revise their work in order to set goals and improve their learning provide a status report on how well students can demonstrate learner outcomes at that time.

2. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), A Framework for Student Assessment (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1997), p. 14.

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Guiding Principles / 7 2003

Principle 2: Assessment should be collaborative

Students benefit when they are involved in the assessment process. Assessment practices should help and encourage students to: be responsible for their own learning and develop a positive attitude toward the use of technology in meaningful, real-world situations be involved in establishing criteria for evaluating their products or performances work together to learn and achieve outcomes feel competent and successful using technology set goals for further improvements.

Principle 3: Assessment should be comprehensive

Assessment practices should address learner outcomes and include a variety of strategies that meet the diverse learning needs of students. Assessment practices should: be developmentally appropriate, age-appropriate, genderbalanced, and consider students cultural and special needs be constructive, build on student strengths, and encourage further learning by creating positive atmospheres and self-images enable students to demonstrate ICT proficiencies: in many different contexts and subjects in meaningful, real-life situations enable students to demonstrate that ICT proficiency is transferable across contexts and subjects include multiple sources of evidence (formal and informal) provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do.

Principle 4: Assessment should include criteria

Assessment practices should identify and clearly define the critical aspects of performance for demonstrating student learning. Assessment practices should: involve students in identifying and/or creating criteria communicate the criteria used to evaluate student work before students begin tasks so they can plan for success provide students with rubrics to indicate performance levels be communicated to students so that they understand expectations related to learner outcomes. Achievement is based on demonstration of learner outcomes rather than comparing one students performance to anothers. Comparing one students proficiencies to anothers does not motivate students to achieve and frequently has the reverse effect. Meaningful, relevant and realistic criteria for achieving learner outcomes can motivate students to take responsibility for their own learning and develop a lifelong desire to use technology wisely.

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A good assessment instrument can be a learning experience. But more to the point, it is extremely desirable to have assessment occur in the context of students working on problems, projects or products that: genuinely engage them hold their interest motivate them to do well. Such exercises may not be as easy to design as the standard multiple -choice entry, but they are far more likely to elicit a students full repertoire of skills and to yield information that is useful for subsequent advice and placement.
Gardner, 1993, p. 178

[Assessments should] measure learning outcomes of indisputable importance.


Popham, 2001, p. 105

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Guiding Principles / 9 2003

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Components
Curriculum and Assessment Matrices
The learner outcomes of the ICT program of studies identify sets of competencies that are best demonstrated in meaningful activities and projects, rather than as discrete and isolated mini-skills. Several outcomes can be assessed within one activity. Also, more reliable information on student achievement can be collected through several activities or projects. The sample matrix below illustrates how activity codes are assigned to sample assessment tasks. For example, performance assessment task ELA201.01 is an activity code meaning English Language Arts 20, assessment task number 1 for this course. This assessment task will evaluate ICT learner outcomes C3 and C7. C3.4.1 assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information C3.4.2 demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic C7.4.1 use appropriate strategies to locate information to meet personal needs C7.4.2 analyze and synthesize information to determine patterns and links among ideas

Sample Division 4
Assessment ICT Outcomes <Title> PM20.01 <Title> BIO20.01
C1.4.1

<Title> ELA201.01

<Title> CHEM20.01
C1.4.2

<Title> PHYS20.02

C1
Access, use and communicate information

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C3.4.1

C3.4.1, C3.4.2

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.3, C6.4.4 C7.4.1, 7.4.2

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.4 C7.4.3

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.4 C7.4.3

C7
Use electronic research techniques

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Components / 11 2003

ICT Performance Assessments

This Classroom Assessment Tool Kit provides sample assessment tasks in Appendix C for 20/23 level courses. The sample assessment tasks incorporate outcomes from one or more of the core subject areas. These tasks are provided as illustrations and are but one component of a quality classroom assessment program. These examples are intended to demonstrate: how ICT outcomes can be assessed and evaluated how ICT and core subject outcomes can be incorporated in the same assessment task yet provide distinct information about each set of outcomes what good performance assessment tasks look like. Each sample assessment has four parts: 1. learner outcomes 2. criteria for assessing student products and performances 3. student assessment tasks 4. rubrics to evaluate student performance.

Tasks
Tasks are meaningful activities designed to reveal whether students are able to demonstrate the learner outcomes of the ICT program of studies and of one or more core subjects in a real-life context. The tasks require that students have had relevant learning experiences and instruction prior to undertaking the assessment tasks. These task activities are examples only. Teachers are encouraged to modify them to meet the needs and circumstances of their students. The availability of resources, such as software, computers and Internet connections, will determine which tasks are most appropriate. Student interest and readiness should also be taken into consideration.

Rubrics
Rubrics further clarify what is expected of students by describing task assessment criteria and levels of task performance. Two rubrics are provided for each task. As these tasks are principally designed to measure ICT learner outcomes, the rubrics provide only those criteria that match the specific outcomes and criteria listed in the ICT rubric. Core subject rubrics are also provided for the evaluation of learner outcomes. Prior to using the rubrics in Appendix C, teachers should ensure that students understand the language used in each rubric. It is essential to discuss the rubric so that the language becomes understandable to students. This is a great opportunity to help students expand their vocabulary and clarify what is expected of them. When student work is judged limited or insufficient, teachers need to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help students improve. One possibility is for teachers and students to work together to establish learning goals. All students can benefit from setting learning goals. (See Student Learning Goals at the end of each rubric and in the Sample Student Profile on page 21.) Other sources of performance assessment information are included in the reference section of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit and on Web sites, such as www.aac.ab.ca and www.2Learn.ca. 12 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003 Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)
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The following provides an explanation of each performance level of a rubric.

Level 4 Excellent

Meaning The student meets the standard of excellence for the grade, demonstrates exemplary performance or understanding, shows creativity.

Commentary This is a Wow!

3 Proficient

The student meets the acceptable standard for the grade by demonstrating solid performance or understanding.

This is a Yes.

2 Adequate

The student just meets the acceptable standard for the grade. Performance and understanding are emerging or developing, some errors are being made, grasp is not thorough. The student is not yet meeting the acceptable standard for the grade and has serious errors, omissions or misconceptions.

This is a Yes, but

1 Limited*

This is a No, but there is some basis for making improvement. The teacher needs to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Insufficient/ Blank*

No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

This is a No judgement can be made. The teacher must decide: if the student should redo the task if more time should be provided to complete the task if a different task at the students ability level should be assigned if further instruction leading to reassessment should be provided if the task is inappropriate for the student and should be scrapped.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, teachers need to make decisions about appropriate interventions to help students improve.

3. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 4849.

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Components / 13 2003

Developing Your Own Performance Assessments

The following are suggestions for developing and using performance assessments. Collect examples of performance assessment tasks and rubrics. Have ongoing discussions with colleagues about assessment tasks and rubricswhats working and whats not. Work with others in your school or department to develop common language about assessments and grading. Develop a plan of action for including more products or performances in your assessment program. Add one self-reflective activity during the week. Add one performance assessment with criteria and scoring rubric per grading period. Visit Web sites that provide examples of performance assessment tasks and rubrics.

When developing performance assessments, begin by selecting subject and ICT learner outcomes. Three to five learner outcomes for each is an appropriate goal. Once students have completed a task, they should be given an opportunity to reflect on their performance and set goals for future learning. This allows teachers and students to link assessment results to teaching and learning. A sample planning template is provided below.

Sample Performance Assessment Template


Grade

TITLE <Insert overview of assessment task here>


<SUBJECT> OUTCOMES No. Description

ICT OUTCOMES No. Description

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will:

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The following templates are for developing student assessment tasks and rubrics.

<TITLE> Student Assessment Task <description of task>


Student ___________________________________

<SUBJECT> RUBRIC <TITLE>


Level Criteria

4
Excellent

3
Proficient

2
Adequate

1
Limited*

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate
interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Components / 15 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC <TITLE>


Level Criteria

4
Excellent

3
Proficient

2
Adequate

1
Limited*

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Criteria for Designing Performance Assessment Tasks4


The following analytic rating scale provides a guide to ensure that important elements are included in performance assessments. It also provides an indicator of the extent to which each element is present.
To what extent does the performance assessment: a. establish clear criteria for assessing student learning related to specified learner outcomes these criteria form the bas is for evaluating and communicating student learninginvolving students in developing criteria is encouraged assess student performance on high priority and relevant outcomes what is important for a student to know and be able to do is based on student learning needs and interests together with the priorities of the community, school and jurisdiction establish a meaningful, real-life context (based on issues, problems, themes and/or student interests) require the application of a range of thinking skills or processes contain age- and grade-appropriate activities that are sufficiently challenging provide students with a meaningful/real-life role call for products or performances directed to a specific audience allow for more than one right answer elicit responses that reveal levels of performance rather than simply correct or incorrect answers provide for students of varying ability levels to successfully complete tasks provide for purposeful integration of subject areas provide clear directions for students Fully Partially Not at all

b.

c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l.

m. engage students so their interest and enthusiasm will be sustained n. o. p. merit the time and energy required to complete it provide an evaluation rubric matched with the criteria provide students with the criteria and opportunities to reflect on, selfevaluate and improve their performance?

4. Adapted with permission from the Maryland Assessment Consortium, Performance Task Rubric (Linthicum, MD: Maryland Assessment Consortium, 1994).

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Components / 17 2003

Criteria for Designing Rubrics


The following analytic rating scale provides a guide to ensure that important elements are included in rubrics. It also provides an indicator of the extent to which each element is present. Rarely, if ever

Do the rubric descriptors: a. state criteria in specific terms using action verbs b. address expected learner outcomes c. describe what students are to know and do d. address the same criteria, in the same order and number at each level e. describe measurable qualities of a performance or product (not quantities) f. use age-appropriate, helpful, understandable and succinct language g. use parallel language at each level h. clearly distinguish one performance or product level from the others?

Fully

Partly

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Student Self-reflection

Students do better when they understand the goal, see models and know how their performance compares to learner outcomes. Sample Student Self-reflection Tools are provided in Appendix D, pages 7173, to encourage students to think about how they have performed, review what has been learned and set goals for further 5 learning.

Rationale5
Learning increases when students are involved in the assessment process. Underlying the various approaches [to improving classroom assessment] are assumptions about what makes for effective learningin particular that students have to be actively involved [in the assessment process].
Black and Wiliam, 1998, p. 5

Learner outcomes are clarified when students assist in describing the criteria used to evaluate the performance. Students can reach any target they know about and that holds still for them.
Stiggins, in Davies, 2000, p. 19

Students are motivated to learn when they are involved in determining performance criteria and setting goals. Rubrics offer a means for educators to motivate students through classroom assessment. Students, who are given a voice in their grading, also are given a clear understanding of what is expected from them and the assurance that their accomplishments will be recognized. Thus, the process creates a safe environment for students to take creative risks.
Stix, 1996, p. 51

Students understand how they learn when they assess their own learning. When students assess themselves they develop insights into their own learning.
Gregory, Cameron and Davies, 2000b, p. 10

Strategies to involve students in assessment5


Continual self-reflection throughout performance assessment enables students to assess progress, identify areas of difficulty, define learning and reassess goals. Self-reflection is the key to continued, powerful learning.

5. Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 3032.

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Components / 19 2003

Developing criteria and/or rubrics Students can help:

identify and determine important criteria for a task (use brainstorming and discussions that analyze student samples to develop a critical elements list) write descriptors in student-friendly language create their own rubrics for open-ended tasks (begin by having students write criteria for simple things, like the ideal birthday party, being a good friend or expected classroom behaviours) generate or choose samples that demonstrate or reflect each performance level.
5

Initiating teacherstudent communication As teachers move about classrooms during the administration of performance assessments, they should: provide continual feedback to students observe student progress encourage students to continuously self-assess assist students with difficulties.
5

Using Pause-and- Think Have students pause briefly to think about their work and what they have learned. The reflection should be guided and specific. Students could reflect on their progress, their learning, what they did not understand, what comes next or changing goals. After Pause-and-Think, students could complete the following activities. Share Turn to a partner and describe what they learned. Look for proofSelect and comment on a work sample that demonstrates an aspect of their learning. Connect to criteriaExplain how they have met the criteria. Relate the learningConnect current concepts to past learning or find examples of the concepts in other contexts. Self/Peer assessment Use the rubric to evaluate their own or another students product or performance, and suggest what works, what doesnt and whats missing.

5.

Adapted with permission from the Alberta Assessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), pp. 3032.

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Sample Student Profile

A profile of the various levels of achievement on general ICT outcomes, in the context of core subjects, provides a visual and ongoing record of student performance. Student profiles are rating scales that may be used to record and communicate students levels of performance based on C category ICT learner outcomes. This information could be taken from an ICT scope and sequence developed by the school or jurisdiction. (See www.learning.gov. ab.ca/ict for a document describing how to adapt a scope and sequence framework, and for sample frameworks.)

ICT OUTCOMES: Sample Profile, Division 1


Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date: Jamie Doe English Language Arts 3 November 15, 2002

Division 1

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome

Date:

C1
Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.1.1 access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry

October 2002 (Grade 3)

June 2002 (Grade 2)

C3
Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.1.1 compare and contrast information from similar types of electronic sources Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Finding information that I need from the Internet Action June 2002By October 2002, I will successfully access and retrieve relevant information from the Internet, independently. Strength to enhance: My ability to use a variety of technologies to access information Action January 2002I want to find new ways to access information; e.g., discussion forums.

January 2002 (Grade 2)

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Components / 21 2003

Communicating Student Learning

Information and communication technology learner outcomes can be assessed formatively or summatively. Effective communication informs students, parents and others about the outcomes accomplished and the next steps in the learning process. Student Profiles are provided in Appendix E, pages 7578. The greater the role students are given in this process, the richer the information that is shared and the greater the impact on future student learning. Communication of student learning should: celebrate and improve learning enhance the home and school partnership involve a variety of strategies reflect a schools philosophy about learning be based on curriculum outcomes. Information on student progress is required for reporting clearly to students, parents and others. This information is essential in order for teachers to change or refine instructional plans to ensure learning activities are appropriate for all students. The information is also required to evaluate program effectiveness and revise programs to improve student learning (Alberta Learning 2002).

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Appendix A
Sample English Language Arts Assessment Task
This English Language Arts (ELA) task identifies both ELA and ICT outcomes. Many of these ICT outcomes can be contextualized within the ELA program of studies. This assessment sample uses an integrated rubric (page 26) to assess both the ICT and ELA outcomes Note : If ICT outcomes are not included and contextualized with another core curriculum, the ICT and core subject outcomes need to be evaluated separately. Two distinct rubrics would be used because the English language arts subject outcomes could be demonstrated without the application of ICT outcomes. The sample rubrics on pages 2728 illustrate how ICT outcomes and English language arts outcomes can be evaluated separately.

Grade 6: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Students will write a new version of a story incorporating elements found in at least two versions of the story. Students will then create a multimedia version of the new story.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES No. 2.4.2 2.4.3 Description Elaborate on the expression of ideas use literary devices, such as imagery and figurative language, to create particular effects Structure texts determine purpose and audience needs to choose forms, and organize ideas and details in oral, print and other media texts/express the same ideas in different forms and genres; compare and explain the effectiveness of each for audience and purpose Determine information needs decide on and select the information needed to support a point of view Plan to gather information develop and follow own plan for accessing and gathering ideas and information, considering guidelines for time and length of investigation and presentation Use a variety of sources locate information to answer research questions, using a variety of sources, such as printed texts, bulletin boards, biographies, art, music, community resource people, CD-ROMs and the Internet Access information skim, scan and read closely to gather information Organize information organize ideas and information using a variety of strategies and techniques, such as comparing and contrasting, and classifying and sorting according to subtopics and sequence Record information quote information from oral, print and other media sources

3.1.2 3.1.3

3.2.1

3.3.1

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 23 2003

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS OUTCOMES (contd) No. 3.4.1 4.1.3 Description Share ideas and information select appropriate visuals, print and/or other media to inform and engage the audience Enhance legibility experiment with a variety of software design elements, such as spacing, graphics, titles and headings, and font sizes and styles, to enhance the presentation of texts Attend to spelling edit for and correct commonly misspelled words in own writing, using spelling generalizations and the meaning and function of words in context

4.2.2

ICT OUTCOMES No. C1.2.1 C1.2.2 Description access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locations (URLs) organize information gathered from the Internet or an electronic source by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories; communicate effectively, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes organize information, using such tools as databases, spreadsheets or electronic webbing retrieve data from available storage devices, such as shared folders, to which groups have contributed use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

C4.2.2 C5.2.1 C7.2.1 C7.2.2

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information organize information create a storyboard compose a story use conventions present a story. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. The following Web sites can be pertinent to this task. http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/storfolk.html Folklore, Myth & Legend (from the Childrens Literature Web Guide) http://www.cln.org/themes/fairytales.html Stories, Folklore, and Fairy Tales Theme Page (from the Community Learning Network) http://www.qesn.meq.gouv.qc.ca/folklore/index.htm Teaching with Folklore

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


People are storytelling creatures. We make sense of our experience of the world through the stories we tell, and we are drawn to the stories of others. As a young storywriter, you have been hired by a publishing company to create a new version of a story and prepare it for publication. To accomplish this, find and read at least two versions of a myth, folktale or legend that you find engaging. (Use print or Web sources.) Genres you may choose from include: Greek myths Chinese folktales forest lore space folklore and myths myths and folklore about flight. Your job is to: use a graphic organizer (web, chart, Venn diagram) to compare the two story versions of the myth, folktale or legend you have found select elements from these two versions incorporate these elements into a well-written new story by: using a storyboard to plan your new version of the tale creating a multimedia version presenting your story to representatives from the publishing company.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 25 2003

Single Rubric Combining ELA and ICT Outcomes


Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS and ICT RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES
Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1, C1.2.1, C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment tas k.

Organizes information (3.3.1, C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Creates storyboard (3.1.2, C1.2.2, C7.2.1) Composes story (2.4.2, 2.4.3) Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Creates an original, interesting storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre

Creates a storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Composes original, compelling story with rich supporting details

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes simple, predictable story with few supporting details

Com poses incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and significantly interfere with writers intended meaning Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of the piece; errors are hardly noticeable Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors, but these do not interfere with writers intended meaning Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Presents story (3.4.1, 4.1.3, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

* When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve. Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Separate Rubrics for ELA and ICT Outcomes


Student ___________________________________

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (3.1.3, 3.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (3.3.1)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using a graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using a graphic organizer

Places information into topical categories using a graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using a graphic organizer

Creates storyboard (3.1.2)

Creates an original, interesting storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre

Creates a storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Completes a storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Composes story (2.4.2, 2.4.3)

Composes original and compelling story with rich supporting details Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance impact of the piece; errors are hardly noticeable Presents story that engages and holds the interest of the audience

Composes original story with supporting details

Composes simple and predictable story with few supporting details Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are inconsistent and interfere with writers intended meaning

Composes incomplete, uninteresting or disjointed story Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation errors are evident and significantly interfere with writers intended meaning Presents story that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

Uses conventions (4.2.2)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have few errors, but these do not interfere with writers intended meaning Presents story that communicates to the audience

Presents story (3.4.1, 4.1.3)

Presents story that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix A / 27 2003

Student ___________________________________

ICT RUBRIC USING STORIES TO CREATE STORIES


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.2.1, C5.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from several electronic sources

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from electronic sources provided

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves both relevant and irrelevant information from electronic sources provided

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (C1.2.2, C4.2.2)

Organizes significant information into purposeful categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Organizes topical information into appropriate categories using an electronic graphic organizer Creates an electronic storyboard using the requirements of the selected genre

Places information into topical categories using an electronic graphic organizer

Places incomplete, irrelevant information into pre-set categories using an electronic graphic organizer Completes an electronic storyboard template by placing events and ideas randomly

Creates storyboard (C1.2.2, C7.2.1)

Creates an original, interesting electronic storyboard using the essential requirements of the selected genre Creates a multimedia presentation that engages and holds the interest of the audience through the effective use of sound and graphics

Completes an electronic storyboard template based on the requirements of the selected genre

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.2.2, C7.2.2)

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience

Creates a multimedia presentation that communicates to the audience, but does not sustain interest throughout

Creates a singledimension presentation that suits neither the needs nor interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

28 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B
Evaluation Tools for ICT Outcome Categories F and P
Since F, P and C ICT learner outcomes measure different skills, the tools used to assess and evaluate these outcomes are also different. F outcomes are concerned with social, moral and safety issues, and P outcomes are primarily skillbased, therefore assessment strategies that give students opportunities to demonstrate their skills either as a finished product or as a process are appropriate. Rubrics, analytic rating scales and checklists are efficient tools for judging the quality of student performance and promoting successful learning because clear explanations are provided to students. To be effective, it is essential that these evaluation tools be shared with students before they start assessment tasks. Analytic rating scales and rubrics are comparable to dimmer switchesthere are various degrees of illumination just as there are degrees of quality of performance. Checklists, on the other hand, are more like simple toggle switchesthey are either on or off. Checklists provide teachers with opportunities to reveal to students whether specific criteria are present or absent. Checklists are two-point scalesyes or not yet. The sample checklists in this appendix are based on F and P learner outcomes.
6

6. Adapted from Alberta Education, Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 10 to Grade 12 (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998), pp. 11, 12, 27.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix B / 29 2003

F and P Outcomes Checklist


Student ___________________________________ A. BASIC PROCEDURES, COMPUTER WORKSTATION COMPONENTS AND PROCESSES FOR PRODUCTIVITY
Observation of Student

The student continues to demonstrate outcomes achieved in prior grades and courses

B. PROCESSES FOR PRODUCTIVITY


Observation of Student YES NOT YET

To support communication, the student can: manipulate and present data through the selection of appropriate tools (P2.4.1) select and use independently, multimedia capabilities for presentations in various courses (P3.4.1) integrate a variety of visual and audio information into a document (P4.4.1) create multiple-link documents appropriate to the content of a topic (P5.4.1) post multiple-link pages on the World Wide Web or on a local area or wide area network (P5.4.2)

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C
Sample Performance Assessment Tasks and Rubrics for ICT Outcome Category C
The sample ICT assessment tasks focus on C category learner outcomes. C category tasks subsume outcomes from the F and P categories of the ICT outcomes. The result is a comprehensive assessment that requires the completion of fewer assessment tasks. This appendix provides sample performance tasks and scoring rubrics for mathematics, science, social studies and English language arts representing some of the C category outcomes. Below is a Curriculum and Assessment Matrix indicating the activity code assigned to the sample performance assessment task and the ICT learner outcomes that the task assesses. For each assessment task, students are given a real-life, meaningful context with a definite role and audience. As these are simulations, the audience may consist of teachers, parents, support staff or classmates. The samples may also include Web link references that were active at the time of publication and will be updated from time to time in the online edition of this tool kit. Teachers should determine and communicate to students whether assessment tasks will be evaluated on an individual or group basis.

Curriculum and Assessment Matrix


Assessment ICT Outcomes C1
Access, use and communicate information

MacBeth Made Easy

Interviewing the Literary Greats

Investigating Global Warming

Investing for a Capital Purchase

ELA201.01
C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C1.4.4 C2.4.1, C2.4.2 C3.4.1

ELA201.02
C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C1.4.4

AM20.01
C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C1.4.4

PM20.01
C1.4.2, C1.4.4

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C3.4.1, C3.4.2

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C6.4.4

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.3, C6.4.4

C6.4.1, C6.4.2, C6.4.3, C6.4.4

C7
Use electronic research techniques

C7.4.3

C7.4.3

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 31 2003

Assessment ICT Outcomes C1


Access, use and communicate information

Cracking the Ethene Problem

Planetary Motion

War Guilt Tribunal

World War I Soldier

CHEM20.01
C1.4.1, C1.4.4 C2.4.1, C2.4.2

PHYS20.01
C1.4.1

SS20.01
C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C1.4.4 C2.4.1, C2.4.2 C3.4.1, C3.4.2

SS23.01
C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C1.4.4 C2.4.1 C3.4.2

C2
Seek alternative viewpoints

C3
Critically assess information

C4
Use organizational processes and tools

C5
Use technology to aid collaboration

C5.4.1 C6.4.4, C6.4.5 C6.4.1, C6.4.2

C5.4.2 C6.4.4 C7.4.3 C7.4.2, C7.4.3

C6
Investigate and solve problems

C7
Use electronic research techniques

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 11: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA201.01)

MACBETH MADE EASY


Students will create a practical resource intended to help others more easily interpret Shakespeares Macbeth.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 201 OUTCOMES No.
1.1.1

Description
Form tentative understandings, interpretations and positions form tentative understandings and interpretations of works of literature and tentative positions on issues communicated by texts, and assess their potential by connecting own and others explorations and by exploring additional aspects of these texts Consider new perspectives compare own ideas, perspectives and interpretations with those of others, through a variety of means, such as pro-con charts, alternative Internet search engines, comparison tables, plus -minus -interesting (PMI) charts, think-pair-share and discussion groups on the Internet, to expand perceptions and understandings when exploring and responding to texts Understand and interpret content compare the personality traits, roles, relationships, motivations, attitudes and values of characters developed/persons presented in literature and other texts Use production, publication and presentation strategies and technologies consistent with context match presentation materials, strategies and technologies to purpose, audience and situation develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors; e.g., volume, tone, stress; nonverbal factors; e.g., gestures, posture, distance, eye contact; and visual production factors; e.g., colour and contrast, appropriate to purpose, audience and situation Edit text for matters of correctness know and be able to apply capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly, including end punctuation, commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, quotation marks, hyphens, dashes, ellipses and parentheses

1.2.1

2.1.2

4.1.4

4.2.4

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C1.4.2 C1.4.4

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues consult a wide variety of sources that reflect varied viewpoints on particular topics evaluate the validity of gathered viewpoints against other sources assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information use appropriate presentation software to demonstrate personal understandings

C2.4.1 C2.4.2 C3.4.1 C7.4.3

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 33 2003

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve points of view evaluate sources interpret character traits create a resource use conventions present information. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Prior to undertaking the assessment task, students should brainstorm and establish criteria for rating the value of information sources. This assessment task may be used in different ways, depending on student abilities and/or teacher preference. For example, it could be the basis of a major self-directed study of the play. Or, after a teacher-directed cloze-reading of Act I, students could use it to study the remainder of the play. Or, it could be used to summarize student learning following a traditional study of the play. Provide samples of material in the widely-used format ...for Dummies to use in a discussion of tone, style and organization. For example, Computers for Dummies could be a resource for people who want to know how to use computers. The task lends itself to having students work in groups to develop a multimedia resource because there are numerous sources of information available on the Internet about Shakespeare and his plays.

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

MACBETH MADE EASY


Since its creation, the number of times people worldwide have produced, reviewed and analyzed Shakespeares Macbeth is incalculable. Of course, not all the reviewers are in agreement and have put forth many different interpretations of character, imagery and issues in the play. Your task is to explore and use a variety of resources about the play to deepen your own understanding and create a resource on Macbeth. Your intended audience has little previous exposure to Macbeth , so you want to help them understand as much of the play as possible. This resource will be modelled on the ...for Dummies approach and can be in booklet, Web site or multimedia format. You are required to: determine the kinds of information that will be most helpful to your audience and how this information should be organized survey a wide variety of sources, including electronic sources maintain a research log with a record of each source rate at least five sources according to class-developed criteria select relevant information for your resource that includes: a summary of key events an analysis of the needs, wants and values of the characters a commentary on key speeches issues raised or suggested by the play select and/or create appropriate visuals and icons to include in your final product.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 35 2003

Student

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC MACBETH MADE EASY


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves points of view (1.2.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from a wide variety of sources representing diverse points of view about critical aspects of the play Supports own interpretations effectively using precise evidence that demonstrates insightful understanding and expresses a relevant point of view about the play

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from a variety of sources representing points of view about aspects of the play

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves information from few sources representing more than one point of view about predictable aspects of the play

1 Limited*
Accesses and retrieves information from few sources representing a singular point of view about predictable aspects of the play

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Interprets character traits (1.1.1, 1.2.1, 2.1.2)

Supports own interpretations using detailed evidence that demonstrates understanding and expresses a clear point of view about the play

Supports own interpretations using some evidence that demonstrates partial understanding and expresses a point of view about the play

Supports own interpretations using little, if any, evidence that dem onstrates vague understanding and expresses an unclear point of view about the play

Creates resource (4.1.4)

Creates an engaging resource that incorporates creative text and a variety of dramatic visual production factors, and addresses purpose and audience effectively

Creates a resource that incorporates meaningful text and a variety of visual production factors, and addresses purpose and audience thoroughly

Creates a resource that incorporates text and some visual production factors, and addres ses purpose and audience appropriately

Creates a resource that includes text and visuals that do little to address purpose or audience

Uses conventions (4.2.4)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance the impact of the document

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have errors that do not affect the impact of the document

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have errors which interfere with the impact of the document

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have errors that seriously impair the impact of the document

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC MACBETH MADE EASY


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves points of view (C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C2.4.1)

4 Excellent
Uses technology efficiently to access and retrieve relevant information from a variety of sources representing diverse points of view about critical aspects of the play Maintains a clear and complete record of sources, and accurately rates sources based on criteria

3 Proficient
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from a v ariety of sources representing points of view about aspects of the play

2 Adequate
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from few sources representing more than one point of view about predictable aspects of the play

1 Limited*
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from few sources representing a singular point of view about predictable aspects of the play

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Evaluates sources (C2.4.2, C3.4.1)

Maintains a record of sources and rates sources based on criteria

Maintains a sketchy/incomplete record of sources and rates sources in a manner that is inconsistent with criteria Uses technology to create a resource that is difficult to read, has few visuals and little audience appeal

Maintains incomplete, if any, record of sources and randomly applies criteria

Presents information (C1.4.4, C7.4.3)

Uses technology effectively to create a highly visual, readable resource that is persuasive and engages the audience

Uses technology to create a readable resource with visuals that appeal to the audience

Uses technology to create a resource that is difficult to read, uses irrelevant visuals and lacks audience appeal

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 37 2003

Grade 11: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA201.02)

INTERVIEWING THE LITERARY GREATS


Students will produce a script and conduct a multimedia interview with a character from a literary work.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 201 OUTCOMES No.
2.1.2

Description
Understand and interpret content describe the relationships among plot, setting, character, atmosphere and theme when studying a narrative Evaluate the verisimilitude, appropriateness and significance of print and non-print texts assess the appropriateness of own and others understanding and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence analyze and assess character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and in terms of contribution to theme analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience Consider and address form, structure and medium apply, when appropriate, the common conventions of oral, print, visual and multimedia text forms, including the common conventions of script Edit text for matters of correctness pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling and grammar usage, and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices

2.3.2

4.1.2

4.2.4

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C1.4.2 C1.4.4

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic generate new understandings of problematic situations by using some form of technology to facilitate the process use appropriate presentation software to demonstrate personal understandings

C3.4.1 C3.4.2 C6.4.4 C7.4.3

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: assess and retrieve information interpret a literary character create a script present an interview with a literary character use conventions. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. This task has applicability to English Language Arts 202 and selected Career and Technology Studies courses. Prior to completing the performance task, students will need the skills of researching and assessing Internet information for validity. Because of its complexity, Part 2 lends itself to being completed by a small group of students. The overall completion of this part of the task is the responsibility of the group and a group score should be awarded. Individual scores will be based on Part 1 of the assignment. The use of digital video or conventional video technology is essential to produce the multimedia interview. Video editing programs available on the Internet will facilitate completion of the task. Communication technology staff in the school or jurisdiction can be a helpful resource.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 39 2003

Student Assessment Task

INTERVIEWING THE LITERARY GREATS


As part of a literacy campaign, municipal libraries across the province want to inspire more people to read. They are setting up displays where patrons can check out interesting literary wo rks. These displays include video or computer terminals where patrons can view engaging interviews of some of the great literary characters. The local library board has contracted you to conduct an interview with a great literary character to use in this promotional campaign. Part 1: To be completed individually From a list of texts provided by the library, pick a character from a novel you have read. Conduct research related to the context of the novel from at least five different types of valid sources; e.g., journals, newspapers, encyclopedias, Internet, magazines, interviews. Include at least two electronic sources. From this research, produce a top 10 list of the most essential questions you would like to ask this character. These questions should reflect varied viewpoints on the selected character. Maintain a record of your sources and rate their validity based on established criteria. Create a script for the conversation that will occur during the interview. There should be evidence that exhibits in-depth understanding of the great literary character. This script should also indicate that filming techniques; e.g., pan in/out, zoom, dissolve, lighting, camera angle and sound, are considered.

Part 2: Group work For the remainder of this assessment task, you will work in groups of three. Your first task as a group is to select one script to use in creating a multimedia presentation. Assign roles and begin to produce the multimedia interview. The interview should clearly portray the character depicted in the novel. Include animation, video, graphics, pictures, hyperlinks and any tools that will enhance the communication of your ideas. Present your multimedia presentation to the library board.

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Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS RUBRIC INTERVIEWING THE LITERARY GREATS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (2.3.2)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves relevant information from a wide variety of sources representing diverse points of view about the literary character Creates an engaging script that incorporates creative, meaningful dialogue with various filming techniques, that effectively engages the audience

3 Proficient
Selectively accesses and retrieves relevant information from a variety of sources representing points of view about the literary character

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves information from few sources representing more than one point of view about the literary character

1 Limited*
Accesses and retrieves information from few sources representing a singular point of view about the literary character

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Creates script (4.1.2)

Creates a workable script that incorporates meaningful dialogue with various filming techniques, that engages the audience

Creates a readable script that incorporates dialogue and some filming techniques, that holds audience interest

Creates a script that incorporates some dialogue and filming techniques, that does not hold audience interest

Interprets literary character (2.1.2, 2.3.2)

Uses a variety of effective examples to develop an in-depth portrayal of the character in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and thematic consideration Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation are accurate and enhance the impact of the script

Uses examples to portray the character in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and thematic consideration

Uses examples that partially portray the character in terms of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and thematic consideration

Uses irrelevant examples that inconsistently portray the character in terms of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and thematic consideration

Uses conventions (4.2.4)

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have errors that do not affect the impact of the script

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have errors which interfere with the impact of the script

Spelling, grammar, capitalization and punctuation have errors that seriously impair the impact of the script

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 41 2003

Student

ICT RUBRIC INTERVIEWING THE LITERARY GREATS


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C3.4.1, C3.4.2)

4 Excellent
Uses technology efficiently to access and retrieve insightful, valid and relevant information from a variety of sources that reveals in-depth character understanding Creates a creative, smooth, clear and plausible script that includes a variety of filming techniques, including lighting, sound, camera angles and stage directions Creates an interview using multimedia effectively that provides insightful, relevant and meaningful information about the character, is persuasive and engages the audience

3 Proficient
Uses technology to access and retrieve relevant information from a variety of sources that reveals character understanding

2 Adequate
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from few sources that reveals character understanding

1 Limited*
Uses technology to access and retrieve information that does little to reveal character understanding

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Creates script (C1.4.4, C6.4.4)

Creates a workable script that includes a variety of filming techniques, including lighting, sound, camera angles and stage directions

Creates a script that includes some filming techniques or stage directions

Creates an incomplete script that incorporates few, if any, filming techniques or stage directions

Presents interview (C1.4.4, C7.4.3)

Creates an interview using multimedia that provides relevant information about the character and appeals to the audience

Creates an interview using multimedia that provides relevant information about the character in a straight -forward manner with little audience appeal

Creates an interview using multimedia that provides little, if any, information about the character and lacks audience appeal

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

42 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 11: APPLIED MATHEMATICS (AM20.01)

INVESTIGATING GLOBAL WARMING


Students will select data from a variety of reliable electronic sources and present a wellsupported argument for a position on global warming.
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 20 OUTCOMES No.
1.1

Description
Graphing and design extract information from given graphs of discrete or continuous data using: time series glyphs (custom pictorial representation) continuous data contour lines draw and validate inferences, including interpolations and extrapolations, from graphical and tabular data design different ways of presenting data and analyzing results, by focusing on the truthful display of data and the clarity of presentation Regression and nonlinear equations collect experimental data; graph the data using technology and represent the data with best-fit exponential or quadratic functions of the form: Y = ab^x Y = ax^2 + bx + c use best-fit exponential and quadratic functions and their associated graphs to make predictions and solve problems

1.2 1.3

2.3

2.4

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C1.4.2 C1.4.4

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues investigate and solve problems of prediction, calculation and inference investigate and solve problems of organization and manipulation of information manipulate data by using charting and graphing technologies in order to test inferences and probabilities generate new understandings of problematic situations by using some form of technology to facilitate the process

C6.4.1 C6.4.2 C6.4.3 C6.4.4

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 43 2003

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: plan and retrieve information collect and interpret data organize data generate a graph make inferences manipulate a graph make predictions communicate findings. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. To help prepare students for the task, teachers may want to spend time discussing graphs for depicting the type of data being collected; i.e., exponential versus line graphs, and consider which types may be suited to the task. Also, discuss criteria for selecting reliable electronic sources.

44 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

INVESTIGATING GLOBAL WARMING


Being able to collect and analyze information is a critical skill for many occupations, including researchers, market analysts and policy makers. Data collected from a variety of sources can be used to argue different viewpoints. As a researcher for an environmental group, prepare and present an argument to government policy makers that indicates global warming is a problem and that there are measures that need to be taken to prevent further warming. Conduct searches for data from reliable sources demonstrating that global warming has occurred. Select one possible cause of warming and locate data verifying that global warming is on the increase. Graph the data using a spreadsheet and find a best-fit curve to represent the data. Without making modifications to the actual data, manipula te the graph; i.e., by adjusting scale, size, beginning, ending, so that it convincingly represents the position of the environmental group. Using technology, prepare a presentation on behalf of the environmental group to government policy makers. Include predictions for the future based on the best-fit curve.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 45 2003

Student

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC INVESTIGATING GLOBAL WARMING


Level Criteria
Collects and interprets data (Graphing and design 1.1, Regression and nonlinear equations 2.3) Organizes data (Graphing and design 1.3, Regression and nonlinear equations 2.3) Makes inferences (Graphing and design 1.2, 1.3, Regression and nonlinear equations 2.4) Manipulates graph (Graphing and design 1.3)

4 Excellent
Uses logic and problem solving to identify relevant, reliable data which clearly indicate a cause of global warming

3 Proficient
Uses logic and problem solving to identify data which indicate a possible caus e of global warming

2 Adequate
Uses logic and problem solving to identify data relevant to global warming

1 Limited*
Uses logic and problem solving to identify data but relevance to global warming is unclear

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Creates easy to interpret spreadsheet and scatter plot that accurately represent the data with a bestf it curve or curves

Creates an interpretable spreadsheet and scatter plot that represent the data with a best-fit curve

Creates an interpretable spreadsheet and scatter plot, however, the best-fit curve does not accurately represent data

Creates a spreadsheet and scatter plot that are not interpretable, is unable to generate a best-fit curve

Makes insightful, logical inferences based on an exponential or quadratic equation that accurately represents the data

Makes logical inferences based on an exponential or quadratic equation that represents the data

Makes inferences based on an equation that partially represents the data

Makes inferences that are not bas ed on data

Manipulates graph to convincingly present data indicating global warming is a problem

Manipulates graph to present data favourably, indicating existence of an environmental problem Provides predictions that are generally supported by data

Manipulates graph to present data

Fails to manipulate graph, or instead, manipulates data

Makes predictions (Regression and nonlinear equations 2.4)

Provides insightful predictions that are clearly supported by data

Provides predictions that are partially supported by data

Provides predictions that are not supported by data or are based on personal opinion

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

46 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC INVESTIGATING GLOBAL WARMING


Level Criteria
Plans and retrieves information (C1.4.1, C1.4.2)

4 Excellent
Plans and conducts an efficient search retrieving comprehensive data from relevant sources

3 Proficient
Plans and conducts a search retrieving necessary data from relevant sources

2 Adequate
Plans and conducts a search retrieving some data from relevant sources

1 Limited*
Plans and conducts a search retrieving little, if any, data that address the topic

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Generates graph (C6.4.3, C6.4.4)

Thoroughly analyzes, synthesizes and graphs collected data, manipulating the graphs to present data in a highly favourable way Communicates information from findings in a highly persuasive, engaging presentation, using technology efficiently

Accurately analyzes, synthesizes and graphs collected data, making adjustments to present data in a favourable way Communicates information from findings in an interesting, coherent present ation, using technology

Analyzes and graphs data in a predictable way, making attempts to present data favourably

Graphs data without sufficient analysis or synthesis, making few, if any, adjustments to present data

Communicates findings (C1.4.4, C6.4.1, C6.4.2.)

Communicates information from findings in a straight forward presentation, using technology

Fails to communicate information from findings coherently or accurately, or use technology efficiently

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 47 2003

Grade 11: PURE MATHEMATICS (PM20.01)

INVESTING FOR A CAPITAL PURCHASE


Students will investigate low-risk investment options for a future capital equipment purchase and present recommendations, using technology, to the owners of a small business.
PURE MATHEMATICS 20 OUTCOMES No.
6.1 6.3 6.4 6.5 1.3

Description
Finance solve consumer problems solve budget problems using graphs and tables to communicate solutions plot and describe data of exponential form solve investment and credit problems involving simple and compound interest Linear and nonlinear systems determine the solution to a system of nonlinear equations, using technology as appropriate

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.2 C1.4.4

Description
select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues investigate and solve problems of prediction, calculation and inference investigate and solve problems of organization and manipulation of information manipulate data by using charting and graphing technologies in order to test inferences and probabilities generate new understandings of problematic situations by using some form of technology to facilitate the process

C6.4.1 C6.4.2 C6.4.3 C6.4.4

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information represent data determine strategies present findings. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. To help prepare students for the task, teachers may want to limit or delineate some investment options. Students should be encouraged to find options that represent exponential growth. Teachers may also want to provide students with instruction on how to predict future machinery costs and how to apply the concept of domain.

48 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student Assessment Task

INVESTING FOR A CAPITAL PURCHASE


For many small businesses, it is critical to have an investment plan in place to provide capital for future purchases. The owners of a small machine shop are considering the purchase of a new lathe and have asked you, as an investment adviser, to investigate low-risk investment options. They own a computerized turning center (lathe) which they purchased for $100 000 several years ago. However, they believe they will have to replace it in three to five years. They need to know how much money they should invest today to have the capital to replace the machine when it is no longer cost effective to repair. Conduct searches for investment data from reliable sources. Select at least two different investment options. Display and graph the growth of the investments. Identify the domain and range of the region bounded by the curves which represent the capital investment options. Using technology, prepare a presentation for the business owners outlining the investment strategies, and indicating the strengths and weaknesses of each. Be sure to indicate the range of investment amounts depending on the life of the current lathe.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 49 2003

Student

MATHEMATICS RUBRIC INVESTING FOR A CAPITAL PURCHASE


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (Finance 6.1, 6.5)

4 Excellent
Identifies a wide variety of low-risk investment options and narrows the options to those with the highest interest returns

3 Proficient
Identifies a variety of low-risk investment options and identifies the one with the highest returns

2 Adequate
Identifies low-risk investment options that are similar, but does not identify those with the highest returns

1 Limited*
Identifies sources for investing

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Represents data (Finance 6.4)

Generates equations that represent investment options, displays data graphically in the appropriate domain and range Determines insightful and logical strategies that thoroughly account for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

Generates equations that represent investment options, displays data graphically with little attention to domain or range Determines logical strategies that account for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

Generates equations that represent investment options, displays data without attention to domain or range

Generates inappropriate or inaccurate equations that do not represent the data

Determines strategies (Finance 6.1, 6.5., Linear and nonlinear systems 1.3)

Determines reasonable strategies that partially account for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

Determines strategies that do not account for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

Presents findings (Finance 6.3)

Develops a thoughtful and convincing presentation that clearly demonstrates a wide variety of possible strategies

Develops an interesting and coherent presentation that demonstrates a variety of possible strategies

Develops a predictable presentation that partially demonstrates a variety of strategies

Develops a sketchy presentation that considers a single investment option, with little consideration of alternate strategies

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

50 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

ICT RUBRIC INVESTING FOR A CAPITAL PURCHASE


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.4.2)

4 Excellent
Uses technology efficiently to access and retrieve relevant information about a wide variety of lowrisk investment options and narrows the options to those with the highest interest returns Uses technology to generate equations that represent investment options, displays data graphically in the appropriate domain and range Uses technology to develop and deliver a thoughtful, convincing presentation that thoroughly accounts for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

3 Proficient
Uses technology to access and retrieve relevant information about a variety of low-risk investment options and identifies the one with the highest returns

2 Adequate
Uses technology to access and retrieve relevant information about similar low-risk investment options, but does not identify those with the highest returns

1 Limited*
Uses technology to identify sources for investing

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Represents data (C6.4.3, C6.4.4)

Uses technology to generate equations to represent investment options, displays data graphically with little attention to domain or range

Uses technology to generate equations that represent investment options, displays data graphically without attention to domain or range Uses technology to develop and deliver a predictable presentation that partially accounts for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

Generates inappropriate or inaccurate equations that do not represent the data

Presents findings (C1.4.4, C6.4.1, C6.4.2)

Uses technology to develop and deliver an interesting, coherent presentation that accounts for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

Uses technology to develop and deliver a sketchy presentation that considers a single investment that does not account for the ambiguity of the three to five year term

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 51 2003

Grade 11: CHEMISTRY (CHEM20.01)

CRACKING THE ETHENE PROBLEM


Students will prepare and present a research paper about ethene production, and the associated environmental and social issues.
CHEMISTRY 20 OUTCOMES (Unit 4: The Diversity of Matter: An Introduction to Organic Chemistry) No.
4.1

Description
Organic compounds are a common form of matter. Demonstrate the interrelationships among science, technology and society by understanding that organic compounds have distinguishing characteristics by: comparing them with inorganic compounds, describing the composition of and providing names and structural formulas for various hydrocarbons and their derivatives, and by investigating the physical and chemical properties of representative examples of organic compounds and building models depicting the structures of simple examples The chemical changes of organic compounds are many and diverse. Demonstrate an understanding that organic compounds undergo a variety of chemical reactions by: defining and giving examples of addition, substitution, elimination, etherification and combustion reactions of hydrocarbons writing and balancing chemical equations for the reactions described above comparing hydrocarbon cracking and reforming defining, giving examples of and writing chemical equations for various reactions, and by synthesizing an organic compound in the laboratory and building models to depict polymerization describing the petrochemical industry in Alberta and investigating career opportunities related to organic chemistry assessing the positive and negative effects of synthetically produced organic compounds, recognizing that the development of these products has played a major role in quality of life and standard of living but that a practical solution to related social and environmental problems often requires a compromise between competing priorities Demonstrate an ability to use skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, emphasizing: organizing and communicating connecting, synthesizing and integrating in the investigation of organic compounds and their reactions

4.2

Skills

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C1.4.4

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues consult a wide variety of sources that reflect varied viewpoints on particular topics evaluate the validity of gathered viewpoints against other sources generate new understandings of problematic situations by using some form of technology to facilitate the process evaluate the appropriateness of the technology used to investigate or solve a problem

C2.4.1 C2.4.2 C6.4.4 C6.4.5

52 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: research information build chemical models explain organic chemical reactions evaluate information present findings. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Helpful technology tools include draw and paint programs or molecular modelling programs. Free demonstrations are available at www.wavefun.com.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 53 2003

Student Assessment Task

CRACKING THE ETHENE PROBLEM


As the chief chemist at a chemistry laboratory, you have been asked to prepare a research paper to be presented to a local municipal council. The community needs to make an informed decision about a new chemical processing plant to be built in the area. This plant will produce ethene. Ethene (C 2H4) is an important commercial product used in many everyday items, particularly in the production of plastics. Because ethene does not exist in large quantities in nature, it must be produced by the cracking o f propane, ethane, butane, naphtha and assorted refinery off-gasses. Selection of an ethene production method depends on raw resources availability. For instance, in areas where crude oil is abundant, ethene production involves putting the naphtha fraction of crude oil through a cracking process. In Western Canada, there is an abundant supply of crude oil. You are asked to present: a description of the process of ethene production a model of the equation for the cracking of ethene and the cracking of one possible component of naphtha information about the derivatives (products) manufactured using ethene social and environmental issues a recommendation about building a processing plant based on the information you accessed on social and environmental issues, and on research of how other communities have dealt with this situation.

54 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

CHEMISTRY RUBRIC CRACKING THE ETHENE PROBLEM


Level Criteria
Researches information (4.1, 4.2)

4 Excellent
Conducts comprehensive research on production methods, social and environmental issues, and ways that operating facilities have dealt with concerns

3 Proficient
Conducts necessary research on production methods, social and environmental issues, and ways that operating facilities have dealt with concerns

2 Adequate
Conducts part of the necessary research on production methods, social and environmental issues, and ways that operating facilities have dealt with concerns

1 Limited*
Conducts part of the necessary research and acces ses superficial information about production methods, social and environmental issues, and ways that operating facilities have dealt with concerns Constructs models that have little scientific accuracy

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Builds chemical models (4.1) Explains organic chemical reactions (4.2)

Constructs models that effectively depict structures and scientific principles accurately Provides in-depth scientific descriptions of chemical processes, including complete and accurate chemical equations

Constructs models that accurately depict structures and scientific principles

Constructs models that partially depict structures, may lack scientific accuracy

Provides scientific descriptions of chemical processes, including accurate chemical equations

Provides partial scientific descriptions of chemical processes with few chemical equations

Provides scientifically incorrect descriptions of chemical processes; equations, if included, contain many errors

Evaluates information (4.2)

Presents a comprehensive list of various sides of the issue that represents important possible alternatives in detail and makes a recommendation effectively supported by insightful analysis

Identifies various sides of the issue representing important possible alternatives and makes a recommendation supported by analysis

Identifies some important sides of the issue and others that are not relevant, makes a recommendation that is partially supported

Identifies sides of the issue which are not relevant and makes a recommendation that is not supported by analysis

Presents findings (Skills)

Communicates ideas and information effectively, using specific vocabulary and extensive chemistry conventions that are persuasive and engaging

Communicates ideas and information clearly, using vocabulary and correct chemistry conventions that are persuasive but have few engaging elements

Communicates ideas and information using vocabulary that does not interfere with the flow of communication but has few persuasive elements and is not engaging

Communicates ideas and information using vocabulary that is incorrect and interferes with the flow of communication; presentation is neither persuasive nor engaging

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 55 2003

Student

ICT RUBRIC CRACKING THE ETHENE PROBLEM


Level Criteria
Researches information (C1.4.1, C2.4.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently uses technology to access a wide range of credible viewpoints regarding social and environmental issues surrounding ethene production Uses technology to create an animated 3-D model that effectively depicts structures and scientific principles accurately Uses technology efficiently to access and organize significant information to support or refute particular viewpoints

3 Proficient
Uses technology to access a range of viewpoints regarding social and environmental issues surrounding ethene production

2 Adequate
Uses technology to acces s a few viewpoints regarding social and environmental issues surrounding ethene production

1 Limited*
Uses technology to access narrow or one-sided viewpoints regarding social or environmental issues surrounding ethene production

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Builds chemical models (C6.4.4)

Uses technology to create a 3-D model that depicts structures and scientific principles

Uses technology to create a 2-D model that depicts basic structures, may lack scientific accuracy

Uses technology to create a model that lacks scientific accuracy

Evaluates information (C2.4.2)

Uses technology to access and organize relevant information to support or refute particular viewpoints

Uses technology to find and list related information to support or refute particular viewpoints

Uses technology to find a few facts to support or refute few, if any, viewpoints

Presents findings (C1.4.4, C6.4.5)

Applies information technologies skillfully and effectively to present recommendation in a persuasive manner

Applies information technologies meaningfully to present recommendation in a logical manner

Applies information technologies to present recommendation in a straight -forward manner

Does not apply information technologies to enhance presentation of the recommendation

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

56 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 11: PHYSICS (PHYS20.01)

PLANETARY MOTION
Students will create hypotheses to better explain the motion of the planets by researching and recording the period and radii of the known planets in our solar system and interpreting the results.
PHYSICS 20 OUTCOMES (Unit 2: Circular Motion and Gravitation) No. Description
Demonstrate an understanding that uniform circular motion requires a non-zero net force of constant magnitude by: explaining quantitatively, circular motion in terms of Newtons laws of motion solving quantitatively, circular motion problems, using algebraic and/or graphical vector analysis Demonstrate an understanding that gravity is a universal force of nature by: explaining qualitatively, how mechanical understanding of circular motion and Keplers laws were used in the development of Newtons universal law of gravitation explaining qualitatively, the shape of our solar system and that of galaxies, in terms of Newtons laws of motion and gravitation Demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science by: relating the gravitational force, using Newtons second law, to planetary and satellite motion problems

2.1.4 2.1.5 2.2.1 2.2.8 Skills

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C5.4.1 C6.4.1 C6.4.2

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source use telecommunications to pose critical questions to experts investigate and solve problems of prediction, calculation and inference investigate and solve problems of organization and manipulation of information

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: plan and perform complex searches use telecommunications construct spreadsheet explain laws organize data interpret data create hypothesis. TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Teachers may want to encourage students to consult with other students to generate possible hypotheses prior to completing the assessment task.

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 57 2003

Student Assessment Task

PLANETARY MOTION
Science is not an absolute body of factsit is a progression of increased understanding and improved ideas. Consider the three laws of planetary motion of Kepler (1571 1630). Not until many years later, did Newtons Law of Universal Gravitation mathematically reinforce Keplers findings, providing a more rigorous description of planetary motion by incorporating the force of gravity. As a scientist, evaluate Keplers and Newtons laws as they relate to the known values of the planets in our solar system. Research and record the period and radii of the known planets in our solar system. Create a spreadsheet that meets the following criteria: shows each planet with its known period and known radius has a calculated value for the radius of each planet using Keplers Third Law shows a calculated value of the radius of each planet using Newtons Law of Universal Gravitation calculates percentage difference between the accepted values and your calculated values. Interpret the results and create a hypothesis that addresses the differences between the three values of the radii. Synthesize a concept that will better explain the motion of the planets. Submit your hypothesis to an expert in the field; e.g., NASA, Calgary Space Science Centre, Edmonton Odyssium. Engage in a dialogue that further defines your hypothesis.

58 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Student

PHYSICS RUBRIC PLANETARY MOTION


Level Criteria
Explains laws (2.1.4)

4 Excellent
Reveals complete and insightful understanding

3 Proficient
Reveals clear understanding

2 Adequate
Reveals partial understanding

1 Limited*
Reveals little or no understanding

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes data (2.1.5)

Organizes data that are accurate, directly related to the evidence and easy to interpret

Organizes data that are accurate and interpretable

Organizes data with minor errors, but are interpretable

Organizes data that have many errors and are not interpretable

Interprets data (2.2.1, 2.2.8)

Provides an insightful, detailed explanation supported by logic and data

Provides a complete, reasonable explanation supported by data

Provides an incomplete explanation that is partially supported by data

Provides little or no explanation which is not supported by data

Creates hypothesis (Skills)

Makes an insightful, testable hypothesis based on logical reasoning

Makes a clear, testable hypothesis based on theory

Makes an hypothesis that may be difficult to test and is based on opinion

Makes an hypothesis that is not testable and is based on opinion

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Appendix C / 59 2003

Student

ICT RUBRIC PLANETARY MOTION


Level Criteria
Plans and performs complex searches (C1.4.1)

4 Excellent
Performs complex searches efficiently; selects relevant information from appropriate sources

3 Proficient
Performs searches and selects relevant information from sources provided

2 Adequate
Performs searches and selects irrelevant or incomplete information from sources provided

1 Limited*
Performs search but is unable to retrieve relevant information from sources provided

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Uses telecommunications (C5.4.1)

Uses telecommunication to pose critical questions to experts

Uses telecommunication to pose questions that require clarification from experts

Uses telecommunication to pose questions that do not further the hypothesis

Uses telecommunication to pose provided questions

Constructs spreadsheet (C6.4.1, C6.4.2)

Organizes data into a table that is complete and correct, uses appropriate formulas and scientific conventions and is easy to interpret

Organizes data into a table that is correct, efficient and interpretable

Organizes data into a table that lacks organization and has minor errors, but is interpretable

Organizes data into a table that has major errors and is not interpretable

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

60 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003

Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)


Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada

Grade 11: SOCIAL STUDIES (SS20.01)

WAR GUILT TRIBUNAL


Students will assess and evaluate the merit of the charge that Germany was primarily responsible for causing World War I. Students will formulate, present and defend a position based on assigned or chosen roles using a multimedia presentation and/or through participation in a role-play scenario using a discussion forum.
SOCIAL STUDIES 20 OUTCOMES (Topic A: Development and Interaction of Nations International Conflict) No.
Theme IV.a Theme IV.b Process Skills

Description
understand that the pursuit of national interests at the expense of other nations may result in international conflict understand that warfare leads to change summarize information from a variety of print and nonprint sources distinguish among different points of view make decisions and defend their choice establish a thesis or take a position, and defend it in a well-written essay present ideas effectively in class debate convey information and express ideas, using timelines, charts and concept maps interact effectively with others in a variety of group settings consider alternatives, make decisions and substantiate choices use appropriate inquiry models to answer questions, solve problems and resolve issues

Communication Skills

Participation Skills Inquiry Skills

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C1.4.2 C1.4.4

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues consult a wide variety of sources that reflect varied viewpoints on particular topics evaluate the validity of gathered viewpoints against other sources assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic participate in a variety of electronic formats generate new understandings of problematic situations by using some form of technology to facilitate the process use appropriate presentation software to demonstrate personal understandings

C2.4.1 C2.4.2 C3.4.1 C3.4.2 C5.4.2 C6.4.4 C7.4.3

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CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information select and organize information identify and explain issue synthesize information formulate position create multimedia presentation participate in online forum present and defend position.

TEACHER NOTES Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. Software products available for discussion forums include: Nicenet Internet Classroom Assistant: http://www.nicenet.org/ Eboard: http://www.eboard.com Ezboard (Dr. Bs Virtual Conferencing Tool): http://drb-software.com/ FirstClass: http://www.centrinity.com/# WebCT: http://www.webct.com/ WebBoard: http://www.webboard.com/products/webboard/index.cfm World Crossing: http://worldcrossing.com/ The assessment task is designed to have students work in groups of eight: three judges forming a tribunal two prosecutors representing the Allied Powers two defense representatives one witness representing Germany. Additional participants can be added to represent the major Allied and Central Powers, as government or military officials, for instance. Before participating in the role-play scenario, students should have prior experience using discussion forums and be provided with guidance in the effective use of this asynchronous tool. (T he term asynchronous is usually used to describe communications in which data can be transmitted intermittently rather than in a steady stream.) See a sample discussion forum, such as www.uncg.edu/cex/common/discuss.htm. The following describes discussion forums (adapted from WebCThttp://www.webct.com/OTL/ ViewContent?contentID=898084). Discussion forums allow for assimilation, reflection and critical thinking. In an asynchronous learning environment, the instructor provides the leadership, designs the environment and manages the process. The learner engages the environment, collaborates with other learners, resources and experts to construct knowledge and understanding. Research indicates that discussion forums offer a number of advantages to students. Discussion forums: increase student motivation, engagement and participation in discussions that involve not only classmates, but fellow students worldwide, in a manner that allows them to respond at their own pace offer access to multiple perspectives through exposure to the opinions of many students build confidence as students dare to take more risks in this non-threatening learning environment encourage lifelong learning as students begin to compare and contrast myriad opinions and perspectives conveniently allow students who are geographically dispersed to work together on projects without the constraints of date, time and place.

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Student Assessment Tas k

WAR GUILT TRIBUNAL


After the defeat of the Central Powers in the First World War, the Allied Powers met at Versailles in 1919 to impose a peace settlement. One of the most controversial clauses in this settlement was the War Guilt Clause, which blamed Germany for causing the war. Unlike the events after the Second World War, there was no formal process for putting Germany and its leaders on trial. You first need to assess and evaluate the merit of the charge that Germany was primarily responsible for causing World War I. Your research should involve a variety of sources from different sides of the issue. Be prepared to defend a position as well as refute arguments. Construct a bibliography correctly citing traditional and electronic sources of information. You will then be required to assume an assigned or chosen role representing one of various participants in a war guilt tribunal. The participants are as follows. Prosecutors: present the charge and introduce their case. This role also involves possible cross-examination of witnesses and a final statement of guilt. Defenders: present a statement of defence, examine key witnesses and give a final rebuttal to the charges. German witnesses: answer questions involving the historical role of Germany in the era leading up to the outbreak of war in 1914. Judges: assist in the formal conduct of this mock tribunal and render a final judgement.

Other roles: Country representatives: are prepared to be called as witnesses and present the position of your country to the tribunal. Reporters: submit a series of dispatches outlining the background of the trial and the conduct of it. An editorial statement regarding the outcome is also expected. Create a multimedia presentation with hyperlinks to present your position and/or participate in a role -play scenario using a threaded discussion forum.

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Appendix C / 63 2003

Student

SOCIAL STUDIES RUBRIC WAR GUILT TRIBUNAL


Level Criteria
Identifies and explains issue (Theme A IV.a, Theme A IV.b)

4 Excellent
Specifically identifies and thoroughly explains in-depth, the nature of war guilt related to the events of World War I for the role assigned

3 Proficient
Identifies, and clearly and logically explains, the nature of war guilt related to the events of World War I for the role assigned

2 Adequate
Generally identifies and partially explains the nature of war guilt related to the events of World War I for the role assigned

1 Limited*
Provides little or no explanation of the nature of war guilt related to the events of World War I for the role assigned

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Synthesizes information (Process and Inquiry skills)

Synthesizes information to determine patterns and link ideas to effectively defend a position Formulates a wellorganized, completely developed position based on the assigned role and presents logical, persuasive arguments

Synthesizes information to determine patterns and link ideas to defend a position

Partially synthesizes information to determine patterns and link ideas to defend a position

Synthesizes information to defend an incomplete or indefensible position

Formulates position (Process skills)

Formulates a reasonable position based on the assigned role and presents sound arguments

Formulates a general position based on the assigned role and presents questionable arguments

Formulates an unreasonable position based on the assigned role that is disorganized, difficult to follow and provides little or no support

Presents and defends position (Communication and Participation skills)

Proposes a realistic and justifiable position, thoroughly and convincingly explains several strengths and weaknesses of each alternative solution proposed by others

Proposes a reasonable position, logically explains strengths and weaknesses of each alternative solution proposed by others

Proposes a position, partially explains strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions proposed by others

Proposes an irrelevant position and is unable to identify strengths or weaknesses for solutions proposed by others

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Student

ICT RUBRIC WAR GUILT TRIBUNAL


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.4.1, C2.4.1, C3.4.1)

4 Excellent
Uses technology efficiently to access and retrieve relevant information from a wide variety of sources representing diverse points of view about Germanys involvement in the war Electronically locates and organizes comprehensive evidence that effectively supports or refutes different viewpoints

3 Proficient
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from a variety of sources representing differing points of view about Germanys involvement in the war

2 Adequate
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from few sources representing more than one point of view about Germanys involvement in the war

1 Limited*
Uses technology to access and retrieve information from few sources repres enting a singular point of view about Germanys involvement in the war

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Selects and organizes information (C1.4.2, C2.4.2, C3.4.2)

Electronically locates and organizes relevant evidence that supports or refutes different viewpoints

Electronically locates and organizes incomplete evidence that partially supports or refutes different viewpoints

Electronically locates and organizes little, if any, evidence

Creates multimedia presentation (C1.4.4, C7.4.3)

Creates a persuasive and engaging multimedia presentation with relevant hyperlinks incorporated Participates fully in an online forum discussion to effectively present and defend a position; thoroughly and insightfully debates the positions of others

Creates a convincing multimedia presentation with relevant hyperlinks incorporated

Creates a multimedia presentation with some hyperlinks incorporated that contains some errors

Creates a multimedia presentation with few, if any, hyperlinks incorporated

Participates in online forum (C5.4.2, C6.4.4)

Participates in an online forum discussion to present and defend a position; thoroughly debates the positions of others

Participates in an online forum discussion to present and defend a position that contains errors; may be unable to debate the positions of others

Participates in an online forum discussion to present a position, but is unable to defend the position or debate the positions of others

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix C / 65 2003

Grade 11: SOCIAL STUDIES (SS23.01)

WORLD WAR I SOLDIER


Students will demonstrate understanding of the human impact of the events of World War I by creating a profile of a soldier from one of the opposing forces.
SOCIAL STUDIES 20 OUTCOMES (Topic A: The Development of the Modern World) No.
Theme 1C

Description
understand how the rise of nationalism has res ulted in conflicting national interests examine nationalism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: national unification Germany World War I causes, including national, economic and military rivalries the nature of the conflict; e.g., trench warfare, new weapons Treaty of Versailles summarize written materials assess more than one point of view on an issue use maps to gather, analyze and provide information

Process skills

Communication skills

defend a point of view in a multi-paragraph composition

ICT OUTCOMES No.


C1.4.1 C1.4.2 C1.4.4

Description
plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues consult a wide variety of sources that reflect varied viewpoints on particular topics demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic analyze and synthesize information to determine patterns and links among ideas use appropriate presentation software to demonstrate personal understandings

C2.4.1 C3.4.2 C7.4.2 C7.4.3

CRITERIA are evidence that the student has achieved the outcomes Each student will: access and retrieve information organize information synthesize data explain nature of warfare create profile present findings. TEACHER NOTE Prior to using the rubrics for this task, ensure that students understand the language used. See page 12 of the Classroom Assessment Tool Kit for more information. 66 / Classroom Assessment Tool Kit 2003 Information and Communication Technology (Division 4)
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Student Assessment Task

WORLD WAR I SOLDIER


Until the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, the First World War was referred to as the Great War. The greatness reflects the extent of destruction, and the impact on the lives of participants and victims. Focusing on the events and human impact of the Great War and assuming the role of an ordinary soldier, construct a self-profile of a soldier from the armies of the primary combatants. You can be of any rank and from any branch of the armed forces of: Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Russia or the United States. Some possible profile formats are: a diary with entries from significant dates letters sent home to a loved one or friend formal dispatches sent to a commanding officer. Your profile should include: a personal interpretation of the causes and consequences of events personal reflections of a soldier, including descriptions of daily activities brief descriptions of the historical events under discussion maps and diagrams to facilitate communication of ideas about the war. Determine a method for presenting this profile to a military tribunal or war veterans group. The presentation could take the form of: reading the profile a visual displayposter, bulletin board, slide show an electronic presentation.

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Appendix C / 67 2003

Student

SOCIAL STUDIES RUBRIC WORLD WAR I SOLDIER


Level Criteria
Explains nature of warfare (Theme 1C)

4 Excellent
Provides an in-depth, accurate explanation of factors that contributed to World War I, and roles of major combatants

3 Proficient
Provides a clear, logical explanation of factors that contributed to World War I, and roles of major combatants

2 Adequate
Provides a straight forward explanation of some factors that contributed to World War I, and roles o f major combatants

1 Limited*
Lists few factors that contributed to World War I, and roles of the major combatants

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Synthesizes data (Process skills)

Synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas that enhance understanding of the events and human impact of the war

Synthesizes information, determines patterns and links ideas that clarify the events and human impact of the war

Partially synthesizes information, determines few patterns and links ideas that have relevance to the events and human impact of the war

Synthesizes information with little relevance to the events and human impact of the war

Presents findings (Theme 1C, (Communication skills)

Develops and presents a comprehensive, vivid soldier profile that incorporates supporting details allowing one to visualize World War I conditions

Develops and presents a detailed, accurate soldier profile that incorporates supporting details providing a depiction of World War I conditions

Develops and presents a general, predictable soldier profile that incorporates some supporting details within a World War I context

Develops and presents a soldier profile that incorporates few, if any, supporting details about World War I

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Student

ICT RUBRIC WORLD WAR I SOLDIER


Level Criteria
Accesses and retrieves information (C1.4.1, C1.4.2, C2.4.1)

4 Excellent
Efficiently accesses and retrieves valid, relevant information using a variety of electronic sources

3 Proficient
Accesses and retrieves relevant information using a variety of electronic sources

2 Adequate
Accesses and retrieves little relevant information using a variety of elec tronic sources

1 Limited*
Accesses, but is unable to retrieve, relevant information from electronic sources

Insufficient/ Blank*
No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task.

Organizes information (C3.4.2, C7.4.2)

Uses technology to effectively organize information from a variety of viewpoints that is clearly summarized and directly related to the evidence Creates a profile using multimedia that conveys insightful, relevant and meaningful information Uses multimedia to explain ideas clearly, precisely and convincingly; presentation engages and holds the interest of the audience

Uses technology to organize information from a variety of viewpoints that is summarized and related to the evidence

Uses technology to organize information from a variety of viewpoints partially related to the evidence

Uses technology to organize information from a single viewpoint

Creates profile (C7.4.3, C1.4.4)

Creates a profile using multimedia that conveys relevant information

Creates a profile using multimedia that conveys a mixture of relevant and irrelevant information

Creates a profile using multimedia that conveys mostly irrelevant information

Presents findings (C1.4.4)

Uses multimedia to explain ideas in a logical, sequential way; presentation communicates to the audience

Uses multimedia to explain ideas that are incomplete and contain errors or distracting elements; presentation does not sustain interest throughout

Uses multimedia to present few, if any, ideas; presentation does not suit the needs or interests of the audience

When work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Student Learning Goals

Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix C / 69 2003

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Appendix D
Sample Student Self-reflection Tools 7
The following tools can be used to encourage students to self-reflect. Select one to use with your students.

Progress Self-reflection Name ______________________ Date ___________________ Task _______________________________________________


The steps I have completed in this task include

The steps I still have to complete include

Stumbling Blocks Self-reflection Name ____________________ Date ___________________ Task _____________________________________________


Something I did not understand about this task was

7. Adapted with permission from the Alberta As sessment Consortium (AAC), How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom (Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000), p. 35.

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Now What? Self-reflection Name ______________________ Date _________________ Task _____________________________________________


Something I am going to change/correct/add/remove from this task is

Learning Self-assessment Name _______________________ Date ________________ Task _____________________________________________


One concept I have learned from this task is

This piece of work demonstrates that I can Check (list the criteria) (list the criteria) (list the criteria) I can improve my work by

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My Changing Goals Self-assessment Name _______________________ Date ________________ Task _____________________________________________


After reviewing this task, I would now like to achieve (define revised goals).

I would like to do this because (explanation).

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Appendix D / 73 2003

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Appendix E
Student Profiles
Name: Subject: Grade: Reporting Date:
Division 4 Level 4 Excellent (Wow!) ICT Learner Outcome C1 Students will access, use and communicate information from a variety of technologies. C1.4.1 plan and perform complex searches, using more than one electronic source C1.4.2 select information from appropriate sources, including primary and secondary sources C1.4.3 evaluate and explain the advantages and disadvantages of various search strategies C1.4.4 communicate in a persuasive and engaging manner, through appropriate forms, such as speeches, letters, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies for context, audience and purpose that extend and communicate understanding of complex issues Date: Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date: Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date: Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix E / 75 2003

Division 4

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C2 Students will seek alternative viewpoints using information technologies. C2.4.1 consult a wide variety of sources that reflect varied viewpoints on particular topics C2.4.2 evaluate the validity of gathered viewpoints against other sources C3 Students will critically assess information accessed through the use of a variety of technologies. C3.4.1 access the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information C3.4.2 demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic C4 Students will use organizational processes and tools to manage inquiry. C4.4.1 use calendars, time management or project management software to assist in conducting an inquiry

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Division 4

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C5 Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry. C5.4.1 use telecommunications to pose critical questions to experts C5.4.2 participate in a variety of electronic group formats C6 Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems. C6.4.1 investigate and solve problems of prediction, calculation and inference C6.4.2 investigate and solve problems of organization and manipulation of information C6.4.3 manipulate data by using charting and graphing technologies in order to test inferences and probabilities C6.4.4 generate new understandings of problematic situations by using some form of technology to facilitate the process C6.4.5 evaluate the appropriateness of the technology used to investigate or solve a problem

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Appendix E / 77 2003

Division 4

Level 4 Excellent (Wow!)

Level 3 Proficient (Yes) Date:

Level 2 Adequate (Yes, but) Date:

Level 1 Limited (No, but) Date:

ICT Learner Outcome C7 Students will use electronic research techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning. C7.4.1 use appropriate strategies to locate information to meet personal needs C7.4.2 analyze and synthesize information to determine patterns and links among ideas C7.4.3 use appropriate presentation software to demonstrate personal understandings

Date:

Student Learning Goals


Area of need (Whats hard for me): Action Strength to enhance: Action

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Glossary
Achievement Assessment Contextualize Evaluation Formative Assessment Performance Performance Assessment Reliability Rubric Standard Student Profile Summative Assessment Validity
a students demonstration of knowledge, skills and attitudes relative to grade level curriculum standards collecting information on student achievement and performance to improve student learning to include ICT learner outcomes in another program of studies, such as language arts, by rephrasing the outcome to suit the context of the subject judgement regarding the quality, value or worth of a response ongoing assessment providing information to guide instruction and improve student performance the quality of a students demonstration of the learner outcomes a meaningful, real-life task that enables students to demonstrate what they know and can do in situations like those they will encounter outside the classroom as well as in situations that simulate how people do their work consistency of assessment results a fixed measurement scale and list of criteria that describe the quality of products or performances used to evaluate a students performance expected level of performance in relation to a specified curriculum outcome for a division or grade a chart that illustrates both the outcomes that have been taught and the students level of performance culminating assessment for a unit, grade level or course of study providing a status report on mastery or degree of proficiency according to identified learner outcomes appropriateness, adequacy and truthfulness of interpretations made from assessment information based on learner outcomes

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Glossary / 79 2003

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References
Alberta Assessment Consortium. A Framework for Student Assessment . Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1997. Alberta Assessment Consortium. A Framework for Communicating Student Learning. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 1999. Alberta Assessment Consortium. How to Develop and Use Performance Assessments in the Classroom. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Assessment Consortium, 2000. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 1 to Grade 6. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998a. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 7 to Grade 9. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998b. Alberta Education. Illustrative Examples to Accompany Information and Communication Technology Interim Program of Studies, Grade 10 to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Education, 1998c. Alberta Learning. Physical Education Guide to Implementation, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 2000. Alberta Learning. Information and Communication Technology Program of Studies . Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 20002003. Alberta Learning. Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Learning, 2002. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Redirecting Assessment. Educational Leadership 46, 7 (1989). Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Teaching for Authentic Student Performance. Educational Leadership 54, 4 (1996). Black, Paul and Dylan Wiliam. Inside the Black Box. London, UK: Kings University, 1998. Davies, Anne. Making Classroom Assessment Work. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000. Eisner, Elliot W. The Uses and Limits of Performance Assessment. Phi Delta Kappan 80, 9 (1999), pp. 658660. Gardner, Howard. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. New York, NY: BasicBooks, 1993. Goodrich, Heidi. Understanding Rubrics. Educational Leadership 54, 4 (1996), pp. 1417. Gregory, Kathleen, Caren Cameron and Anne Davies. Knowing What Counts, Book OneSetting and Using Criteria: For Use in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000a. Gregory, Kathleen, Caren Cameron and Anne Davies. Knowing What Counts, Book TwoSelfAssessment and Goal Setting: For Use in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms. Merville, BC: Connections Publishing, 2000b.

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References / 81 2003

Guskey, Thomas R. Reporting on Student Learning: Lessons from the PastPrescriptions for the Future. In Thomas R. Guskey (ed.), Communicating Student Learning: 1996 ASCD Yearbook (Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1996), pp. 1324. Joint Advisory Committee on Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada. Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Research in Applied Measurement and Evaluation, University of Alberta, 1993. Jonassen, David H., Kyle L. Peck and Brent G. Wilson. Learning With Technology: a constructivist perspective. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999. Popham, W. James. The Truth About Testing: An Educators Call to Action. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2001. Stiggins, Richard J. Student-Centered Classroom Assessment (Second Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1997. Stiggins, Richard J. Student-Involved Classroom Assessment (Third Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2001. Stix, Andi. Strategies for Student-Centered Assessment . New Rochelle, NY: The Interactive Classroom, 1996. Wiggins, Grant and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1998.

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