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DECEMBER 2013

P
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Harvesting your honey supply

How good is your dogs eyesight?

Pests & toxin use on the block

Taking strike against blowflies on livestock


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Taking a bite
of berry good
business
PLANTS that
will save you
from spraying
TAMWORTH PIGS
Rare, cute & edible
QUACKING GOOD BIRDS
Why ducks are great!
A GOLDEN HARVEST
Grains in your garden
Berry
delicious
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Ea
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Super food
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THE EASY-GROW
BEAN FOR
EVERY NEED
10
WAYS TO
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GREENS
}
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12
Big on berries
A Wairarapa couple
have turned a rundown
lifestyle block into a successful,
award-winning fruit and berry business.
18
Farm breeds: Tamworth pigs
Great golden porkers growing tasty
bacon on Soggy Bottom Farm.
28
Christmas Gift Guide
Great ideas for Christmas for the
farmer in your life.
32
Golden garden harvest
An award-winning garden
designed on permaculture principles has
risen from a concrete desert.
36
The easy-care duck
If you like the benefits of keeping
chickens, youre going to love having
ducks, and as a bonus, they are super
easy to care for.
52
Bees getting busy
Its the busiest time of year for
beekeepers, especially if you want to keep
your honeys floral lines pure.
contents
How to live the good life
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz
FEATURES
36
18
12
DECEMBER 2013
Plus
Harvesting your honey supply Howgood is your dogs eyesight?
Pests & toxin use on the block Taking strike against blowflies on livestock
Fairfax M
ed
ia $
7.9
0
incl gst
Taking a bite
of berry good
business
PLANTS that
will save you
from spraying
TAMWORTHPIGS
Rare, cute &edible
QUACKINGGOODBIRDS
Why ducks are great!
A GOLDENHARVEST
Grains in your garden
Berry
delicious
4
Great gift ideas
for farmers
Easy edible
decorations
Why our native Christmas tree offers more than
just glamour
Christmas
on the block
Super food
soybeans
THE EASY-GROW
BEAN FOR
EVERY NEED
10
WAYS TO
DRESS UP
YOUR SALAD
GREENS
}
PLUS
Great summer berry desserts
How to grow
strawberry
guavas
10
WAYS TO
DRESS UP
YOUR SALAD
GREENS
}
Berry
delicious
Taking a bite
of berry good
business
DECEMBER
32
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2 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
REGULAR FEATURES
6 Your letters
8 On our bulletin board
10 Country Smile
The cute and cuddly on your block
70 Subscribe, save & be in to WIN!
78 Buys For Your Block
79 Village Green
85 Grass Roots
86 BookLook
Our farm and garden book store
88 A Country Life
Love at first buzz
FARMING
17 Farm Diary
5 tips for farm fence maintenance
18 Farm Breeds
Golden Tamworth pigs
20 Down on the farm
Using poisons on pests
24 Tales of a Country Vet
Dancing through spring
26 Vet Notes
Taking strike against flies
Dress u
p
yo
u
r
C
hristm
a
s tree
w
ith ed
ib
le
d
eco
ra
tio
n
s!
POULTRY
SELF-SUFFICIENCY
GROWING
59 Garden diary
How to grow soybeans
60 Grow & tell
Getting the b plants in the ground
62 Bugman
Ruud sees red
64 Plants with a purpose
Berry merry Christmas dessert ideas
68 The Organic Garden
4 plants that will save you spraying
71 In the orchard
The tropical taste of
strawberry guava
72 Pasture weed watch
How to beat storksbill
73 Weedbusters
Killing off bushy
asparagus
44 Farmhouse kitchen
Easy Christmas tree edibles
46 Do it yourself: Food
Dress up your salad greens
48 The Good Life
Do we have a housing crisis?
36 Your Poultry: ducks
Super easy, super layers
Make your
own
salad dressing
46
44
60
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4 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
As readers of our weekly enewsletter will
know, a few weeks ago I met a lovely fellow
who made me wonder about what my future
might have in store for me.
Sadly, I did not meet him via a dating
website - thats a whole other story and Ill
spare you the sorry (so very sorry) details -
but on the front lawn at my parents house.
Id actually met Harley the Beagle before
and found him completely adorable but
had resisted his cute, sweet, squishable face
and roly polyness: I have enough animals
with those attributes laying about the place
doing bugger-all except eating, sleeping
and dropping the odd odorous bomb.
But now Im tter and more agile, it was
a lot of fun to take him for a run around the garden, and then to meet the cows. Well, that is
I tried to introduce him to the cows. They were very keen but Harley wasnt,
standing in absolute shock before turning and none-so-bravely taking off
in the opposite direction.
Ive wanted a dog forever. My mother wasnt keen when I was young
so she got me a horse instead and that must be one of her biggest (and
most expensive) regrets. Since then I have helped out at the SPCA kennels,
Ive puppy-sat and dog-sat and generally tested out a variety of canines,
wondering which type would be the best for me.
Ive always loved the Border Collie and I adore my BC nephew Jake. However, puppy-
sitting Jake made me realise you do need a certain personality to get you through the rst
couple of years when their exuberance is at its highest. Also, having watched Jake throw
himself and his super-long, super-thick coat into a green slimey pond with gusto, Im not sure
if I have a good-enough water supply to keep a BC in any t state of cleanliness.
Harley was perfect though: just the right amount of pep, so curious, super cute and with
a short, easy-clean coat. The drawbacks that I thought would put
his owners (my Aunt and Uncle) off him were not apparent and
my Aunt reports the best part of having Harley around is how
much he makes them smile on a daily basis.
Sounds like my kind of fellow.
Follow NZ Lifestyle Block
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From The Editor
2013 IuIfIux New ZeuIund LId
Volume 27, number 12
ISSN 1176-726X
EDITOR Nudene HuII
Phone (09) 634-9861 of 0274 914-078,
PO Box 6341, AuckIund 1036 of
email editor@nzlifestyleblock.co.nz
ADVERTISING MANAGER Marlisa de Winter
Phone (09) 634-9864 of 0274 796-96b,
PO Box 6341, AuckIund 1036 of emuII
marlisa.dewinter@fairfaxmags.co.nz
DESIGNER Bebeccu Needhum
PRODUCTION Mike Embleton
DIGITAL IMAGING Willie Coyle
COMMERCIAL MANAGER Duncan Brough
PROUDLY PRINTED BY PMP MAXUM
CIRCULATION AND READERSHIP
CIfcuIuIIon pef Issue: 8901 (Soufce
NZ AudIIed Bufeuu oI CIfcuIuIIon, IoIuI
NeI CIfcuIuIIon ApfII 2012 - Mufch 2013).
BeudefshIp: 84,000 (Soufce: NIeIsen NuIIonuI
Readership Survey April 2012 - March 2013)
New ZeuIund LIIesIyIe BIock Is pubIIshed
by IuIfIux MuguzInes, u dIvIsIon
oI IuIfIux MedIu. The conIenIs ufe
copyright and may not be reproduced
without the consent of the Editor.
Unsolicited editorial material may be submitted but
should include a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
While every care is taken, no responsibility is accepted
for material submitted. Opinions expressed by
conIfIbuIofs ufe noI necessufIIy Ihose oI NZ LIIesIyIe
BIock of IuIfIux MuguzInes. AII fIghIs fesefved.
4 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
WEBSITE
Find great ideas for your
block, inspiration and
how-to guides.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz
FACEBOOK
Join us for regular updates
on farming news, poultry tips
and tricks, cheese-making,
preserves and more.
www.facebook.com/
lifestyleblock
SUBSCRIBE
Buy or renew your
subscription online, or
get one of our special
publications, including
How to Care for Your Poultry,
Volumes 1 & 2, and
How to Make Cheese 1 & 2.
www.mags4gifts.co.nz/nz-
lifestyle-block
BY JEAN MANSFIELD
YOUR GUIDE
TO EASY CHEESEMAKING
GREAT RECIPES
20
+
All new! 100 page
How to make
& other dairy products
CHEESE
Our second essential guide to making cheese
Volume 2
EASY STEP-BY-STEP recipes for brie, harvarti, cottage cheese,
Stilton, gruyere, gouda, gorgonzola, emmental, red and blue
Cheshire, wrapped cheeses, ash cheeses and much more
EASY STEP-BY-STEP recipes for brie, harvarti, cottage cheese,
Stilton, gruyere, gouda, gorgonzola, emmental, red and blue
Cheshire, wrapped cheeses, ash cheeses and much more
Our second essential guide to making cheese
Nadene Hall, Editor
Harley, none-
so-bravely,
took off in
the opposite
direction.
Merry Christmas!
CONTACT DETAILS
HOW TO GET IN
TOUCH WITH US
Please note there are two nzs
in our email address
Email editor@nzlifestyleblock.co.nz
Phone 09 909-6800
Post NZ Lifestyle Block,
PO Box 6341, Auckland 1036
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All goods have a minimum 12 month warranty and 30 day right of return.
All prices include GST. Offers apply 20 November - 31 Decemberr 2013 or while stocks last.
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NO MATTER WHAT YOURE AFTER,
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(MAY OR MAY NOT INVOLVE A JOLLY MAN WITH A WHITE BEARD)
6 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Your Letters
WRITE IN
AND YOU
COULD
WIN A $50
GIFT CARD OF YOUR CHOICE
Each month, our winning letter
receives a $50 card of their choice.
This months winner is Patricia
Deveraux, congratulations!
Letters should include your name,
phone number and postal address
(although only your name and
region will appear). Email editor@
nzlifestyleblock.co.nz, fax to 09 634-
2948 or post to NZ Lifestyle Block
Letters, PO Box 6341, Auckland 1036.
W
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RAW MILK
ON TAP
Letters to NZ Lifestyle Block
I
always enjoy your enewsletter,
and this time (NZ Lifestyle Block
enews AugusI 28) Ihe fuw mIIk
article had me smiling.
I work in an organic store in
West Auckland and we often get
enquiries for raw milk. We are
happy to give them the contact
details for a farm out of Helensville,
since of course we are not
permitted to sell it ourselves. I
am also pleased to discover that
there is a farm at Mangawhai also
selling raw milk, since this is where
I plan to retire next year.
On a different note, I have some
information for your reader Emma
Lonsdale (Letters, NZ Lifestyle Block,
September), who was asking for more
about ducks.
I totally recommend to Emma a
gardening book called The Resilient
Gardener by Carol Deppe. Its excellent
as a food gardening book, but it also
includes Deppes story of the health
benets she gained from eating free
range duck eggs and her experience with
a home ock. Having tried a variety of
breeds, she has found the Ancona to be
the most versatile (see www.rarebreeds.
co.nz for a breeder listing). She even gives
cooking hints and recipes!
She also recommends another
specialist duck book, Storeys Guide to
Raising Ducks by Dave Holderread (see
Book Look, puge 87).
Patricia Deveraux, by email
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SIGN UP FOR NZ LIFESTYLE BLOCKS ENEWSLETTER
You read the magazine monthly but every week we come across interesting information that you might find useful.
If youd like to sign up to NZ Lifestyle Blocks eNewsletter, visit our website www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz (note there are
two nzs in our address) and click on Newsletter in the main menu.
T
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LETTERBOX WARS PART 1
Last week when I went out to get the mail,
all that was left of our letterbox was the
plank and post it had been sitting on for
ve years.
When I discussed the theft with
our postie she said it was
probably already in front
of someone elses house,
and that when she
sees an old letterbox
in a new place she
always checks to
see if there are any
identifying marks on it.
With that tip I
engraved our address
on it with a wood-burning
pyrography pen it wont be
much good to a potential thief
now. I might also paint the
address on the side which faces
the road. It was very annoying,
not to mention the $100 cost of
the new letterbox.
Clare Strange, Dobson
ONLINE RESOURCES
Thank you so much for sending your
resource notes from the Tree Crops
presentation you gave back in
July. I really enjoyed your talk and
we have already implemented
the Evernote system and it
is making life a lot easier,
especially for my husband
who has meetings all over
the place.
I already receive the
NZ Lifestyle Block weekly
e-newsletter and look forward to its
arrival in my inbox. It is a great resource
and an awesome starting point to nd
out new things as I nd Im often side-
tracked by other articles within the ones
you have suggested.
It all helps to keep on top of the
newest and latest cool things in
gardening and in helping us to look after
our land.
Thank you so much for taking the time
to put it together.
Sarah ONeil, Auckland
Note from Nadene: the presentation I
gave to the Franklin Tree Crops seminar
is on www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz under
Resources (please note there two nzs in
our websites name), and you can also sign
up for our free weekly enewsletter at the
same address.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 7
Telford a Division of Lincoln University ofers over 30 correspondence programmes, at diferent levels,
ranging from: Equine, Farrier, Small Farming, Apiculture, Camelid, Agriculture, Dairying, Horticulture, Forestry,
Horticulture Organics, Working Dogs, Pasture Management and Agribusiness Management.
Broaden your career or hobby from home
Learn more
www.telford.ac.nz
0800 835 367
BEATING THAT GREEN GUNK
I feud youf ufIIcIe (ubouI NosIoc) on puge 84 oI Ihe SepIembef 2013 Issue und
wanted to share with readers the problem I had in Otaki on our gravel driveway.
The seaweedy globs spread until it covered the entire yard! Anyhow, I went down
to the local RD1 to see if they had any poison or spray to deal with it and they
advised me to make up a solution of common household bleach and water and
spray the smelly mess.
It worked for me and now, as soon as I see any dried green blobs appearing on
my driveway, I give it a sprinkle. You know the bleach is working as soon as the green
slime turns brown it takes about a week to notice the change in colour.
Happy spraying everyone.
Patricia Deveraux, by email
LETTERBOX WARS PART 2
We have had trouble with our rural
letterboxes. Twice now, almost all the
letterboxes on our road have been
vandalised. They even used a ute to pull
the four concreted-in posts out, an action
we and our neighbours took after the rst
incident.
Currently our letterboxes are a tin
bucket, a wooden box, a drench container
and one proper letterbox that got duct-
taped back together (see below).
LuckIIy one oI ouf NeIghboufhood
Watch people had set up a camera and got
the perps on lm actually destroying their
letterbox.
Police + conviction + reparation =
unmolested letterboxes for the past
month.
Roz McDonald, Outram
8 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
N
O
T
IC
E
B
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D
Puketiti
Station
By Bee Dawson
Random House,
304 pages
$50
This is the story
of Puketiti Station,
the 180-year-old Williams family
legacy, and how an airline pilot and
his wife from Auckland unexpectedly
inherited a new life farming on the
East Cape. More than 15 years on,
Dan and Anna are still coming to
terms with life on this most remote
and romantic of New Zealands
historic stations, a traditional way of
life in the backblocks of beyond, but
it hasnt come easy.
Big Ideas
for Small
Gardens
By Carol
Bucknell & Sally
Tagg
Penguin NZ,
192 pages
$45
The aim of this book is to help small
garden owners turn their outdoor
spaces into beautiful, well-designed
places that complement their
lifestyle and reect their own creative
vision. Small gardens are places
for dining, entertaining, bathing,
exercising, playing games, and even
working, and a place where you feel
comfortable and relaxed - this book
shows you how to achieve it.
A Taste of Home
By Brett McGregor
Random House,
264 pages
$45
Tasty, simple, weekday
family meals from
MasterChef NZ winner
Brett McGregor, plus lots of
tips and delicious recipes
designed for busy families
with children. Theres also an impressive list of
how-to guides on marinades, sauces, chutneys,
cooking sh, whipping cream and the perfect
scrambled eggs. Its a great instruction manual for
the beginner and those whove been cooking for a
while. Recipes include great ways with mince, lots
of delicious salads, stews, pasta and bakes, tasty
dinners with a touch of Mexican or Asian inuence,
desserts and baking.
Bluebells Cakery
By Karla Goodwin
Random House,
hard cover, 256 pages
$50
This gorgeous and
romantic recipe book
is by Karla Goodwin.
She learned her craft
at the internationally-
reknowned Primrose
Bakery in London and has developed her
style since her move to New Zealand. The
books chapters include recipes for her
biscuits, cakes, cupcakes, desserts, slices,
sweets, friands and loaves, drinks, icings
and jams, a high tea section which includes
savouries, and instructions on how to achieve
some of Karlas signature decorating looks.
Ladies,
a Plate:
Jams and
Preserves
By Alexa
Johnston
Penguin NZ,
160 pages, $47
Alexa Johnston removes all
the fear and trepidation from
the processes of making jams,
jellies, pickles, chutneys and
sauces, fruit cordials and
liqueurs, and bottling fruit
with over 100 traditional and
contemporary preserves recipes.
Everyday Easy
Quick Meals
By Simon Holst
Hyndman Publishing, 60 pages
$12.95
It may be small, but this book is
packed full of delicious, easy meal
ideas for busy weekday cooks,
plus a few extra recipes for the
weekends. It includes tips for
stocking your pantry and a monthly
menu plan.
BOOKS OF INTEREST
Words Nadene Hall
The 45th parallel south is a circle of latitude that lies 45 degrees
south of the equator and theoretically marks the mid-way point
between the equator and the South Pole, with New Zealand one of
the few land masses to lie in its path. Photographer Arno Gasteiger
has documented the dramatic variety of landscapes and interesting
characters that lie along this invisible southern marker, while award-
winning novelist Laurence Fearnley writes of her deep love of this part
of the world, and the events and people that have shaped it.
G
REAT
C
HRISTM
AS
G
IFT IDEAS!
45 South
By Laurence Fearnley
& Arno Gasteiger
Penguin NZ,
hardback, 192 pages
$65
8 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 9
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This Old Ram
By Errol McLeary
David Bateman
Publishing, paperback,
32 pages, ages 2-4 years
$20
This old ram, he played ONE
He set out to have some fun
And he does, chasing sheep, chewing on
cabbage trees and scaring pukeko chicks.
A wily old ram causes all sorts of trouble for
a hard-working farm dog. Includes a lively,
rhythmical text introducing the numbers 1-10
using the traditional song This Old Man. A
fun Kiwi take on the classic counting song
with fabulous illustrations featuring New
Zealands rural landscape with lots of details
for children to enjoy nding on each page.
Phylys the
Farm Truck
By Christine Fernyhough,
illustrated by Susan Elijas
Random House, 32 pages
$20
The folk at Castle Hill high
country farm are not too impressed when
they rst meet Phylys, a shiny, ash city
truck. How will this gleaming new arrival
cope with the steep hills, wide rivers and
rough tracks? But Phylys has a twinkle in
her eye and soon shows shell give anything
a go. Shes not put off by a few skids,
crunches, sheep poo, high fords, soggy
bogs, getting stuck or heaps of hard work.
New Zealand Poultry
Standards
Compiled by Ian Selby
310 pages, $70 + $7 postage
The newly-updated New Zealand Poultry Standards book
is out now in two versions, hard cover or binder (A4).
If you want to breed or buy good quality, purebred
poultry in NZ, this book is your bible. It includes the
most up-to-date breed information, photos and
descriptions, all carefully examined by NZs top poultry
breeders and compiled by poultry guru Ian Selby.
TO BUY visit Trade Me, or order from Ian at www.poultrynz.
com, phone 06 754-6262, email poultrynz@xtra.co.nz
CHRISTMAS
BOOK IDEAS
FOR CHILDREN
Dogs in
Action
By Maria Alomajan
Exisle Publishing,
paperback,
160 pages
$30
Long-time dog
owner and
journalist Maria Alomajan tells the
stories of a number of NZ working
dogs, from their initial selection,
to their training, experiences and
relationships with their handlers and
owners. Among the animals proled
are dogs working for the police and
customs, farm dogs, therapy and
guide dogs, search and detection
dogs (including cancer, cadaver,
trufe, avalanche, LandSAR and
USAR dogs), acting, model
and show dogs, sled dogs
and mascots.
FOR POULTRY
LOVERS
Be in
to WIN!
We have two copies of Dogs in
Action to give away. To be in to
win, send your name, postal details
and phone number with the words
Action Dogs in the subject to
editor@nzlifestyleblock.co.nz, fax
09 634-2948 or on the back of an
envelope and post to NZ Lifestyle
Block, PO Box 6341, Auckland 1036.
One entry per person, final date for
entries December 31, 2013.
IF YOU BUY Dogs in
Action from Exisle
Publishings website
www.exislepublishing.
co.nz, youll save 30% off
the price of Dogs in Action -
just enter the promo code BLOCK.
*offer valid until December 31, 2013
Christm
as
special
S
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%
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Sage & Thyme having some fun with a zucchini plant.
Amy Adams, Auckland
Kia (5) helping her Dad to dig potatoes
by carrying the potato sacks.
Lucy Pearson, Nelson
Princess Polly (then 8 weeks) with Mr Darcy,
her PPPO (Principal Personal Protection Officer).
K Parfitt, Nelson
Victoria (4) with an exhausted Red (3 months) on
a very hot drought-stricken Northland day. Gail Mason, Northland
Sam (pony) and Samuel believe in headwear
at all times.
Tanya Hawthorne, Gisborne
10 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
S
end in your best farm and garden pictures
and each month the photo we like best will
win a $50 voucher to your favourite rural
supply store or garden centre.
Tell us who is in the picture, their age and what
region theyre from, plus any other relevant details.
Photos need to be sent as high resolution jpegs
(more than 500kb) via email.
Send your photos to:
Email editor@nzlifestyleblock.co.nz
T
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 11
Anyone for a nice leg of lamb?
Kirstine and Kelvin Cox, Whatawhata
Rosie (6) is a chicken-mad farm girl.
Fiona McKay, Warkworth
Theres nothing like a good meal... although he (and his mum)
love hay and feijoa prunings too.
Karen Herbert, Masterton
The perfect fit for a pig on a hot day.
Jacqueline Nankervis, Hawkes Bay
Lexie and the chickens race to see who can eat the most pellets.
Phil & Rose, by email
Country Smile
YOUR PICTURES
12 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Feature The Wee Red Barn
In just seven years, a Wairarapa couple have turned
a derelict wee barn and a rundown lifestyle block into
a successful, award-winning fruit and berry business.
Words & images Barbara Gillham
T
he Wee Red Barn is certainly
not big you could easily miss
it as you head north on SH2 from
Masterton.
However, those that do stop are
spoilt for choice when they walk inside,
especially if they are lovers of fruit and
berries.
Alan and Dot Bissett initially
specialised in growing strawberries when
they rst set up the business in 2007, and
it wasnt long before the Wee Red Barn was
boughI II beIofe movIng Io New ZeuIund
in 2007.
Since then a derelict barn has been
transformed into the Wee Red Barn and
their work on the property itself has
turned it into a highly productive business
that is renowned for the quality of its
produce.
Enormous steps have been taken since
to utilise their block to its fullest potential
and ensure nothing is wasted. One of the
unique aspects is the triple-tiered table
top system they have installed to ensure
they utilise and get optimum strawberry
production from the land that they have.
When Dot and Alan were offered the
opportunity to trial the new system by its
manufacturers (UK Company Haygrove)
they saw the benets and accepted. The
berries
BIG
ON
known as the place to visit if you wanted
some particularly good fruit.
They describe themselves as a wee bit
of Scottish (Alan) and a wee bit of Kiwi
(Dot) who literally met over a strawberry
patch. Alan had been managing a soft fruit
farm in Scotland for a number of years
and Dot was on her OE when she began to
work on the same property.
After marrying and deciding they
would like an adventure, they found a
run-down property on Trade Me and
berries
BIG
ON
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 13
they become quicker which reduces your
picking costs. So if youre paying per
hour while the picking rate goes up your
kilo price comes down. For example, our
average used to be approximately $1.20
pef kIIo In Ihe heId. Now we`fe down Io
about 45-50 cents a kilo picking from the
table, so our picking costs have halved.
Alan says using the system has also
eliminated a lot of the work that growing
strawberries in the eld entailed such as
ploughing and re-laying the eld, and
there is less use of chemicals.
Were working on eight acres
(approximately 3.5ha) where we would
normally plant 54,000 plants per hectare.
Now wIIh IhIs sysIem we ufe pIunIIng Ihe
equivalent of 117,000 plants per hectare.
On Alan and Dots property the triple
couple were so impressed by the results
they bought it, making them currently the
rst and only strawberry growers in the
country using it.
Alan admits the system doesnt suit
all varieties and some especially the
bushier varieties are better suited to
a double tier system, but for them it is
working well.
It allows us to put in three times more
plants per square metre so youre utilising
your ground. Instead of having ve acres
of strawberries in the eld we can knock
that back to two acres.
Using this method we also nd we
keep staff longer because they are not
breaking their backs picking as they are
now picking at waist level. Thats good
because if they are working for you longer
WHO: Alan & Dot Bissett
WHERE: Masterton
LAND: 3.2ha (8.1 acres)
WHAT: strawberries, grapes,
raspberries, currants, blackberries,
boysenberries, gooseberries,
blueberries, vegetables
WEBSITE: www.weeredbarn.co.nz
tier system is in 9m lengths although
the original length is 75 metres.
Weve got it at that length so it is not
too long for people to walk along. We
also use trolleys so nobody is carrying
fruit anymore. By picking from the
plant straight into the punnet we are
also reducing all previous damage and
handling costs.
Since installing the system yields have
increased, something Alan puts down
to there being no damage to the fruit,
especially from rain.
Being up off the ground when it stops
raining, the air circulates and dries the
berries very quickly, it gives them a good
air ow.
I think generally pollination is also
better for some reason, instead of the A
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Growing berries along a
frame makes for much
easier harvesting.
14 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Generally pollination is better for some reason, I think (bees)
like the height thing as well, although obviously I cant ask them.
bees working on the ground I think they
like the height thing as well, although
obviously I cant ask them.
In the triple tier system the
strawberries are planted in coconut peat
(Coir) which helps hold the moisture in
and has reduced the amount of water
needed, another important benet of the
system. Alan says he has also noticed an
improvement in the quality of the fruit
produced and the size, which he describes
as denitely bigger.
There is also no need to rotate the crop
in the ground, and less use of chemicals,
although Alan has his own secret fertiliser
mix that saturates the plants with
nutrients with the aid of a pump at a
pre-set time.
Although the Wee Red Barn is
well known for its strawberries, the
couple soon realised they needed to
be able to offer more. Today they also
produce raspberries, blackberries,
boysenberries, gooseberries, red and
black currants, potatoes, tomatoes,
leeks, beans, garlic, free range eggs,
jam made from surplus fruit, olive oil,
and wine made from their own grapes.
Last season they also began using
Voen, a special plastic crop cover for
their raspberries, picking three times
more than in previous seasons with only
marginally more plants.
After six years Alan says the business
has grown a lot but it was the rst two
years that were the hardest and most
costly.
Its typical farming youve got to
spend money and you dont get anything
back until you sell it. At least now we have
created something that is here and can be
here for a long time to come.
Since setting up the triple tiered system
Alan and Dot have had a number of visits
from growers, especially in Australia,
who have contacted them to learn more
about it. Such is the interest some have
even come over to visit them and see the
system in operation.
In the few years they have had the
business Alan and Dot have also won
several awards. Last year they described
themselves as dumbfounded when they
were announced as winners of the Hill
Laboratories Harvest Award. Although
among the nalists, neither expected to
win when they viewed the competition
The triple tier
system allows the
couple to produce
significantly more
fruit per acre, and
harvesting is much
easier and faster.
Berries dry
quickly after
rain, reducing
spoilage.
The Wee Red Barn now sells a wide
range of its own food products.
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The triple tier
system allows the
couple to produce
significantly more
fruit per acre, and
harvesting is much
easier and faster.
Berries dry
quickly after
rain, reducing
spoilage.
The Wee Red Barn now sells a wide
range of its own food products.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 15
Entrance
with Style
DRIVEWAY GATES
First impressions count and that
makes the NEW Franklin Driveway
Gates the perfect choice for any
entrance way that needs something, a
little bit special.
Attractive, yet affordable the Driveway
Gate modular design will not only bring
style to your driveway but will also be at
the envy of all who pass through it.
For more information visit your local
Franklin stockist today.
www.franklinsystems.co.nz
N
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The pigs on the
Bissetts block get
the best leftovers.
they were up against, so the announcement at the 2012 Greater
Wellington Ballance Farm Environment Awards ceremony in
Martinborough was a complete surprise.
At the time the judges described the couples passion
and enthusiasm as the driving factors in the success of their
intensive horticultural operation based around the Wee Red
Barn, which they described as a UK farm shop-styled retail
outlet. They were also praised for their astute local market
analysis, supplying product where and when needed, and
their passion and amazing ability to multi-task in a complex
business.
Although they had won the Lifestyle Block category of the
awards in 2009, last years win was a signicant step up to the
main categories and a clear indicator of the growth and success
of their business.
While their property and volume of fruit may be small
compared to the bigger commercial growers, sales are strong
and demand is high, a sure sign of a successful business and
one that is putting money back into the local economy. The
quality of their fruit sees little left on the shelf and as Alan points
out, nothing is ever wasted.
We sell throughout the Wairarapa from the shop, at stalls
and even from the roadside but we dont supply shops or
supermarkets. Anything not suitable for sale we feed to our
pigs.
Theyre not planning to expand, but Alan and Dot have
renovated an area of their barn behind the shop which hosts
functions such as wine tastings and wedding receptions.
It is also used for educational purposes for the many school
children who visit their business. They have a close relationship
with pupils from the local Opaki School, and the schools food
scraps feed the couples pigs. Pupils visit during term time to
undertake jobs such as planting and helping in the shop.
For those who like to sit back and relax, the couple offer
guests the opportunity to enjoy
a tour of their property and taste
some of their wonderful wines,
all made from grapes grown on
their own vines.
Today the business is
anything but wee with regular
customers and visitors to the
region popping in to either
purchase from their huge
selection of fresh fruit and
vegetables, or to buy the jams,
pickles, vinegars and olive oil,
made by Dot from produce
they grow.
16 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
FARM &
LIVESTOCK
SUMMER ON THE BLOCK
16 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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COMING UP IN FARM & LIVESTOCK THIS MONTH
Farm breed: Dexter cattle | pg 18
Down on the Farm: using toxins on pests | pg 20
Country Vet: doing the silly cow sidestep | pg 24
Vet notes: flystrike in livestock | pg 26
1 KEY TIP
for goat owners
Sometimes its necessary to have
a stay on the inside of a fence,
and for goats that means youve
created a built-in ramp!
Theres an easy fix though, as
suggested by the fencing experts
from the QEII Trusts website,
www.openspace.org.nz
Run a wire from the base of the
stay to near the top of the post.
This will put any would-be climber
off balance.
DOES A FENCE NEED REPLACING?
If youre looking to buy a new block or assessing your own
fences, there are a couple of easy-to-perform tests for working
out whether you need to replace or repair a fence. Look at each
post and check to see if they are loose or rotten. If you push them
hard, do they move easily? Are the wires rusty or broken? If they
are, the fence needs replacing. If the posts are generally firmly in
place and in good condition, and the wire is loose but not rusty, it
will be worth repairing to get an extra 10-20 years of life out of it.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 17
3
Wait for rain so the soil around posts
is damp before tightening wires
on fences. If you do it during hot
summer months when posts are often
loose, you can force them up and out of
the ground.
4
If youre fencing off areas of
bush or wetlands for restoration
purposes, the best fence for
keeping cattle and sheep out as
recommended by the QEII Trust is
a 9-wire fence with 3m post spacings
without battens. A second option is a
5-wire fence to 700mm high (to stop
sheep), with an electric wire at 900mm
for cattle.
5
Posts are the backbone of any
fence, and you get an immediate
advantage by having them
rammed in, versus digging holes. This
does mean you will need to hire a
contractor but it can be worth it for the
added stability it gives to a fence (not
to mention the manpower saved by
not having to bore holes and backll
around dozens of posts). If you are
building a fence that will curve for
aesthetic reasons, it can be worth
setting the key posts in the curve
using concrete so they can resist the
pull of wires or boards.
1
Check your fences twice a year,
preferably in late spring and
autumn. Youre looking for loose
or broken wires/mesh or battens,
wobbly posts (especially if youve had
a drought as the soil at the base will
dry out), broken electric insulators,
and missing staples.
2
If you do have loose, rusted or
missing staples, replace them
by putting in the new staple on
a 45 degree angle, not straight up and
down, so its less likely the wooden
post will split (causing the staple to fall
out). Dont drive the staple all the way
in you want to leave a small gap so
the wire can move freely if stock lean
on it, and also to allow for expansion
and contraction of the wire during hot
and cold weather.
Farm Diary
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
TRIBUNALS and courts now
seem to be looking not just for
common practice (as required
under the Animals Law Reform
Act 1989), but for best practice
in regards to fencing. In FMGs
view, fences that comply with
the Fencing Act and stock
control practices that meet
all relevant regulations and
bylaws of your local council are
only half the equation. Make it
standard practice on your block
to consider what type of animals
you have in any roadside
paddocks (or those alongside
railway lines), envisage the
possible escape scenarios,
and then take all reasonable
steps to prevent them.
COOP OF THE
TIP
of the
MONTH
5
DECEMBER 2013
Farm diary: fencing maintenance
Hammer staples in on a 45 angle
so you dont split the wooden
post, and leave a small gap so the
wire can move when under stress.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 17
tips for keeping
your fences in
good condition
18 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
B
eing surrounded by rare breed
livestock reminds Jonathan and
Sarah Walker of their native home
in England.
There is something undeniably noble
about the ancient pig breeds which trufe
around their Waikato property. Although
Jonathan, Sarah and their two children
have been honorary Kiwis since 2003,
they admit having the pigs brings a touch
of nostalgia.
Theyre breeds that we appreciated
back in Britain and so having them here
on ouf pfopefIy In New ZeuIund Is IhuI
little bit special, says Sarah.
Our fascination with Tamworth came
about after buying one to reclaim a
derelict vegetable garden when we lived in
the Scottish Highlands. Once she cleaned,
rotovated and manured the vegetable
patch, we re-fenced an old paddock where
she and her offspring grazed on acorns,
hazelnuts and ferns.
When we killed our rst free range
pig we realised how much better it tasted
than pork we had previously eaten from a
supermarket. This led to us also
making pork and herb sausages and
smoking bacon.
This interest in pigs and producing
quality meat has also enabled Jonathan to
cfeuIe u IhfIvIng busIness hefe In NZ, wIIh
his range of Soggy Bottom free range meat
products keenly sought after. His stall at
the Hamilton farmers market is a popular
meeting point for locals who appreciate
the ethics behind his meat products.
The ex-forestry manager
has also doggedly and
painstakingly transformed
24 hu (60 ucfes) oI fough, hIIIy
terrain (which he admits few
other farmers would have
touched) into a haven for the familys pigs,
cattle and chooks. Sarah and Jonathan
have also planted more than 5000 trees on
the former gorse and scrub-lined hills. It
is still a work in progress, although close
to a decade of persistent hard work has
transformed the once neglected block.
Their array of home-grown bacon,
ham, sausages and other products feature
delicious combinations, usually created
from fresh seasonal ingredients grown in
the garden or raised on the land.
The rare Tamworth breed of pig is a
source of great pride and Jonathan wasted
no time building up a small collection
of the rare old breed thats renowned
for its quality meat. He also has Wessex
Saddleback pigs.
The Tamworth are a bit of a favourite,
he admits. Theyve got really great
temperaments and produce wonderful
meat. Theyre a bit ighty, especially when
young, and are often used for pig racing in
the UK. They are also a really good bacon
pig as they are long, with trademark big
back legs, ideal for ham.
Heritage British outdoor breeds like the
Tamworth and Wessex Saddleback have
smaller litters than modern pigs and are
slower growing, but are good mothers and
produce very tasty meat.
We enjoy our pigs because they
are hugely affectionate, intelligent and
endearing, says Jonathan. They run free
range and have access to shelter, shade,
wallows and plenty of fresh grass.
The pigs clearly thrive on the free range
life, and also get fed a mix of stock food,
cheese, milk, apples and fruit.
Sticking to the rare breed
theme, Belted Galloway cattle
also thrive on the steep land.
Plus they turn rough pasture
into beautifully tender and
well-marbled meat, says Jonathan. They
are also relatively small animals so tend to
do less damage to our heavy clay soils.
Wiltshire Horns have proven to be the
breed of sheep to win Jonathan around.
Ive never been a huge lover of sheep
and always found them quite high
maintenance, he admits. Discovering
this breed which doesnt need shearing or
dagging was fantastic.
In the past we considered sheep to be
little more than woolly maggots. We had
no desire to learn how to either shear or
LISA POTTER
Farm Breeds: Tamworth Pigs
Loving pigs at
Soggy Bottom
Theyve got
really great
temperaments...
Loving pigs at
Soggy Bottom
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 19
crutch sheep but we realised they
full an important role in pasture
management. The Wiltshire Horn
breed is very low maintenance
and has been welcomed with open
arms. They are self-shedding,
require no dagging and rarely have
problems with y strike, even in
humid Waikato. They are hardy
animals and a very good meat
breed. They clear our land after the
cows have grazed, control many
weed species and produce ne grained,
tender meat. Our Wiltshire sheep come
from imported organic stock.
However it is clearly his pigs which are
his pride and joy. They amble up to the
fenceline whenever he is near, eager for a
scratch on their wiry backs and Jonathan
always takes the time to oblige.
His respect for his stock is reected
in their careful handling, from piglets
through to the butchery process. All stock
is taken to MAF-approved abattoirs for
slaughter, with the carcases delivered
Farm & Livestock
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
There are just a handful of
registered Tamworth breeding
sows in New Zealand. The
distinctive ginger reddish-
coloured breed dates back to the
beginning of the 19th century in
England. The primate type of pig,
with its long snout and shorter
ears, is what many consider to
be the purest representative of
the native English pig. Its snout
and strong shoulders make the
breed excellent for reclaiming
derelict land thanks to their
excellent digging abilities.
The breed is also renowned
for its long neck, narrow back
and deep sides, boasting firm
muscular ham structures and
was once a popular commercial
bacon breed.
The females usually produce
relatively small litters (6-10) and
are good mothers. The young
pigs are lively, charismatic and
love to chase each other around
the paddock, and have been
described as the Arabs of the pig
racing world.
TAMWORTH
PIGS
back to Jonathon for processing in his
licensed on-farm butchery.
The meat is processed into prime cuts
which are hung to age. Theres no point
rushing the process. The avours need
time to mature. We age our beef for two to
three weeks which brings out the best in
avour and texture of these slow-grown
rare breeds.
All Soggy Bottom products are MSG-
free with no articial additives, colours or
avourings.
Theres no extra water, just prime pork,
beef or lamb, herbs, breadcrumbs, salt,
pepper and natural wood smoke in the
sausages and bacon, says Jonathan.
The Walkers vegetable garden is a riot
of fresh seasonal produce and is often
incorporated into sausages. Flavours
include Black Doris plum sausages, pork,
plum and ginger, pork, sage, nutmeg and
white pepper, and the popular pork and
black pudding.
Any spare time is spent following in
his wifes footsteps. Sarah is a highly
competitive Ironman athlete, having
competed at the world championships.
When life on the farm permits, the pair
usually takes to the hills, either running
or mountain biking. Jonathan has been
inspired by Sarahs motivation and has
progressed from a half-hearted jog to
some more serious training, including
competing in the Auckland and San
Francisco Marathons.
www.alpaca.org.nz
Interested in Alpacas? Want to nd out more?
Contact Toni Soppet on 03-341-5242 or
tonisoppet@alpaca.org.nz at the AANZ offce to
receive an introductory information pack
Easy to assemble kitsets,
strong relocatable designs
Kitset parts come precut & semi
assembled for easy assembly.
Other sizes available - call today!
www.outpostbuildings.co.nz
Kitset Sheds
Summer SPECIAL $4226 inc gst
BDL301E 5.8x3.0m
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20 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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DEAD
TO RIGHTS
20 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
PART 2
Poisoning animals is not a pleasant business, but for some pest
species in some situations, its the only way to get the job done.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 21
WARNING
If your livestock do ever gain access
to toxic baits, they must be withheld
from food production until the end
of the required withholding period,
which will be advised by the NZFSA,
along with any further actions that
may need to be taken.
Call free for information on 0800 693 721,
www.foodsafety.govt.nz
Who do you call?
The Department of Labour, Health
Protection Ofcers and Police
all have roles in the regulation of
Controlled Substances and any
inappropriate use or misuse should
be reported immediately. Incidents
can be reported directly to the
EPA (Environmental Protection
Authority) on 0800 376 234 or
hsinfo@epa.govt.nz
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n the November issue I looked at the
use of the anticoagulant toxins for
pest animals. They can be used by
anyone, even though their use requires a
high degree of care and responsibility
to be taken.
There are a number of other toxins
registered for the control of pest animals
in New Zealand but these ones require
users to hold a Controlled Substances
License (CSL) after being trained and
certied as an Approved Handler. You
need a legitimate reason to hold such
a license such as for a work purpose
(including voluntary work), but you may
also apply with a statement from the
applicant that the substance/s are to be
used on their own property (eg, a farm) for
legitimate reasons.
For example, if you have a signicant
possum problem and a serious native
regeneration programme underway, the
ability to do some serious population
knock-downs is very useful. Many people
work with land care groups in a voluntary
capacity and require CSLs for toxin use.
Contractors are also sometimes employed
by such bodies to do their pest control.
It is worth being aware of the
requirements for CSL holders, even if you
dont intend to hold one yourself. Holders
are permitted to use some very dangerous
substances and carelessness could have
dire consequences for them and for others
where the toxins are used. If someone is
laying toxins in your vicinity, you want to
be sure theyre doing it as they should be.
The granting of a CSL is subject to a
number of provisions including:
IhuI you ufe u 'hI und pfopef pefson,` In
many of the same ways which apply to the
granting of a rearm's licenses;
IhuI you musI be uI IeusI 17 yeufs oId,
IhuI hoIdefs oI CSLs ufe fequIfed
RUTH RENNER
to renew them every ve years, including
a reassessment of their Approved
Handler status.
A CSL is issued for the use of specied
toxins only, so not everyone with a license
would be able to use every sort of toxin
available. Holders must provide the license
to any vendor of the toxins they wish to
purchase and must always carry it with
them when using the toxins. There are
strict requirements for the storage and
disposal of toxins because of their danger
should they be improperly used or fall into
the wrong hands.
Where toxins are used there are
regulated requirements for appropriate
signs at points of entry to a property and
often at more distant points of access,
and those signs remain in place
for specic periods after a toxin
has been used. Neighbours must
be notied of the use of toxins
and what they need to do to keep
themselves and their animals safe,
bearing in mind that even a dog under
someones direct control might still nd
and eat something dangerous. Toxins must
not be laid near waterways where dead
or dying animals might fall in and pollute
the water and must be laid at appropriate
distances from legal boundaries.
Some toxins must be removed again
after specied periods and some will
become inactive with exposure to
the elements. While the CSL holder is
responsible for those matters, a landowner
where toxins are being used should ensure
that they are fully informed about what
is being used and what provisions are
needed for its presence on their land.
If toxin is laid on adjacent property, you
should be advised of its use, but
if not, all warning signs must
include the contact details of
the person responsible for its
use on that occasion.
Domestic animals and
livestock should always be kept away from
areas where toxins are in use and in many
cases must be excluded from those areas
for some months afterwards, depending
on the substance used and the likely speed
of decay of poisoned animal carcasses.
In areas where ground birds may be
present (especially kiwi), toxic baits or bait
stations should always be positioned at
IeusI 70cm Ifom Ihe gfound.
A CSL allows a person to hold and to
Down On The Farm
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
Neighbours
must be
notified of the
use of toxins.
22 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
A licensee must not decide whether or not there is a risk
to public health - that is up to the Public Health Unit.
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use the toxins as specied on their license,
but because of the potential danger to
people, another step must be taken before
use in most cases. Users of any of the CSL-
regulated toxins must:
Check with the Public Health Unit
of the local District Health Board as to
whether there may be a risk to public
health from your proposed use of the VTA
and whether a Permission is required. You
must not decide yourself whether or not
there may be a risk to public health - it is
up to the Public Health Unit to make this
assessment.
Contacting the Public Health Unit is
the responsibility of the CSL holder who
proposes using the toxin on your land,
not you as the landowner, but if you know
there is regular public access to your land
or the collection of water for domestic use,
those issues should be raised with anyone
proposing the use of CSL-regulated toxins
on or around your property.
Any use of these toxins on Department
of Conservation (DoC) land must be
approved by DoC, but use on public land
CYANIDE
Cyanide paste is often used by those
who hunt possums for the fur trade.
The paste is used after a couple of nights
of pre-feeding with a non-toxic lure,
placed in pots or dry above-ground
points (eg, trees).
Cyanide pellets (Feratox) are
presented as little pea-sized balls, so are
safer to handle, and usually presented
in biodegradable bags with a lure or
embedded in a lure paste, above ground.
(Rats will take the pellets and are less
susceptible to the toxin, so should be
controlled separately by other methods.)
is usually severely restricted.
TOXINS THAT REQUIRE A CSL
These IncIude DBC 1339 (Iof bIfd conIfoI),
Potassium cyanide, Sodium cyanide,
Yellow phosphorus, Sodium uoroacetate
(1080), und some pfesenIuIIons oI PIndone
(for ground application without bait
stations).
The toxins used to control mammalian
pests are coloured green or green/blue to
deter birds. Many of them are formulated
as pastes, avoured with a scented
lure to attract the target animals. Other
presentations include pellets, strikers
(bait/toxin on a card strip which can be
stapled to trees) and cereal-based baits.
Their characteristics vary in terms of
effectiveness, how humane a death they
cause (all are more humane than the
anti-coagulant toxins) and their secondary
poisoning potential. All are seriously toxic
to non-target species including humans,
hence their high level of control. All are
less persistent in the environment than the
anti-coagulant toxins.
A cyanide bait bag.
Photo: Connovation
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 23
How to find a Health
Protection Officer
GO TO www.health.govt.nz and
click in the menu at the top on
the option NZ Health System,
then choose Public Health Units
from the dropdown option on the
lefthand side, then Contacts.
Cyanide kills possums almost instantly.
Secondary poisoning is unlikely - only
another animal directly licking excess paste
from around a possums mouth would cause
another death.
1080 of SodIum IIuofouceIuIe Is Ihe
toxin everyone seems to know about,
although most peoples information comes
via the medias reporting of the ongoing
debuIe ubouI 1080 use. The unIofIunuIe
effects of early mistakes in its use by
conservation groups have continued to be
used as arguments against it ever since. It is
relatively safe for users to handle and has no
Down On The Farm
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
More information
SAFETY DATA SHEETS are readily
available online, as are the product
labels with directions for correct use
and all safety information.
Contact your local Regional Councils
Pest Officer if you have any concerns
or questions about any of the
information presented here.
OBTAIN or download a copy of the
booklet Health and Safety in Animal
Pest Control: Working with Vertebrate
Toxic Agents. It contains information
specifically for use of the heavy
toxins which require a CSL.
THE NATIONAL Pest Control Agencies
website provides some excellent
information and downloadable
resources: www.npca.org.nz
A FREE WARNING SIGN
(pictured above) for
Potassium cyanide can be
downloaded free from
www.epa.govt.nz/Publications/
Brodifacoumbaitstn.pdf
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From $10,499.00rrp
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www.FerrisIndustries.com
Distributed in New Zealand by Briggs & Stratton
2+2 YEAR
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WARRANTY
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ongoing toxic effect in the environment
although its secondary poisoning
effect on dogs (which are particularly
susceptible) makes it very unpopular
with hunters. Its positive secondary
poisoning effects are on mustelids,
rats and feral cats when they scavenge
poisoned possums.
1080 Is IfequenIIy used Iof uefIuI
drops into regions too remote and
rugged to be effectively controlled by
people laying toxin by hand, primarily
to control possums in areas where
Bovine TB is endemic. While there is no
antidote to poisoning, if a sub-lethal
dose has been ingested by a domestic
dog or cat, immediate supportive
veterinary treatment may be effective.

PHOSPHOROUS
This is presented as a paste and has no
antidote at all, in animals or handlers.
Its secondary poisoning potential
Is sImIIuf Io 1080. Thefe ufe fIsks oI
combustion when phosphorus is
used in high temperatures and dry
conditions.
Phosphorus may kill within about
three days or can take up to three weeks
depending on the dose ingested. It
works as a systemic toxin, with major
effect on the liver. Ingestion causes
caustic burns to the alimentary tract. It
is not a particularly humane option, but
is very effective.
Bait locations should
always be marked
in some way to
enable clean-up or
later checking to
ensure the toxin is
inactivated.
24 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
S
pring is traditionally a busy
time for the Vet. Through until
late September he has to put
the practice rst which means
as a family we dont count on
him to celebrate his middle sons August
birthday, or even his own at the end of
the month.
Too many times a nice meal has just
been served up, a pile of interesting
parcels beside it, and the phone will
go. Calving. Prolapse. Head back. Head
forward. Tail up. Twins. Schistozome.
Downer cow the list goes on and the
kids learned the words early even if they
werent sure just what they meant for the
cows involved. They did know what it
meant for them.
See you later Dad!
Its not that cows always have problems.
Most cows manage to slip their offspring
out without any great delays or difculties
and, according to the statistics, its a mere
two percent that might need assistance.
Usually it is the Vet that does the assisting,
so allowing for the fact
IhuI he hus someIhIng IIke 6000 cows In
the area to supervise, that is something
IIke 120 cuIIouIs ovef u Ihfee monIh
period. That works out at more than a call
a day and usually in clusters according to
the weather.
Fortunately some farmers are happy to
get their hands dirty and smelly if it saves
them the cost of a vet visit, plus mileage,
plus drugs. That drops the number of
calls down, but still, a day at
home during that time is an
extraordinary event in the
Vets life.
So it was no surprise when
Bill Branson rang at midday.
I think its a tail
presentation, he said. Its one of my early
calvers, a bit silly, but shes gone down,
seems paralysed in the back end. Youd
better come and help or the calf will be
dead for sure, and the cow stuffed as well
if I have a go at it.
Tail presentations are just that. While
sensible calves dive into the world with
their nose tucked between their front toes,
more difcult animals sometimes come
backwards, or breach. Even people do
me included and live to tell the tale, but
breach does not work if the hind legs dont
come up rst. A bum or tail stuck in the
birth canal means nothing else will t.
Lucky you picked it up, said the Vet,
looking at the fat cow sprawled on the
ground. These ones often get missed if the
cow isnt straining.
Well, she looked a bit out of sorts when
I checked them this morning, Bill replied.
But nothing was showing
so I left her to it. Then after
breakfast I had another look
and she had gone down, was
straining like mad, but still
nothing showing. I looked
again half an hour later, and
woops, now she was down and stuck there.
I couldnt get her up at all.
Nerve paralysis, said the Vet. The
calf will be pressing on the back bone and
shutting the nerves down. We had better
try and shift it or the damage could be
long term.
The Vet slopped down into the mud
at the back end of the cow. She turned to
look and bellowed angrily at him but was
sufciently incapacitated that she could
TRISHA FISK
She turned to look
at the Vet
and bellowed
angrily at him.
Spring dance
Words & artwork
Trisha Fisk
Perfecting the silly cow sidestep.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 25
only talk and not do.
After lubing up his arm and inserting
it into the cow he could picture what was
going on.
Yep, its bum rst. Ill give her a shot to
stop her straining so hard and something
to reduce the inammation.
Then back into the cow he went.
Now I need to shift the calf back in
enough so that I can feel for the hind legs
and bring them through.
There was much heaving, the Vet
pushing the calf in and the cow still
trying to push it out, and both of them
groaning and swearing at each other. Ever
so gradually the Vets arm disappeared
further and further into the cow. The calf
was shifting.
It was at this point that the mother-to-
be decided the indignities were too great
to be tolerated. The paralysing pressure
was off and she staggered to her feet and
turned to repay the Vet push for shove.
Ah, geddout of it ya silly cow. He
staggered up, chains, calving gown and
lube bottle ying.
But now she was a demented thing with
all her angry maternal instincts awoken.
0800 440 290 www.polaris.co.nz
*Offer ends 30/11/13 or earlier if stocks
run out. Only available at participating Polaris dealers.
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SAVE $1500
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SEALED FRONT STORAGE
Cripes, look out,cried Bill. Shell be
having you.
Hey, dont run towards me.
We need to get her up to the yards.
Go that way. You go rst.
Cripes, and be quick about it.
First came the Vet, who makes a
better prop on the rugby eld than a
loose forward, but he led the team like
a nimble-footed wing on this unusual
training run in gumboots and wet muddy
plastic gown, shambling at a creditable
pace considering age and ground
conditions.
The crazed cow probably a bit
decient in magnesium and denitely
decient in the calming joys of
motherhood had her head low and was
shaking it from side to side, tits opping
in time, tongue out, giving an angry
bellow every few paces.
And Bill was following on behind,
laughing t to burst, but with the presence
of mind to pick up the Vets bits and pieces
as they were dropped in his race to safety.
Dont worry, Bill gasped with laughter.
Ill close the gate!
It was a pretty fast quarter mile, and
just maybe the
Vet wasnt as
sympathetic
and gentle as he could have been pulling
the calf out once they reached the yards.
But yes, it was still alive, and seemed as
wary of its overly protective mother as Bill
and the Vet were looking on from behind
some very tall rails.
Well, I reckon you were wasted as
a prop. The rugby club is always looking
for a bit of speed in the backs. You should
get down there on training night,
laughed Bill.
Why dont you just go for the All
Blacks tryout. Or at least give the coaches
our new manoeuvre. Call it the silly cow
sidestep. We could be famous.
Thats a great idea, said the Vet. Ill
leave you to perfect it. You can put her
back in the paddock.
But hey, doesnt she need some more
shots or something? protested Bill.
Its all there on the railing, once a day
for three days, said the Vet, slapping Bill
on the back. Just think how good youll
get. Ive gotta go now. More cows are
calling
Tales of a Country Vet
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
26 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
F
ly strike is a serious condition that
can affect all species of animals
ranging from sheep to alpacas,
goats and even pet rabbits.
CAUSES
Fly strike is very common during the
warm months of November through to
March and is caused by the three species
of blowy: Lucilia sericata, Lucilia cuprina
and Calliphora stygia.
These species overwinter as adults or
pupae. As temperatures rise in springtime,
the ies become active and start laying
their eggs on animals bodies where there
is warmth, moisture and a food supply.
WIIhIn 12 houfs Ihe eggs huIch und
maggots start feeding on the surface of the
hosts skin by scraping it with their hook-
like mouthparts and secreting enzymes
to dissolve the skin. During feeding the
maggots cause extensive damage to the
animal and the open wounds attract even
more ies.
Once blowy maggots have eaten
enough, they drop onto the pasture and
burrow into the soil where they pupate
Iof 1-2 weeks uIIef whIch Ihey emefge us
adult ies.
CLINICAL SIGNS
There will be obvious irritation, seen as
stamping, tail twitching, rubbing and
biting at the affected area. After a few days
affected animals stop eating, seek shade
and appear depressed.
On close examination you may notice
wounds, often hidden underneath the
wool or fur, that will be quite raw and
can ooze a lot of uid. Once the wool is
parted, a large number of maggots will be
found that will start wriggling away from
the light when disturbed.
Occasionally sheep or goats with
footrot can get maggots in between
their toes so check their feet daily and
remove any maggots as needed.
As the wound enlarges uid is lost
through its surface and animals can
become very dehydrated. Untreated
animals invariably die due to the loss
of uid, protein and electrolytes from
the wounds as well as the toxaemia
following tissue damage.
Treated sheep may take up to six
weeks to recover lost weight, and it can
be up to eight months for the eece to
recover fully.
PREDISPOSING FACTORS
Sometimes animals can be struck on
any part of the body for no apparent
reason, but typically its moist and warm
areas that are most at risk, including:
IuecuI und ufIne sIuInIng ufound Ihe
crutch, often associated with high worm
burdens
eece foI und skIn InIecIIons
IooIfoI
wounds Ifom sheufIng of oIhef In|ufIes
wfInkIed ufeus oI skIn, especIuIIy In
some Merino breeds of sheep
TREATMENT
As soon as you identify an affected
animal, the maggots need to be removed
and destroyed. Soaking the clippings in
methylated spirits will kill the maggots.
Avoid putting meths straight onto the
wound and animal though as it will sting
a lot.
Maggots will often hide in the wool,
bre or fur around a wounded area, so
this will need to be clipped or shaved off
gently. Avoid cutting the wool right down
to the skin though as this can predispose
the skin to sunburn. Initially only a few
maggots may be visible, but once you
start clipping the surrounding area, many
more maggots will usually start crawling
away from the light and noise.
Once all the maggots have been
removed, bathe the affected area
with salty water then apply a ystrike
treatment like a powder or dressing.
Some products may have milk and
meat withholding times so talk to your
vet before using such products where
relevant.
Check wounds daily to avoid
reinfection and check other animals in
the mob for ystrike too. Apply y spray
on the surrounding wool - not the wound
itself - to keep blowies away.
Very deep or large wounds may be
difcult to treat - contact your vet if you
are unsure what to do. These can be very
painful for the animal and may require
pain relief and antibiotics. In severe cases
euthanasia may need to be considered. J
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Take strike
Vet Notes
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
9 WAYS
TO PREVENT
FLY STRIKE
These tips are mainly for sheep but may
be applicable for other animals too.
1
Crutch and dag sheeps bottoms
to remove soiled wool.
2
Ensure worm control, especially for
young stock, is up and running to
reduce diarrhoea.
3
Tail dock lambs to the appropriate
length - check with your vet if you are
unsure.
4
Treat wounds, cuts and footrot
quickly so flies dont get a chance to
lay their eggs.
5
Keep animals out of deep moist
gullies, bush margins and shelter
belts during peak fly strike season
as these have a particularly high fly
challenge. Windy exposed paddocks are
less favourable to flies.
6
Dispose of dead animals and animal
materials like placentas quickly to
reduce sites where flies multiply.
7
Consider the use of fly traps if your
area has high fly burdens.
8
There are long-acting pour-on or
spray-on products available to
prevent flystrike if you want to use
these, you need to apply them now.
9
Check animals regularly for
development of fly strike this goes
for pet rabbits in outdoor hutches too.
Words: Stef Knaack, BVSc, Levin & Horowhenua Vets, www.lhvc.co.nz
Thats what works out here.
You don't move out
to the countryside,
you move in with
the countryside.
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If that brought a wry smile to your face then youll know that whilst nothing beats
country life, country life can sometimes feel like its beating you. From livestock liability
to re risks, each day brings a new challenge. And it takes a rural specialist to know
how to deal with them right from your home to the front gate.
Ask around about us, search fmg insurance on or call 0800 366 466.
28 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer 28 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Christmas
GIFT GUIDE
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Christmas
GIFT GUIDE
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 29 www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 29
S
tyle your home and garden with
art from Omni Products that
reects your love of country life.
The vibrant colours of Robbie
and Rocky roosters make a beautiful
feature indoors or outdoors. Both
are made of metal and stand
uppfoxImuIeIy 40cm hIgh.
You can also make notes on this
gorgeous blackboard designed in
the style of an old milk bottle.
All available from garden and
rural supply stores nationwide.
www.omniproducts.co.nz
ART FOR THE
farm & garden
FOR THE HOME CHEF
C
lassic copper homeware and cookware is a timeless
gift that will last forever.
Classic Preserving Pans Perfect for preparing summer
preserves. The copper heats evenly with no cold spots
ensuring a quick set, maintaining the avours of the fruit.
Copper Kettle Great on the coal range, rapidly comes to
the boil, tinned on the inside and lasts a lifetime.
Cataplana Cook sh and shellsh gathered on family
holidays, then prepare in a Cataplana for a fresh-tasting
dish and serve.
Wine pitcher Decant your own wine and serve with
elegance and air.
Water Jug and Basin Fill the jug with summer owers or
freshly distilled hydrosols, and the bowl with seasonal fruit.
All products freight free. For your convenience, shop
online at www.alembics.co.nz, email info@alembics.co.nz
or call Jill or Charlie 09 372 3639.
Classic copper gifts
T
hIs gfeuI 3-pIece cofdIess gufden combo Is Ihe pefIecI
gift for dads around the country. Its got everything you
need to keep the backyard looking great all summer.
The combo includes:
Line trimmer Hedge trimmer Blower
To keep it simple all of the tools are designed to use the
sume hundy 18V LIIhIum Ion buIIefy. NoI onIy does IhIs
eliminate the need for messy refueling, it also recharges in less
than 45 minutes just enough time for dad to recharge too.
Order this power garden combo on sale until Christmas
from only $289! All Trade Tested products are delivered
nuIIonwIde und come wIIh u 12 monIh wuffunIy.
Call Trade Tested free on 0800 800 880 or head
to www.tradetested.co.nz and order online.
WHAT DAD
REALLY WANTS
for Christmas!
30 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
ENTRANCE
T
he Driveway Gate is a truly versatile, affordable
and highly attractive gate ideally suited to both
rural and urban properties.
The modular design allows you to choose between
different width, height and swinging options. You can
also create a multitude of design patterns by altering
the gates hanging side and direction.
Highly attractive with a multitude of design options
to create custom, unique gate solutions
Fully hot dip galvanized for longer life and durability
MunuIucIufed Ifom 40mm box-secIIon Ifume
Extension ttings included
9.bmm vefIIcuI buf upfIghIs uI 102mm spucIngs
2 boII-on hInges munuIucIufed Ifom heuvy duIy
at steel.
Available through your local Franklin & Greyson
Gate stockists. For more information call free on
0800 731 500 or visit www.franklinsystems.co.nz
or www.greysongates.co.nz
with style
D
rift Go Karts are safe,
awesome fun and
suitable for the whole
family. Powered by
u 200cc 4-sIfoke
motor, they are
very easy to
drive and drift
when cornering
because of their
low centre of gravity.
Suppliers Go Karts Direct is a NZ business
dedicated to making go karts affordable and
accessible for NZ families, and owners Jan and
Bryce Marshall have established a reputation for
quality karts over the past eight years.
These go karts are great fun for all ages, and are ideal
for farms, orchards, paddocks, lifestyle blocks, gravel
driveways or any large open space, says Bryce. Its a great
way for children to learn driving skills and control out in the
open spaces.
Go Karts Direct now has an impressive selection of go
karts to choose from, including two models of caged go
karts which are becoming increasingly popular. Both have
udded suIeIy IeuIufes oI u pudded foII cuge und 3-poInI
safety harness.
The family team at Go Karts Direct pride themselves
on offering extensive back-up support, professional advice
and a full range of spare parts.
With Christmas almost here its time to place orders.
Karts can be sent direct to purchasers nationwide or
picked up from Tauranga. For more information visit
www.gokartsdirect.co.nz, call 07 548 0677 or 0274 807 611
Help Chickenman
F
ive years ago
Jonathan
Branton-Casey got his
rst batch of
ex-battery hens
to stop his wife
complaining about
them having no eggs.
Ironically, they then
got so many she told
him to sell some birds
and so Chickenman
was born.
Jono now buys
hens from battery
and free range farms
when Ihey ufe 14 monIhs oId und huve compIeIed one
commercial season of laying. At this stage they are no longer
commercially viable for the farmers but as backyard hens
Ihey wIII sIIII Iuy IoIs oI eggs Iof unoIhef 2-4 yeufs.
'ChIckenmun` Jono now seIIs Ihem dIfecI Io Ihe pubIIc,
along with a range of feed and accessories.
Call Jono and let him introduce you to the rewards
of backyard poultry on 03 310-2183 or 021 243-8566.
Follow on facebook: www.facebook.com/chickenman.co
or Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/chickenmanltd
HELP THE CHICKENS
30 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 31 www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 31
I
t can be difcult to buy a great gift at a reasonable price for food lovers,
but you can introduce them to the fun and delight of cheesemaking for
|usI $19.90 IhIs ChfIsImus wIIh NZ Lifestyle Block magazines newest special,
How to Make Cheese, VoIume 2.
Thefe`s 100 puges IeuIufIng mofe Ihun 20 IubuIous, eusy-Io-IoIIow fecIpes
from cheesemaking tutor and judge Jean Manseld, plus all the tips and
techniques you need to know. Learn how to make some fabulous traditional
cheeses including: Gruyere Emmental Stilton Havarti Gorgonzola
Cream cheese Brie
Thefe`s uIso u IubuIous, supef-eusy 30-mInuIe mozzufeIIu Iof pIzzu,
plus instructions on how to make a basic cheese press, smoke your cheeses,
create a great curing place ,and what you need to know about good and bad
bacteria and fungi.
Check out the magazine section at your local supermarket or book stores, or
you can order online at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/nz-lifestyle-block-special-gifts
or call free on 0800 113-488 and well get it to you, postage free.
A great $19.90gift idea for food lovers
GIFTS
T
his year Gubba Online
Garden Store has
your gardening Christmas
presents covered with over
7b0 pfoducIs, uII oI whIch
make will great gift ideas
for the keen gardeners
in your life.
Gubba wraps and
ships to your door or direct
to the lucky gift recipient, saving you
time and hassle during this busy season.
Weathervanes are their most popular gift item, expertly
made in NZ and well presented in a fantastic gift box,
with your choice of wooden or cardboard boxes. Made
using traditional sand casting methods, with quality
aluminium and brass, they are then powder-coated
black to give long lasting colour and protection from the
eIemenIs. Thefe ufe 12 sIyIes Io choose Ifom $19b.
Gubbas sand cast sundials are another great
Christmas gift for your garden, designed
to show the correct time in the southern
hemisphere. They make a great
feature or centrepiece in
your garden and come
in three sizes from
$89 (pIInIhs uIso
available).
To order, go to
www.gubba.co.nz
or call free on
0508 448 222.
for gardeners
for Very Important Pets
Beds & pillows
VIP
dog beds
are made
with therapeutic
wool lling to suit
every breed in
every situation.
The tartan cotton
for the VIP oval beds
and Mutt Mattresses
now comes in a choice
of mainly red or mainly
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uppeuIIng Iook. The 100% coIIon uIIows Ihe mussugIng
balls of wool to breathe so it always stay sweet-smelling,
and the covers are easily removed for washing.
The Tough Stuff outdoor mats lled with long eece
wool for kennelled dogs come in double layers of sacking
and theres camel coloured corduroy or jute for German
Shepherds, Great Danes and retired Greyhounds.
The little Pillows for Very Important Passengers are
very popular with travellers and hospitalised adults, or
you can simply pope one on top of the bed pillow at home.
See www.vipbeds.co.nz, ring Barbie for a brochure or to
order on 06 858-9766. Christmas orders are requested
by November 30 if possible.
32 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer 32 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Feature Growing Grains
An award-winning garden designed on
permaculture principles has risen from
what was once a concrete-covered section.
Words & images Fiona Cameron
Golden
garden
harvest
Buckwheat.
An award-winning garden designed on
permaculture principles has risen from
what was once a concrete-covered section.
Words & images Fiona Cameron
An award-winning garden designed on
permaculture principles has risen from
what was once a concrete-covered section.
Words & images Fiona Cameron
Golden
garden
harvest
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we done? It was July, bitterly cold and the
house was horrible!
Builder Bruce started by laying a new
oor and knocking down a wall to give
them more room. He then crafted a bed,
kitchen bench, table, double glazed
windows, and doors.
After four years it was looking good
Bruce was working at the same time so it
wasnt easy and were still adding extras,
says Terry, who now holds regular yoga
classes for locals in one of the rooms.
They started on the garden in their rst
spring. Eleven tonnes of concrete was
smashed into pieces by Bruce then loaded
by hand onto a truck.
Under the concrete they
found large rocks which
were then dug up and used
to form the garden borders
and to make attractive
walls. Despite all that
work, they continue to nd
chunks of concrete.
A local permaculture
garden designer gave them
a consultation that helped
with the layout. While
buying fruit trees from the
local garden centre they
were told the good news
that the garden had no chemicals used
on it in the past, which pleased Terry and
Bruce who wanted to grow organically.
Years of hard work later and the couple
have removed (almost) all the concrete
and re-awakened the fertile soil that was
encased beneath it. Their garden has
W
hen Terry and Bruce
Burgess started looking
for the perfect place
where they could have
their own mini lifestyle block supplying
as much of their food as possible, they
looked at and rejected the land they
are now on four times before nally
deciding to buy it.
The reason for their hesitation was
the daunting task of not just starting
from scratch, but also undoing what was
already there: the previous owner had
covered almost the entire section
with concrete and the house needed
a complete makeover. It was one of
the original coal miners cottages from
Puponga (located at the west end of
GoIden Buy) buIII In Ihe 1940s und
feIocuIed In Ihe 19b0s, wIIh IIIIIe done
to it since then.
The main selling point was its
affordable price. It also had Takaka spring
aquifer water and was on the river ats,
so potentially the soil would be good
underneath all that concrete. It ticked
most of their boxes so the decision was
made to purchase, although it wasnt
without a few regrets at rst.
You could see through the bathroom
oor and an open re did little to heat
the place, says Terry. I sat on the living
foom oof, cfyIng, IhInkIng 'whuI huve
WHO: Terry & Bruce Burgess
WHERE: Takaka, 100km north-west
of Nelson
LAND: 0.1ha (1/4 acre)
WHAT: award-winning
permaculture garden
now won four environmental awards, an
amazing achievement for land that was
once completely hidden under concrete.
Its transformation is a real pleasure to
both Terry and Bruce, who enjoy knowing
exactly what goes into producing their
food. All their seeds are saved each year
unless new varieties are tried.
We dont use hybrids, you cant save
the seed, says Terry.
Compost is made from garden waste
and used on every new bed. Fish meal,
sheep manure and boron are added, and
sea grass is used as mulch. They nd horse
manure, although plentiful, has too many
weed seeds.
The couple also enjoy
working together in the
garden.
I plan the garden,
plant seeds, water and
process the produce,
says Terry. Bruce digs,
weeds, composts and
harvests. There is very
little overlap and it works
really well!
Now theyre sharing it
wIIh IocuIs, wIIh ovef 200
people visiting it during
open days, garden and
eco tours, and courses. After one tour, a
city dweller told Terry:
I have often read about all this but
have never seen anyone really live it.
On another tour, the organiser
commenIed, I`ve onIy uIIocuIed 30
minutes for your garden, but it needs
Grains harvested from
the Burgess garden.
Red amarynth seeds.
34 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
a whole day!
Visitors also like looking at their unique
beehive, an adapted Langstroth with
viewing windows, beautifully hand-
crafted by Bruce. The previous Top Bar
hive he built is no longer used as it lacked
moveable frames and regulations now
state only total frames are to be used.
What is so impressive about the garden,
which is managed on permaculture
principles, is the abundance produced
on |usI 1000m. ThIfIy-hve IfuII und nuI
trees have been planted, and although
still young are thriving and starting to
produce. Extensive vegetable gardens
and grain crops plus their beehive mean
every available space is productive and is
gradually being used to produce food.
A neighbour commented that the
couple will end up with no lawn.
Thats the idea! says Terry. Why mow
when you can grow?
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SORGHUM is certainly worth considering
as a grain crop make sure you buy seeds
for grain, not forage even on a small
scuIe. JusI one seed wIII pfoduce 7-10
stalks heavy in seeds for use as our, and
this prolic plant is also extremely disease
resistant.
CLIMATE: Sorghum needs warm
temperatures for strong germination so
dont sow until after the risk of frost has
passed.
SOIL: fertile, weed-free, loose, deep
(sofghum fooIs cun go down Io ovef 2m In
the right conditions)
SOW: b-10cm deep (wIII depend on
vufIeIy), 10-1bcm upufI In fows 90cm
apart.
Sorghum should be treated like
sweetcorn. It grows a better crop if well
wuIefed, und pIunIs wIII geI Io ovef 2m In
height, with its seed-lled heads right at
the top so Koanga Gardens recommends
covering each seed head or the crop so
you dont lose it to birds.
HARVEST & PROCESSING
The seed crop is ready to harvest when the
seed heads turn from green to a rust-red
and when the seeds are hard and dry (a
grain pinched between your nger and
the edge of your thumbnail wont break).
Cut off each head using scissors, then
leave to dry in a protected, sunny spot
like a porch.
You can use sorghum as a whole grain,
but if you want to process the seeds and
remove the seed heads, roll it vigorously
and rmly between your palms over a
bucket, then winnow it. Use a small fan
How to use sorghum
Cook and use as you would for brown
rice or couscous.
Pop the dried seeds as you would with
popcorn.
Cook it up as you would for porridge.
Toast and use in salads.
Sorghum can be ground into a gluten-
free our (and can replace whole wheat
our) but it works best when blended
with other ours otherwise it tends to
create dry, gritty baking. If you do use it
on its own, you will need to experiment
by adding slightly more oil, fat or eggs to
improve the moisture and texture.
to create a breeze, then drop the seeds/
heads/debris through it onto a large
pIusIIc sheeI Ifom u heIghI oI ubouI 1m.
The air will blow away the lighter debris
and leave you with a clean pile of seeds.
If any bits of seed head are still sticking to
some grains, putting it through a soil sieve
can help.
Growing grains
TERRY grew up in Louisiana where her
father grew all the familys vegetables on
their farm. She was keen to follow in his
footsteps, albeit on a much smaller scale,
and started experimenting growing grains
in their new garden. Their harvest now
includes maize, millet, rye, oats, barley,
popcorn, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat
and sorghum.
By May the sorghum is over head
height and held up by a bamboo spiral
'coffuI`. II Is u cIose feIuIIve oI sweeI
corn with similar-looking leaves but
the difference is that the seed heads
grow on top of the plant, rather than
as ears on the sides.
Terry is very enthusiastic about
sorghum as a crop because it is so
versatile. The grain can be ground into
our for bread or popped like corn, and
the canes can also be crushed to produce
a syrup similar to that of sugar cane,
using an old laundry wringer to extract it.
Sorghum canes are also good as an animal
feed and as a carbon addition to the
compost heap or garden.
How to grow
sorghum
Terry with her sorghum
crop inside its corral.
Sorghum
seeds grow
in heads at
the top of
the plant.
34 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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CHEESE
Our second essential guide to making cheese
Volume 2
EASY STEP-BY-STEP recipes for brie, harvarti, cottage cheese,
Stilton, gruyere, gouda, gorgonzola, emmental, red and blue
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EASY STEP-BY-STEP recipes for brie, harvarti, cottage cheese,
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Cheshire, wrapped cheeses, ash cheeses and much more
Our second essential guide to making cheese
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How to use
sorghum syrup
Can be used in recipes instead of honey
(like for like).
To replace sugar, use 1/3 more sorghum
syrup than the amount of sugar in the
recipe, but decrease the amount of liquid
by the same amount.
THE STEMS of sorghum are very
much like sugar cane but easier
to suck and chew on when raw.
If you have the right pressing
equipment, it yields a juice that
can be boiled down to a syrup that is
somewhat like molasses in texture and
colour but more mild to taste, although
the avour does depend on the soil,
climate and growing conditions.
The stems are ready to harvest when
the seed plumes appear. To check, cut
a stalk off near the ground and peel off
How to make
syrup from
sorghum
the outer skin, then chew on the
green pith inside. It should taste
sweet you may want to check
over several days.
Its easiest to strip the stalks of
leaves while they are still standing
in the garden if you dont have
strong hands, use a knife then,
cut down the bare stems. If you
leave the canes to then cure in a
dry place for 3-5 days, it reduces
the amount of water you need to cook
off later in the process.
In the US they use special
sorghum cane mills to crush the
stems and extract the green juice,
but for those with a small amount,
you can put the canes through a
shredder/grinder, then use a cider
press or old laundry wringer.
Once you have the juice, you need to
get it cooking the same day or it can go off.
It rst needs to be strained to remove any
bits of stalk that remain, then cooked in
a large, wide pan (preferably outside) so
that the liquid can rst boil, then slowly
evaporate over several hours. The syrup
will form a scum on its surface that needs
to be skimmed off periodically.
Knowing when its cooked takes
practice: stop cooking too soon and you
end up with watery syrup, cook it too long
and its too thick and very strong-tasting.
Carry on boiling and skimming as
necessary until the juice has been reduced
to about an eighth of its original volume. At
this point the product is a rich brown colour
and has a molasses-sweet smell.
As the syrup becomes thicker and darker,
allow the rate of boiling to diminish by
slowing the re. Then take up some of the
hot juice in a dipper and pour it slowly
back into the pan. When it begins to form
strings or drip off the spoon in sheets, the
liquids viscosity is at the right point and the
cooking must be stopped.
Making Sorghum, Mother Earth News,
July 2011
The syrup is left to cool, then bottled
and will keep for several years.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 35
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36 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
YOUR
POULTRY
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36 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
WHY DUCKS TRUMP CHICKENS
COMING UP IN
YOUR POULTRY THIS MONTH
CorIng Ior d0cks | p37
Vho! !o do wI!h d0ck eggs | p41
D0ck breeds In NZ | p42
WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT DUCKS?
See the November issue of NZ Lifestyle Block for
7 reasons why ducks are better than chickens, or check
out a free preview on www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz
please note there are two nzs in our website.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 37
the food
I put down
for them
because
theyve
spent the
whole day chasing (and
eating) ies and for their
bodyweight I nd they dont
eat as much as chickens
anyway.
MOULTING
Ducks are exactly like chickens,
shedding a seasons worth of
feathers as the daylight hours
lessen going into autumn.
The moult on any bird is for
them to have a downtime, to replace
those feathers, says Fiona. At the
same time it corresponds with
them stopping laying so their energy
goes into growing new feathers
and not eggs.
As the daylight hours
begin to lengthen in late
winter, ducks (and chickens)
slowly start laying again although this
will depend on their age (as any bird
gets older its moulting period gets longer
and its laying period gets shorter) and the
BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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Although hens (and
ducks) enjoy picking over
supplementary scraps,
the nutritional value of
vegetable peels, fruit scraps
and stale bread is usually
fairly low. If scraps are
fed in place of a properly
balanced ration, egg
production will suffer.
Your Poultry
Why you
need the
easy-care
duck
W
hen you own as many
chickens and ducks as
Waikato poultry breeder
Fiona Taylor, you need
to have good systems in place. However,
her practices for all those birds arent that
complicated.
It doesnt matter if youve got ducks
or poultry, I treat mine very similarly.
I offer them the same pellets, they get
the same grit.
If Ive got bread scraps Ill throw those
over to the ducks. If there are fresh greens
around, theyre such good foragers theyll
often get enough goodness out of their
environment, and they wont just eat for
the sake of eating - they will turn down
food if theyve had enough during the day.
Its for this reason that during summer
and autumn, Fiona does change her
feeding habits slightly, putting out a
good quality balanced poultry feed in
the afternoon for her ducks, versus in the
morning for her chicken ocks.
Youve got to do what works for you
and you might have to feed out in the
morning, but this works for me. They have
a love of natural food and when its warm
and theres lots of nasty ies and bugs
around, I can reduce what I feed them by
half - they will refuse to eat the majority of
Feature Duck-keeping Part 2
Words Nadene Hall
NZ D0ck Imoges Marina Steinke & Chris Wuest
If you like the benets of keeping chickens,
youre going to love having ducks.
TIP
of the
MONTH
NO FLY ZON
Traditional
domestic duck
breeds naturally
cannot fly - the
ability to fly has
been bred out
of them over
hundreds of years,
so there is no
need to clip their
wings, or have
high fencing.
38 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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breed (purpose-bred laying breeds will
lay for longer periods of time than dual-
purpose or meat breeds).
BREEDING DUCKS
Keep a mix of male and female ducks and
even II Ihe IemuIes ufen`I 'bfoody` IheIf
eggs will still be fertile if they are mating
and both birds are in good condition. Fiona
takes her ducks to poultry shows in winter
and needs to get the rst eggs of the season
hatched, so she uses broody hens for their
reliability.
If I left the ducks to it, especially toward
the end of summer, they wouldnt have any
problem sitting and hatching ducklings.
But I tend to keep a ock of broodies and I
use those for whatever Im raising.
Also, if youre interested in having large
volumes of eggs, the fewer animals you
have go broody the better, as once a female
goes broody thats her out of laying for
several weeks.
Large volumes of duck eggs can be
valuable. They are keenly sought-after at
farmers markets, especially by Asian and
European-born people as its traditional to
eat duck eggs.
Duck eggs wIII seII Iof up Io $24 u Ifuy,
thats quite a premium.
If you are breeding purebreds -
something Fiona is very passionate about
as there are very few purebred lines of
ducks in NZ so every breeding opportunity
is precious - then you can have about one
male for 4-6 females.
As with poultry, you want to make sure
the fertility is good. You dont tend to get a
lot of problems with inbreeding but after
3-4 seusons you mIghI geI u new IIne In,
maybe change the male or get a couple of
new females, it depends on what youre
trying to do.
Duck eggs take slightly longer than
chIcken eggs Io huIch, ufound 28 duys vs
21 duys. Muscovys (see puge 40 Iof mofe on
Ihese 'ducks`) Iuke 3b duys.
Fiona gives her hens one or two less
duck eggs to sit on - duck eggs are slightly
bigger than chicken eggs - and always
gives her broody hens a little help when
they are sitting.
Duck eggs need slightly higher
humidity, so in the last week of sitting I
take a water spray bottle and give the nest
a light misting once a day. If you think
about how a mother duck works, she
builds a lovely nest, lays eggs that are a
little tougher, a little harder. They require
slightly more humidity and she achieves
that by soaking all of her breast feathers
(when shes swimming) then comes
back and hops onto the nest, raising the
humidity naturally.
A hen doesnt swim so in that last week,
once a day I put the hen out to have a feed
and a dust bath, then mist the top of the
A Pekin duck in the
middle of a group
of Aylesburys,
recognisable by its
orange beak, smaller
shape and more
upright posture.
FOR MORE ON DUCK EGGS,
SEE PAGE 41
A Pekin duck in the
middle of a group
of Aylesburys,
recognisable by its
orange beak, smaller
shape and more
upright posture.
Duck egg shells
will look slightly
discoloured but
are still fine to
eat in this state,
so long as you
take precautions
as for any egg.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 39
Your Poultry
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
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eggs and the hay just lightly, then she sits
back in there and voila, youve created
humidity.
If youre using an incubator its
important to follow its instructions - it
will stipulate slightly different settings
depending on the type of egg - and its best
to incubate either chicken or duck eggs,
but not both at the same time.
Duck eggs take a week longer and
theyre just a slightly different temperature
and humidity so you cant usually do a mix
of both at the same time.
Broody hens cant count but youd think
theyd notice that extra week. However,
their excellent mothering skills count for a
lot says Fiona.
Most broodies will feel, sense the eggs
developing, the eggs will begin to generate
their own heat, shell hear the little ones
scrabbling around inside the egg. Most will
generally sit very tight, they dont just head
oII uIIef Duy 21, so |usI becuuse II`s u duck
egg theyre sitting on and it hasnt hatched,
if they feel the babies are alive, theyll keep
sitting.
You can raise ducklings under a heat
lamp using the same principles as you
would for chicks, but a mother hen can
also successfully brood ducklings, to a
certain point.
The funniest thing is when you see a
mother hen with her little ducklings and
they rush over to play in a dish of water
and youll see the hen scolding them - she
wants them to have a drink because to a
chicken water is a foreign thing.
Dont supply ducklings with anywhere
unsupervised to swim until they are
shedding their down and growing their pin
feathers.
You only want to supply drinking water
until then, says Fiona. Theyre not ready
to swim and if they get tired and cant
climb out (even of a shallow dish) they will
drown - they just swim around until theyre
so exhausted their heads fall under water.
They can also get chilled.
When it is time to learn how to swim,
ducklings are naturals but need a shallow
dish to start with, with an easy way for
them to climb in and out. Mother hens
also nd this difcult to cope with and will
often patrol the swimming area, loudly
scoIdIng IheIf 'chIcks`.
By the time ducklings are about three
weeks old, theyre old enough to gradually
wean off their mothers or articial heat
sources. Keep them in a ock and raise
them separately from adult ducks until
they are young adults and have completed
their rst moult, then move them into your
main duck pen.
For the rst few days the young ones
will sit in the paddock on their own but
theyll slowly integrate into the main ock.
Its not that they get picked on, its more
IIke 'whou, who ufe Ihey`"
If youre using an incubator, its important to follow its
instructions for duck eggs which require higher humidity.
You can successfully
hatch ducklings in an
incubator and brood
them under a heat
lamp as for chicks.
40 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
ways
3
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When is a duck
not a duck?
IT LOOKS like a duck and its called
a duck but technically the Muscovy is
a member of the goose family. Its eggs
take longer to hatch - 35 days - and the
breed is primarily a grazer, eating a lot of
grass in comparison to ducks that prefer
higher protein feed like poultry feed,
insects, worms and snails.
Muscovies will also y away, unlike
domestic breeds of duck which naturally
cant y (wild duck breeds like Mallards
can y).
Muscovy males tend to be twice the
size of females, versus domestic ducks
which have similar-sized males and
females.
They are included in the poultry
clubs duck section but they are actually
domesticated water fowl and theyre very,
very different to all other breeds, says
Fiona Taylor. The male is a very powerful
bird and it can be a bit intimidating to
small children. If youve got toddlers, just
keep an eye on your Muscovys and geese,
they have big, powerful wings.
Goose egg Duck egg Chicken egg
Duck feet are
shaped like
paddles, so
they cant
dig holes like
chickens.
ducks are different
to chickens
1
FEET
A duck has feet shaped like a paddle
so it cant scratch like a chicken. This
is why ducks are great in the garden as
they use their bill to sift through plant
material, making them less likely to pull
out even small plants. Theres another
bonus says Fiona Taylor.
You dont get dust-bathing hollows!
2
PHYSIOLOGY
A chicken has a weak neck and
strong legs, but a duck is the
opposite says Fiona.
When people handle chickens, we
pick them up by the legs, but ducks have
quite weak legs and necks that are very
strong so you dont want to run the legs
off them or chase them, its too stressful
for them.
3
HATCHING
Ducks Iend Io go 'bfoody` und
nest later in the year than hens,
so Fiona nds it easier to get her team
of reliable broody hens to hatch out
duck eggs so she gets them early in the
season. A duck egg takes longer to hatch
and requires higher humidity - Fiona
uses a spray bottle to give duck eggs
under a broody hen a light misting daily
in the nal week but broody hens are
amazing mums, listening out for their
little charges and staying put until the
eggs hatch.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 41
Just yolking
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Your Poultry
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
D
uck eggs are slightly bigger than
your average hens egg, about
30% heuvIef, weIghIng In uI ubouI
70g on uvefuge vefsus ufound b0g Iof u
hen. The shells are much thicker and they
tend to be grey to off-white, but are often
discoloured because a ducks feathers and
feet may be slightly dirtier.
Dont be put off by this though. So long
as the egg is fresh and laid in a clean nest
by a healthy duck, and collected within
a few hours of being laid, then stored in
your fridge, it will be safe to eat. Dont eat
any that are excessively dirty, cracked or
that have been in a hot place for too long.
Duck eggs stored in your fridge last
longer than chicken eggs thanks to their
thicker shell, staying useable for up to six
weeks. They are slightly harder to crack
though.
COOKING WITH DUCK EGGS
Bakers love duck eggs. Their higher fat
and protein levels mean cakes made with
duck eggs tend to be lighter, ufer, rise
higher, stay moist for longer and have a
better texture. Taste is subjective but most
people note things like a richer avour
rather than a taste that they dont like.
You can use duck eggs for any recipe
that uses chicken eggs if you take a few
things into account:

Replace chicken eggs for duck eggs by
weight. For example, if a recipe calls for ve
chIcken eggs (b3-60g euch, IoIuI 2b0g), you
wouId use 3-4 duck eggs (70g of so, IoIuI
2b0g). The numbef oI duck eggs you use
will depend on their weight as some breeds
lay heavier eggs than others so check
before you add them to a recipe mix.

A duck egg is also slightly harder to whip
up at rst if youre making meringues or
pavlova because of the thicker albumen,
but keep at it and once they froth, they do
get there.

They can go rubbery if overcooked so be
careful when frying them, and note you
will not need to cook them as long as you
would for a chicken egg.

If you want a beautiful ice cream or
custard, the higher fat and protein makes
for a much richer end result.

For some amazing recipes using duck
eggs, try this site:
http://foodgawker.com/tag/duck-egg/
Duck
Chicken
42 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
SILVER APPLEYARD
Colour: silver-grey and
brown feathers with
basic Mallard pattern
Origin: England
Type: dual-purpose
(eggs, meat)
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D0ck breeds In NZ
T
raditional domestic duck breeds are
rare in New Zealand so you will have
to hunt around to nd breeders in your
area, or a supplier of fertile eggs. Talk to
your local poultry club, and check out
the duck breeders directory of the Rare
Breeds Conservation Society of NZ.
If you want ducks for eggs, duck
breeder Fiona Taylor recommends
concentrating on Khaki Campbells and
Indian Runners.
They can out-lay a lot of hens no
problems at all if you get one from a good
IuyIng sIfuIn - ovef 200 eggs u yeuf. WhuI
CAYUGA
Colour: metallic green-
black with lustrous
feathers (also known
as beetle-green)
Origin: USA
Type: dual-purpose
(eggs, meat)
MAGPIE
Colour: black and white, blue and
white (very rare)
Origin: Wales
Type: dual-purpose (eggs, meat)
AYLESBURY
Colour: white glossy
feathers, orange legs,
pink-white bill
Origin: Aylesbury,
England
Type: heavy, meat
PEKIN
Colour: Creamy-
white, bright orange
bill, legs and feet
Origin: China
Type: heavy (meat)
I like is theyre a good size, theyve got
that sturdier, more robust shell, and you
get quite a large yolk in proportion to
the white - youll generally nd the old
farmers wifes sponge recipe always used
duck eggs so they could get that good
colour.
MEAT BREEDS
Pekins have a bigger, heavier body with a
big carcase and are great if you want to eat
your ducks. The Rouen is a utility breed, a
good layer and offers a good meat carcase
as well.
CRESTED
Colour: various
Origin: UK, Holland
Type: heavy
Note: very rare in NZ
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 43
Your Poultry
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
KHAKI CAMPBELL
Colour: females are a warm
khaki-brown colour, males
have a greenish-bronze
head and wing bars.
Origin: Gloucestershire,
England
Type: light, layer
BLUE SWEDISH
Colour: slate blue,
white blotch on throat
and upper breast
Origin: Sweden
Type: heavy, meat
FOR MORE INFO
www.waikatopoultryandpigeonclub.com
www.nzpoultryassociationsinc.co.nz
www.rarebreeds.co.nz/ducks.html
OTHER BREEDS
Orpington: various colours
including buff (red-gold), heavy
breed bred from Indian Runner,
Aylesbury and Rouens.
Rouen: French breed, comes in
two sizes, large and small, looks
similar to a Mallard but cant fly.
Welsh Harlequin: very pretty,
developed from the Khaki
Campbell, Mallard colour pattern
but variety of fawn, cream,
browns and black feathering.
INDIAN
RUNNER
Colour: various,
originally white
or fawn
Origin: Indonesia
Type: light, layer
Khaki
Campbell
female
Khaki
Campbell
male
Ph 03 325 1236
www.chookmanor.co.nz
Stockists of quality poultry products:
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Poultry feeder & drinker systems
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44 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer 44 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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SELF
SUFFICIENCY
HOW TO CREATE THE GOOD LIFE ON YOUR BLOCK
SELF
SUFFICIENCY
HOW TO CREATE THE GOOD LIFE ON YOUR BLOCK
COMING UP IN SELF SUFFICIENCY THIS MONTH COMING UP IN SELF SUFFICIENCY THIS MONTH
Christmas crafts | pg 45
Dress up your salads | pg 46
Housing in a crisis | pg 48
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 45
Farmhouse Kitchen
I

write my columns many months
ahead of the actual publishing date.
For a food writer it means making
sure that seasonal items are available
when a recipe is actually published.
This can cause problems and become
very expensive if you want to source
ingredients that are out of season to test
your recipes over and over, as I do.
I now research and practice recipes
nearly a year ahead of when they will
be required so that I can make and
photograph food and put it in my text and
photo library. This requires organisation,
and many a time my family have to wait
for dinner while I hastily set up a tripod
and camera before they can eat.
As I wrote this column, I was looking
after my grandchildren for three weeks
while their parents were overseas. It might
have been months before Christmas but it
was a great time for us to get things ready.
This year I wanted to try some edible
Christmas decorations. I have some
cookie cutter shapes that are ideal for
crispy biscuits in various avours and the
kids got to enjoy a trial run with coloured
icings and decorations.
Vanilla, chocolate or cinnamon-spiced
biscuits for a sweet treat and parmesan
and herb crackers for the savoury lovers
are a good mix, and cut into pretty shapes
and hung with ribbons from the tree they
look festive too.
The kids got to practice making some
special gifts for Mum and Dad that we
will actually re-do in the week before
Christmas but they decorated the boxes
ready to house their home-made goodies.
Everyone should have a plain cookie
dough recipe that the kids can decorate
for Easter or Valentine gifts or to hang on
the Christmas tree. You can also make
alphabet shapes for birthday parties and
children can take their own initials from a
board or tree as part of a game.
ThIs dough cun be |uzzed up wIIh 1
tbsp of cocoa to make chocolate cookies,
1 Isp oI gfound gIngef Io muke gIngef
cookies, tsp cinnamon for a sweet A
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Jeans tips
IF YOU are in a hurry, roll out a
sheet of shop-bought sweet short
pastry and cut out the shapes.
Decorate with icing and smarties or
chocolate hail. Shake the biscuits
off well or all the sweet decorative
bits will drop off and make a mess
around the tree.
SILVER cachous, hundreds
and thousands, chocolate chips,
marzipan and/or multi-coloured
icings can all be used as toppings
on the biscuits to brighten the tree.
CAKE decorating supply houses
have a huge range of items that
the kids will love.
ChristmasEDIBLES
A simple biscuit recipe can turn your Christmas tree into something sweet.
JEAN MANSFIELD
spicy taste, or tsp of cardamom to give
it some spice. You can colour the mix if
you dont want to ice them, or create a
rainbow of colour by splitting the mixture
into three (red, green, chocolate). The
biscuits will keep in an airtight container
for two weeks so you can make them well
ahead of time.
If you want to make gifts, place 4-5
biscuits in a cellophane bag and tie with
festive ribbon.
NEVER FAIL
CHRISTMAS BISCUITS
Preparation 15 minutes
Chilling time 30 minutes
Cooking time 15 minutes
125g butter
1 cup caster sugar
1 egg
2 tsp milk
2 cups plain our
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp vanilla essence
Cream butter and sugar until light
and uffy, then beat in egg and
milk. Sift our and baking powder
and stir into mix, then knead on a
clean bench until smooth. Place in a
bowl covered with plastic wrap and
feIfIgefuIe Iof uI IeusI 30 mInuIes.
PfeheuI oven Io 180C. IIouf Ihe
bench and roll out the dough to
5mm thick the dough may be a
little stiff to begin with but loosens
up as you roll it. Use biscuit cutters
to cut shapes. If you want to hang
the biscuits on a tree, cut a hole
with the end of a plastic drinking
straw at the top of the biscuit before
baking. Dont go too far to the edge
as it will break off when you thread
the ribbon through the hole. Place
shapes on baking paper on a tray
und buke Iof 1b mInuIes of unIII
golden brown. Leave on tray to cool.
If you have forgotten to cut a small
hole for the ribbon, now is the time
to use a skewer and put the hole
in I have forgotten this part many
times. Ice and decorate.
ICING
1 cup icing sugar
1 tsp butter
Vanilla essence
Drop of colouring of choice
Spoon u IIIIIe boIIIng wuIef (1 Isp
or so) over the other ingredients
and mix well until the butter has
been absorbed. Spoon into a small
resealable bag, then cut off a little
corner of it and use it as a piping bag.
Children can pipe their names on to
the biscuits to personalise them.
46 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
DIY Food: Salad dressings
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W
e all know about those
bold and sassy salad
dressings that hit you
hard in sweet and sour
places. Strong statements on the taste
front perhaps but such a dressing can
distract your palate from the subtle
nuances of the vegetables that make up
the dish. Maybe you have experienced
a salad suffering from what I call the
limp and oppys? This is where oil and/
or vinegar has completely saturated the
greens leaving them with a texture not
unlike plastic wrap.
You might get the impression that
creating a good salad dressing is
something only a master chef should
tackle, but it is not a secret realm.
All it takes is mastering a simple yet
satisfactory base and experimenting
from there.
This is a basic vinaigrette recipe and
the base for all the recipes in this article.
Vinaigrette has one rule: 3 parts oil,
1 part vinegar or citrus juice.
46 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Dressing up
your greens
Dressing up
your greens
Whether you like to dress up or
dress down, there is an analogy
here for salad creators.
KRISTINA JENSEN
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 47
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1
LIME & GINGER
Replace lemon juice in
basic recipe with lime juice.
Add 2 tbsp sweet chili sauce
and 1 tsp freshly grated ginger.
2
HONEY MUSTARD
Add 1 tbsp liquid honey and 1 tbsp
wholegrain mustard.
3
LEMON PEPPER & MINT
Add cup Greek yoghurt, 1 tbsp chopped
mint, the zest of a lemon and tsp of white
pepper.
4
CHILLI ORANGE
Add 1 garlic clove (crushed), the juice
of 1 orange, tsp chili powder, tsp cumin
powder, 1 tbsp hot English mustard and 1 tbsp
honey.
5
BALSAMIC PESTO
Add 2 tbsp basil pesto, 1 tbsp balsamic
vinegar and 1 tsp liquid honey.
6
SESAME CHIVE
Add 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
and 1 tbsp finely chopped chives.
7
HERBAL DELIGHT
Replace lemon juice in basic recipe with
cider vinegar. Add 3 tbsp finely chopped
mixed fresh herbs like parsley, mint, coriander,
chives, oregano, marjoram, thyme or sage.
8
PARMESAN ROCKET
Add 1 tbsp grated Parmesan, 2 cloves of
garlic (crushed) and 2-3 tbsp finely chopped
rocket leaves.
9
CURRIED YOGHURT
This is best made fresh and in the blender
as it tends to curdle otherwise. Add cup
unsweetened yoghurt, 1 tsp curry powder
and 2 tbsp freshly squeezed orange juice.
10
TOMATO & RED WINE VINEGAR
Replace lemon juice in basic recipe
with cup of red wine vinegar. Add 1 clove
of garlic (crushed), 1 tsp paprika and either
2 fresh tomatoes, peeled and de-seeded
OR 1 tsp of tomato paste.
10
Honey Mustard
Vinaigrette.
great ways to
dress your salad
These simple, tasty dressings make for a gourmet salad experience.
After mastering the art of the basic recipe, you can start to create
your own unique combinations, or try these ones:
KRISTINAS TIPS

As long as you stick to the basic


recipe, you dont have to hold back
if you are a person who likes a bit
more of a zing to your dressing.
Add more vinegar or citrus juice.

Different types of oils make a


huge difference to the taste, and
sometimes texture, of your dressing.
If you like to experiment, try
adding more creative ingredients
including fruit pulp, roasted nuts,
toasted sesame oil, mashed
avocado, maple syrup, olives,
anchovies, capers or fresh chilli.
2
4
8
10
6
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 47
BASIC VINAIGRETTE
cup of good quality olive oil
(sunower oil works well too)
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp wine vinegar
tsp salt

tsp freshly ground pepper
On its own, this quick and simple
vinaigrette goes very well with
freshly-picked greens, or you can
expand the basic recipe with just a
small stretch of the imagination. The
recipes I have included here each
represent a unique taste explosion.
By adding fresh herbs, different
types of mustard, yoghurt, honey or
even wine vinegar to the base, you
can create all sorts of interesting
avours for your favourite salads.
I like to use a blender to make
larger quantities of a dressing but a
wand or food processor will do just
as well, or a basic vinaigrette can be
all shook up in a few seconds in a
handy jar or bottle.
Most salad dressings keep in the
refrigerator for up to a week so if
you are planning a large function
or have a house full of guests, make
up a double batch so that its always
on hand. This way, the avours also
have longer to mix and mingle,
producing a smooth, rounded
dressing where no one ingredient
necessarily dominates another.
Specialty salad dressings also
make terric gifts, especially at
short notice. A salad dressing in an
attractive glass bottle is eye catching
and appealing. The ingredients will
separate somewhat over time but
a quick shake will encourage them
to merge and lift your taste-buds to
new levels of salad satisfaction.
48 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Going up
The Good Life
So we have a housing
crisis, right? But is that
the right question asks
Murray Grimwood.
MURRAY GRIMWOOD
48 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
H
ousing affordability is the
major issue that the next
election will be fought on,
apparently.
There are calls from otherwise
intelligent-sounding people to increase
the land supply, mutterings about council
restrictions and the dratted land bankers,
about rst-home buyers, and productivity
in the building industry.
Sometimes when things get
complicated, an analogy helps, so try this
one.
TITANIC PRESS NEWSFLASH!
We have a deckchair crisis. There are calls
to increase the usable deck space. The
crew are stopping steerage passengers
getting access to the deck. First-class
passengers are hogging it for themselves.
They arent building deckchairs fast/
cheap enough.
You can see what is wrong with that
story. Nobody is tracking the reduction
in deck space still above water or the fact
that there are too many people on the ship
or what tomorrow will bring.
Recently a team of number-crunchers
sent Government ministers a report into
productivity in the building sector. As
with much of the earlier Productivity
Commissions housing report, it failed to
question what is really happening. To me
it was just another attempt by an ideology
which worked until it didnt, asking the
wrong questions, or is that the right
questions for the wrong reasons?
WHAT IS PRODUCTIVITY?
Lets start with trying to dene a word
thrown around casually and often:
productivity. Productivity relates inputs to
outputs, no more, no less.
Think of it in terms of your chicken
ock. The short term inputs are mash,
wheat, water, grit, the long term inputs are
the chicken coop materials, mesh, feeders
etc. Outputs are eggs, meat and manure. S
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 49
Ride On Mower Lift
LTD
www.ezyup.co.nz
email: angela@ezyup.co.nz
021 267 0007
The piece of equipment you
need to clean and maintain
your Ride On Mower
Maximum wheel track 105cm
Maximum load bearing 550kg
Folds fat for easy storage
$
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nationw
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chook is a chook and an egg is an egg is
an egg.
Now apply that to the building
industry, which according to the
Productivity Commission has low
productivity. When I was a wee chap
builders still cycled to work, used
hammers, had a treasured collection of
hand saws, hand chisels, hand planes
and so on. Now they turn up in their
utes with their nail-guns, and power-
driven everything else. I suggest that
the move from a hammer to a nail-gun,
was the big productivity gain the best
way to speed up nailing but now its
been done, how can you do it better?
Automatic re? Robots? Self-nailing
timber? Its hard to see any move in
nailing terms which could outdo the
quantum leap of the nail-gun.
However, there can be unintended
spin-off costs. Take the nail-gun: in the
old days, a carpenter put four 4 nails
into each nog (dwang). You could safely
climb such a structure, and Ive spent
time with my knee over old nogs, foot
locked under the ones below, working
in perfect safety.
But the nails used in nail-guns are
shorter and thinner and (from personal
observation) can often not be as well-
placed. Timber too is softer - weve
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Address:...............................................
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Grow Fruit with
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Arc you inrcrcsrcu in rrccs,
pro uuc ing fruir, nurs, lcc foou
anu spccialry rimlcrs?
!ZTCA Wclsirc
www.treecrops.org.nz
Tree Crops
Association
Now its
been done,
how can
you do it
better?
So what can we do to increase our
productivity? Make sure sparrows dont
pirate the feed, maximise the light our
birds get, keep them healthy, and run a
breeding programme with our heads more
than our hearts.
Youd tackle the easiest things rst,
the ones promising the best return.
Clearly, the more you have done, the less
there will be to do and the less useful
it will be. Eventually, it wont be worth
changing anything and it will be an
optimised chicken run. Anyone looking
to implement an endless programme
of increasing improvements is doomed
to disappointment because a chook is a
50 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer

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cherry-picked the heart rimu and now
were using fast growing pine, another of
those processes which cannot possibly get
better. All of a sudden a nog is no longer
a safe ladder-rung and a carpenter needs
scaffolding, an unintended cost.
There is also a decreasing
productivity trend in comparison to
past performance, says the Productivity
Commission. What else did they expect?
These folk - Im guessing they all studied
Economics - seem to expect quantum
gains to continue or even increase, but it
was never going to happen.
The next magic elixir is apparently
robotics and 3D printing and Im listening
to an enthusiastic Professor Olaf Diegel
talking of these to Radio NZs Kathryn
Ryan as I write this. Dont get me wrong,
Im a techno-nut, I love clever engineering
and innovative thinking, but no amount
of robotic person-replacement can
alter the energy required to raise a ton
of concrete hundreds of vertical metres
into a hill suburb, or alter the fact that
a ton represents a ton of emitted CO2.
Ultimately, no construction method will
ever eliminate the need for raw materials
in the rst place.
The other thing this particular market
study wants to investigate is pricing, both
of materials and contracting. Fair enough,
gouging and monopolies are what you
get in an unfettered market. But with
materials weve done that cherry-picking
thing too. First we went for the closest/
cheapest, then for the most available
economies of scale. We chopped the local/
easy rimu, kauri, miro, totora, then the
distant/hard rimu, kauri, miro, totora,
then moved onto planting vast forests of
fast-growing cardboard (sorry, pine).
All that harvesting, transporting,
some of the processing, and all the re-
transporting, involves using fossil fuels.
I recently saw 100x50mm timber, H3
treated for $1.30 a metre, proof positive
that real costs are well screwed down.
Id argue that they are too far down
to properly reect the draw-down of
Natural Capital (like forest soil
degradation) involved. How
can you grow, chop, shift, saw,
shift again, then retail that piece
of timber for so little? By not
factoring in real depletion costs,
is how. It cant last.
Another question about cost
of materials is social, rather
than to do with drawing-down from
the physical world. More and more we
expect things to be cheap, and much
of the cheapness is because someone,
conveniently somewhere else, is paid
diddly-squat. It would be nice to think we
could pay those folk wages like our own,
but it would only be at the expense of
ourselves and it seems we dont have the
collective will to do that for someone we
dont know.
Seems? Seemed, is more the word. The
simple fact is that if all those on minimal
wages globally-speaking had the
purchasing power we have, the planet
could no longer supply the materials.
Taking social instincts out of that
picture, then over-demand will still drive
up prices and weve seen the bottom of
the curve.
Adding to costs is the increasing
number of folk who expect to be paid for
their exclusively-held right to do some
of your build. It used to be a builder could
draw and build a house from go-to-whoa,
and you could too. No more. Those folk all
expect to buy themselves houses too, so
they expect to charge a house-relative slice
of your cake. I suspect this is a political
hot-potato its votes which count and that
those who live off the industry will always,
at any given moment, outnumber those
who are building, although if enough
young folk cant get their feet in a
door, who knows?
Demographics are the quoted
driver of housing demand. Auckland
Council projects recent graphs
indenitely into the future but
without reference to other inuences.
We have a baby-boomer bulge who
are getting older, and a dwindling birth-
rate. Two families could live in most houses
of the recent era and still have more oor-
space apiece than their ancestors, let alone
many folk around the world currently. Stop
immigration, let demographics play out,
and do we have a long-term shortage? The
answer is no.
Interestingly, one of the things that
pretty much all commentators fail to
address is whether incomes will can
continue at present levels. Given that
income is half the affordability question,
thats a media fail, big-time. Still,
dwindling real income (real ability to buy
real stuff ) can be masked by ination or
debt-forgiveness. The houses will still exist!
Who owns them at the end of the day is the
moot point, along with whether they are
future-appropriate.
NEXT MONTH: What can we do about
housing affordability?
Were not
factoring
in real
depletion
costs. It
cant last.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 51
therefore have a vested interest in the
trashing of the planet, illogic taken to its
logical conclusion. Until they work out
how to conduct their business without the
need to advertise processed parts of the
planet, theyre part of the problem. Until
we voters realise that the media are part of
the problem and do our own thinking, we
will vote for continuance of the
problem.
On the other side of the coin,
increasing austerity will force
many councils in the right
direction, even if they have a
majority of wrong-thinkers
around their tables. My own
local council in Dunedin will never re-visit
the debt incurrence they recently choked
on. Increasingly, they have enlightened
policies in place to do with transport,
energy, resilience, food, all good stuff.
Trouble is, they also have an economic
growth strategy. Cognitively dissonant
that is, and theres a lot of it about. One
wonders whether its a growing problem
knowing or just a knowing problem
growing?
Time to bah the humbug, methinks.
we expect from news-suppliers but
who obstinately refuse to investigate
or publish. If a newspaper opines
that growth is good/needed while
simultaneously binning the ip-side
of the argument, it does its readers a
disservice. If it then surveys those same
readers, nds they are (unsurprisingly,
given what theyve just been told)
optimistic, and extrapolates the survey to
prove that growth will indeed happen, you
have a self-supporting piece of nonsense.
That same media-produced nonsense,
having told the good folk what to think,
skews what the voters vote for. If you
arent told that there are physical limits
to growth, if you arent told that your
accounting system fails to
account for your long term life-
support properly, youll vote for
growth and awed accounting.
Its that simple.
Ive been taking it to the
media with increasing force
and diminishing politeness for
a wee while now. You wont have noticed
any results and I have yet to notice any
rebuttal from them, yet day in and day
out we get an economist said . as if
economists were some kind of Delphic
Oracle. Day in, day out we get the
economy taken as a given, and GDP is
the assumed Holy Grail, unquestioned,
unchallenged, undebated. Unbelieveable!
Maybe Im being too harsh. The current
system is what is trashing the planet, the
media are part of the current system and E
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Thoughts from a
grumpy old man
GDP is
unquestioned,
unchallenged,
undebated.
Unbelieveable!
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W
atching the Local Body
elections recently, I couldnt
help being amazed that yet
again we arent addressing the big issues.
Its all about the economy, about jobs and
growth, all shown in air-brushed adverts,
on bland bill-boards, and via meaningless
one-liners.
The media, who should be asking
the hard questions? Forget it. They fall
for it too, making assumptions all over
the place that growth is (a) possible, (b)
desirable, (c) consequenceless.
So for yet another cycle we have a mix
of councillors appropriate for yesterday. If
they are appropriate for tomorrow, itll be
by chance. When I was younger, I thought
wed never leave it this late to change.
Heck, I got onto a council myself (in 1986
when I was 31) to help effect the change.
It didnt happen, and actually that was the
time things stared to go backwards faster.
In hindsight, I shouldnt have been
surprised. Even if you know about
exponential growth, it still leaves you
blind-sided when it takes off. Even when
you know a nite planet cant be dug into
forever, you are still stuck with being part
of the society doing the digging.
The surprise for me has been the
vehemence with which folk have denied
that there are limits, the number of
people doing the denying, and their
unwillingness to question their faith.
My biggest beef is with the media
who purport to purvey to you something
understood to be the truth its what
52 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Its the busiest time of year for beekeepers, especially
if you want to keep your honeys oral lines pure.
Words Gary Jeffrey
Feature Bees on the Block
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Bees
getting busy
52 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 53
H
opefully December has
arrived bright and sunny
with little wind, warm
temperatures and a lot of
owers for your bees.
In many parts of New Zealand white
clover is the main honey source at this
time of year, although if you live near
native bush or scrub land there are other
trees and shrubs your bees can work like
kamahi. Manuka and kanuka can also
start to ower during this period, so you
often need to remove one type of honey
as the bees start to move onto another
one if you want pure oral lines, although
a mixed ower honey often is very nice.
Pohutukawa are in full ower in
December and can give good crops of
very nice white honey, but it has to be
extracted and pottled up as soon as the
super is full or it will granulate in the
comb or container.
If you are in areas where rape or some
of the other brassicas are grown, the
resulting honey will be watery and white
with a mild avour. I mention it
because rape honey granulates
quickly, often in the combs, so
extract it as soon as you can,
and preferably clean out
the combs before the next
honeyow or it will trigger
the new honey to also
granulate. Rape honey is not suitable for
comb honey because of this granulation.
If you only have a few hives, how do you
extract your crop? If you are a member
of a local hobbyist club, they might
have a small extractor you can borrow,
but otherwise you will have to use Kiwi
Ingenuity.
If you have used new comb foundation
you can just eat the honey with the comb
- it will have the best avour - but its best
if you use a thin foundation to reduce the
amount of wax on your bread.
Apart from comb honey, you might
want to separate the wax from the honey
to avoid the crunchy peanut butter-like
texture when eating bread with this honey
on it. You can scrape the honey comb
down to the midrib using the curved end
of your hive tool and collect the waxy
honey mixture in a container. You should
have thicker wax foundation in your
combs or perhaps plastic frames for this
to be successful as otherwise it is easy to
make holes through the centre. The bees
will patch up the holes, if not
too big, when you put it
back in for more honey.
We use this method for
our manuka honey
and then use a juice
press to separate the
honey from the wax.
GARYS TIP
Comb honey will
keep indefinitely in
your deep freeze
and will remain liquid
while there.
C
omb honey is at greatest
risk for tutin poisoning
as it concentrates the
poison. Check with your local
Apicultural Beekeeping Officer
if you are in an at-risk area.
If you are, avoid any honey
gathered by your bees after
December.
Tutu (Coriaria arborea) is a
native bush found throughout
New Zealand, particularly
along stream banks and in
regenerating native bush. Vine
hopper insects (Scolypopa
sp) feed on the sap of the
tutu plant and produce
honeydew containing tutin
and hyenanchin. Toxic honey
is produced as a result of bees
gathering this honeydew.
A number of Coriaria
species are present in
New Zealand and known to
contain tutin. It is not clear
whether Coriaria arborea is
the only species that suffers
vine hopper infestation to a
point where toxic honeydew
is available for collection
by bees.
tutu area?
ARE YOU IN A
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 53
Pohutukawa are in full flower
in December and can give good
crops of very nice white honey.
54 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
trying to get into your house. If robbing
does start, it is best to stop for the day and
clean up all signs of honey/wax etc, and
leave honey processing for another day.
If the honey ow is still in progress, the
bees will ignore your extracting and you
will not have any problems. This is why its
best to extract as much of your crop early
in the season before robbing starts. The
added benet is if you can get extracted
combs back on your hives, you might get
a second crop as bees like working
extracted combs.

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Next, arrange to tip the mixture into
a suitable-sized mesh bag suspended
over an open container and let the honey
drip out. After a while, it can be squeezed
or tightened by screwing the bag to get
the maximum amount of honey out of
the mixture.
In the evening when bee activity has
stopped, the bag can be opened up
inside an empty super on top of a strong
hive, perhaps on top of a board with an
opening, for the bees to reach the top box.
The bees will collect the honey from the
remaining mixture leaving you with dry
wax that can be put into your deep freeze
and eventually sold or exchanged for
comb foundation when enough
F
ruit trees, particularly
pears, face
competition from willow
trees in spring and it
can be difficult to attract
bees.
One trick is to make
up a dilute sugar syrup
mixture (not honey)
and dip some of the
branches of flowers into
the syrup, or perhaps
spray some syrup onto
some of the flowers.
The bees should find
the syrup and a few
will leave the willows
to pollinate the pear
or other types of fruit
blossom if bees are
working other types
of flower.
has accumulated.
Do not put the capping
wax outside for the bees
to clean up. First, it could spread disease
if you have overlooked it while removing
your crop. Secondly, you will have upset
neighbours because local bees will be
searching all over the place for honey
including inside your neighbours houses.
Likewise, when extracting after the
honey ow has nished, it is best to
extract your crop in the evenings after
the bees stop ying. If done during the
day, if a bee does get inside, be mean and
dont let it outside again or it will tell all its
friends where the honey is and you could
be overwhelmed with thousands of bees
PLENTY OF BEES BUT
FRUIT TREES NOT
PROPERLY POLLINATED?
GARYS TIP
A cold wet day is
ideal for extracting
your honey crop as
it will keep the bees
from nosing around
your house.
Pear tree
A honey extractor.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 55
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I
t is a legal requirement in New
Zealand for all beekeepers and
the location of their apiaries to be
registered. AsureQuality maintains
an apiary database on behalf of the
Management Agency for the American
Foulbrood Strategy with information on
over 2700 beekeepers, 21,700 apiaries and
368,000 hives.
Apiaries are geo-referenced (ie, have a
grid reference), which allows planning of
detailed disease surveys and location of
apiaries for hive inspection. The register
is used to co-ordinate and manage
inspection and sampling programmes for
both the endemic American Foulbrood
disease and suspected bee disease, as well
as clear apiaries for the export of live bees
and products.
To register as a new beekeeper or to
register new apiaries, call AsureQuality
free on 0508 00 11 22.
DISEASE CONTROL
IN APIARIES
All hives must be inspected annually by an
Approved Beekeeper for the presence of a
serious bacterial disease called American
Foulbrood or AFB (Paenibacillus larvae
subspecies larvae).
To become approved a beekeeper
must pass a competency test in American
IF YOU HAVE BEES,
YOU have TO DO THIS
Foulbrood recognition and control and
have a Disease Elimination Conformity
Agreement (DECA) approved by
AsureQuality Limited. If a beekeeper is
not Approved then they must engage an
Approved Beekeeper to inspect their hives
and report on the inspection.
Any case of American Foulbrood
disease must be reported and the hive
and bees destroyed within seven days of
discovery. Beekeepers must also furnish
a return each year updating all apiary
records and stating that their hives have
been inspected.
If you have beehives
their location must be registered.
56 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
American Foulbrood
Photo: Tanarus, Wikimedia Commons
Burning of hive infected with AFB.
Photo: Tanarus, Wikimedia Commons
Diseased tissue
caused by AFB
creates a brown,
ropey looking
substance when
stirred.
6 SIGNS OF
AMERICAN
FOULBROOD
1
CHANGE IN APPEARANCE
OF CELL CAPPINGS
The rst observable symptom of AFB
is usually a change in the appearance
of cell cappings. Healthy cappings are
raised in shape and range in colour
from light to dark brown. Cappings
covering infected cells will initially be
the same colour as the uninfected cells
surrounding them but will eventually
become darker in colour until they
appear black. Infected cells also develop
a moist, almost greasy appearance and
become sunken.
Source: American Foulbrood Pest Management Strategy, www.afb.org.nz
The ropiness test, using a small
stick, to diagnose AFB.
The ropiness test, using a small
stick, to diagnose AFB.
The ropiness test, using a small
stick, to diagnose AFB.
The ropiness test, using a small
stick, to diagnose AFB.
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 57
Le Grande Garage:
$1,350 + GST
Cars, Boats, Little animal shelter,
Workshop.
6m 40 Shelter:
$3,850 + GST
Farm Machinery, Storage.
Two Car Garage:
$2,425 + GST
Cars, Boats, Storage, Construction
Sites.
RV Shelter:
$3,250 + GST
Motorhomes, Caravans, Tractors,
Equipment.
2
HOLES IN THE CAPPING
Worker bees will chew holes in
the capping before removing the
contents of the cell and these will have a
more irregular appearance compared to the
holes they chew in healthy cells.
3
SPOTTY-LOOKING
BROOD
Because larvae infected with AFB
fail to emerge, infected cells are often
surrounded by empty cells or by younger,
healthy larvae. As a result, the brood in a
colony with a heavy AFB infection often
takes on a spotty pattern.
4
CHANGES TO LOOK
OF PUPAE & LARVAE
Healthy larvae and freshly capped
pupae are pearly white in colour. Infected
larvae and pupae change from pearly white
to a brown colour resembling coffee with
milk. The distinctive coffee-brown colour
is often considered a denitive symptom
of AFB, although brownish-coloured larvae
can sometimes be found that have died
from causes other than AFB.
Healthy larvae and pupae are
characteristically plump in shape. In
healthy larvae at the prepupal stage,
the circular lines of segmentation are
clearly visible and the shape of all of
the external body parts can be seen.
When an AFB infection occurs, the rst
symptom is often a slight change in the
colour of the prepupae or pupae. As
the infection develops and the brood
tissues are consumed, the remains
slump down onto the lower wall of the
cell. In diseased larvae in the prepupal
stage, the lines of segmentation can no
longer be determined easily. In diseased
pupae, the body parts lose most of
their characteristic shape, although the
tongue remains upright and prominent.
5
FOUL SMELL
Larvae and pupae infected with
AFB can exhibit a characteristic
foul smell similar to dead sh (foul
brood) but smell should not be relied
upon to determine the presence or
absence of AFB.
6
ROPINESS IN
THE CELLS
Larvae and pupae infected with
AFB display a characteristic ropiness
when a small stick is used to slightly stir
the diseased tissue in the cell and then
the stick is slowly removed. The ropiness
is thought to be caused by the presence of
long chains of the vegetative stage of AFB
bacteria intertwining and producing an
elastic, binding effect. The ropiness test
is a common technique used to diagnose
American Foulbrood. D
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58 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
GROWING
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58 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Soy bean plant
December
BERRIES, BASIL, BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND A DASH OF THE TROPICS
COMING UP IN GROWING THIS MONTH
Ge! go0r '8' pIon!s In !he gro0nd | p60
R00d sees red | p62
CeIebro!e o berrg merrg ChrIs!mos | p64
4 pIon!s !ho! wIII sove go0 Irom sprogIng | p68
How !o grow s!rowberrg g0ovos | p71
GROWING
December
BERRIES, BASIL, BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND A DASH OF THE TROPICS
COMING UP IN GROWING THIS MONTH
Get your B plants in the ground | p60
Ruud sees red | p62
Celebrate a berry merry Christmas | p64
4 plants that will save you from spraying | p68
How to grow strawberry guavas | p71
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 59
Garden Diary
FOR DECEMBER
Garden work
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Plant out annuals to fill any gaps
and provide ongoing colour once the
first spring flush is over in the garden.

Feed lilies as they approach
flowering time.

De-head spent flowers throughout
the garden to encourage continued
blooming.

Keep all plants, both ornamental
and edible, growing steadily as the
weather continues to warm with the
application of liquid fertiliser or a few
handfuls of compost, aged manure or
blood and bone.

Make liquid fertiliser by adding
weeds to a drum, topping it up with
water and leaving it to work for
about a month. Keep it covered (but
not airtight) to keep out flies. Stir
every couple of days and serve to
your plants diluted to the colour of
weak tea.

Consider gifts from the garden
as the festive season approaches;
potted plants, herbs (fresh or dried),
wreaths, bottled liquid fertiliser etc.

Hardly a task, but remember to
take the time to enjoy your garden.
Walk in it, read, sleep, play in it and
simply sit and enjoy.
How to grow
SOYBEANS
Soybean seeds are available
in home garden and cropping
quantities from Kings Seeds
(www.kingsseeds.co.nz)
CONDITIONS: add good quality
compost to well-drained, loose soil.
SOW: late spring early summer,
when soil temperature is above
15C, 3cm deep if soil is heavy,
5cm deep if light, 8-10cm apart,
rows 45-60cm apart in full sun.
Make sure all threat of frost has
passed soybeans prefer daytime
temperatures above 20C and
keep soil moist until germination.
DAYS TO GERMINATE: 5-7 days
THIN: cut smaller seedlings off
using scissors so plants are 10-
15cm apart.
CARE: keep well watered during
owering (around 4-5 weeks after
planting) and as pods are forming
(around 6-7 weeks after planting),
mulch well.
HEIGHT AT MATURITY: 75cm
HARVEST EDAMAME: Day 45+
or so, depending on variety
HARVEST SOYBEANS: Day
90-100 or so, depending on variety.
Wait for leaves to turn yellow, then
brown, then fall to the ground.
Pods should be brown. Harvest on
a ne day cut plants off at the
base (leave the roots in the soil as
they will be full of nitrogen-xing
bacteria) and hang dried plants/
pods in a dry, cool place like a
garage or porch.
If you want to store your soybeans
they are dry enough to store when
one breaks apart when you bite
it you can thresh them by putting
them in a sack, then beating it with
a stick to separate the beans from
the pods. Winnow by dropping
beans/pods from a standing height,
using a light breeze or fan to blow
away debris. Store in a cool dry
place and turn sacks weekly to
help prevent weevils. If you live in
a humid area, you need to control
the humidity to stop the beans
sprouting prematurely.
How to cook
EDAMAME
EDAMAME are just immature
soybeans, picked when the pods are
rm, plump and bright green, around
halfway through their growing cycle
(day 45 or so).
You can shell the beans out of the
pods before you cook them follow
the rip it, zip it and pop it method
here (www.youtube.com/user/
TheSoyfoodsCouncil) but its easier to
cook them rst.
Steam pods, or boil up a pot of
lightly salted water, then add the pods
and cook for about 5 minutes. Drain,
then cool under running water to stop
the cooking process before the beans
go mushy. Squeeze the beans out
of the pods and dip in salt (a lemon
wedge goes well with this) or soy sauce,
or add a knob of butter to a bowl of
them, or add them to savoury dishes.
Dont eat the pods.
If youre really keen, you can make
edamame ice cream: www.bonappetit.
com/recipe/edamame-ice-cream
You can use dried soybeans
to make flour (use it to
replace 1/8 of regular flour
when baking), or you can
toast them in a pan, then
grind them into flour. You can
also make a soy coffee by
toasting beans in a pan until
they are black. Grind, then
use as you would for coffee.
TIP
of the MONTH
GROW
ING
60 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Janes Garden Diary
GROW & TELL
DECEMBER: getting the B plants in the ground
BOUNTIFUL
BASIL
One essential growing practice with Brussels sprouts is to keep off the pests. Use
a BT (Bacillus thuringiensis)-based organic caterpillar control, follow the packet
directions, spray regularly and it should keep the little beggars in check.
J
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IN THE
FOOD GARDEN
THE B PLAN means right now Im
planting basil and Brussels sprouts.
We usually sow basil a couple
of times in its season. The rst crop goes
into the greenhouse in late October or
November and does its companionable
thing with the tomatoes. We start picking
the leaves for kitchen use early while the
plants are still quite small. Were impatient
for that particular summer taste fresh in
salads and tossed at the last minute into
tomato dishes.
In December the second
sowing goes in, usually as an
outside crop. This is tended,
weeded, fed and watered
and left to grow to a full ush
of maturity. I will go through
and nip out the growing tips from time to
time to encourage the plants to become
bushier but apart from that they are left to
grow as they wish.
When it comes to pesto-making time
there is always plenty for us and enough
to share around as well.
That aromatic pungency of basil is
fantastic and it gives meals a special lift.
When the basil starts to ower it gets
a haircut whether I use the trimmings
or not. Being able to slow the natural
inclination
to ower
and set
seed
means a few
more pickings over a longer period. When
I have enough of what I want from the
plants, the owers are allowed to bloom
and its another big attraction for the bees.
Every time we go into the greenhouse
and brush against the basil plants the
scent is released. We think the basil is
keeping away the whitey as we no longer
have a problem with them.
Basil may seem like an obviously
seasonal plant to be growing now but
surely Brussels sprouts are a winter thing?
Of course they are, but to have them
JANE BELLERBY
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 61
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Christmas
culinary wreaths.
in winter you need to be getting these
long-growing brassicas into the soil before
Christmas. They need a lengthy warm
growing season before the weather turns
cold. Its the cold which ripens the sprouts
and if they dont get that they tend to be
limp imitations of the tightly-hearted
real thing.
This means a commitment to keeping
the young seedlings free of pests, well fed,
moist and mulched over the hot season.
These tasty baby cabbages are heavy
feeding plants so will need a rich soil to
begin with and then a few top-ups of
fertility in the form of blood and bone, a
side dressing of compost, liquid fertiliser
and possibly a side dressing of general
garden fertiliser at least two or three times
over their growing months.
Plant in December, start harvesting in
June. Yes its a long time but good eating
awaits! A dozen or so plants is sufcient
for an average household to be able to
enjoy Brussels sprouts throughout the
winter months.
These tall brassicas may be helped to
stay stable in the soil by putting in support
of some sort. The lower leaves can also be
picked off and fed to the chooks or pigs to
encourage air movement. Do this as you
harvest the sprouts, gradually working
your way up the thick stem.
IN THE FLOWER
GARDEN
BACK IN THE WINTER months
I had the annual cut-back-and-
clean-out of the vines. If I didnt have
claustrophobic leanings I would get under
the house and cut out and rip up the
criss-crossing web of long runners from
the wisteria and jasmine but I think Ill
save that job for a younger, tter and non-
phobic person. And pay them well.
I stick to cutting back the previous
years exterior growth which if left would
set about ripping the house apart,
smothering other plants and running
wild. I do pull out the runners that I can
and this means 4-5m lengths of strong
and exible vine, ideal for making wreath
bases which is what I did as part of the
winter hack-back.
The circles of entwined vines have
hung as skeleton wreaths on the verandah
and I can now decide what greenery I
would like to insert into them to create
gifts or for us to enjoy.
I make a wreath, give it away or hang
it up at home and mist it with water
for the rst few days to keep it looking
fresh. It then begins to turn into a dried
arrangement which also has its charms.
Alternatively, I can discard the leafy
material and add another fresh set of
decorations to the vine base.
Materials such as rosemary and
lavender work well, plus bay, roses,
lavender owers, hebe, larkspur, ake ake,
helichrysum, gypsophila and statice.
Culinary wreaths make a good gift and
can include bay branches, mandarins,
rosemary, lavender, sage, thyme and
oregano and anything else you like to
include that is edible.
The possibilities go on and on. If there
are children in your lives the wreaths can
be made to t small heads and worn as
part of summer celebrations. Wreaths
can hang on doors, in kitchens, lie at on
tables and can also include decorative
aspects such as candles, festive baubles
and candy canes. Its all entirely up to the
creativity of the maker.
Take time to sit and
enjoy the garden.
Winter wreath
bases of wisteria
and jasmine vines.
PLANT YOUR
BRUSSELLS
SPROUTS
62 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Theres one thing Ruud misses now hes living in Christchurch,
especially at this time of year.
The Bugman
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I SEE RED
62 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 63
T
he red plumes of pohutukawa
have impressed me now for
more than 35 years; rst in the
Bay of Plenty, then for a year
in Wellington and after that for 30-odd
years in Auckland.
Its not that you can put your watch on
it pohutukawa are notoriously ckle in
terms of their owering time but the
month of December is usually when the
action stuns the retina.
I have been known to drop everything
on my desk and ride out to the waterfront
of Mission Bay, Kohimaramara and St
Heliers just to blast my eyeballs and to
see the tui scream across Tamaki Drive
in an alcohol-fuelled frenzy of territorial
defence.
The iron-hearted trees (Metrosideros)
are a feature of the New Zealand
botanical scene. Although this genus
occurs in other Pacic countries and
even as far away as Hawaii, we have
a great number of species right on
our doorstep.
Pohutukawa is the most notorious
member of the tribe, probably because its
plight and conservation status was made
famous by Project Crimson back in the
day. Its natural distribution is the north,
down to about a line from Gisborne to
Taranaki. Anything further south has
been planted and is often considered
inappropriate by the ecological purists.
Project Crimson was instrumental
in highlighting the fact that coastal
pohutukawa forests were in decline
due to a whole range of human
activities: subdivisions, cattle grazing
and browsing, and competition from
invasive grasses and other weeds. Thick
mats of vegetation certainly prevent
pohutukawa seedlings from germinating
and establishing.
Possum browsing is yet another
unfortunate thing that sets the trees
back enormously. Once the possum has
had a go, the trees will sprout new, sweet
succulent leaves to restore the balance
and this new foliage is like ice cream to
the Aussie browsers.
Although our coastal pohutukawa
forests are still challenged in terms
of quality and quantity, new Project
Crimson plantings are looking good for
RUUD KLEINPASTE
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 63
the future.
Rata is another jewel in the
Metrosideros genus. Probably the most
common one (or perhaps most obvious
one) is the northern rata, a tree that has a
few weird growth habits.
Some start off like any other tree on
the ground and grow and climb their way
up towards the light. Others start at the
top, by germinating in some leaf litter
trapped way up in the crown of a host
tree. This seedling then sends down really
long roots along the trunk of its host,
nally reaching the ground where they
anchor and develop feeder roots to fuel
the botanical monster in the crown.
The lattice work of rata roots slowly
grows and envelops the poor old host
tree, eventually strangling it to death
while using its remains as a support for
as long as possible. The end result is a
dead host tree inside a huge, hollow rata.
That rata can go on living for many
hundreds of years, owering, seeding
and hosting whole bat colonies inside
its hollow trunk. Its spectacular red
owering crowns can be seen right
throughout its distribution area
from the North Island, along the
West Coast of the South Island,
way down to Fiordland.
As long as the frosts are not
too rough, the northern rata will
pop its head out of the bush.
In the places where frosts and
environmental conditions do get too
hairy, the southern rata takes over.
Places like the Catlins, Fiordland and
the Subantarctic islands are absolutely
smothered in the gnarly trunks of rata
and the fallen petals of spent umber-
orange blooms.
But there are lots of other rata in
Aotearoa that are worth having a look at.
Some pretty small climbing species are
dotted around the North Island bush: red
owering, white owering, small-leaved
and larger-leaved beauties. Theres even
a seriously rare species in the far north,
Bartletts rata, which becomes a medium-
sized tree.
But my favourite pet here in
Christchurch is Metrosideros carminea,
a beautiful rambler that can climb,
hang and stand up straight. Every year it
rewards me with a burst of Myrtaceous
mirth in the form of a red glowing carpet.
Of course, to achieve this I have to keep
it in a large pot and cover it during the
harshest frosts as thats the only way to
ensure its survival.
This plant is a real weirdo when it
comes to propagation: take a cutting
from a juvenile plant and you will get
a vine; a cutting from an adult plant
gives you a shrub!
These iron-hearted trees are not just
fabulous to look at. Their ecological
services are numerous and remarkable
too. One look at the open owers shows
a glistening treasure-trove of moist
nectar, the kind of stuff bees, ants and a
lot of ies, parasites and predators give
their left antenna for. Rata honey
is something special!
The pollen at the tips of the anthers
is another wholesome food for our tiny
heroes, full of proteins needed to build
insect bodies and larvae. Pollen is often
misunderstood by gardeners and hay-
fever sufferers alike - Id go so far as to
proclaim pollen to be one of the most
important substances on
the planet!
Your task, for this
December, is to nd your local
owering Metrosideros and
stand still near a ower, then
get a child or grandchild and
watch the spectacle of the
busiest airport in the world. Everybody
tries to land there to partake of the
fabulous and open snack bar.
But owers are just a small part of
a great pohutukawa or rata tree. Their
hollow trunks host a range of animals,
their branches support a whole forest
of epiphytes and the leaves have their
own suckers, chewers and raspers,
sometimes copious enough to feed the
local insectivorous birds through the
demanding breeding season.
And underground? Who knows!
There could well be a huge network
of mycelium, the internet of the
fungus world.
When I see red, I see an ecosystem that
is so large it is hard to comprehend. Just
as well its almost time for a Christmas
break.
Watch the
spectacle of
the busiest
airport in
the world...
64 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Plants With A Purpose
64 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
A berry merry
A dash of honey and herbs and you can
make a berry delicious summer dessert.
64 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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CHRISTMAS
A dash of honey and herbs and you can
make a berry delicious summer dessert.
A berry merry
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 65
How do you get herb avouring
into berries?
Before Ken told me it was mission
impossible, I skived off. Hours later I came
back to nd the kitchen bench dotted
with little bowls of thawed berries in a
liquid with coloured labels on each bowl.
Ken told me he solved the problem by
making a herb and honey syrup which
he poured over the berries. The herbs he
trialled were lemon thyme, anise hyssop,
rose geranium and spearmint.
I sneakily tried a taste of the
raspberries. The syrup had a subtle
rose avour absolutely delicious with
raspberries and when I checked the
label it was rose geranium. I have to
confess I didnt think of that one!
The second creation had a touch of
class for a special occasion: a berry tart
featuring a berry and cream cheese lling
with herbs and cardamom, so not one for
the diet conscious unless you can use low
fat cream cheese.
Ken tried half with tarragon and half
with mint both were yummy!
Finally, if all this sounds like a bit too
much work and you dont want to fuss
around with syrups or baking, but would
like to try rose geranium avour with
berries, there is an excellent Rose Cream
Recipe in Mary Brownes The Cooks Herb
Garden. Cream, castor sugar and cream
cheese are combined with the subtle
avour of rose geranium leaves (see NZ
Lifestyle Block, April, 2012 for the recipe).
Its a no-fuss dessert with a touch of
elegance, and perfect for spooning over
fresh berries.
I
thought I had a winner an article just
in time for Christmas parties combining
the delicate avour of herbs with
chocolate and fresh berries.
It couldnt go wrong until the chef
pointed out that we were writing this
column in mid-spring (when we needed
to experiment) but there were no fresh
berries to be found. Not one. So before we
start, I have to confess we cheated. Yes, we
raided the freezer.
Finding the berries wasnt difcult.
They come in free-ow packs as single or
mixed varieties, so a day later I was armed
with several packets of freshly frozen
berries boysenberries, strawberries,
cranberries, raspberries but then new
problems announced themselves.
BERRY BIG PROBLEMS
What recipes would work for frozen
AND fresh berries?
When it comes to solving culinary
problems my mind draws a complete
blank. Give me a recipe book and all the
ingredients and Im ne. Deviate from the
plan and Im in trouble, so I passed it on
to my chef-husband which I will confess
was my intention all along!
In typical mannish fashion he decided
there were in fact more problems!
This made me wonder if men create
problems in order to have the satisfaction
of solving them?
Berry avours and textures vary from
the delicate strawberry and raspberry to
the strong blackberry, with boysenberry,
karaka berry and others in between.
Then there are the berries with skins like
blueberries and cranberries, which have a
stronger, tarter avour and rmer texture.
JENNY SOMERVELL
Herb &
honey syrup
I used creamed clover honey but
runny honey would also work.
For the herbs, rose geranium was delicious
with raspberries and strawberries, and
French tarragon or spearmint worked well
with boysenberries.
cup water
cup of a light-avoured honey
1 tbsp nely-chopped fresh herb
of choice
BRING the water to the boil in a small
pot. Add the herbs, stir once or twice and
remove from the heat. Stir in the honey and
return to a very low heat. Do not boil but
simmer lightly for 5-10 minutes to allow the
herb avour to infuse the liquid. Remove
from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain
out the herbs, keeping the liquid.
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Jenny s tip
If you have fresh berries, wait for the
syrup to cool down a bit, then pour the
sweet-flavoured liquid over fresh berries
in lieu of icing sugar, stirring once or twice
before serving to coat the berries well.

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66 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Divine herb
& berry parfait
This is a dessert with a difference: softer,
more liquid, but delicious. Use free-ow
frozen berries directly from the freezer
without thawing. It looks and tastes
fabulous with the subtle herb avours.
Warning: Not for the calorie conscious!
4 cups frozen berries of choice
boysenberries and strawberries both
worked well
A double quantity of strained herb-
avoured honey (recipe on page 65)
1 x 250g pack cream cheese
1 x 250g carton sour cream
6-8 squares of dark chocolate, grated
or curled (using a potato peeler gives
longer curls of chocolate than grating)
BEAT the cream cheese and sour cream
together with a tablespoon of the herb-
avoured honey liquid until smooth and
creamy. Bring the remainder of the honey
liquid nearly to the boil, add three cups
of frozen berries, and turn up the heat to
rapidly thaw the berries and heat them
quickly with the herb avours. Do not boil
turn the heat down to a bare simmer
before it gets to boiling, then remove from
the heat. The idea is to thaw the berries as
fast as possible but not turn them to mush
(or make jam). Strain off and reserve the
liquid, then set aside to cool. In a parfait
glass (or large wine glass, as we did),
alternate layers of the cream and berries,
with a little chocolate sprinkled on each
layer of berries and a dribble of the
reserved liquid to ll the spaces between
the berries. Finish with a layer of cream
and sprinkle with chocolate. Chill until
ready to serve. Makes four servings, with
a little left over, depending on the size of
the glasses.
Berry tart with
cardamom & tarragon
(or rose geranium)
PASTRY BASE
1 cups plain our
cup castor sugar
90g butter
2 eggs
A little cold water
SIFT the our and sugar together, soften
the butter and rub it into the our and
sugar. Beat the eggs then blend this into
the our and butter to make a soft dough.
If your eggs are small you may need to
add a teaspoon or two of water. Use the
dough to line a greased 20cm an dish,
then put it in the fridge while you prepare
the lling.
FILLING
1 x 250g carton cream cheese
5-6 cardamom pods
6-8 squares dark chocolate, grated
or curled
2 cups of berries
approx. (boysenberries,
strawberries or raspberries)
2 eggs
cup castor sugar
2 tbsp nely-chopped fresh herbs
(eg, French tarragon, spearmint or rose
geranium)
cup herb-avoured honey (recipe on
page 65) or an extra cup castor sugar
PRE-HEAT the oven to 180C. Remove the
seeds from the cardamom pods, discard
the pods and nely grind the seeds. Cream
the cream cheese and sugar together, add
the eggs, honey and ground cardamom
and blend well. Spread the berries evenly
over the pastry base, sprinkle the herbs
over the fruit, then pour over the blended
cream cheese. Bake at 180C until cooked,
about 40 minutes. Once removed from the
oven, sprinkle with the chocolate while
still hot this melts the chocolate then
allow to cool and rm before cutting.
Can be served warm or cold.
For frozen berries
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 67
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French tarragon
Artemisia dracunculus var. sativa
The Rolls-Royce of herbs and one our favourites. The warm, back-of-
the-mouth anise flavour is delicious in so many foods and provides
a unique flavour experience in desserts. Not to be substituted for
Russian tarragon (A. dracunculus subsp. dracunculoides) which is seed-
grown and vastly inferior in flavour. French tarragon is grown from
cuttings and root division only. This hardy herbaceous perennial likes
full sun and excellent drainage, especially over winter.
Rose-scented geraniums
There are a number of rose-scented pelargonium
cultivars and a few species. However before
buying or using them in the kitchen, check the
scent as there is considerable variation between
plants. We used P. Attar of Roses, which is one
of the stronger scented plants. The other used
most in cooking is P. graveolens Old Fashioned
Rose which is also grown commercially for rose
geranium oil. There are also cultivars with lemon
or citrus undertones, Boths Snowflake and Roberts
Lemon Rose.
Scented pelargoniums are frost tender and best
grown in pots in hard frost areas. Where frosts are
not too severe they may be frosted to the ground
but will regrow the following spring.
Lemon thyme
Thymus x citriodorus
The strong, slightly sweet lemon scent of
this thyme makes it ideal for desserts. Lemon
thyme forms a small, mounded bush with soft,
rounded green leaves. There is also a variegated
variety. Orange thyme (T. x citriodorus Fragrantissimus)
with a citrus scent and narrow green leaves is worth trying
as well. These are attractive garden plants, loved by bees,
and fun to experiment with in sweet and savoury dishes.
Thymes require full sun in an open situation and excellent drainage
(they like stones) as the flavour is best if the soil is not too rich.
Cardamom, green or true
Ellettaria cardamomum
This is the third most expensive spice after saffron
and vanilla but a little goes a long way. The strong,
distinct flavour is found in the small black seeds
borne in small, spindle-shaped seed pods with a thin papery outer
shell. Seeds are best bought in pods and stored that way ground
seeds quickly lose their flavour.
Cardamom comes from the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) and
resembles ginger in leaf form. It is a tropical plant native to parts
of India, Sri Lanka and South East Asia. Plants require high humidity
and mean temperatures of around 22C to do well. For several years I
grew a plant in a container in a greenhouse in Canterbury but it never
fruited. Most of the worlds commercial supply of cardamom comes
from Guatemala, followed by India.
Rose-scented
geranium
PLANT SUPPLIERS
Somerfields / www.somerfields.net, andyburnettster@gmail.com
The Fragrant Garden / www.fragrantgarden.co.nz
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68 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Organic Garden
CELANDINE
Despised and forgotten, this pretty plant
will run rampant below deciduous trees
and reward you with brilliant yellow
owers in early spring, before dying
down over summer, leaving a mulch of
organic matter that will deter other plant
establishment.
MINERS LETTUCE
Also known as winter purslane (Claytonia
perfoliata), the advantage of this plant is
that it also produces a brilliant early spring
salad vegetable. It grows over winter and
into spring, then seeds, dies down and
leaves a deep mulch that deters other
plants from establishing until autumn rains
occur and new growth re-establishes.
What a bonus both this and the violet
offer to the farmers market stall, especially
for those with a child or two. Violets were
once a favourite of the orist but are now
almost unknown - it is too costly to grow
and pick but what an opportunity for a
cash-strapped child. See US farmer/author
Joel Salatin for inspiration on such early
opportunities!
ONION WEED
Probably more controversial would be the
use of the onion weed with its profusion
of white owers in the spring. Again, it
grows into winter and spring, then dies
down during summer, creating a thick
mulch which deters growth of other
species until the autumn rains stimulate it
into growth once again.
Decades ago at the Biological
Husbandry Unit (BHU) at Lincoln
University, the place of frost-
susceptible autumn
green crops was
investigated
as a system for
establishing
spring-sown
crops with
minimal tillage
without the use
of herbicides to
kill the green crop
in spring. It still offers
an area for research
of organic systems.
plants that will save
you from spraying
4
Why waste your time
spraying when you could
let nature take care of
things and do a better job?
The humble Celendine
as a foil for a tree base
rather than herbicide.
Miners lettuce, a
productive ground cover.
The violet, a possible
opportunity for a farmers
market stall too.
S
pring and early summer brings
the usual environmental
abominations around both town
and countryside as the inevitable
halo of yellow appears around trees,
shrubs, fence lines and ditches, indicative
that herbicide has been used yet again.
What a jarring note this is in a
landscape that should be so green and
pleasant, and what a lost opportunity
for introducing biodiversity into the
landscape which is so often devoid of
owers and opportunity for benecial
insects. Perhaps one can condone their
use just once if there is a tenacious weed
problem, but after that why not consider
something more environmental?
VIOLETS
Trees can benet by a planting of violets
around the trunk which look great in
spring, do not grow vertical over summer,
and suppress most other plants.
BOB CROWDER
68 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 69
W
hen I went away to the
UK and Europe for the NZ
winter, it was in the expectation
that by my return in July, my
half acre paradise would have
been reduced by half and the
back section cleared, part of a
redevelopment of the rest home
next door.
But such things take time,
especially in this quake-ravaged
city, and so nothing had been
done. However, friends and the rest
home had taken full advantage of
the reprieve and the land had been
scoured for all its bounty of suitable
trees, shrubs and spring flowers to
the extent that not one was to be
seen. Over the last few months the
scavenging has continued as other
treasures put their heads above the
soil surface.
Then one September day, all hell
broke loose and in just one morning
30 years of endeavour was devoured
by the machines of an impressively
hard working crew. By the end a
great heap of carbon credits lay in
shredded glory, with selected timber
laid out in neat piles.
Quite a sad experience you might
think, but in fact after the awe at
witnessing how easy it is to destroy
something that took so long
to make, I could only think
about what a lovely piece of
cleared land had been opened
up, the soil rich in decades of
accumulated fertility and ready
for the establishment of an
organic production unit.
This vision flickered across my
eyes just as it must have done when
the first settlers would have come
across this fertile area on the banks
of the Heathcote River so many years
ago. One thing is certain, it would
have taken much longer to clear
and prepare than a mornings work.
Soon the new rest home building
will occupy the site but a legacy of
the garden will hopefully
remain in the form of
heritage apple trees
which were salvaged
before the apocalypse
and moved to new
quarters within their
grounds, along with many of the
bulbs and perennials. Meanwhile
the remaining part of my garden
has been enriched by many
treasures stockpiled last autumn
and gradually replanted.
What a
lovely piece
of cleared
land and
rich soil.
BEFORE BEFORE
AFTER AFTER
Bobs new garden
Correction
The mesh recommended in the
November issue of NZ Lifestyle Block
for protecting crops from the tomato/
potato psyllid in NZ is used in Europe
to stop other pests such as carrot
rust fly and butterflies, not the psyllid.
However, testing in NZ has show it
is effective against the psyllid when
used on potato crops.
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70 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
In The Home Orchard
G
uavas are fruiting myrtles from
South America, so they do well
in our southern climes. Feijoas
(also known as pineapple
guavas) and NZ cranberries (Chilean
guavas) are surprisingly hardy to cool
winds and salt air, but generally dislike cold
or dry weather.
The large yellow guavas that thrive in
South Africa are not grown here, but one
that will and that approaches its superb
tropical avor is the strawberry guava
(Psidium cattleianum).
Like all the guavas, these ones like a
constant heavy mulch to feed the roots,
and a good supply of moisture. Having
said that, this plant won the 2013 drought
resistant subtropical prize in my orchard
after a summer that was so dry it killed off
citrus trees and my big tamarillo.
The strawberry guava is a healthy small
tree, but prone to fungus and black mould
if left untidied. You have to pick off any
mouldy fruits and funny leaves. For ease
of picking and ripening I cut mine off
when its about 1.5 metres tall or it gets too
unruly for my 2.5m-high tunnel house. A
heavy annual trim of leggy branches seems
to help it too.
It took 10 years for this tree to start
fruiting in my cool climate but with
attention, good plant hygiene and feeding,
the fruit have grown bigger and more
BEN GAIA
profuse each year. It is self-pollinating if
bees are let in, and the snow-white owers
ll the autumn tunnel house with a delicate
scent. Fruit comes in winter between the
pipfruit and citrus. They ripen fast and need
to be eaten as soon as the pink fruit turn
dark. A daily pick adds a few goodies for
your fresh fruit salad or dry fruit leathers.
PROTECTION
The attractive shiny green leaves and dark
pink guava-avoured fruits of this Brazilian
coastal bush make it a lovely addition to
your frost-free northern garden or tunnel
house. Because it fruits in winter like many
subtropicals, it will need protection from
frost anywhere south of the Bombay Hills.
EATING TIPS
The seeds are not a big problem when
youre eating and can be easily dealt with
in two ways. Either prepare by slicing
around the fruit, and throw the seeds in
your bin that goes to the tip (not your
compost) or invest in an antique spittoon
and amuse your guests with some
innovative guava etiquette.
When cutting up the fruit to serve in
a fruit salad with kiwifruit, feijoas and
tamarilloes, add lemon juice and sugar to
offset the sweet tropical avours, or slice
around the fruits outside the seeds and
drop the slithers into fresh Greek yoghurt.
Mmmm. Just call me Nigella.
tropics
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If you want a wonderful taste of the
tropics, try this small tree.
A little taste
of the
Strawberry
guavas and
yoghurt.

The nearer you get to the tropics,


the more strawberry guava
thrives. In Hawaii it has become
a major weed problem in their
native bush, largely because
of its hard small seeds that are
spread about by wild pigs.
So far it has not become
invasive in NZ, and those of you
in cool areas wont need to worry,
but Weedbusters have it on their
watchlist in warmer regions. If
you do want to plant it, make sure
the fruit are protected so birds
and wild animals cant forage
seeds and spread it.
Warning
FOR NORTHERN
GARDENERS
If you want a wonderful taste of the
tropics, try this small tree.
tropics
If you want a wonderful taste of the
tropics, try this small tree.
A little taste
of the
If you want a wonderful taste of the
tropics, try this small tree.

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or renew to NZ Lifestyle Block
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Subscribe on or before 22 December, 2013 to get in the draw
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72 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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L
et me just state for the record that
I love getting emails and letters
from readers, and this column
was inspired by a lovely note from
Sheryn (check out her very cool website:
www.corrugatedcreations.co.nz).
Sheryn has a lovely little block just
north of Tirau in the Waikato, but it has
been invaded by a new weed that has
steadily and persistently been making
itself quite at home. Sheryn was nice
enough to send me some photos of the
offending weed and I was able to quickly
identify it as storksbill.
There are three different types found
in New Zealand: storksbill (Erodium
cicutarium), long storksbill (Erodium
botrys) and musky storksbill (Erodium
moschatum), the one that Sheryn has.
All three of these weeds belong to the
Geraniaceae family of weeds which
contains (not surprisingly) the Geraniums,
the Pelargoniums and the Erodiums.
The Erodiums are native to the
Mediterranean and Western Asia but are
now found all over the world. In North
America they are known as heronsbills
and in Europe they are known as
storksbills. The Erodiums get their
bird-like name from the distinctive
shape of their fruit which resembles
a long bird beak, and in fact the name
Erodium is derived from the Greek
work for heron (erodios).
All three varieties of storksbill are
opportunistic weeds; if there is a bare
patch of dirt they will pop up. They
are often found in paddocks that are
recovering from drought or have been
beaten up a bit by stock.
Storksbill varieties begin their lives in
late summer/early autumn, germinating
and then immediately form a rosette of
leaves. At this stage it is possible to tell the
three varieties of storksbill apart. Musky
storksbill has quite large oval-shaped,
highly lobed leaves, storksbill has a very
ne fern-like leaf and long storksbill has a
very hairy stem and leaf.
At this stage the plant also begins to
develop a quite long, thick and brous
taproot that enables the plant to survive
very dry conditions. In spring the
storksbills produce stems with small
purple/pink owers, which later produce
the distinctive seed heads that give the
plants their name, with seeds developing
a long spirally twisted awn (the bit that
looks like a birds beak). This spiral awn
can wind and unwind and actually drill
the seed into loose soil. Unfortunately it
also tends to drill itself into other things
too such as animal fur and skin.
There is also a question as to whether
or not consumption of storksbill has
a toxic effect on stock - there is some
evidence to suggest that stock eating
storksbill have shown increased
photosensitivity - but the jury is still out.

CONTROLLING STORKSBILL
This is not an easy endeavour. If you get
to it early enough it can be pulled out but
once the taproot starts to get a few root
hairs on it all youll do is rip a few leaves
off and it can regenerate from the root.
Spraying is an option but you need to
MILTON MUNRO is a soil and plant
scientist for rural supply company
PGG Wrightson. He looks at common
pasture weeds youll find on your
block and how to deal with them.
Pasture Weed Watch
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
STORKSBILL
Erodium sp.
DO YOU NEED HELP WITH
A WEED PROBLEM?
If anyone has a request for a
particular weed they would like
to know more about please dont
hesitate to let Milton know:
mmunro@pggwrightson.co.nz
Erodium
moschatum
Photo: Eugene Zelenko
Wikimedia Commons
MILTON MUNRO
be careful about your choice of product.
In order to get any effect on Storksbill
using 2,4D or MCPA you will need to use
very high rates (2l/ha+) to get any effect
and even then only on small plants. You
could also spot spray plants with Tordon
PastureBoss, although this is only effective
on small plants.
Any of these options will cause damage
to any clover plants you spray.
Erodium moschatum
Erodium
cicutarium
Photo: Follavoine
Wikimedia Commons
Erodium
moschatum
Photo: Eugene Zelenko
Wikimedia Commons
Erodium moschatum
Erodium
cicutarium
Photo: Follavoine
Wikimedia Commons
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 73
Stinking iris
Iris foetidissima
Bushy asparagus
Asparagus densiorus
WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?
Two growth forms are known, one is a trailing scrambler, the other has erect
stems to about 700mm high forming a dense cylinder. Both cultivars have small
tubers, thin wiry stems, tiny pinkish owers and bright red berries.
WHY IS IT WEEDY?
Dense, patch-forming habit, tough, long-lived tubers that resprout, moderate
to slow growth rate, and seeds that are widely distributed. Tolerates moderate
to high rainfall.
WHAT CAN I DO TO GET RID OF IT?
1. Dig out tubers. Dispose of at a refuse transfer station or burn. Leave rest of cut
material on site to rot down.
2. Weed wipe (spring-early summer only): glyphosate (333ml/L), no penetrant.
3. Spray (spring-early summer only): glyphosate (20ml/L). Do not add penetrant
when spraying against tree trunks. Spray lightly, avoiding runoff.
WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP IT COMING BACK?
Tubers often resprout after spraying, and stems break at ground level so plants
cannot be pulled out. Tuber fragments usually survive digging. Always follow up
on treated areas at least 6-monthly. Replant treated areas where possible after
2-3 treatments to establish dense ground cover and minimise reinvasion.
For more on weeds and
how to control them, go to
www.weedbusters.org.nz
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 73
74 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
A dog
sees less
detail than
humans.
HOW GOOD IS
A DOGS EYESIGHT?
Reader Questions
If you have a question regarding anything to do with your block, please email it to editor@nzlifestyleblock.co.nz,
fax 09 634-2948 or write to NZ Lifestyle Block Questions, PO Box 6341, Auckland 1036.
ASK US YOUR FARM OR GARDEN QUESTION
Q
Our rescue dog Marley, a
dog of dubious parentage,
was staring into the sky yesterday
looking at a skylark which I could
barely see myself. He regularly
stops and stares at things in the
distance, especially if something has
changed like a paddock with sheep.
Anything he doesnt like he barks at. I have
read that a dogs visual acuity is estimated
to be in the order of 20/75, ie not good
enough to get a driving licence (luckily). Is a
dogs eyesight dependent on breed? Maybe
my dog was listening to the skylark rather
than looking at it but I am convinced his
eyesight is good from what I have observed.
I shall keep an eye on him.
David Rodgers, Brightwater
A
NZ Lifestyle Block editor Nadene Hall
replies: Id always assumed dogs had
reasonably good vision but it turns out that
youre quite right, their eyesight is actually
terrible compared to humans. However,
they also use their eyes differently to us,
mostly for scanning wide horizons (looking
for prey), vs humans who have vision that is
more binocular-like.
Dogs cant see as well as humans in
74 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer

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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 75
To nd out more go to www.nait.co.nz or call NAIT on 0800 624 843
Get your NAIT basics sorted...
Tag
Tag cattle and deer with a NAIT approved RFID tag before they are six months old,
or before their rst o farm movement
Cattle born before 1 July 2012 and deer born before 1 March 2013 have a three year
grace period in which to be tagged, unless they are being moved o farm
White tags are for cattle and orange tags are for deer
Register
Register your animals in the NAIT system within one week of being tagged
Registration links individual animals to tags in the NAIT system so they can be traced
Record and conrm
Sending cattle or deer o farm? Record the movement within 48 hours
Receiving cattle or deer? Conrm the movement within 48 hours
Sending animals to a NAIT accredited sale yard or meat processor? They will
record the sending movement for you
Receiving animals from a NAIT accredited sale yard? Conrm the movement
daylight. In humans, a Dr can use an eye
chart to do an assessment of just how
well you can see (your visual acuity). If
you can see the letters on an eye chart
these use a font that is specially designed
to measure the eyes ability to make out
detail from 20ft (6m) that a person with
normal eyesight can see at the same
distance, you are said to have 20-20 vision.
If you can only read larger letters correctly
at 20ft that a person with normal eyesight
can see at 40ft, your vision is 20/40 (thats
around the mark where you would need
glasses to drive).
Dogs see at about 20/75, so theyd need
to be 20ft from something to see it clearly
when you could see it clearly from 75ft.
Thats the equivalent of seeing the world
through a ne mesh gauze where the
overall outline is visible but details are
blurred or lost.
Its also believed dogs see the world
in shades of grey, blue-violet and yellow,
similar to people who are colour-blind.
A dogs vision is tested used a similar
method to humans except instead of
letters, experts use black and white stripes
on test cards. If it can see the stripes, it
gets a treat.
Dogs use other cues (such as smell, B
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texture, brightness, and
position) rather than relying
solely on colour. Seeing-eye
dogs, for example, may not
distinguish between a green
or red stoplight; they look at the
brightness and position of the
light. This, along with the ow and noise
of trafc, tell the dog that it is the right
time to cross the street.
Source: Pets Doc Veterinary Clinic,
www.petsdog.org
It may be that a dogs eyesight is
dependent on breed, although not
enough research has been done to say
this conclusively. We get some clues
from research conducted in 1992 that
compared the ganglion cell distribution
in the eyes of wolves, German Shepherds
and Beagles. Rods and cones in the
eye send signals to the brain telling it
what its looking at using ganglion cells.
Scientists can use these cells to work
out an animals visual acuity. What this
research discovered was that wolves could
see better than the German Shepherds
and some of the Beagles, but particular
families of Beagles could see better than
others. It suggests there is a genetic
component to how well a dog can see.
Dogs can see much better
than humans in the dark,
almost as well as a cat, and
again this was developed
for use in the wild when they
would tend to be most active
at dawn and dusk.
Dogs have evolved to see well
in both bright and dim light, whereas
humans do best in bright light, says Paul
Miller, a clinical professor of comparative
ophthalmology at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison.
No one is quite sure how much better
a dog sees in dim light, but I would
suspect that dogs are not quite as good as
cats which can see in light thats six times
dimmer than our lower limit. Dogs can
probably see in light ve times dimmer
than a human can see in.
Research also shows dogs are much
more likely to recognise something it
cant see well based on its motion - dogs
have good motion sensitivity so they see
moving objects much better than ones
that are still - plus their sense of smell
and hearing.
Dogs that go blind can adapt very well,
so long as their environment is safe and
stays the same.
Dogs are much
more likely
to recognise
something...
based on its
motion.
76 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
NETTLES FOR ARTHRITIS
Q
I love your magazine - it has such
a variety of interesting articles. In
the September 2013 magazine, Kristina
Jensen wrote an article on growing and
using stinging nettles. I was given a few
handfuls of dried nettles to steep and
drink for my arthritis. It took about four
days to work and the relief was amazing
and as well, I could close my ngers
without pain. I have two questions: how
do I tell the difference between the edible
and non-edible varieties, and where can
I buy some seed so that I can grow it
myself?
Carol McHannigan, by email
A
Plants with a Purpose columnist and
herb expert Jenny Somervell replies:
There are three types of nettle commonly
found in New Zealand. There is the
native tree nettle (Urtica ferox), and two
introduced species, the annual small or
European nettle (Urtica urens) and the
perennial (Urtica dioica).
The stings of all three are to be avoided,
especially that of native tree nettle which
has been lethal to humans, horses and
dogs.
However, Urtica dioica and U. urens
have a long history of use in the diet of
humans and animals
TREE NETTLE
Easily distinguished, as it is a woody
shrub, growing up to 2m tall, with the
trunk up to 12cm in diameter. It should
not be eaten.
It is a valuable nectar plant for the Red
and Yellow Admiral butteries. Seed can
be obtained from:
Monarch Buttery New Zealand Trust
www.monarch.org.nz/monarch/items-
for-sale/seeds
Oratia Native Plant Nursery
www.oratianatives.co.nz
New Zealand Tree Seeds
www.nzseeds.co.nz
EUROPEAN NETTLE
Urtica urens
This annual has heart-shaped, dark green,
nely toothed leaves, which along with
the stems are covered in ne stinging
hairs. It grows to about 60cm. Annual
nettle has a short life
cycle and runs to
seed very quickly.
Seed follows the
inconspicuous
green owers.
Pick owers
(with gloves) as
Urtica urens
Photo H Zell Wikimedia Commons
Urtica urens
Photo H Zell Wikimedia Commons
Urtica urens
Photo H Zell Wikimedia Commons
Ongaonga/ native nettle -
do not touch or eat!
Photo: Avenue, Wikimedia Commons
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www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 77
soon as the green seeds are visible and
pop in a paper bag to ripen. It self-sows
prolically so if you dont want it in the
garden, you need to weed it before self-
sowing - it self-seeds readily! You may
want to grow it in an old bath or pots so
you can easily control it.
I have not found any New Zealand
source for this but it is a very common
weed in gardens. Ask a friend!
PERENNIAL NETTLE
Urtica dioica
The similar perennial nettle is a larger
plant, reaching up to 1.5m and spreading
by a creeping perennial root. It is
classied as a pest weed in most parts of
New Zealand and therefore it is illegal to
sell, propagate, or distribute any parts of
the plant.
Urtica australis and U. incisa are
alternatives to this and are available from
some seed nurseries eg Oratia Native
Plant Nursery (see link above).
USING NETTLES
Both Urtica urens and U. dioica are
valuable nutritionally and have numerous
therapeutic uses. They contain vitamins
A & C and minerals including calcium,
potassium, silicon, iron, manganese and
sulphur.
They are easily digested and valuable
for supplying minerals and natural
salts in a salt reduced diet, without
overburdening the system.
Nettles are known as a cleansing
detoxier, increasing the elimination of
toxins and waste products. They are also
a known diuretic, helping poor kidney
function, relieving uid retention and
promoting elimination of uric acid which
may be a source of the relief of the pain.
A cup of nettle tea morning
and evening will improve the
function of liver, gall bladder
and intestines. When
added to vegetables and
salads they impart a
salty, tangy avour.
BORER IN BLACK CURRANTS
Q
Does anyone have a simple remedy to
prevent borer in blackcurrants?
Jan Richardson, Blenheim
A
Nadene replies: Mike Kearney is the
head of the NZ Blackcurrant Co-op
and says boring damage in blackcurrants is
quite difcult to control.
The best control method in a home
garden or lifestyle block would be through
pruning out old wood each year.
Geoff Langford has 41 years of
experience as a scientic advisor in the
horticultural industry and now runs
Berryworld, consulting in plant breeding,
propagating and management to the
berryfruit industry in New Zealand and
offshore. He also has blackcurrants in his
home garden in Christchurch.
Mike is correct in that the best method
for managing this pest in a garden-type
situation is by keeping plenty of growth in
the bush and pruning is one of the ways to
encourage good growth. The pest weakens
the bush but can be tolerated at quite high
levels without affecting production.
Annual pruning in winter time by
cutting out any dead wood and
some of the oldest shoots
at the base will usually
maintain sufcient
growth without the need to use
any other control. This is what I do
in my garden.
Commercially, growers use
mating disruption as a technique for
management of this pest, and this works
well in large production areas.
Urtica dioica
Perennial nettle
Blackcurrant bug
Photo Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado
State University, Bugwood.org
Blackcurrant bug
Photo Gyorgy Csoka, Hungary Forest
Research Institute, Bugwood.org
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 77
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78 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
BUYS FOR YOUR BLOCK
G
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CHECK OUT THESE NEW PRODUCTS FOR YOUR BLOCK
78 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
WITH THE recent drought still fresh
in many farmers memories, and the
governments recent focus on irrigation
as a safeguard for the future, New
Hollands range of high performance
irrigation or standalone power units
are competitively priced and available
in four configurations depending on
your power requirements.
All units are Tier III compliant, very
fuel efficient and can be supplied with
or without direct drive hand-operated
PTO clutch.
The latest New Holland line-up
includes models:
S8b - TIef III compIIunI, 4.bL, 4-cyI,
turbo-charged engine rated 102hp
continuous @ 1800rpm
S110 - TIef III compIIunI, 4.bL,
4-cyl, turbo-charged engine rated
117hp continuous @ 1800rpm
S170 - TIef III compIIunI, 6.7L,
6-cyl, turbo-charged engine rated
162hp continuous @ 1800rpm
S240 - TIef III compIIunI, 6.7 L, 6-cyI,
turbo-charged, common rail engine
rated 236hp continuous @ 1800hp
New Holland is imported into NZ
by C B Norwood Distributors Ltd.
To find your local dealer visit
www.newholland.co.nz or call
CB Norwood on 06 356-4920.
CATTLE OR DEER ON YOUR PROPERTY?
THE NAIT scheme applies to everyone with cattle or deer,
whether you have one animal or 1000.
The National Animal Identification and Tracing (NAIT)
scheme provides lifetime traceability for individual cattle and
deer, enhancing New Zealands ability to respond quickly if
theres a food safety concern or a biosecurity threat.
To meet your legal obligations you must:
fegIsIef wIIh NAIT us u pefson In chufge oI unImuIs,
Iug youf cuIIIe und deef wIIh u NAIT-uppfoved BIID euf Iug,
fegIsIef youf unImuIs In Ihe NAIT sysIem,
fecofd uny movemenIs oI cuIIIe of deef oII youf pfopefIy,
and;
conIIfm uny movemenIs oI cuIIIe of deef onIo youf
property.
To find out more visit www.nait.co.nz or call NAIT on free
phone 0800 624 843.
Are
your
livestock
traceable?
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HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER FROM NEW HOLLAND
EASY CAREFREE COOPS
CAREFREE COOPS are the
answer to hen keepers needs for
hygienic, durable and attractive
coops that wont break the bank.
Carefree Coops are computer-
designed and precision-
manufactured, supplied in
flat pack form, and simple to
assemble thanks to their unique
Coop-Clip assembly system.
Carefree Coops are:
ComIofIubIe Iof youf hens
with ample space, plenty of
ventilation, moulded nest areas
and elevated wooden perches as
standard;
Lusy Io cIeun Io heIp
eradicate red mite;
Tough und dufubIe Ihe
coops need no maintenance
and are resistant to the effects
of UV light;
HIghIy fesIsIunI Io pfeduIofs,
Lusy Io move,
AvuIIubIe wIIh u Ifee 3-yeuf
guarantee, subject to simple
on-line registration.
To order or for more
information, visit
www.chookmanor.co.nz,
or call them on 03 325-1236.
Durable,
easy-clean
carefree
coops
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villagegreen
100% Pure Food Grade
Diatomaceous Earth
100 NATURAL
100 CHEMICAL FREE
100 NON-TOXIC
100 NON-ALLERGENIC
100 ORGANIC
FOSSIL SHELL FLOUR
Enquire NOW and receive a FREE SAMPLE!
CaII Maria 09 432 2722 saIes@denz.co.nz
www.denz.co.nz
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 79
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Get sorted quickly and efciently with one of our compact,
multi-purpose tractors.
We supply and support AVANT loaders
exceptionally functional vehicles that
allow you to perform any task, anywhere,
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highest specications, these vehicles are
rugged, reliable and well designed for
access, safety and ease of maintenance.
8 Nelson Street, Pukekohe. Monday - Friday, 7:30am - 5pm
0800 453 627 | 09 238 6955
www.glenbrook.co.nz
CAN DO WHATEVER
YOU WANT IT TO DO
Small farms | Lifestyle blocks
Stables | Landscaping | Nurseries
ASK ABOUT
OUR PACKAGE
DEALS:
Tractor, front end loader,
mower, digger, harrow
FROM ONLY
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DIG, LEVEL, LOAD, TOW A TRAILER,
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OVER
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Tunnelhouses
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P0 8ox j8j, InvercariII 8qo
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morrieIdQcIear.net.nz
www.morrieId.com
- IdeaI additien te yeur IiIestyIe bIeck
- Crew vegetabIes aII year reund and reduce
yeur grecery biII
- very aIIerdabIe and easy te instaII
- 1etaIIy NZ made by IamiIy business making
tunneIheuses Ier je years
- kange eI medeIs Irem zm te 8m Ieng
A Growing Opportunity
Interested?
1820 Cambridge Road, RD5, Te Awamutu 3875.
0800 GROWBULBS - 0800 476928
Ph: 07 871 3231 Fax: 07 871 3291
E: aylesburygardens@xtra.co.nz
www.aylesburygardens.co.nz
Niche market
in bulb growing!
Spend $1,150 to
grow it up to $60k
or more in 7 years
(incl. GST)
Become a
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Represent us with
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0800 GROWBULBS - 0800 476928
80 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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villagegreen
Sign up for our email newsletter
and be the rst to know
about specials and promotions.
If you can grow it
from seed,
Weve got it!
Visit
www.kingsseeds.co.nz
for inspiration, advice
& 100% satisfaction from
your shopping experience.
Kings Seeds (NZ) Ltd. PO Box 283, Katikati 3166
Ph: 07 549 3409 Fax: 07 549 3408
info@kingsseeds.co.nz
The cute wee hre with a
big heart
Pop him in your mobile home,
rural cottage or holiday bach or
even in front of your old open re.
Sparky will chuckle away
and brighten your day.
5 Allen Bell Drive, Kaitaia
Ph 09 408-2469
Sparky
WAGENER
www.connovation.co.nz
email: lyn@connovation.co.nz Ph: 09 215 4355
Environmentally Responsible and Humane!
ITS D DAY FOR POSSUMS!
Connovation leads the way in researching and developing innovative, humane and socially
acceptable pest control technologies. Choose Conservation. Choose Connovation!
MENTION THIS ADVERT AND SAVE 10%
Our DROP DEAD easy-to-use pest control
products make possum control on your farm or
lifestyle block easy and safe for pets and livestock!
Know your
Enemy!
Monitor their presence
and population with
Chew Cards
Lure them in with
irrestible Lure-It!
Easy spray on lures with
irresistible scents like
cinnamon, aniseed and peanut
Taken care of
with Timms trap
and Long Life
Solid State Baits

www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 81
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villagegreen
Our machines are fully
portable 220v and plug into
a standard NZ power socket.
Perfect for milking 20 cows
or just the one.
Suitable for cows or goats.
Priced from $2395
including delivery.
www.milkingnz.co.nz
Phone: 09 420 9291
Milking New Zealand
We have affordable mobile milking plants
www.omcpowerequipment.co.nz
PH 0800 662-769
HIGH PRESSURE PORTABLE PUMPS & GENERATORS
GENUINE HONDA MOTORS
MH15 SHP PUMP
390 Ltrlmin
74.5 mtr head
105 psi
6enuine 5.5hp
Kcnda mctcr
GENERATORS
McdeIs avaiIabIe
frcm 2.5 kva - 16 kva
Friced frcm $999 + GST
$1099
+GST
FIRE
PROTECTION
Freight Free NZ wide
3000 psi 6X200 6.5 Mctcr
11 Ltrlmin
10 inch pneumatic tyres
Cat IndustriaI pump
15 Mtr KlD Kcse
IndustriaI Iance with CIick in
nczzIes MAD in uSA ( Nct China)!
$1675
+GST
All prices exclude GST unless stated.
FS3000KD WA1k8LAS1k
FREE TURBO
NOZZLE value
$149 + GST
Aluminium frames
Twin wall
polycarbonate
Better insulation
and no breakage
Hunkin
Garden Products Ltd
Full catalogue online at
www.hunkin.co.nz
or phone 0800 14 48 65
GREENHOUSES
www.lifestyleproducts.net.nz
Quality Cookers
Warm Home
Good Food
Hot Water
Rayburn
Solid Fuel Cookers
Phone Lo|s or Brendon 03 3106 534 or 0800 Rayburn
www.classiccookers.co.nz
82 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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Solar Water Pumping Systems
Provide water reliably and economically anywhere without fossil fuel or batteries
www.ablesolar.co.nz 09 837 2211
Distributor of
Solar Powered
Bore Pumps
Surface Pumps
Pool Pumps
The Mantis
Lightweight Cultivator
The Mantis will greatly reduce
your effort in gardening. No more
wrestling with a heavy machine.
With the optional accessories the
Mantis will also detach and aerate
lawns, trim edges and cut furrows
for planting potatoes etc.
Hunkin Garden Products Ltd
Catalogue online at
www.hunkin.co.nz
or phone 0800 14 48 65
Freephone 0800 946 837 www.wintergardenz.co.nz
Pricing
from $995
Unique features of a
Winter Gardenz Greenhouse...
Two superior glazing options available:
- mm Iwin wc|| polycarbonate - insulating
- 4mm Icughenec safety glass - strong & safe
Slrcng cnc curcL|e pcwcer ccclec
c|uminium jcinery ccn:lruclicn
Slurcy /|uminium Lc:e inc|ucec wilh
fcuncclicn mcunling cplicn: cvci|cL|e
Lcrge rcnge cf :ize: lc :uil ycur neec:
Fu|| rcnge cf ccce::crie: & :he|ving
8ui|l lc |c:ll Dcnl Le fcc|ec Ly checp &
nc:ly impcrlec ccpie: which ccnl |c:ll
G|c:: & Fc|yccrLcncle
Greenhcu:e: &
/cce::crie:
Quality NZ made
Greenhouses
10 year
guarantee
BUILT FOR NEW ZEALANDS HARSH CONDITIONS
SEPTIC TANK PROBLEMS??
Our easy to use ECOBAC product will solve your
problems. Call us to nd out how!!
Freephone 0508 425 742
Ph 03 544 4365, 16 Gladstone Road, Richmond, Nelson
We Courier Anywhere in New Zealand.
alpha
environmental
Odours - Blocked Drainage Lines -
Frequent Pump Outs - Overloading -
Start Up or Maintenance of Tank
Incubators New Zealand
New Zealands Oldest & Largest
Incubator Supplier
3-egg Incubators to over 1000-egg Incubators
We have USA made incubators that hold 50 eggs for $285
We have fully automatic, all electronic, LCD display, digital control
for humidity & temperature, automatic turning,
built-in fan, humidity pumping system.
Monitors and adjusts itself to suit.
All this for under $500.
Mention this Ad and get it for $450
Phone: 09 420 9291
web: www.incubatorsnz.co.nz
email: incubatorsnz@ihug.co.nz
Cows / Goat / Sheep
Stainless Steel Milking Machines
Single or Double Kit Sets
Electric or Petrol
asy to use & Clean ldeal for Bouse Cows, Calf kearing, Cheese Making etc
Milking time 5-6 mins per cow 12 Month Warranty
All parts and accessories available
ph 09 28J J425 mob 021 519 507 email: infomilkingsolutions.co.nz
www.milkingsolutions.co.nz
CHOOK HOUSES
Lightweight
Even easier to move
Ideal for 6-8 chooks
$
905
Water trough
$
63
Pellet feeder
$
74
All prices include GST
New Improved Design
0800 826 574
www.mainline.net.nz
Also: Fuel Tanks, Diesel Trailers, Hay Racks, Dog Kennels & Carriers, General Engineering
As seen at
National Fieldays
www.nzlifestyleblock.co.nz 83
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STRONG RELIABLE GREAT VALUE
CHOICE OF 7 MODELS FOR
TRACTORS 15-50HP
ERS100 1mtr $1290
ERS120 1.2mtr $1450
ERS140 1.4mtr $1550
ERM110 1.1mtr $1390
ERM125 1.25mtr $1490
ERM140 1.4mtr $1590
ERM160 1.6mtr $1790
ALL PRICES INCLUDE GST
COMPETITIVE FREIGHT ARRANGED NZ WIDE
EUROFARM EQUIPMENT CO
A DIVISION OF THAMES MACHINERY
Lifestyle Block Equipment Suppliers for over 18 years
P. 07 868 8775 E. sales@thamesmachinery.co.nz
W. www.thamesmachinery.farmtrader.co.nz
ROTARY MOWERS
TOPPERS
EUROFARM
ROTARY MOWERS
POLYNET PRODUCTS
Mikroclima crop cover/frost cloth.
Tunnet heavy duty cover.
Fibreglass rods for cloches.
Olirete olive/nut & birdnet.
Extruded mesh for fenceing, pest,
stock/pet control. Drying mesh,
Mosquito mesh & Safety net.
Clips, fastenings and more..
For info and online shop see..
www.polynet.co.nz
The BEST way
to collect eggs
Ezynest poultry nest boxes are
the best way to protect eggs.
Available in 3 sizes -
When the eggs are laid they
roll-away into a collection tray.
ph (06) 856 6059

ezynest.co.nz
MAKE
LIFE EASY
Use a Jenquip
Harvester
Phone: 0800 35 35 37
info@jenquip.co.nz
www.jenquip.co.nz
Orders and
Catalogues
Ph 03 217 5752 F
orever
NZ Seedlings
F
orests
BEECH TREES
SEEDLINGS
Nothofagus $60 per 100
NZ Beech trees are our most
distinctive trees. Growing to
magnificent trees, large and
spreading. Branches weep with
plenty of room. For farms, driveways
and one tree sections. Also fantastic
planted in groups where growth
stays upright. Dainty foliage.
Rapid growth when young. Partly
deciduous, red confetti like leaves
drifting down. Order plenty ASAP!
Long untidy Grass?
The DR Trimmer/Mower mows everything
from whole lawns to waist high weeds,
wet or dry. Mows rough areas where
you would not dare to take a mower
or ride on. Ideal for lifestyle farms,
roadsides, orchards, holiday
homes and large properties.
Hunkin
Garden Products Ltd
Catalogue online at
www.hunkin.co.nz
or phone 0800 14 48 65
specialist suppliers
of hazelnut trees for
commercial orchard
planting
STRONG RELIABLE GREAT VALUE
MODELS TO SUIT 16-40HP
ERT100 1mtr $1995
ERT125 1.25mtr $2495
ERT140 1.4mtr $2795
MODELS TO SUIT 40-75HP
ERH125 1.25mtr $3495
ERH140 1.4mtr $3895
ERH160 1.6mtr $4395
ERH180 1.8mtr $4995
ALL PRICES INCLUDE GST
FREIGHT FREE TOANY MAINFREIGHT DEPOT INNZ
EUROFARM EQUIPMENT CO
A DIVISION OF THAMES MACHINERY
Lifestyle Block Equipment Suppliers for over 18 years
P. 07 868 8775 E. sales@thamesmachinery.co.nz
W. www.thamesmachinery.farmtrader.co.nz
ROTARY
HOES
EUROFARM
ROTARY HOES
Booking deadline
9th December
book your
ad
for February 2014
Aluminium and Brass Weathervanes
using traditional casting techniques -
11 designs: Trout, Rooster, Cat, Snapper,
Arrow, Yacht, Horse, Bull, Marlin, Dog
or Kiwi - Matt Black nish.
WATERPROOF FOOTWEAR LTD
0800 285 285
www.sandcast.co.nz
84 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
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BREED SOCIETIES

LLAMAS. For information about
owning and caring for llamas visit
www.llamas.org.nz or contact The NZ
Llama Association (09) 407 7107.
FOR SALE
AUTOPOT - the original & best
power free hydroponics. Check it
out - its impressive.
www.bearforest.co.nz
GREENHOUSE - Top Quality - Best
range - 10 year guarantee. 6 months
interest free. Buy online today
www.thegreenhouseshop.co.nz
LEEAKY HOSE IRRIGATION.
www.hunkin.co.nz 0800 14 48 65.
LPG WEED BURNER.
www.hunkin.co.nz 0800 14 48 65.
NZ DISTRIBUTOR SACCO Cheese
Cultures - for home, artisan or
commercial cheesemaking we can
help. www.curdsandwhey.co.nz
or ph 09 376 3055.
PLANT RAISING PANELS.
www.hunkin.co.nz 0800 14 48 65.
RABBIT REPELLENT.
www.hunkin.co.nz 0800 14 48 65.
SOLAR POWERED FOUNTAINS
AND WATERFALLS.
www.hunkin.co.nz 0800 14 48 65.
TUNNEL HOUSES.
www.hunkin.co.nz 0800 14 48 65.
LIVESTOCK

MINIATURE HEREFORDS.
Ph 09 236 9390.
www.miniatureherefords.co.nz
PLANTS & TREES

MARA WHENUA APPLE TREE
SPECIALIST. 60 varieties; heritage
& modern eaters, cookers, cider.
Organically grown. Hardy rootstocks.
6 trees $150. Ph 09 408 5443.
www.tastytrees.co.nz
SUBTROPICAL EDIBLE and
ornamental plants couriered
throughout NZ. Send $5 for catalogue
to Subtropica, Massey Road, RD2,
Waipu. Ph 09 432 0018 or visit
www.subtropica.co.nz
TAGASASTE the most useful tree ever!
Dryland areas, fast shelter, bird, bee
and livestock feed. Great rewood too.
Ph 06 838 6614.
tetotara@slingshot.co.nz
TREE PROTECTORS. Stop your new
young trees being eaten. Freestanding
robust, galvanised wire mesh from
$18 each. Contact Allan 0274 321 133.
chickinout@ymail.com
POULTRY

APPLETONS HEN HOUSES and
Poultry Supplies. Visit our informative
website www.chooks.co.nz for
everything to do with keeping
chickens. Ph 03 542 3224.
NEW ZEALAND POULTRY
STANDARDS BOOK 3rd Edition. 310
pages and 65 in colour. A4 size. $70 +
$7 postage anywhere in New Zealand.
Also for Poultry Shield, Diatomaceous
Earth, Poultry Tonic, Poultry Water
Nipples and other products, check out
our website and join up for our FREE
E-Newsletter. Available from
www.poultrynz.com or contact
Ian Selby, poultrynz@xtra.co.nz
or ph 06 754 6262.
OYSTER SHELL GRIT. Kiln dried,
crushed & screened. 20kg bag $10.
Ex-Papakura factory. Discounts for
quantity. Enquire for NZ wide freight
rates. Excelsior Poultry Grit Co. Ltd.
Ph 09 298 5954 or email
excelsiorgrit@ihug.co.nz
REAL ESTATE

LIFESTYLE BLOCK, MAUNU,
Whangarei, 8 acres, sheep/cattle
grazing, olive grove, orchard, stream
with water rights, 15 mins to town,
good schools. 09 438 2595 or 027 541
6211. kaiser_tina@hotmail.com
SEMINARS & COURSES

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY training.
Two courses. Beginners and
advanced. Free facts pack. Toll-free
0800 801 994. www.nzibs.co.nz
HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO
WRITE? Getting published is now
easy. Free facts pack. Toll-free 0800
801 994. www.nzibs.co.nz
LIFE COACHING COURSE. Work
from home; make a life-changing
difference to others. Details ph 0800
801 994. www.nzibs.co.nz
PROOFREADER training course.
Get paid to nd Misteaks. Free facts
pack. Toll-free 0800 801 994.
www.nzibs.co.nz
ROMANCE NOVEL READERS. Learn
how to write bestselling romance
stories. Ph 0800 801 994.
www.nzibs.co.nz

TOURS

LEARN HOW YOU GET PAID while
you travel and write about it.
Free facts pack. Toll-free 0800 801 994.
www.nzibs.co.nz

WEBSITES TO VISIT

www.lavender.org.nz
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86 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
GROWING
SELF-SUFFICIENCY
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AND MORE IS AVAILABLE AT THE NZ LIFESTYLE BLOCK BOOK STORE.
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Practical Small Farming in NZ
Trisha Fisk, 224 pages $40
Lifestyle Farming in NZ
Paul Martin, 202 pages, $40
How to build Animal Housing
Carol Ekarius, 272 pages, $70
Plants that Poison: A NZ Guide
Henry Connor & John Fountain,
112 pages, $29.99
I am a working dog
Michael Oliver & Tony Sheild,
80 pages, $19.99
Pocket Guide to Cattle Breeds of NZ
Graham Meadows, 176 pages, $29.99
Pocket Guide to Sheep Breeds of NZ
Graham Meadows, 176 pages, $29.99
Making Animals Happy
Temple Grandin, 352 pages, $39.99
One-Straw Revolution
Masanobu Fukuoka, 226 pages $34.99
STOREYS GUIDES $50 EACH
Raising Pigs, 320 pages
Raising Sheep, 400 pages
Raising Llamas, 327 pages
Raising Beef Cattle, 352 pages
Raising Dairy Goats, 283 pages
Raising Meat Goats, 337 pages
Organic Vegetable Gardening (NZ)
Xanthe White, 320 pages, $50
Tui NZ Vegetable Garden
Sally Cameron, 304 pages, $45
The Native Plant Garden (NZ)
Dennis Greville, 128 pages, $39.95
Koanga Garden Guide (NZ)
Kay Baxter, 345 pages, $55
Palmers Herb Growers Handbook (NZ)
Gilian Painter, 120 pages, $19.99
Palmers Citrus Handbook (NZ)
Eion Scarrow, 120 pages, $19.99
Know your NZ native plants
Lawrie Metcalf, 176 pages, $35
100 Best Native Plants for NZ Gardens
Fiona Eadie, 336 pages, $45
The Weed Control Handbook
Weedbusters NZ, 112 pages, $30
Design your own orchard (NZ)
Kay Baxter, 174 pages, $32
Know your NZ insects & spiders
Don Horne & John Early, 176 pages, $35
Practical Beekeeping in NZ
Andrew Matheson & Murray Reid,
288 pages, $49.95
Managing Pests & Diseases (NZ)
Rob Lucas, 404 pages, $39.99
The New Self-Sufcient Gardener
John Seymour, 256 pages, $65
Roses love garlic (companion planting)
Louise Riotte, 256 pages, $40
Carrots love tomatoes (companion
planting)
Louise Riotte, 224 pages, $40
The Mulch Book
Stu Campbell, 352 pages, $37.50
The Permaculture Home Garden
Linda Woodrow, 192 pages, $47
One Magic Square
Lolo Houbein, 368 pages, $47
Homegrown Whole Grains
Sara Pitzer, 168 pages, $35
Beekeeping - A Practical Guide
Richard Bonney, 192 pages $50
Storeys Guide to Keeping Honey Bees
Malcolm Sanford & Richard Bonney,
256 pages, $50
COUNTRY WISDOM BULLETINS
Various authors, 30-36 pages, $10 each
Grow the Best Tomatoes
The basics of growing great tomatoes
Gardening in Clay Soil
What to do and what not to do
10 Herbs for Happy, Healthy Dogs
Safe herb remedies to make
10 Herbs for Happy, Healthy Cats
Safe herb remedies to make
15 Herbs for the Kitchen Garden
A brief introduction to kitchen herbs
Easy Composters You Can Build
Ideas for building composters
Storeys Basic Country Skills
John & Martha Storey, 576 pages, $70
The New Complete Book
of Self-sufciency
John Seymour, 408 pages, $67
The Soapmakers Companion
Susan Miller-Cavitch, 288 pages, $55
Milk-based Soaps
Casey Makela, 112 pages, $30
Organic Body Care Recipes
Judy Pangman, 176 pages $50
The Handmade Market Place
Kari Chapin, 224 pages, $32.50
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How to Care for your Poultry Volume 1
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Nadene Hall & Sue Clarke, 144 pages,
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The Chicken Health Handbook
Gail Damerow, 352 pages, $55
Chicken Coops - 45 Building Plans
Judy Pangman, 176 pages, $55
STOREYS GUIDES $50 EACH
Raising Poultry, 352 pages
Raising Chickens, 436 pages
Raising Turkeys, 208 pages
Raising Ducks, 320 pages
COUNTRY WISDOM BULLETINS
Various authors, 30-36 pages, $10 each
Building Chicken Coops
Designs for different coops
Eggs & Chickens
In a small space on home-grown food
Ducks & Geese
An introduction to ducks and geese
A fresh take on preserves (NZ)
NZ Lifestyle Block, 144 pages, $19.90
How to Make Cheese (NZ)
Jean Manseld, 78 pages, $19.90
Digby Laws Pickle & Chutney
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216 pages, $29.99
Digby Laws Vegetable Cookbook (NZ)
304 pages, $29.99
Ladies, a Plate, Alexa Johnston (NZ)
178 pages, $45
The Growers Cookbook (NZ)
Dennis Greville & Jill Brewis, 176 pages
$45
The River Cottage Meat Book
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, 544 pages,
$110
The River Cottage Cookbook
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, 450 pages,
$42
River Cottage Family Cookbook
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, 416 pages,
$65
River Cottage: Preserves
Pam Corbin, 224 pages, $39.99
A Year in a Bottle
Sally Wise, 256 pages, $27
Home Sausage Making
Susan Mahnke Peery, 288 pages, $40
The Home Winemakers Companion
Gene Spaziani, 266 pages, $55
Home Cheesemaking
Ricki Carroll, 176 pages, $45
Making Artisan Cheese
Tim Smith, 176 pages, $50
The Home Creamery
Kathy Farrell-Kingsley, 214 pages, $40
Escape to River Cottage $69.95
Return to River Cottage $69.95
River Cottage Forever $69.95
Beyond River Cottage $69.95
River Cottage Spring $55.95
River Cottage Autumn $55.95
River Cottage Road Trip $55.95
Pig in a Day $59.95
How to Make Compost (NZ)
Joe and Trish Polaischer, $25
Make Cheese with Jean Manseld DVD
$39.95
COUNTRY WISDOM BULLETINS
Various authors, 30-36 pages, $10 each
Jams, Jellies & More
Transform fruit into tempting preserves
Making Homemade Wine
A look at the process of basic
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Making Cheese, Butter & Yoghurt
The basics of making dairy products
Making & Using Flavoured Vinegars
Recipes for avouring vinegar
Healing Herbal Wines, Vinegars & Syrups
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88 NZ Lifestyle Block incorporating NZ Lifestyle Farmer
Every month we tell the stories of NZ Lifestyle Block readers, and wed love
to hear from you too. Share your story of farm life and if we print it you get
a $50 voucher for your favourite rural supply store or garden centre.
Wed love to hear about your property and its animals, your projects, your lifes moments. Write to NZ Lifestyle
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they can be posted (on CD or memory stick) or emailed (high resolution jpegs, 300dpi) to us.
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TELL YOUR STORY & WIN!
bees would wake from their waxy slumber
and swarm my tiny car. Within days of
installing the hive in a carefully selected
spot among the blooming manuka,
neighbours reported sightings of honey
bees in their gardens, something they had
not seen for years. I congratulated myself
over the buzz my bees were creating.
But just like Die Hard, things started to
go wrong not long into the journey.
The bees have varroa! I wailed
into the phone at my Mentor. He
appeared in a flash of Bayvarol
glory, applying the requisite remedy
and saving the bees from certain
death. Could he be the hero of this
misadventure? Was that a cape I
saw tucked into his overalls?
It was a slow recovery, but
the colony bounced back.
However, distracted by other
summery jobs on our block, I
checked the hive infrequently,
or never if you ask my Beloved
who is conveniently allergic to bees.
Ive come to look at the hive,
Words Joan Rockell
M
arch can be a very bad time for
the Unprepared Beekeeper,
my Beloved reads aloud from
the latest NZ Lifestyle Block.
The words sting a little. Hes too polite
to say it, but we both know he should.
Its March. Late March. And I am the
Unprepared Beekeeper.
I have just returned from another
unsuccessful search for the wasp nest
that is tormenting my hive. Theyre like
terrorists taking over the plane/building/
vehicle in the Die Hard movies. Which
of my bees would do a Bruce Willis and
lead the colony to victory against the
oppressors? My hive needed a hero. I
watched the Bee Movie for the fifth time,
searching for animated clues. Maybe I
should have gone to more than just one
Beekeeping Association meeting.
I was excited to become an Amateur
Beekeeper. They had me at bzzz bzzz.
I fondly recall the day my Beekeeping
Mentor gave me my first hive. That night,
I carefully drove it home, anxious not to
take too many sharp bends for fear the
A Country Life
I congratulated
myself over the
buzz my bees
were creating.
Should she bee or not bee into bees?
announced my Mentor one weekend,
casually dropping in without notice like
a Mystery Shopper hired to catch you not
doing your job. I fired up the smoker and
led the way.
The honeys gone, the Queen is weak
and wasps are breaching the hive, he
reported. It was like the opening line of a
sad country and western song.
The casualties are high survivors
few. His military past was surfacing.
Would I be charged for crimes against my
apiary? I refrained from verbalising the
thought. It was not the time for humour
or equally for finding out there exists an
international convention for the rights of
the honey bee.
Sensing I was a massive
disappointment to a man that had
successfully kept bees for many years,
I asked if he planned to terminate our
Mentor/Apprentice relationship.
To be or not to be, he said cryptically.
All these years since high school English
and I still wasnt sure if that was a genuine
question or more of a statement. Without
argument, the hive was removed from
my care and driven many miles away to
the bee equivalent of rehab. Bee-reft, I
drowned my sorrows in a lemon-honey
drink. March really can be a very bad time
for the Unprepared Beekeeper.
LO
V
E AT

rst bu
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Order online at mags4gifts.co.nz or call 0800 113 466
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Love M
ark (age 41)
D
ear S
anta
A
quick note to say thanks for the very interesting
reindeer jacket you gave m
e last C
hristm
as.
This year, however, w
hat I w
ould real l y l ove is a
Christmas special subscription pricing is available until 8th January 2014. Standard subscription pricing will resume from 9th January 2014.
E
njoying my
favourite magazine
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