You are on page 1of 146

qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqw ertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwert yuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyui Quotes About opasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopa Habits of the sdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdf Mind ghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghj Great Quotations klzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklz xcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcv

bnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbn mqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmq wertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwer tyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyui opasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopa sdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdf ghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghj klzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklz


1/19/2 ! "arious#$uthors

Page1

QUOTES ABOUT HABITS OF MIND


A Habit of Mind means having a disposition toward behaving intelligently when confronted with problems, the answers to which are not immediately known: dichotomies, dilemmas, enigmas and uncertainties. It means getting into the habit of behaving intelligently when you D !"# know the answer.

"Habit is a cable; we weave a thread of it each day, and at last we cannot break it." Horace Mann "The sum of one's intelligence is the sum of one's habits of mind." Lauren esnick "!owerful indeed is the em"ire of habit." !ublicus #yrus, $% &' "( learned to make my mind large, as the universe is large, so that there is room for "arado)es." Ma)ine Hong *ingston "Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what kee"s you going." +im yuh "Learning to e)"lain "henomena such that one continues to be fascinated by the failure of one's e)"lanations creates a continuing cycle of thinking, that is the cru) of intelligence. (t isn't that one "erson knows more than another, then. (n as sense, it is im"ortant to know less than the ne)t "erson, or at least to be certain of less, thus enabling more curiosity and less e)"laining away because one has again encountered a well,known "henomenon. The less you know the more you can find out about, and finding out for oneself is what intelligence is all about." oger #chank "How much do students really love to learn, to "ersist, to "assionately attack a "roblem or a task- ...to watch some of their "ri.ed ideas e)"lode and to start anew- ...to go beyond being merely dutiful or long,winded- Let us assess such things." /rant 0iggins "The secret of a leader lies in the tests he has faced over the whole course of his

life and the habit of action he develo"s in meeting those tests." /ail #heehy "1ut of clutter, find #im"licity. 2rom discord, find Harmony. (n the middle of difficulty lies o""ortunity." 3lbert 4instein "3 great "leasure in Life is doing what "eo"le say you cannot do." Tommy +ohn

"5atural abilities are like natural "lants; they need "runing by study." 2rancis &acon "( believe everybody is creative, and everybody is talented. ( 6ust don't think that everybody is disci"lined. ( think that's a rare commodity." 3l Hirschfield "There is no education like adversity." &en6amin 7israeli "0hat ha""ens is not as im"ortant as how you react to what ha""ens." Thaddeus /olas "#uccessful "eo"le aren't born that way. They become successful by establishing the habit of doing things unsuccessful "eo"le don't like to do. The successful "eo"le don't always like these things themselves; they 6ust get on and do them." 0illiam Make"eace Thackeray "!er"le)ity is the beginning of knowledge." *ahlil /ibran "5othing can sto" the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can hel" the man with the wrong mental attitude" Thomas +efferson "1""osition is a natural "art of life. +ust as we develo" our "hysical muscles through overcoming o""osition , such as lifting weights , we develo" our character muscles by overcoming challenges and adversity." #te"hen 'ovey "0hen you are face to face with a difficulty, you are u" against a discovery." Lord *elvin "#uccess is a state of mind. (f you want success, start thinking of yourself as a

success." 7r. +oyce &rothers "The true test of character is...how we behave when we don't know what to do." +ohn Holt "The greater "art of our ha""iness or misery de"ends on our dis"ositions, and not on our circumstances." Martha 0ashington "3nyone can have a good day. The 8uestion is what do you do on a bad day. That's when you're being tested. (n a very tangible sense, a bad day shows your innermost essence more than a good day." 3rthur /olden "3 ha""y "erson is not a "erson in a certain set of circumstances, but rather a "erson with a certain set of attitudes." Hugh 7owns "To learn new habits is everything, for it is to reach the substance of life. Life is but a tissue of habits." Henri 2redric 3miel "/ood habits are as addictive as bad habits, and a lot more rewarding." Harvey Mackay "0hen we no longer know what to do we have come to our real work and when we no longer know which way to go we have begun our real 6ourney. The mind that is not baffled is not em"loyed. The im"eded stream is the one that sings." 0endell &erry "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy." 7r. Martin Luther *ing, +r. "4)cellence is an art won by training and habituation. 0e do not act rightly because we have virtue or e)cellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. 0e are what we re"eatedly do. 4)cellence, then, is not an act but a habit." 3ristotle "(ron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its "urity and in cold weather becomes fro.en; even so does inaction sa" the vigor of the mind." Leonardo da 9inci

"Hel" your children understand that e)cellence in education cannot be achieved without intellectual and moral integrity cou"led by hard work and commitment." 5ational 'ommission on 4)cellence in 4ducation "The mind is like the stomach. (t's not how much you "ut into it, but how much it digests." 3lbert +ay 5ock "To make headway, im"rove your head." &. '. 2orbes "The successful "erson is the individual who forms the habit of doing what the failing "erson doesn't like to do." 7onald iggs "5urture your mind with great thoughts, for you will never go any higher than you think." &en6amin 7israeli "The em"ires of the future are the em"ires of the mind." 0inston 'hurchill

"( have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the "osition that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed." &ooker T. 0ashington "There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives of the "eo"le you love. 0hen you learn to ta" this source, you will have truly defeated age." #o"hia Loren "The habits of a vigorous mind are formed in contending with difficulties." 3bigail 3dams "Trouble creates a ca"acity to handle it." 1liver 0endell Holmes #mooth seas do not make skillful sailors. 3frican "roverb "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy." Martin Luther *ing +r.

"Take the obvious, add a cu"ful of brains, a generous "inch of imagination, a bucketful of courage and daring, stir well and bring to a boil." &ernard &aruch "&e of good cheer. 7o not think of today's failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow. ;ou have set yourselves a difficult task, but you will succeed if you "ersevere; and you will find a 6oy in overcoming obstacles." Helen *eller "The mind has e)actly the same "ower as the hands: not merely to gras" the world, but to change it." 'olin 0ilson, 3uthor "5urture your mind with great thoughts; to believe in the heroic makes heroes." &en6amin 7israeli "Man needs difficulties; they are necessary for health." 'arl +ung "The true test of character is not how much we know how to do, but how we behave when we don't know what to do." +ohn Holt "(t is not in the still calm of life, or the re"ose of "acific station that great characters are formed." 3bigail 3dams "*nowledge comes, but wisdom lingers." 3lfred, Lord Tennyson

"0hen we are "lanning for "osterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." Thomas !aine "'haracter is higher than intellect." al"h 0aldo 4merson "5o brain is stronger than its weakest think." Thomas L. Masson "(t is not enough to have a good mind. The main thing is to use it well." en< 7escartes

"3chieve success in any area of life by identifying the o"timum strategies and re"eating them until they become habits." 'harles +. /ivens &usinessman, and 3uthor "#uccess is a "rocess, a 8uality of mind and way of being, an outgoing affirmation of life." 3le) 5oble, "hiloso"her "(n adversity remember to kee" an even mind." Horace "Habit is ten times nature." 7uke of 0ellington "The ha""iness of your life de"ends on the 8uality of your thoughts." Marcus 3urelius 3ntoninus, oman ruler "The greatest discovery of any generation is that human beings can alter their lives by altering the attitudes of their minds." 3lbert #chweit.er, M. 7. "0hen "eo"le will not weed their own minds, they are a"t to be overrun with nettles." Horace 0al"ole, Lord 1rford "1ur self,image and our habits tend to go together. 'hange one and you will automatically change the other." 7r. Ma)well Malt., author "Thought makes the whole dignity of man; therefore endeavor to think well, that is the only morality." &laise !ascal

1. PERSISTING

$ e r s e v e r i n g o n a t a s k e v e n t h o u g h t h e r e s o l u t i o n i s n o t

"&e like a "ostage stam"=stick to one thing until you get there." Margaret 'arty 2ailed in business, >?@> 7efeated for legislature, >?@% 3gain failed in business, >?@@ 4lected to legislature, >?@$ 7efeated for #"eaker, >?@? 7efeated for elector, >?$A 7efeated for 'ongress, >?$@ 4lected to 'ongress, >?$B 7efeated for 'ongress, >?$? 7efeated for #enate, >?CC 7efeated for vice,"resident, >?C? 7efeated for #enate, >?C? 4lected !resident of the Dnited #tates, >?BA 3braham Lincoln "!atience, "ersistence and "ers"iration make an unbeatable combination for success." 5a"olean Hill, author "4very day you miss "laying or "racticing is one day longer it takes to be good." &en Hogan, /olfer "5othing in the world can take the "lace of "ersistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. /enius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a "roverb. 4ducation will not; the world is full of educated failures. !ersistence and determination alone are omni"otent." 'alvin 'oolidge "2aith that the thing can be done is essential to any great achievement." Thomas 5. 'arruther

"3lways bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more im"ortant than any other thing." 3braham Lincoln "Tribulation "roduces "erseverance; and "erseverance, character; and character, ho"e." Romans

"'onstant dri""ing hollows out a stone." Lucretius "3ll effort is in the last analysis sustained by faith that it is worth making." 1rdway Tweed "0hen you have a great and difficult task, something "erha"s almost im"ossible, if you only work a little at a time, everyday a little, suddenly the work will finish itself." (sak 7inesen E"seudonym for *aren &li)enF, 7anish 0riter "3ge wrinkles the body. Guitting wrinkles the soul." 7ouglas Mac3rthur "( hated every minute of training, but ( said, '7on't 8uit. #uffer now and live the rest of your life like a cham"ion.'" Muhammad 3li "The difference between "erseverance and obstinacy is that one comes from a strong will, and the other from a strong won't." Henry 0ard &eecher "(n the realm of ideas, everything de"ends on enthusiasm; in the real world, all rests on "erseverance." /oethe "'ourage and "erseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disa""ear and obstacles vanish into air." +ohn Guincy 3dams "To be able to concentrate for a considerable time is essential to difficult achievement." &ertrand ussell

"(f ( had to select one 8uality, one "ersonal characteristic that ( regard as being most highly correlated with success whatever the field, ( would "ick the trait of "ersistence. 7etermination. The will to endure to the end, to get knocked down HA times and get u" off the floor saying, 'Here comes number H>I'"

ichard M. 7evos "Mastery is not something that strikes in an instant, like a thunderbolt, but gathering a "ower that moves steadily through time, like weather." +ohn 0 /ardner "(f the only tool you have is a hammer, you will treat the whole world as if it were a nail. " 4dward de &ono "2laming enthusiasm, backed u" by horse sense and "ersistence, is the 8uality that most often makes for success." 7ale 'arnegie "!ersistence is the twin sister of e)cellence. 1ne is a matter of 8uality; the other, a matter of time." Marabel Morgan "&ig shots are only little shots who kee" shooting." 'hristo"her Morely "Most of the im"ortant things in the world have been accom"lished by "eo"le who have ke"t on trying when there seemed to be no ho"e at all." 7ale 'arnegie "(t takes a long time to become young." !ablo !icasso "0hen we acce"t tough 6obs as a challenge to our ability and wade into them with 6oy and enthusiasm, miracles can ha""en." 3rland /ilbert "(t is a great nuisance that knowledge can be ac8uired only by hard work." 0. #omerset Maugham "(f ( have the belief that ( can do it, ( shall surely ac8uire the ca"acity to do it even if ( may not have it at the beginning." Mahatma /andhi

"(t's never crowded along the e)tra mile." 7r. 0ayne 7yer "(t's hard to wring my hands when ( am busy rolling u" my sleeves." Linda /eraci

"Those who succeed and do not "ush on to greater failure are the s"iritual middle,classers." 4ugene 1'5eill "Life is often com"ared to a marathon, but ( think it is more like being a s"rinter; long stretches of hard work "unctuated by brief moments in which we are given the o""ortunity to "erform at our best." Michael +ohnson "0inning isn't everything. J0antingJ to win is." 'atfish Hunter "0hatever course you decide u"on, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising which tem"t you to believe that your critics are right. To ma" out a course of action and follow it to an end re8uires courage." al"h 0aldo 4merson "0hen you get in a tight "lace and everything goes against you, till it seems as though you could not hold a minute longer, never give u" then, for that is 6ust the "lace and time that the tide will turn." Harriet &eecher #towe "3lways continue the climb. (t is "ossible for you to do whatever you choose if you first get to know who you are and are willing to work with a "ower that is greater than ourselves to do it. " 1"rah 0infrey "5othing of worth or weight can be achieved with half a mind, with a faint heart, and with a lame endeavor." (ssac &arrow "2ailure is usually the line of least "ersistence." 0ilfred &eaver "#uccess seems to be connected with action. #uccessful men kee" moving. They make mistakes but they don't 8uit." 'onrad Hilton "/rant me the courage not to give u", even though ( think it's ho"eless." 3dmiral 'hester 0. 5imit. "(t does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not sto"." 'onfucius

"Let me tell you the secret that has led me to my goal. My strength lies solely in my tenacity. " Louis !asteur "#tudies indicate that the one 8uality all successful "eo"le have is "ersistence. They're willing to s"end more time accom"lishing a task and to "ersevere in the face of many difficult odds. There's a very "ositive relationshi" between "eo"le's ability to accom"lish any task and the time they're willing to s"end on it." +oyce &rothers, !sychologist and 3uthor "( will "ersist until ( succeed. 3lways will ( take another ste". (f that is of no avail ( will take another, and yet another. (n truth, one ste" at a time is not too difficult . . . . ( know that small attem"ts, re"eated, will com"lete any undertaking." 1g Mandino, 3uthor "&y "erseverance the snail reached the ark." 'harles H. #"urgeon "#triving for success without hard work is like trying to harvest where you haven't "lanted." 7avid &ly The man who removes a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. 'hinese "roverb "1bstacles don't have to sto" you. (f you run into a wall, don't turn around and give u". 2igure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it." Michael +ordan "&eing defeated is often a tem"orary condition. /iving u" is what makes it "ermanent." Marlene #avant "( think there are two keys to being creatively "roductive. 1ne is not being daunted by one's fear of failure. The second is sheer "erseverance." Mary,'laire *ing 2all seven times, stand u" eight. +a"anese !roverb "!erseverance is the hard work you do after you get tired of doing the hard work you already did." 5ewt /ingrich

"(t's always too soon to 8uitI" 5orman 9incent !eale "The true art of memory is the art of attention." #amuel +ohnson "4nergy and "ersistence con8uer all things." &en6amin 2ranklin "( think and think for months and years. 5inety,nine times the conclusion is false. The hundredth time ( am right." 3lbert 4instein, !hysicist and Teacher "The great thing and the hard thing is to stick to things when you have outlived the first interest, and not yet got the second, which comes with a sort of mastery." +anet 4rskine #tuart, 4ducator "/reat works are "erformed not by strength, but by "erseverance." #amuel +ohnson "/reatness comes with recogni.ing that your "otential is limited only by how you choose, how you use your freedom, how resolute you are, how "ersistent you are=in short, by your attitude.K !eter *oestenbaum, !hiloso"her "5o matter how big and tough a "roblem may be, get rid of confusion by taking one little ste" towards solution. 7o something. Then try again. 3t the worst, so long as you don't do it the same way twice, you will eventually use u" all the wrong ways of doing it and thus the ne)t try will be the right one." /eorge 2. 5ordenhold "4ither ( will find a way, or ( will make one." !hili" #idney "(t's not that ('m so smart, it's 6ust that ( stay with "roblems longer." 3lbert 4instein (n the struggle between the stone and the water, in time, the water wins. 'hinese "roverb

"7on't be discouraged. (t's often the last key in the bunch that o"ens the lock." 3nonymous

"9itality shows in not only the ability to "ersist but the ability to start over." 2. #cott 2it.gerald "0hen you have a great and difficult task, something "erha"s almost im"ossible, if you only work a little at a time, every day a little, suddenly the work will finish itself." (sak 7inesen E"seudonym for *aren &li)enF, 7anish 0riter "#trength does not come from winning. ;our struggles develo" your strengths. 0hen you go through hardshi"s and decide not to surrender, that is strength." 3rnold #chwar.enegger, 3ctor "The man who can drive himself further once the effort gets "ainful is the man who will win." oger &annister "To give yourself the best "ossible chance of "laying to your "otential, you must "re"are for every eventuality. That means "ractice." #teve &allesteros, !rofessional /olfer Let us then be u" and doing, 0ith a heart for any fate; #till achieving, still "ursuing, Learn to labor and to wait. Henry 0adsworth Longfellow

"(f something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. (f still boring, then eight. Then si)teen. Then thirty,two. 4ventually one discovers that it is not boring at all." +ohn 'age "7iligence is the mother of good luck." &en6amin 2ranklin "The greatest results in life are usually attained by sim"le means and the e)ercise of ordinary 8ualities. These may for the most "art be summed u" in these two=commonsense and "erseverance." 1wen 2eltham, 0riter "'haracter consists of what you do on the third and fourth tries." +ames 3. Michener "5othing in the world can take the "lace of "ersistence and determination." 'alvin 'oolidge

"0hen the world says, '/ive u",' Ho"e whis"ers, 'Try it one more time.'" 3nonymous "The difference between "erseverance and obstinacy is that one comes from a strong will, and the other from a strong won't." Henry 0ard &eecher "Hard work s"otlights the character of "eo"le: some turn u" their sleeves, some turn u" their noses, and some don't turn u" at all." #am 4wing "Let me tell you the secret that has led me to my goal. My strength lies solely in my tenacity." Louis !asteur "That which we "ersist in doing becomes easier to do. 5ot that the nature of the thing has changed but the "ower to do it has changed." al"h 0aldo 4merson, 3uthor "2ailure is the condiment that gives success its flavor." Truman 'a"ote "!ersistence is what makes the im"ossible "ossible, the "ossible likely, and the likely definite." obert Half, 4)ecutive "4nergy and "ersistence con8uer all things." &en6amin 2ranklin "2ailure is usually the line of least "ersistence." 0ilfred &eaver ";ou don't win an 1lym"ic gold medal with a few weeks of intensive training." #eth /odin "( found that ( could find the energy...that ( could find the determination to kee" on going. ( learned that your mind can ama.e your body, if you 6ust kee" telling yourself, ( can do it...( can do it...( can do itI" +on 4rickson, scientist and author "4ffort only fully releases its reward after a "erson refuses to 8uit." 5a"oleon Hill

"The great thing, and the hard thing, is to stick to things when you have outlived the first interest, and not yet got the second, which comes with a sort of mastery." +anet 4rskine #tuart "!erseverance alone does not assure success. 5o amount of stalking will lead to game in a field that has none." ( 'hing "0hen we acce"t tough 6obs as a challenge to our ability and wade into them with 6oy and enthusiasm, miracles can ha""en." 3rland /ilbert, writer "(t does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not sto"." 'onfucius "!eo"le of mediocre ability sometimes achieve outstanding success because they don't know when to 8uit." /eorge Herbert 3llen

2. MANAGING IMPULSIVITY

A c t i n g w i t h f o r e t h o u g h t a n d d e l i b e r a t i o n . # a k e y o u r t

"(t is easier to su""ress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it." &en6amin 2ranklin "The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right "lace but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tem"ting moment." 7orothy 5evill "The immature mind ho"s from one thing to another; the mature mind seeks to follow through." Harry 3. 1verstreet "/reat things are not done by im"ulse, but by a series of small things brought together." 9incent 9an /ogh "#"eak when you're angry=and you'll make the best s"eech you'll ever regret." Laurence !eter "The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The secret of getting started is breaking your com"le) overwhelming tasks into small manageable tasks, and then starting on the first one." Mark Twain "3ction without study is fatal. #tudy without action is futile." Mary &eard "Think twice before you s"eak=and you'll find everyone talking about something else." 2rancis odman "5o good work is ever done while the heart is hot and an)ious and fretted." 1live #chriner "(ts better to slee" on things beforehand than to lie awake about them afterward." &althasar /raciare "...goal directed self,im"osed delay of gratification is "erha"s the essence of emotional self,regulation: the ability to deny im"ulse in the service of a goal, whether it be building a business, solving an algebraic e8uation, or "ursuing the #tanley cu"." 7aniel /oleman "Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, sto" thinking and go in."

3ndrew +ackson "Look twice before you lea"." 'harlotte &ronte "( can give you a si) word formula for success: Think things through=then follow through." 4ddie ickenbacker "The sign of intelligent "eo"le is their ability to control emotions by the a""lication of reason." Marya Mannes "/reat things are not something accidental, but must certainly be willed." 9incent van /ogh "1ne of the sources of "ride in being a human being is the ability to bear "resent frustrations in the interests of longer "ur"oses." Helen Merrell Lynd "5o man can think clearly when his fists are clenched." /eorge +ean 5athan "Let our advance worrying become advance thinking and "lanning." 0inston 'hurchill "'aution is the eldest child of wisdom." 9ictor Hugo "(m"ulse without reason is not enough, and reason without im"ulse is a "oor makeshift." 0illiam +ames "3 man has no more character than he can command in a time of crisis." al"h 0. #ockman

";our life is the sum result of all the choices you make, both consciously and unconsciously. (f you can control the "rocess of choosing, you can take control of all as"ects of your life. ;ou can find the freedom that comes from being in charge of yourself." obert 2. &ennett, D.#. #enator "The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right "lace

but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tem"ting moment." 7orothy 5evill 3 handful of "atience is worth more than a bushel of brains. 7utch !roverb &efore you start u" a ladder, count the rungs. ;iddish "roverb "The wise man thinks once before he s"eaks twice." obert &enchley (f you are "atient in one moment of anger, you will avoid one hundred days of sorrow. 'hinese "roverb "( count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who con8uers his enemies; the hardest victory is the victory over self." 3ristotle "The trouble with talking too fast is you may say something you haven't thought of yet." 3nn Landers "5ever be afraid to sit awhile and think." Lorraine Hansberry "3 man is not idle because he is absorbed in thought. There is a visible labor and there is an invisible labor." 9ictor Hugo "1ne cool 6udgment is worth a do.en hasty councils. The thing to do is to su""ly light and not heat." 0oodrow 0ilson "How "oor are they that have not "atienceI 0hat wound did ever heal but by degrees-" #hakes"eare EOthelloF

"/enius is nothing but a great a"titude for "atience." /eorges Louis Leclerc

"4verything comes gradually and at its a""ointed hour." 1vid "Learn the art of "atience. 3""ly disci"line to your thoughts when they become an)ious over the outcome of a goal. (m"atience breeds an)iety, fear, discouragement and failure. !atience creates confidence, decisiveness, and a rational outlook, which eventually leads to success." &rian 3dams "3ll things "ass ... !atience attains all it strives for." #t. Theresa of 3vila He who hurries can not walk with dignity. 'hinese !roverb "The cyclone derives its "owers from a calm center. #o does a "erson." 5orman 9incent !eale "( count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who con8uers his enemies; for the hardest victory is the victory over self." 3ristotle "0hen angry, count ten, before you s"eak; if very angry, an hundred." Thomas +efferson "( sto" and taste my words before ( let them "ass my teeth." 3nonymous "The most difficult thing in the world is to know how to do a thing and to watch someone else do it wrong, without comment." Theodore H. 0hite , re"orter and author " emember not only to say the right thing in the right "lace, but far more difficult still, to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tem"ting moment." &en6amin 2ranklin "&efore s"eaking, consider the inter"retation of your words as well as their intent." 3ndrew 3lden

3. LISTENING WITH UNDERSTANDING AND EMPATHY

D e v o t i n g m e n t a l e n e r g i e s t o u n d e r s t a n d i n g o t h e r s " t h o u

"(f you 6udge "eo"le, you have no time to love them." Mother Teresa "The way of being with another "erson which is termed em"athic means tem"orarily living in their life, moving about in it delicately without making 6udgments.... To be with another in this way means that for the time being you lay aside the views and values you hold for yourself in order to enter the other's world without "re6udice...a com"le), demanding, strong, yet subtle and gentle way of being." 'arl ogers "The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right "lace but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tem"ting moment." 7orothy 5evill "(t is the "rovince of knowledge to s"eak and it is the "rivilege of wisdom to listen." 1liver 0endell Holmes, #r. "(f you want to be listened to, you should "ut in time listening." Marge !iercy He who guards his mouth kee"s his life, but he who o"ens wide his li"s comes to ruin. !roverbs >@:@ "7ialogue is about "eo"le=listening to them, em"athi.ing with them, and humbling ourselves for a moment that we might understand a different view." Science & Spirit: Connecting Science, Religion and Life, +anuaryL2ebruary %AA>, ". H. "3 uni8ue relationshi" develo"s among team members who enter into dialogue regularly. They develo" a dee" trust that cannot hel" but carry over to discussions. They develo" a richer understanding of the uni8ueness of each "erson's "oint of view." !eter #enge " eal dialogue is where two or more "eo"le become willing to sus"end their certainty in each other's "resence." 7avid &ohm "Think twice before you s"eak=and you'll find everyone talking about something else." 2rancis odman

"Try to see it my way, only time will tell if ( am right or ( am wrong. 0hile you see it your way, there's a chance that we might fall a"art before too long. 0e can work it out. 0e can work it out." +ohn Lennon and !aul Mc'artney "The sim"le act of "aying attention can take you a long way." *eanu eeves "7ialogue's sole "ur"ose is to create something that has not "reviously been thought by any individual "rior to the dialogue. (t's "ur"ose is not to share information but to create information...." Michael McMaster "(f there is any secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other "erson's "oint of view and see things from his angle as well as from your own." Henry 2ord "5othing increases the res"ect and gratitude of one man for another more than when he is heard e)actly and with interest." . Dmbach Listening is the beginning of understanding.... 0isdom is the reward for a lifetime of listening. Let the wise listen and add to their learning and let the discerning get guidance. !roverbs >:C "3 good listener is not only "o"ular everywhere, but after a while he gets to know something." 0ilson Mi.ner "7id you ever notice how difficult it is to argue with someone who is not obsessed with being right-" 0ayne 0. 7yer "The only service a friend can really render is to kee" u" your courage by holding u" to you a mirror in which you can see a noble image of yourself." /eorge &ernard #haw

"( like to listen. ( have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most "eo"le never listen." 4rnest Hemingway "Life is the first gift, love is the second, and understanding the third." Marge !iercy

"7ialogue is a s"ace where we may see the assum"tions which lay beneath the surface of our thoughts, assum"tions which drive us, assum"tions around which we build organi.ations, create economies, form nations and religions. These assum"tions become habitual, mental habits that drive us, confuse us and "revent our res"onding intelligently to the challenges we face every day." 7avid &ohm "#ilent and listen are s"elled with the same lettersI" Dnknown "'ritici.ing others is a dangerous thing, not so much because you may make mistakes about them, but because you may be revealing the truth about yourself." Harold Medina "Listening is as im"ortant as talking. (f you're a good listener, "eo"le often com"liment you for being a good conversationalist." +esse 9entura "*now how to listen, and you will "rofit even from those who talk badly." !lutarch "(f you're forming a rebuttal, you're not really listening." +ane *livans, &ank 1ne (nvestment /rou" "(f you s"end more time asking a""ro"riate 8uestions rather than giving answers or o"inions, your listening skills will increase." &rian *oslow "Two monologues do not make a dialogue." +eff 7aly "Most conversations are sim"ly monologues delivered in the "resence of a witness." Margaret Millar

"0hen one's own "roblems are unsolvable and all best efforts are frustrated, it is lifesaving to listen to other "eo"le's "roblems." #u.anne Massie "There are very few "eo"le who don't become more interesting when they sto" talking." Mary Lowry

"1ne of the best ways to "ersuade others is with your ears=by listening to them." 7ean usk, D.#. #ecretary of #tate "&ecome the world's most thoughtful friend." H. +ackson &rown, +r., 3uthor "(f you can learn a sim"le trick, you'll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. ;ou never really understand a "erson until you consider things from his "oint of view . . . until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." Har"er Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird "4ducation is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your tem"er or your self,confidence." obert 2rost "Think in terms of what's good for the other "erson and success will seek you out." Mary *ay 3sh, 4ntre"reneur "Hearing is a "assive activity=you're allowing sound waves to "enetrate your ear. (n listening, you actively determine meaning to what is heard=you listen with your eyes and ears. ;ou're in control when a customer is talking about his "roblem, and out of control when you're talking about yourself." 'arolyn iddle, #ales !erson "To listen fully means to "ay close attention to what is being said beneath the words. ;ou listen not only to the 'music,' but to the essence of the "erson s"eaking. ;ou listen not only for what someone knows, but for what he or she is. 4ars o"erate at the s"eed of sound, which is far slower than the s"eed of light the eyes take in. /enerative listening is the art of develo"ing dee"er silences in yourself, so you can slow our mind's hearing to your ears' natural s"eed, and hear beneath the words to their meaning." !eter #enge Listen or thy tongue will kee" thee deaf. 3merican (ndian !roverb

"The key to wisdom is knowing all the right 8uestions." +ohn 3. #imone, +r. "Ten "eo"le who s"eak make more noise than ten thousand who are silent." 5a"oleon

"Most conversations are sim"ly monologues delivered in the "resence of witnesses." Margaret Millar "5ature has given men one tongue and two ears, that we may hear twice as much as we s"eak." 4"ictetus "&eing listened to is so close to being loved that most "eo"le cannot tell the difference." 7avid 1)berg "3 good listener tries to understand what the other "erson is saying. (n the end he may disagree shar"ly, but because he disagrees, he wants to know e)actly what it is he is disagreeing with." *enneth 3. 0ells "There is no greater loan than a sym"athetic ear." 2rank Tyger "0ell,timed silence hath more elo8uence than s"eech." Martin 2ra8uhar Tu""er "4ven a fool is thought wise if he kee"s silent, and discerning if he holds his tongue." 3nonymous The wise man has long ears and a short tongue. /erman !roverb "Listen and hear not only what you thought you wanted to hear. Listen and hear what you have to learn." al"h #. Marston, +r. Listen or your tongue will kee" you deaf. 5ative 3merican !roverb "Listening, not imitation, may be the sincerest form of flattery." 7r. +oyce &rothers ";ou cannot know who is going to bring you your future. ;ou cannot 8ualify them in advance by looking at degrees, or e)"erience, or gender or race. ;ou can only listenI" +oel &arker, F t re !dge "5o one really listens to anyone else, and if you try it for a while you'll see why."

Mignon McLaughlin "The first duty of love is to listen." !aul Tillich, theologian "Listen that you may live." (saiah "(t is the "rovince of knowledge to s"eak and it is the "rivilege of wisdom to listen." 1liver 0endall Holmes "'ourage is what it takes to stand u" and s"eak. 'ourage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." 0inston 'hurchill "Listening is a hug you give with your mind." &arbara 5i)on "The silence of "rayer is the silence of listening." 4li.abeth 1M'onnor, 4lderly Housing !rogram "The more faithfully you listen to the voice within you, the better you will hear what is sounding outside. 1nly he who listens can s"eak." 7ag Hammarskold "!eo"le donMt listen to understand. They listen to re"ly. The collective monologue is everyone talking and no one listening." #te"hen 'ovey Try to listen carefully that you might not have to s"eak. Guaker saying "0hen you are dee"ly contem"lative, you listen more carefully and understand things which cannot be articulated." 7avid 3. 'oo"er ";ou talk when you cease to be at "eace with your thoughts." *ahlil /ibran "The reason why so few "eo"le are agreeable in conversation is that each is thinking more about what he intends to say than about what others are saying, and we never listen when we are eager to s"eak." La ochefoucauld "4very moment ( s"end training myself to inner listening is like digging a well,

dee"er and dee"er, toward the source of re"lenishment that never goes dry." +oanne &lum, !h.7. "(n music we gain a sense of rhythm through the absence of sound. 3 similar "rocess occurs in communication between two "eo"le." #heldon oth "He who s"eaks does not know, he who knows does not s"eak." 3nonymous "( sto" and taste my words before ( let them "ass my teeth." 3nonymous "0e need silence to be able to touch souls." Mother Theresa "Listen as though your life de"ended on it. (t does." The 3rt of !ilgrimage "Listening=the language of love for everyone." 3nonymous "/ood com"any and good discourse are the very sinews of virtue." (.aak 0alton "There's a guidance for each of us, and by lowly listening we shall hear the right words." al"h 0aldo 4merson "( like to listen. ( have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most "eo"le never listen." 4rnest Hemingway "(t is understanding that gives us an ability to have "eace. 0hen we understand the other fellow's view"oint, and he understands ours, then we can sit down and work out the differences." Harry # Truman ";ou don't learn when you're talking." 0atts 0acker, '41, 2irstMatter

4. THINKING FLEXIBLY

% h a n g i n g p e r s p e c t i v e s , g e n e r a t i n g a l t e r n a t i v e s , c o n s

"( can't understand why "eo"le are frightened by new ideas. ('m frightened of old ones." +ohn 'age (t's an ill "lan that cannot be changed. Latin "roverb "+ust when ( think ( have learned the way to live, life changes." Hugh !rather "5othing is more dangerous than an idea when it's the only one you've got." 3lain E4mile 3ugust 'hartierF "(t's a mighty "oor mind that can only think of one way to s"ell a word." 3ndrew +ackson "4ducation's "ur"ose is to re"lace an em"ty mind with an o"en one." Malcolm 2orbes "Life is not a static thing. The only "eo"le who do not change their minds are incom"etents in asylums, and those in cemeteries." 4verett Mc*inley 7irksen "7o not go where the "ath may lead, go instead where there is no "ath and leave a trail." al"h 0aldo 4merson "They always say that time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself." 3ndy 0arhol "1nly fools and dead men don't change their minds. 2ools won't and dead men can't." +ohn H. !atterson "Too much consistency is as bad for the mind as for the body." 3ldous Hu)ley " Dnless you change how you are, you'll always have what you've got." +im ohn, #"eaker and 3uthor "'hange your thoughts and you change your world." 5orman 9incent !eale "'ontinuing to cling to the "atterns you know inhibits your ability to discover

what you don't know." 4ric 3llenbaugh "7iscovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought." 3lbert von #.ent,/yorgyi "'hange is the constant, the signal for rebirth, the egg of the "hoeni)." 'hristina &aldwin "The dust of e)"loded beliefs may make a fine sunset." /eoffrey Madan "There is nothing so confining as the "risons of our own "erce"tions." 0illiam #hakes"eare, King Lear "5o "roblem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it. 0e must learn to see the world anew." 3lbert 4instein "Team members need to be able to sus"end disbelief, think the unthinkable, and let intuition and "remonitions flow freely. Therefore, a necessary skill in team members is tolerance for ambiguity." *ees van der Hei6den "The only thing that makes life "ossible is "ermanent, intolerable uncertainty, not knowing what comes ne)t." Drsula *. Leguin "( desire that there be as many different "ersons in the world as "ossible; ( would have each one be very careful to find out and "reserve his own way." Henry 7avid Thoreau "'hange is fun and e)citing and, like a haircut, looks funny at first; but once you get used to it, it's great." 3nne &lair "5ew frameworks are like climbing a mountain=the larger view encom"asses rather than re6ects the earlier, more restricted view." 3lbert 4instein "7on't be afraid to give u" the good to go for the great." *enny ogers "(f you find a good solution and become attached to it the solution may become your ne)t "roblem."

7r.

obert 3nthony

"4veryone thinks of changing the world but no one thinks of changing himself." Leo Tolstoy "2aced with the choice between changing one's mind, and "roving that there is no need to do so, almost everybody gets busy on the "roof." +ohn *enneth /albraith "7id you ever notice how difficult it is to argue with someone who is not obsessed with being right-" 0ayne 0. 7yer "1ur destination is never a "lace but rather a new way of looking at things." Henry Miller "1nce "eo"le learn something, they're reluctant to let it go." obert 4aston "(f you never change your mind, why have one-" 4dward de&ono "1nly in growth, reform and change..."arado)ically enough...is true security to be found." 3nne Morrow Lindbergh "(t is what we think we know already that often "revents us from learning." 'laude &ernard "Maturity of mind is the ca"acity to endure uncertainty." +ohn 2inley "(t is not the strongest of the s"ecies that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most res"onsive to change." 'harles 7arwin "0hen you're through changing, you're through." &ruce &arton "3 "erson can grow only as much as his hori.on allows." +ohn !owell "0hat we truly and earnestly as"ire to be, that in some sense we are. The mere as"iration, by changing the frame of mind, for the moment reali.es itself." 3nna +ameson "Have confidence in your decisions. Make them e)"editiously, and stay with

them as long as you believe you are correct no matter what others say. However, when you conclude you were in error, do not hesitate to announce the error "ublicly and change course." 4dward +. *och #often the rigidities within yourself and the universe will give you strength and vigor. 3rabic !roverb ";ou are the one who can stretch your own hori.on." 4dgar 2. Magnin "My green thumb came only as a result of the mistakes ( made while learning to see things from the "lant's "oint of view." H. 2red 3le "The test of a first,rate intelligence is the ability to hold two o""osed ideas in the mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function." 2. #cott 2it.gerald "1f all forms of mental activity, the most difficult to induce even in the minds of the young, who may be "resumed not to have lost their fle)ibility, is the art of handling the same bundle of data as before, but "lacing them in a new system of relations with one another by giving them a different framework, all of which virtually means "utting on a different kind of thinking,ca" for the moment. (t is easy to teach anybody a new fact...but it needs light from heaven above to enable a teacher to break the old framework in which the student is accustomed to seeing." 3rthur *oestler "Life at any time can become difficult; life at any time can become easy. (t all de"ends u"on how one ad6usts oneself to life." Morar6i 7esai "There are two ways of meeting difficulties: you alter the difficulties, or you alter yourself to meet them." !hyllis &ottome "0hen one door is shut, another one o"ens." Miguel de 'ervantes "They must often change, who would be constant in ha""iness or wisdom." 'onfucius "(t's never too late=in fiction or in life=to revise." 5ancy Thayer

"0e know that uncertainty creates an)iety and sometimes des"erate attem"ts to find something to believe in. Dncertainty engenders real o""ortunity as well as misleading choices, great leaders as well as false messiahs, and new ways of understanding the world alongside hollow ma)ims and dece"tive "romises. Dnderstandably, we seek guides and guide"osts to ease the an)iety of the 6ourney. &ut we also need to de"end on our own insights and imagination to cultivate, from our own e)"erience, a way to move forward." 3lan &riskin "'hange cannot be avoided. 'hange "rovides the o""ortunity for innovation. (t gives you the chance to demonstrate your creativity." *eshavan 5air, 3uthor and !rofessor "My o"inion is a view ( hold until...well, until ( find something that changes it." Luigi !irandello "(t is not necessary to change. #urvival is not mandatory." 0. 4dwards 7eming "The art of life lies in constant read6ustment to our surroundings." 1kakura *aku.o "(t is well for "eo"le who think to change their minds occasionally in order to kee" them clean." Luther &urbank "#tubbornness does have its hel"ful features. ;ou always know what you are going to be thinking tomorrow." /len &eaman "&ecause things are the way they are, things will not stay the way they are." &ertold &recht "(f you don't like something change it; if you can't change it, change the way you think about it" Mary 4ngelbreit ";ou had better be ready to change your mind when needed." Henry &. 0ilson

"(f you're in a bad situation, don't worry; it'll change. (f you're in a good situation, don't worry; it'll change." +ohn 3. #imone, #r.

"( shall try to correct errors when shown to be errors, and ( shall ado"t new views so fast as they shall a""ear to be new views." 3braham Lincoln "5o one can make you change. 5o one can sto" you from changing. 5o one really knows how you must change. 5ot even you. 5ot until you start." 7r. 7avid 9iscott, 3uthor and !sychologist "1ur only security is our ability to change." +ohn Lilly 3 wise man changes his mind, a fool never will. #"anish !roverb "The foolish and the dead alone never change their o"inion." +ames ussell Lowell "( bend but do not break." +ean de la 2ountaine "2le)ibility and ada"tability do not ha""en 6ust by reacting fast to new information. They arise from mental and emotional balance, the lack of attachment to s"ecific outcomes, and "utting care for self and others as a "rime o"erating "rinci"le. 2le)ible attitudes build fle)ible "hysiology. 2le)ible "hysiology means more resilience in times of challenge or strain. #taying o"en= emotionally=insures internal fle)ibility." 7oc 'hildre and &ruce 'ryer from Chaos to Coherence "(t is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today 5o sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be." (saac 3simov "5othing is so firmly believed as what we least know." Michel 4y8uem de Montaigne, 2rench 3uthor

"Think in terms of what's good for the other "erson and success will seek you out." Mary *ay 3sh, 4ntre"reneur

"3ny "lan is bad which is not susce"tible to change." &artolommeo de #an 'oncordio, !ainter and 0riter "He who re6ects change is the architect of decay. The only human institution which re6ects "rogress is the cemetery." Harold 0ilson "The universe is change; our life is what our thoughts make of it." Marcus 3urelius 3ntoninus "3 truly strong and sound mind is the mind that can e8ually embrace great things and small." #amuel +ohnson "(f you don't change your beliefs, your life will be like this forever. (s that good news-" obert 3nthony, 3uthor "( dwell in "ossibility." 4mily 7ickinson "#o often we try to alter circumstances to suit ourselves, instead of letting them alter us, which is what they are meant to do." Mother Maribel "4mbrace change. (t's going to ha""en whether you like it or not." 1dette !ollar, s"eaker and author "(f you are too attached to your own thinking and how everything is done now, then nothing will change for the better." +ohn '. Ma)well

5. THINKING ABOUT THINKING (META OGNITION!

& e i n g a w a r e o f y o u r o w n t h o u g h t s , f e e l i n g s , a n d a c t i o n s a

"( thank the Lord for the brain He "ut in my head. 1ccasionally, ( love to 6ust stand to one side and watch how it works." ichard &olles "To be able to be caught u" into the world of thought; that is being educated." 4dith Hamilton "To be able to concentrate for a considerable time is essential to difficult achievement." &ertrand ussell "(f you think you can, you can. 3nd if you think you can't, you're right." Mary *ay 3sh "( cannot teach anybody anything, ( can only make them think." #ocrates "5othing is more difficult, and therefore more "recious, than to be able to decide." 5a"oleon "To know that you do not know is the best. To "retend to know when you do not know is disease." Lao Tsu "Learn to de"end u"on yourself by doing things in accordance with your own way of thinking." /renville *leiser "4verything we do consciously remains for us." /urd6ieff and 1us"insky "0hen the mind is thinking it is talking to itself" !lato

The whole, though it be long, stands almost com"lete and finished in my mind so that ( can survey it at a glance. 5or do ( hear in my imagination the "arts successively, but ( hear them, as it were, all at once. 0hat delight this is ( cannot tellI 0olfgang 3madeus Mo.art

"Human thought is a "rocess by which human ends are ultimately answered." 7aniel 0ebster "*ee" in mind always the "resent your are constructing. (t should be the future you want." 3lice 0alker "(f the head is ready, the body will follow." 3le)ander !o"ov "Most "eo"le would sooner die than think; in fact they do so." &ertrand ussell "The only "lace where your dream becomes im"ossible is in your own thinking." obert H. #chuller "( really lack the words to com"liment myself today." 3lberto Tomba "0atch your thoughts, they become words. 0atch your words; they become actions. 0atch your actions; they become habits. 0atch your habits; they become character. 0atch your character; it becomes your destiny." 2rank 1utlaw "'reativity, my students learn, is as natural a function of the mind as breathing or digestion are natural functions of the body." +ohn *ao "( believe everybody is creative, and everybody is talented. ( 6ust don't think that everybody is disci"lined. ( think that's a rare commodity." 3l Hirschfield "(f ( look confused it's because ('m thinking." #amuel /oldwyn

"4ach day, and the living of it, has to be a conscious creation in which disci"line and order are relieved with some "lay and some "ure foolishness." May #arton "The tem"le of our "urest thoughts is silence." #arah +. Hale

"( cannot always control what goes on outside. &ut ( can always control what goes on inside." 0ayne 7yer "(f you had a friend who talked to you, like you sometimes talk to yourself, would you continue to hang around with that "erson-" ob &remer "To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting." 4dmund &urke "1nce we know our weaknesses they cease to do us any harm." /eorg '. Lichtenberg "This moment deserves your full attention, for it will not "ass your way again." 7an Millman "1"timism is an intellectual choice." 7iana #chneider "He who knows others is wise. He who knows himself is enlightened." Lao,T.u "3 "erson can grow only as much as his hori.on allows." +ohn !owell "0hen every "hysical and mental resource is focused, one's "ower to solve a "roblem multi"lies tremendously." 5orman 9incent !eale "To do good things in the world, first you must know who you are and what gives meaning to your life." !aula &rownlee "1nly the human brain can deliberately change "erce"tions, change "atterns, invent conce"ts and tolerate ambiguity." 4dward de &ono

"(f your struggle with the conflicting "arts of yourself is conscious, you are able to choose consciously the res"onse that will create the karma that you desire. ;ou will be able to bring to bear u"on your decision an awareness of what lies behind each choice, and the conse8uences of each choice, and choose accordingly. 0hen you enter into your decision,making dynamic consciously, you insert your will consciously into the creative cycle through which your soul

evolves, and you enter consciously into your own evolution." /ary Nukav "1nce in a while you have to take a break and visit yourself." 3udrey /iorgi "The brain's ca"acity and desire to make or elicit "atterns of meaning is one of the keys of brain,based learning. 0e never really understand something until we can create a model or meta"hor derived from our uni8ue "ersonal world. Learning and memory are influenced by the sets, intentions and "lans generated in the neocorte) of the brain as well as by the information received from the immediate environment and from internal states, drives, and muscular res"onses. The reality we "erceive, feel, see and hear is influenced by the constructive "rocesses of the brain as well as by the cues that im"inge u"on it." Merlin '. 0ittrock "The field of consciousness is tiny. (t acce"ts only one "roblem at a time." 3ntoine de #aint,4)u"<ry "3 man is what he thinks about all day long." al"h 0aldo 4merson "( know of no more encouraging fact than the un8uestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor." Henry 7avid Thoreau ";our mind is a very small, yet "otent "art of you. 'ontrol it, focus it and nourish it with "ositive thoughts that resonate with your authentic self." &rian *oslow "(Mve reached the moment where the movement of my thought interests me more than the thought itself." !ablo !icasso "( "aint ob6ects as ( think them, not as ( see them." !ablo !icasso "(t isn't what "eo"le think that is im"ortant, but the reason they think what they think." 4ugene (onesco ";ou have to allow a certain amount of time in which you are doing nothing in order to have things occur to you, to let your mind think." Mortimer 3dler educator "3 wise ske"ticism is the first attribute of a good critic."

+ames

ussell Lowell

"The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. 0e have created society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." 3lbert 4instein "7own time is where we become ourselves, looking into the middle distance, kicking at the curb, lying on the grass or sitting on the stoo" and staring at the tedious blue of the summer sky. ( don't believe you can write "oetry, or com"ose music, or become an actor without downtime, and "lenty of it, a hiatus that "asses for boredom but is really the 8uiet moving of the wheels inside that fuel creativity." 3nna Guindlen, !ulit.er !ri.e winning writer "They can because they think they can." 9irgil "(f you don't daydream and kind of "lan things out in your imagination you never get there. ;ou have to start some"lace." obert 7uvall, actor "(f you do not ask yourself what it is you know, you will go on listening to others and change will not come because you will not hear your own truth." #aint &artholomew

". STRIVING FOR A

URA Y

D e s i r i n g e ' a c t n e s s , f i d e l i t y , p e r f e c t i o n , e l e g a n c e a n

Measure a thousand times and cut once. Turkish !roverb "/ood is not good, where better is e)"ected." Thomas 2uller "5ever mind what others do; do better than yourself, beat your own record from day to day, and you are a success." 0illiam +. H. &oetcker "0henever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching." Thomas +efferson "( have offended /od and mankind because my work didn't reach the 8uality it should have." Michelangelo "1nly the mediocre are always at their best." +ean /iraudou) "1n course doesn't mean "erfect. 1n course means that even when things don't go "erfectly=you are still going in the right direction." 'harles /arfield "4very day you miss "laying or "racticing is one day longer it takes to be good." &en Hogan, /olfer "The ability to sim"lify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may s"eak." Hans Hoffman "3ny activity becomes creative when the doer cares about doing it right, or doing it better." +ohn D"dike "3 little inaccuracy sometimes saves a ton of e)"lanation." H. H. Munro E#akiF "( don't want to get into anything that would only behalf,way. (f we're going to commit to it, then we're going to commit to it all the way." 3l Dnser, +r., acecar driver "3ccuracy of observation is the e8uivalent of accuracy of thinking." 0allace #tevens

"(f you do the best you can, you will find, nine times out of ten, that you have done as well as or better than anyone else." 0illiam 2eather "(t is necessary to try to sur"ass oneself always; this occu"ation ought to last as long as life." Gueen 'hristina, of #weden "3 man who has committed a mistake and doesn't correct it is committing another mistake." 'onfucius "(f you aren't going all the way; why go at all-" +oe 5amath "The world has the habit of making room for the man whose actions show that he knows where he is going." 5a"oleon Hill "The only man who behaved sensibly was my tailor; he took my measurements anew every time he saw me, while all the rest went on with their old measurements and e)"ected them to fit me." /eorge &ernard #haw "7on't be afraid to give u" the good to go for the great." *enny ogers "0e aim above the mark to hit the mark." al"h 0aldo 4merson "(t's never crowded along the e)tra mile." 7r. 0ayne 7yer "Life is often com"ared to a marathon, but ( think it is more like being a s"rinter; long stretches of hard work "unctuated by brief moments in which we are given the o""ortunity to "erform at our best." Michael +ohnson, E%AA and $AA meter world record holderF "The 8uality of an individual is reflected in the standards they set for themselves." ay *roc "The "rinci"le is com"eting against yourself. (t's about self,im"rovement, about being better than you were the day before." #teve ;oung, 2ootball !layer "3 "roblem is your chance to do your best." 7uke 4llington

"3chievement is largely the "roduct of steadily raising one's level of as"iration." +ack 5icklaus "('ve always tried to go a ste" "ast wherever other "eo"le e)"ected me to end u"." &everly #ills "The difference between failure and success is doing a thing nearly right and doing a thing e)actly right." 4dward #immons "There is a "assion for "erfection which you rarely see fully develo"ed but . . . in successful lives it is never wholly lacking." &liss 'armen "#kill and confidence are an uncon8uered army." /eorge Hebert "1ther "eo"le may not have had high e)"ectations for me . . . but ( had high e)"ectations for myself." #hannon Miller, 1lym"ic /ymnast "He who sto"s being better sto"s being good." 1liver 'romwell ";ou go back to the gym and you 6ust do it again and again until you get it right." 3rnold #chwar.enegger "0e have to do the best we can. This is our sacred human res"onsibility." 3lbert 4instein, !hysicist "Guality means doing it right when no one is looking." Henry 2ord "(f you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it; every arrow that flies feels the attraction of earth." Henry 0adsworth Longfellow

"#triving for e)cellence motivates you; striving for "erfection is demorali.ing." Harriet &raiker "3ny man can make mistakes, but only an idiot "ersists in his error." 'icero

"Have no fear of "erfection=you'll never reach it." #alvador 7ali "&e true to the best you know. This is your high ideal. (f you do your best, you cannot do more." +ean !aul ichter, /erman 5ovelist "To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." #teve !refontaine "(t takes less time to do a thing right, than it does to e)"lain why you did it wrong." Henry 0adsworth Longfellow "There is only one real failure in life that is "ossible, and that is, not to be true to the best one knows." +ohn 2arrar "The noblest search is the search for e)cellence." Lyndon &. +ohnson "The roots of true achievement lie in the will to become the best that you can become." Harold Taylor "'ommit yourself to 8uality from day one ... it's better to do nothing at all than to something badly." Mark Mc'ormack "3ccuracy of observation is the e8uivalent of accuracy of thinking." 0allace #tevens "The secret of 6oy in work is contained in one word=e)cellence. To know how to do something well is to en6oy it." !earl &uck "4)cellence is in the details. /ive attention to the details and e)cellence will come." !erry !a)ton "My motto was to kee" swinging. 0hether ( was in a slum" or feeling badly or having trouble off the field, the only thing to do was to kee" swinging." Hank 3aron "0hen ( was young, ( observed that nine out of ten things ( did were failures. #o

( did ten times more work." /eorge &ernard #haw "(f a man is called a streetswee"er, he should swee" streets even as Michelangelo "ainted, or &eethoven com"osed music, or #hakes"eare wrote "oetry. He should swee" streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and 4arth will "ause to say, 'Here lived a great streetswee"er who did his 6ob well.'" Martin Luther *ing, +r. "Mistakes are a fact of life. (t is the res"onse to error that counts." 5ikki /iovanni, "oet "&eware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance." /eorge &ernard #haw "Hold yourself res"onsible for a higher standard than anybody e)"ects of you. 5ever e)cuse yourself." Henry 0ard &eecher "The roots of true achievement lie in the will to become the best that you can become." Harold Taylor "#im"lify the task. 'ontinually look for faster, better, easier ways to get the 6ob done." &rian Tracy, s"eaker and author

#. QUESTIONING AND POSING PROBLEMS

H a v i n g a ( u e s t i o n i n g a t t i t u d e . D e v e l o p ) i n g s t r a t e g i e

";ou can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. ;ou can tell whether a man is wise by his 8uestions." 5aguib Mahfou. E5obel !ri.e 0innerF "+udge a man by his 8uestions rather than by his answers." 9oltaire "5othing sha"es our 6ourney through life so much as the 8uestions we ask." /reg Levoy "The wise man doesn't give the right answers, he "oses the right 8uestions." 'laude Levi,#trauss, businessman "(t is better to ask some of the 8uestions than to know all the answers." +ames Thurber "Too often we give our children answers to remember rather than "roblems to solve." oger Lewin "The best way to esca"e from a "roblem is to solve it." 3lan #a"orta "( think, at a child's birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity." 4leanor oosevelt "(ntellectuals solve "roblems; geniuses "revent them." 3lbert 4instein "&romidic though it may sound, some 8uestions don't have answers, which is a terribly difficult lesson to learn." *atherine /raham "The im"ortant thing is to not sto" 8uestioning." 3lbert 4instein

"2ind a way to engage the heart in the "roblem and you are likely to see the child rise naturally to his own o"timal levels of uncertainty, risk and relevance." ichard +ones "&e "atient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the 8uestions themselves... 7o not now seek the answers which cannot be given you because

you would not be able to live them and the "oint is to live everything. Live the 8uestions now. !erha"s you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer." ainer Maria ilke "(t is im"ortant that students bring a certain ragamuffin barefoot irreverence to their studies; they are not here to worshi" what is known, but to 8uestion it." +acob &ronowski "Here are the three great 8uestions which in life we have over and over again to answer: (s it right or wrong- (s it true or false- (s it beautiful or ugly- 1ur education ought to hel" us t answer these 8uestions." +ohn Lubbock "3 generous and elevated mind is distinguished by nothing more certainly than an eminent degree of curiosity." #amuel +ohnson "(t is in the formulation of the "roblem that individuality is e)"ressed, that creativity is stimulated, that nuances and subtleties are discovered." Herbert Thelen "The formulation of a "roblem is often more essential than its solution, which may be merely a matter of mathematical or e)"erimental skill. To raise new 8uestions, new "ossibilities, to regard old "roblems from a new angle, re8uires creative imagination and marks real advances." 3lbert 4instein "0hen we acce"t tough 6obs as a challenge to our ability and wade into them with 6oy and enthusiasm, miracles can ha""en." 3rland /ilbert "(f there is something to gain and nothing to lose by asking=by all means askI" 0. 'lement #tone "1bstacles are like wild animals. They are cowards but they will bluff you if they can. (f they see you are afraid of them, they are liable to s"ring u"on you; but if you look them s8uarely in the eye, they will slink out of sight." 1rison #wett Marden "(f you find a good solution and become attached to it, the solution may become your ne)t "roblem." 7r. obert 3nthony "There is no education like adversity." &en6amin 7israeli

"Guality 8uestions create a 8uality life. #uccessful "eo"le ask better 8uestions, and as a result, they get better answers." 3nthony obbins "!er"le)ity is the beginning of knowledge." *ahlil /ibran "Life is often com"ared to a marathon, but ( think itis more like being a s"rinter; long stretches of hard work "unctuated by brief moments in which we are given the o""ortunity to "erform at our best." Michael +ohnson, %AA and $AA meter world record holder "'uriosity is one of the "ermanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous mind." #amuel +ohnson "3 "roblem is your chance to do your best." 7uke 4llington "The measure of success is not whether you have a tough "roblem to deal with, but whether it is the same "roblem you had last year." +ohn 2oster 7ulles "0hen you are face to face with a difficulty, you are u" against a discovery." Lord *elvin "The greater the obstacle, the more glory in overcoming it." +ean,&a"tiste Moliere "(t is better to know some of the 8uestions than all of the answers." +ames Thurber "(t's not the answers that enlighten us, but the 8uestions." 7escouvertes He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains a fool forever. 'hinese "roverb

"(f we would have new knowledge, we must get a whole world of new 8uestions." #u.anne Langer "!roblems are only o""ortunities in work clothes." Henry *aiser

"( think, at a child's birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity." 3nna 4leanor oosevelt "(f you s"end more time asking a""ro"riate 8uestions rather than giving answers or o"inions, your listening skills will increase." &rian *oslow "'uriosity is the wick in the candle of learning." 0illiam 3rthur 0ard "3 man may fulfill the ob6ect of his e)istence by asking a 8uestion he cannot answer, and attem"ting a task he cannot achieve." 1liver 0endell Holmes "&e curious alwaysI 2or knowledge will not ac8uire you; you must ac8uire it." #udie &ack "Millions saw the a""le fall, but 5ewton asked why." &ernard &aruch "'uriosity is one of the "ermanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous mind." #amuel +ohnson "/ood 8uestions outrank easy answers." !aul 3. #amuelson "!hiloso"hy may be defined as the art of asking the right 8uestionOawareness of the "roblem outlives all solutions. The answers are 8uestions in disguise, every new answer giving rise to new 8uestions." 3braham +. Heschel "4very "roblem contains within itself the seeds of its own msolution." 4dward #omers He who is ashamed of asking is ashamed of learning. 7anish !roverb

"0hen solving "roblems, dig at the roots instead of 6ust hacking at the leaves." 3nthony +. 7'3ngelo "(t isn't that they can't see the solution. (t is that they can't see the "roblem." /. *. 'hesterton

"3 "roblem well stated is a "roblem half solved." 'harles *ettering "The vast ma6ority of "roblems, decisions and situations which confront us daily are those which do not have 6ust one answer. #everal solutions are usually "ossible. Logic suggests that if one can mentally generate many "ossible solutions, the more likely it is that an o"timum solution will be reached. This a creative "rocess=the formation of new and useful relationshi"s." ichard 4. Manelis "Millions saw the a""le fall, but 5ewton was the one who asked why." &ernard M. &aruch "( think, at a child's birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity." 4leanor oosevelt "#ometimes 8uestions are more im"ortant than answers." 5ancy 0illard "+udge a man by his 8uestions rather than his answers." 9oltaire 3sk a 8uestion and you're a fool for three minutes; do not ask a 8uestion and you're a fool for the rest of your life. 'hinese !roverb "0hen solving "roblems, dig at the roots instead of 6ust hacking at the leaves." 3nthony +. 7'3ngelo "The im"ortant thing is not to sto" 8uestioning. 'uriosity has its own reasons for e)isting. 1ne cannot hel" but be in awe when he contem"lates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. (t is enough if one tries to com"rehend a little of this mystery every day. 5ever lose a holy curiosity." 4dmund &urke "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity." 4llen !arr "(t is not only by the 8uestions we have answered that "rogress may be measured, but also by those we are still asking." 2reda 3dler "The key to wisdom is knowing all the right 8uestions." +ohn 3. #imone, +r.

"(f you don't ask, you don't get." Mahatma /andhi "0hy and How are words so im"ortant that they cannot be too often used." 5a"oleon "4ffective "eo"le are not "roblem,minded; they're o""ortunity,minded. They feed o""ortunities and starve "roblems." #te"hen 'ovey "The one real ob6ect of education is to have a man in the condition of continually asking 8uestions." &isho" Mandell 'reighton "The world is but a school of in8uiry." Michel 4y8uem de Montaigne, essayist "He who has a why can bear almost any how." 2riedrich 5iet.sche, "hiloso"her "3 "rudent 8uestion is one,half of wisdom." 2rancis &acon "Guestions focus our thinking. 3sk em"owering 8uestions like: 0hat's good about this- 0hat's not "erfect about it yet- 0hat am ( going to do ne)t time- How can ( do this and have fun doing it-" 'harles 'onnolly, "sychologist "( have no s"ecial gift. ( am only "assionately curious." 3lbert 4instein "5othing sha"es our 6ourney through life so much as the 8uestions we ask." /reg Levoy, author "0hen ('m working on a "roblem, ( never think about beauty. ( think only how to solve the "roblem. &ut when ( have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, ( know it is wrong." ichard &uckminster 2uller

"The "roblem is not that there are "roblems. The "roblem is e)"ecting otherwise and thinking that having "roblems is a "roblem." Theodore ubin

"The best way to esca"e from a "roblem is to solve it." 3lan #a"orta "The real "roblem is what to do with the "roblem,solver after the "roblems are solved." /ay Talese "/ood 8uestions outrank easy answers." !aul 3. #amuelson, 5obel Laureate in 4conomics "There is a time in the life of every "roblem when it is big enough to see, yet small enough to solve." Mike Leavitt, former /overnor of Dtah

$. APPLYING PAST KNOWLEDGE TO NEW SITUATIONS

A c c e s s i n g p r i o r k n o w l e d g e * t r a n s f e r r i n g k n o w l e d g e b e y

"0e do not learn from our e)"eriences; we learn by reflecting on our e)"eriences." +ohn 7ewey "The "ur"ose of a course on thinking is to enhance student's abilities to face new challenges and to attack novel "roblems confidently, rationally and "roductively." Marilyn +. 3dams The work will teach you how to do it. 4stonian "roverb ";ou are today where your thoughts have brought you, you will be tomorrow where your thoughts take you." +ames 3llen, author "0e often discover what will do, by finding out what will not do; and "robably he who never made a mistake never made a discovery." #amuel #miles "0e learn the ro"e of life by untying its knots." +ean Toomer "To look backward for a while is to refresh the eye, to restore it, and to render it the more fit for its "rime function of looking forward." Margaret 2airless &arber "(f you can react the same way to winning and losing, that's a big accom"lishment. That 8uality is im"ortant because it stays with you the rest of your life." 'hris 4vert "Learning is the ability to make sense out of something you observe based on your "ast e)"erience and being able to take that observations and associate it with meaning." uth and 3rt 0inter "('ve never made a mistake. ('ve only learned from e)"erience." Thomas 3. 4dison "/ood "eo"le are good because they've come to wisdom through failure." 0illiam #aroyan "!eo"le fall forward to success." Mary *ay 3sh " Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood." al"h 0aldo 4merson

"2acts do not cease to e)ist because they are ignored." 3ldous Hu)ley "The main fuel to s"eed the world's "rogress is our stock of knowledge, and the brake is our lack of imagination." +ulian #imon "(f ( have learnt anything it is that life forms no logical "atterns. (t is ha"ha.ard and full of beauties which ( try to catch as they fly by, for who knows whether any of them will ever return." Margot 2onteym "(t is only after a fair "ortion of one's life that one really knows what are the things that matter, the things that will remain until the end." 4sther Meynell "Those who succeed and do not "ush on to greater failure are the s"iritual middle, classers." 4ugene 1'5eill "1nce "eo"le learn something, they're reluctant to let it go." obert 4aston "The to" of the hill is but the bottom of another mountain." 3nkit +amwal "3n e)"ert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field." 5iels &ohr "There are no mistakes. The events we bring u"on ourselves, no matter how un"leasant, are necessary in order to learn what we need to learn; whatever ste"s we take, they're necessary to reach the "laces we've chosen to go." ichard 7avid &ach

"5otice the difference between what ha""ens when a man says to himself, '( have failed three times,' and what ha""ens when he says, '('m a failure.'" #. (. Hayakawa "/od gave us memory so that we might have roses in 7ecember." (talo #vevo "( got a fortune cookie that said, 'To remember is to understand.' ( have never forgotten it. 3 good 6udge remembers what it was like to be a lawyer 3 good editor

remembers being a writer. 3 good "arent remembers what it was like to be a child." 3nna Guindlen "3s im"ortant as your "ast is related to your current "erformance, it is not nearly as im"ortant as how you see your future." 7enis 0aitley "The measure of success is not whether you have a tough "roblem to deal with, but whether it is the same "roblem you had last year." +ohn 2oster 7ulles "#ome days you must learn a great deal. &ut you should also have days when you allow what is already in you to swell u" and touch everything. (f you never let that ha""en, then you 6ust accumulate facts, and they begin to rattle around inside of you." 4. L. *onigsburg "4verything we do seeds the future. 5o action is an em"ty one." +oan 'hittister "3 life s"ent making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life s"ent doing nothing." /eorge &ernard #haw "(t is necessary for us to learn from others' mistakes. ;ou will not live long enough to make them all yourself." Hyman ickover "Mistakes are "art of the dues one "ays for a full life." #o"hia Loren "The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything." &isho" 0. '. Magee

"There are no secrets to success. (t is the result of "re"aration, hard work, learning from failure." 'olin !owell "+ust because something doesn't do what you "lanned it to do doesn't mean it's useless." Thomas 4dison ";ou will find as you look back u"on your life that the moments when you have

truly lived are the moments when you have done things in the s"irit of love." Henry 7rummond ";our "ast is not your "otential. (n any hour you can choose to liberate the future." Marilyn 2erguson "*nowledge is the rediscovering of our own insight." !lato "5othing we learn in this world is ever wasted." 4leanor oosevelt "( have learned silence from the talkative, toleration from the intolerant, and kindness from the unkind; yet strange, ( am ungrateful to these teachers." *ahlil /ibran "(t is from the fond memories of our "ast that we gather courage to face the future." 4li.abeth 3ndrews "The "ast is a guide"ost, not a hitching "ost." L. Thomas Holdcroft "Look back to learn how to look forward." +oe /irard "Life can be real rough . . . you can either learn from your "roblems, or kee" re"eating them over and over." Marie 1smond "0hen ( want to understand what is ha""ening today or try to decide what will ha""en tomorrow, ( look back." 1liver 0endell Holmes, +r.

"Life must be understood backwards. &ut it must be lived forward." #oren *ierkegaard "0hat ('ve been doing in "ractice will carry over into the game." andall 'unningham, !rofessional 2ootball !layer "There is only one thing more "ainful than learning from e)"erience and that is not learning from e)"erience." 3rchibald McLeish

"3 failure is a man who has blundered but is not able to cash in on the e)"erience." 4lbert Hubbard "The only time you don't fail is the last time you try anything=and it works." 0illiam #trong "0e can chart our future clearly and wisely only when we know the "ath which has led to the "resent." 3dlai 4. #tevenson "5o amount of so"histication is going to allay the fact that all your knowledge is about the "ast and all your decisions are about the future." (an 4. 0ilson "3ny man can make mistakes, but only an idiot "ersists in his error." 'icero "0hat you know is 6ust a "oint of de"arture. #o let's moveI" *eora"etse *gositsile, #outh 3frican !oet "The im"rovement of understanding is for two ends: first, our own increase of knowledge; secondly, to enable us to deliver that knowledge to others." +ohn Locke "There is glory in a great mistake" 5athalia 'rane, 0riter and !oet "Life is divided into three terms=that which was, which is, and which will be. Let us learn from the "ast to "rofit by the "resent, and from the "resent to live better in the future." 0ordsworth 2ailures are but mile"osts on the road to success. (talian !roverb "3nyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." 3lbert 4instein "Mistakes are the "ortals of discovery." +ames +oyce 4)"erience is not always the kindest of teachers, but it is surely the best. #"anish !roverb 2ool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.

'hinese !roverb "Think about the im"act of today's decisions, for tomorrow is much longer than today." 7on aiff, 4conomist "4)"erience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes." 1scar 0ilde "Tomorrow is the most im"ortant thing in life. 'omes into us at midnight very clean. (t's "erfect when it arrives and it "uts itself in our hands. (t ho"es we've learned something from yesterday." +ohn 0ayne "( donMt avoid "ain by not remembering something; ( try to remember.... Memory is em"owering, and itMs what gives you your sense of continuity in the world." Melinda 0. !o"ham "5othing is a waste of time if you use the e)"erience wisely." 3uguste odin "Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. ;ou won't have time to make them all yourself." 3lfred #heinwold "7o you know the difference between education and e)"erience- 4ducation is when you read the fine "rint; e)"erience is what you get when you don't." !ete #eeger "4ducation is knowing where to go to find out what you need to know; and it's knowing how to use the information you get." 0illiam 2eather, 3uthor and !ublisher "Dse the losses and failures of the "ast as a reason for action, not inaction." 'harles +. /ivens, &usinessman and 3uthor "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing." +ohn !owell "Mistakes are the usual bridge between ine)"erience and wisdom." !hyllis Therou) "Making mistakes sim"ly means you are learning faster." 0eston H. 3gor "The measure of success is not whether you have a tough "roblem to deal with,

but whether it's the same "roblem you had last year." +ohn 2oster 7ulles "The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see." 0inston 'hurchill "Mistakes are a fact of life. (t is the res"onse to error that counts." 5ikki /iovanni, "oet ";ou are today where your thoughts have brought you; you will be tomorrow where your thoughts take you." +ames 3llen, author "There is no such thing as a failed e)"eriment, only e)"eriments with une)"ected outcomes." &uckminster 2uller "3 man learns to skate by staggering about and making a fool of himself; indeed, he "rogresses in all things by making a fool of himself." /eorge &ernard #haw, "laywright "0hat looks like a loss may be the very event which is subse8uently res"onsible for hel"ing to "roduce the ma6or achievement of your life." #rully 7. &lotnick "Making mental connections is our most crucial learning tool, the essence of human intelligence; to forge links; to go beyond the given; to see "atterns, relationshi"s, conte)t." Marilyn 2erguson "( have always grown from my "roblems and challenges, from the things that don't work out, that's when ('ve really learned." 'arol &urnett, actress "2ailure is the condiment that gives success its flavor." Truman 'a"ote "Mistakes are "ainful when they ha""en, but years later a collection of mistakes is what is called e)"erience." 7enis 0aitley, author and s"eaker

%. THINKING AND OMMUNI ATING WITH LARITY AND PRE ISION

+ t r i v i n g f o r a c c u r a t e c o m m u n i c a t i o n i n w r i t t e n a n d o

"3 word to the wise is not sufficient if it doesn't make sense" +ames Thurber "4very word or conce"t, clear as it may seem to be, has only a limited range of a""licability." 0erner *arl Heisenberg He who guards his mouth kee"s his life, but he who o"ens wide his li"s comes to ruin. !roverbs >@:@ "(t is the "rovince of knowledge to s"eak and it is the "rivilege of wisdom to listen." 1liver 0endell Holmes, #r. "(t is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book." 2riedrich 5iet.sche "(f you can't write your idea on the back of my calling card, you don't have a clear idea." 7avid &elasco "The limits of my language are the limits of my mind. 3ll ( know is what ( have words for." Ludwig 0ittgenstein "The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and lightning bug." Mark Twain "0ithin the word we find two dimensions=reflection and action. (f one is sacrificed even in "art, the other immediately suffers. To s"eak a true word is to transform the world." !aulo 2reire

"( do not so easily think in words . . . after being hard at work having arrived at results that are "erfectly clear . . . . ( have to translate my thoughts in a language that does not run evenly with them." 2rancis /alton "The world has the habit of making room for the man whose actions show that he knows where he is going."

5a"oleon Hill "(f we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it-" 3lbert 4instein "Think like a man of action, act like a man of thought." Henri &ergson "3n ounce of a""lication is worth a ton of abstraction." &ooker T. 0ashington "This re"ort, by its very length, defends itself against the risk of being read." 0inston 'hurchill "0e sometimes get all the information, but we refuse to get the message." 'ullen Hightower "(t is good to rub and "olish our brain against that of others." Michael 7e Montaigne "There are "eo"le who want to be everywhere at once . . . and they get nowhere" 'arl #andburg "( really lack the words to com"liment myself today." 3lberto Tomba "0atch your thoughts, they become words. 0atch your words; they become actions. 0atch your actions; they become habits. 0atch your habits; they become character. 0atch your character; it becomes your destiny." 2rank 1utlaw "The tem"le of our "urest thoughts is silence." #arah +. Hale "1ur intention creates our reality." 0ayne 7yer

"( cannot always control what goes on outside. &ut ( can always control what goes on inside." 0ayne 7yer "0hat we don't understand we don't "ossess." +ohann 0olfgang von /oethe

"( think the language is one factor that has "revented us from being able even to conce"tuali.e mindLbody "rocesses. +ust the fact that we use one kind of intangible language to describe the mind and another kind of material language to describe the body=languages that don't even have a way of connecting="revents us from seeing that these two kinds of "henomena are actually two manifestations of the same "rocess, neither one more im"ortant than the other, and neither causing the other. (f we can figure out ways to talk that allow us to think about the mind and body as one and the same, we'd be better off." Margaret *emeny "3ll my life ( wanted to be somebody. &ut ( see now ( should have been more s"ecific." +ane 0agner "Life is like a landsca"e. ;ou live in the midst of it, but can describe it only from the vantage "oint of distance." 'harles 3. Lindbergh "&etter understated than overstated. Let "eo"le be sur"rised that it was more than you "romised and easier than you said." +im ohn "0ords are, of course, the most "owerful drug used by mankind." udyard *i"ling "True elo8uence consists of saying all that should be said, and that only." 2rancois de La ochefoucald "To communicate, "ut your words in order; give them a "ur"ose; use them to "ersuade, to instruct, to discover, to seduce." 0illiam #afire "0ise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something." !lato "7rawing on my fine command of language, ( said nothing." !eter &enchley ". . . everything that can be said can be said clearly." Ludwig 0ittgenstein "&e careful of your thoughts; they may become words at any moment." (ra /assen "(t is better to kee" one's mouth shut and be thought a fool than to o"en it and

resolve all doubt." 3braham Lincoln "&lessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us worthy evidence of the fact." /eorge 4liot "#ilence is one of the hardest arguments to refute." +osh &illings " . . . if you cannot say what you have to say in twenty minutes, you should go away and write a book about it." Lord &rabi.on "The words you choose to say something are 6ust as im"ortant as the decision to s"eak." 3nonymous "(t is my ambition to say in ten sentences what other men say in whole books= what other men do not say in whole books." 2riedrich 5iet.sche "( tell you everything that is really nothing, and nothing of what is everything, do not be fooled by what ( am saying. !lease listen carefully and try to hear what ( am not saying." 'harles '. 2inn "(f you 6ust communicate you can get by. &ut if you skillfully communicate, you can work miracles." +im ohn, #"eaker and 3uthor "0ise men talk because they have something to say, fools talk because they have to say something." !lato "3ll my life ('ve wanted to be somebody. &ut ( see now ( should have been more s"ecific." +ane 0agner, 0riter and 7irector "To talk well and elo8uently is a very great art, but an e8ually great one is to know the right moment to sto"." 0olfgang 3madeus Mo.art "'olors fade, tem"les crumble, em"ires fall, but wise words endure." 4dward Thorndike

"&efore s"eaking, consider the inter"retation of your words as well as their intent." 3ndrew 3lden

1&. GATHERING DATA THROUGH ALL SENSES

, a t h e r i n g d a t a t h r o u g h a l l t h e s e n s o r y p a t h w a y s g u s t a

"(t is not easy to describe the sea without the mouth." *okyu "(f all meanings could be ade8uately e)"ressed by words, the arts of "ainting and music would not e)ist." +ohn 7ewey "The sim"le act of "aying attention can take you a long way." *eanu eeves "+oy in looking and com"rehending is nature's most beautiful gift." 3lbert 4instein "How can ( tell what ( think till ( see what ( say-" 4. M. 2orster Tell me, and ('ll forget. #how me, and ( may remember. (nvolve me, and ('ll understand. 5ative 3merican !roverb "Must we always teach our children with books- Let them look a the stars and the mountains above. Let them look at the waters and the trees and flowers on earth. Then they will begin to think, and to think is the beginning of a real education." 7avid !olis #eeing is different than being told. !roverb from *enya "&y "ushing the right biological buttons in the brain, scientists are finding they can make the future brighter for many children whose develo"ment otherwise would have been stunted . . . . How the buttons work is "erha"s the most ama.ing thing of all. The buttons are the senses: vision, taste, smell, touch and sound and they can be "ushed by e)"eriences from the outside world." onald *otulak "1bserve "er"etually" Henry +ames "4veryone must take time to sit and watch the leaves turn." 4li.abeth Lawrence "5othing takes root in mind when there is no balance between doing and receiving." +ohn 7ewey

"The universe is full of magical things, "atiently waiting for our wits to grow shar"er." 4den !hill"otts "The "lace to im"rove the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands." obert M. !irsig "(f ( have learnt anything it is that life forms no logical "atterns. (t is ha"ha.ard and full of beauties which ( try to catch as they fly by, for who knows whether any of them will ever return." Margot 2onteyn "The dynamic inter"lay of neural activity within and in between systems is the very essence of brain function." ichard estak ". . . the research on the brain does not validate that we are singularly "rocessing in"ut or learning with a single sensory in"ut." 4ric +ensen "Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." &erthold 3uerbach "(f it isn't used, it isn't learned" 3leksandr Luria "!ersonal "artici"ation is the universal "rinci"le of knowing." Michael !olanyi "Motion is the conte)t of living. 0e find meaning by and in our doing." obert *egan 5othing reaches the intellect before making its a""earance in the senses. Latin "roverb "The more voices we allow to s"eak about one thing, the more eyes, different eyes we can use to observe one thing, the more com"lete will our conce"t of this thing, our ob6ectivity be." 2redrich 5iet.sche "1ften the hands will solve a mystery that the intellect has struggled with in vain." 'arl /. +ung "3ll of us are watchers=of television, of time clocks, of traffic on the freeway=but few are observers. 4veryone is looking, not many are seeing." !eter M. Leschak, 0riter and 2irefighter

#eeing many things, but thou observest not. "saiah $%: %A "( go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses "ut in order." +ohn &urroughs "1ne might e8uate growing u" with a mistrust of words. 3 mature "erson trusts his eyes more than his ears. (rrationality often manifests itself in u"holding the word against the evidence of the eyes. 'hildren, savages and true believers remember far less what they have seen than what they have heard." 4ric Hoffer "Listen to your life. #ee it for the fathomless mystery that it is. (n the boredom and "ain of it no less than in the e)citement and gladness: touch, taste, smell your way to the holy and hidden heart of it because in the last analysis all moments are key moments, and life itself is grace." 2rederick &uechner, 3uthor, in #o$ and Then ";ou must understand the whole of life, not 6ust one little "art of it. That is why you must read, that is why you must look at the skies, that is why you must sing and dance, and write "oems, and suffer, and understand, for all that is life." +. *rishnamurti, (ndian !hiloso"her "Life is like music, it must be com"osed by ear, feeling and instinct, not by rule." #amuel &utler

(f you will look carefully, Listen carefully, ;ou will find a lot of things carefully. Look ... and listen. (t's good to Look carefully. Listen carefully. That's the way you learn a lot of things carefully. Look. Look...and listen. #ome things you see are confusing. #ome things you hear are strange. &ut if you ask someone to e)"lain one or two, ;ou'll begin to notice a change in you. (f you will Look carefully. Listen carefully. That's a way to kee" on growing carefully. Look, look, look, and listen. Mr. 2red ogers, >PHA

" emember not only to say the right thing in the right "lace, but far more difficult still, to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tem"ting moment." &en6amin 2ranklin "(f you would be "ungent, be brief; for it is with words as with sunbeams=the more they are condensed, the dee"er they burn." obert #outhey "3ll our knowledge has its origins in our "erce"tions." Leonardo da 9inci

11.

REATING' IMAGINING' INNOVATING

, e n e r a t i n g n e w a n d n o v e l i d e a s * f l u e n c y , o r i g i n a l i t y .

"(deas are like rabbits. ;ou get a cou"le and learn how to handle them, and "retty soon you have a do.en." +ohn #teinbeck "3ll human beings are born with the same creative "otential. Most "eo"le s8uander theirs away on a million su"erfluous things. ( e)"end mine on one thing and one thing only: my art." !ablo !icasso "1riginality is sim"ly a "air of fresh eyes." Thomas 0entworth Higginson "To me the desire to create and to have control over your own life, irres"ective of the "olitics of the time or social structures, has always been a "art of the human s"irit. 0hat ( did not fully reali.e was that work could o"en the doors to my heart." 3nita oddick, 2ounderL'41, The &ody #ho" "7iscovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought." 3lbert von #.ent,/yorgyi "There is nothing mysterious about originality, nothing fantastic. 1riginality is merely the ste" beyond." Louis 7an. "3ny activity becomes creative when the doer cares about doing it right, or doing it better." +ohn D"dike "3n idea is a feat of association." obert 2rost "7reams are renewable. 5o matter what our age or condition, there are still unta""ed "ossibilities within us and new beauty waiting to be born." 7r. 7ale Turner

"The main fuel to s"eed the world's "rogress is our stock of knowledge, and the brake is our lack of imagination." +ulian #imon "(f you do not e)"ress your own original ideas, if you do not listen to your own being, you will have betrayed yourself."

ollo May "'reativity, my students learn, is as natural a function of the mind as breathing or digestion are natural functions of the body." +ohn *ao "( believe everybody is creative, and everybody is talented. ( 6ust don't think that everybody is disci"lined. ( think that's a rare commodity." 3l Hirschfield "( would sort out all the arguments and see which belonged to fear and which to creativeness. 1ther things being e8ual, ( would make the decision which had the largest number of creative reasons on its side." *atharine &utler Hathaway "To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong." +ose"h 'hilton !earce "0hat is now "roved was once imagined." 0illiam &lake "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself." /eorge &ernard #haw "The imagination e8ui"s us to "erceive reality when it is not fully materiali.ed." Mary 'aroline ichards "(magination is the highest kite one can fly." Lauren &acall "The future is not a result of choice among alternative "aths offered by the "resent, but a "lace that is created=created first in mind and will, created ne)t in activity. The future is not some "lace we are going to but one we are creating. The "aths are not to be found, but made, and the activity of making them changes both the maker and the destination." +ohn #chaar

"3rt is a terrific vehicle because it unlocks kid's imaginations, touches us in emotional ways, brings to life what might otherwise be abstract." Ted Mitchell "3 firm grounding in the arts teaches "ractical skills and such characteristics as self,disci"line and critical thinking. The arts naturally embrace "arado) and ambiguity; to study them is to learn fle)ible thinking. Those who have trained in

an art form are more likely not only to gras" the nuances in real life, say the e)"erts, but also to "ersevere in finding novel solutions to everyday "roblems." #usan /aines "0e need "eo"le who can read and write. &ut what we really need is "eo"le who can not only read the instructions, but change them. They need to be able to think outside the lines." ichard /urin, '41 and !resident, &inney Q #mith, 'royola !roducts "(nsanity is continuing to do the same thing over and over and e)"ecting different results." 3lbert 4instein "To stimulate creativity, one must develo" the childlike inclination for "lay and the childlike desire for recognition." 3lbert 4instein "(magination is more im"ortant than knowledge." 3lbert 4instein "(f you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot "aint,' then by all means "aint, and that voice will be silenced." 9incent 9an /ogh "(magination was given to man to com"ensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is." #ir 2rancis &acon "The "rinci"le mark of genius is not "erfection but originality, the o"ening of new frontiers." 3rthur *oestler "Man can only become what he is able to consciously imagine, or to Rimage forth.'" 7ane udhyar "'reativity can solve almost any "roblem. The creative act, the defeat of habit by originality, overcomes everything." /eorge Lois, 3dvertising 4)ecutive "4very artist was first an amateur." al"h 0aldo 4merson "( learned . . . that ins"iration does not come like a bolt, nor is it kinetic, energetic striving, but it comes into us slowly and 8uietly and all the time, though we must regularly and every day give it a little chance to start flowing,

"rime it with a little solitude and idleness." &renda Deland "Making the sim"le com"licated is common"lace; making the com"licated sim"le, awesomely sim"le, that's creativity." 'harles Mingus "There are two ways of being creative. 1ne can sing and dance. 1r one can create an environment in which singers and dancers flourish." 0arren &ennis "'reativity re"resents a miraculous coming together of the uninhibited energy of the child with its a""arent o""ositeand enemy, the sense of order im"osed on the disci"lined adult intelligence." 5orman !odhoret. ";ou can't de"end on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain "(magination and fiction make u" more than three,8uarters of our real life." #imone 0eil "(t is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation." Herman Melville 4ducation for creativity is nothing short of education for living." 4ric 2romm "'reativity is the encounter of the intensively conscious human being with his world." ollo May "2ar out thinking is a means to an end. To him whose elastic and vigorous thought kee"s "ace with the sun, the day is a "er"etual morning." Henry 7avid Thoreau

"The vast ma6ority of "roblems, decisions and situations which confront us daily are those which do not have 6ust one answer. #everal solutions are usually "ossible. Logic suggests that if one can mentally generate many "ossible solutions, the more likely it is that an o"timum solution will be reached. This is a

creative "rocess=the formation of new and useful relationshi"s." ichard 4. Manelis (f you can walk, you can dance; if you can talk, you can sing. Nimbabwean !roverb !eo"le who do not break things first will never create anything. Tagalog E2ili"inoF !roverb "Money isn't the scarcest resource=imagination is." Linda ;ates, !ainted 0olf Ltd. "Ha""iness . . . it lies in the 6oy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort." 2ranklin 7. oosevelt "To think creatively, we must be able to look afresh at what we normally take for granted." /eorge *neller "The ability to relate and to connect, sometimes in odd and yet striking fashion, lies at the very heart of any creative use of the mind, no matter in what field or disci"line." /eorge +. #eidel ";ou unlock the door with the key of imagination." od #erling "(n the world of words, the imagination is one of the forces of nature." 0allace #tevens "(magination was given to man to com"ensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is." 2rancis &acon "'reativity is a ty"e of learning "rocess where the teacher and "u"il are located in the same individual." 3rthur *oestler, 5ovelist "(f ( have a thousand ideas and only one turns out to be good, ( am satisfied." 3lfred 5obel

"The !ossible's slow fuse is lit &y the (magination." 4mily 7ickinson

"'reativity is inventing, e)"erimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun." Mary Lou 'ook "4very child is an artist. The "roblem is how to remain an artist once he grows u"." !ablo !icasso "'reativity can solve almost any "roblem. The creative act, the defeat of habit by originality overcomes everything." /eorge Lois ";ou are creative. ;our creativity may be in a dee" slee", but it is there. 3ll you have to do is wake it u" and "ut it to use." *evin 4ikenberry, #"eaker and 'onsultant "Let us consider an alternative style of thinking, which we can call 'creative thinking.' (t is "layfully instructive to note that the word 'reactive' and the word 'creative' are made u" of e)actly the same letters. The only difference between the two is that you ''' SseeT differently." +ohn Guincy 3dams, D.#. !resident "The reward for conformity was that everyone liked you e)ce"t yourself." ita Mae &rown "(t is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation." Herman Melville "The main fuel to s"eed the world's "rogress is our stock of knowledge, and the brake is our lack of imagination." +ulian #imon, economist "(t is wonderful to be in on the creation of something, see it used, and then walk away and smile at it." Lady &ird +ohnson, D.#. 2irst Lady "( dwell in "ossibility." 4mily 7ickinson "The only 6ob we have been given when we came to this earth is to create.

4verything we do is a creation, from a 6ob, to children to thoughts. 0e all create all the time, it is all we do." Tom +ustin, author and trainer "7own time is where we become ourselves, looking into the middle distance, kicking at the curb, lying on the grass or sitting on the stoo" and staring at the tedious blue of the summer sky. ( don't believe you can write "oetry, or com"ose music, or become an actor without downtime, and "lenty of it, a hiatus that "asses for boredom but is really the 8uiet moving of the wheels inside that fuel creativity." 3nna Guindlen, !ulit.er !ri.e winning writer "The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to 6udge it." 'arl. . ogers "'reativity is merely a "lus name for regular activity...any activity becomes creative when the doer cares about doing it right, or better...." +ohn D"dike, novelist, "oet "7efying conventional ideas can yield unconventional returns." +ackson 0. obinson, !resident, 0inslow Management 'om"any "(f you can imagine it, ;ou can achieve it. (f you can dream it, ;ou can become it." 0illiam 3rthur 0ard "0e are told never to cross a bridge until we come to it, but this world is owned by men who have 'crossed bridges' in their imagination far ahead of the crowd." 3nonymous "3 hunch is creativity trying to tell you something." 2rank 'a"ra, film director

12. RESPONDING WITH WONDERMENT AND AWE


"The most beautiful e)"erience in the world is the e)"erience of the mysterious." 3lbert 4instein. "The real mark of the creative "erson is that the unforeseen "roblem is a 6oy and not a curse." 5orman H. Mackworth "To waken interest and kindle enthusiasm is the sure way to teach easily and successfully." Tyrone 4dwards "!ractice being e)cited." &ill 2oster "(t is in the com"elling .est of high adventure and of victory and in creative action, that man finds his su"reme 6oys." 3ntoine de #aint,4)u"<ry "3lign "eo"le's "assions with the "riorities and you'll achieve "erformance." #teve &rown "5othing great in the world has been accom"lished without "assion." /eorge Hegel "3 generous and elevated mind is distinguished by nothing more certainly than an eminent degree of curiosity." #amuel +ohnson "1nly "assions, great "assions, can elevate the soul to great things." 7enis 7iderot "&e anchored to some ideal, "hiloso"hy or cause that kee"s you too e)cited to slee"." &rian *oslow ";our work is to discover your work, and then with all your heart to give yourself to it." &uddha "+oy in looking and com"rehending is nature's most beautiful gift." 3lbert 4instein

"( would rather live in a world where my life is surrounded by mystery than live in a world so small that my mind could com"rehend it." Harry 4merson 2osdick "7isgust and resolve are two of the great emotions that lead to change." +im ohn ";ou get the best effort from others not by lighting a fire beneath them, but by building a fire within." &ob 5elson ";ou only lose energy when life becomes dull in your mind. ;our mind gets bored and therefore tired of doing nothing . . . . /et interested in somethingI /et absolutely enthralled in somethingI /et out of yourselfI &e somebodyI 7o something . . . . The more you lose yourself in something bigger than yourself, the more energy you will have." 5orman 9incent !eale "( think, at a child's birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity." 4leanor oosevelt "'uriosity is one of the "ermanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous mind." #amuel +ohnson "To me the desire to create and to have control over your own life, irres"ective of the "olitics of the time or social structures, has always been a "art of the human s"irit. 0hat ( did not fully reali.e was that work could o"en the doors to my heart." 3nita oddick, 2ounderL'41, The &ody #ho" "0e act as though comfort and lu)ury were the chief re8uirements of life, when all that we need to make us really ha""y is something to be enthusiastic about." 'harles *ingsley "4nthusiasm is not something you can eat or drink. (t's something that bubbles u" from the de"th of your own heart and soul." obert #chuller "0e have to "ursue this sub6ect of fun very seriously if we want to stay com"etitive in the twenty,first century." /eorge ;eo

"!eo"le do their best work when they are "assionately engaged in what they are doing." 4rie #. aymond "0e live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes o"en." +awaharlal 5ehru "2un is going to enhance interest, because "eo"le don't feel incom"etent when they're having fun." Matthew #. ichter "There is real magic in enthusiasm. (t s"ells the difference between mediocrity and accom"lishment." 5orman 9incent !eale "The secret of genius is to carry the s"irit of the child into old age, which means never losing your enthusiasm." 3ldous Hu)ley, author "To be successful, the first thing to do is fall in love with your work." #ister Mary Lauretta "0onder rather than doubt is the root of knowledge." 3braham +oshua Heschel "4nthusiasm moves the world." +. &alfour "0inning isn't everything. J0antingJ to win is." 'atfish Hunter "( don't want "eo"le who want to dance, ( want "eo"le who JhaveJ to dance." /eorge &alanchine "The victory of success is half won when one gains the habit of setting goals and achieving them. 4ven the most tedious chore will become endurable as you "arade through each day convinced that every task, no matter how menial or boring, brings you closer to fulfilling your dreams." 1g Mandino "Man's mind is not a container to be filled but rather a fire to be kindled." 7orothea &rande

"3 good idea will kee" you awake during the morning, but a great idea will kee" you awake during the night." Marilyn 9os #avant "0hen every "hysical and mental resources is focused, one's "ower to solve a "roblem multi"lies tremendously." 5orman 9incent !eale "1nce you do something you love, you never have to work again." 0illie Hill, student "/enius is initiative on fire." Holbrook +ohnson "(f you are working on something e)citing that you really care about, you don't have to be "ushed. The vision "ulls you." #teven +obs "1ne "erson with a belief is e8ual to a force of ninety,nine who have only interests." +ohn #tuart Mills "2ind a way to engage the heart in the "roblem and you are likely to see the child rise naturally to his own o"timal levels of uncertainty, risk and relevance." ichard +ones "3 strong "assion for any ob6ect will ensure success, for the desire of the end will "oint out the means." Henry Ha.litt "2ollow your bliss. 2ind where it is and don't be afraid to follow it." +ose"h 'am"bell "3ll thinking begins with wondering" #ocrates "( would sooner live in a cottage and wonder at everything than live in a castle and wonder at nothingI" +oan 0inmill &rown, 3ctress "4very man without "assions has within him no "rinci"le of action, nor motive to act." 'laude Helvetius

"!ractice being e)cited." &ill 2oster " 0e should be taught not to wait for ins"iration to start a thing. 3ction always generates ins"iration. (ns"iration seldom generates action." 2rank Tibolt, 3uthor "( want to be e)cited, thrilled, ecstatic about all sorts of things as long as ( live." 0in 'ouchman, 0riter and #"eaker "The great man is he who does not lose his child,heart" Mencius "3 child's world is fresh and new and beautiful, full of wonder and e)citement. (t is our misfortune that for most of us that clear,eyed vision, that true instinct for what is beautiful and awe,ins"iring, is dimmed and even lost before we reach adulthood." achel 'arson "4very child is an artist. The "roblem is how to remain an artist once we grow u"." !ablo !icasso ";ou can do anything if you have enthusiasm. 4nthusiasm is the yeast that makes your ho"es rise to the stars. 0ith it, there is accom"lishment. 0ithout it there are only alibis." Henry 2ord, (ndustrialist "Life is enthusiasm, .est." #ir Laurence 1livier "The larger the island of knowledge, the longer the shoreline of wonder." al"h 0. #ockman, Minister " 3 child's attitude toward everything is an artist's attitude." 0illa 'ather "My work, which ('ve done for a long time, was not "ursued in order to gain the "raise ( now en6oy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which ( notice resides in me more than in most other men." 3ntonie van Leeuwenhoek, enowned &iologist "He who can no longer "ause to wonder and stand ra"t in awe, is as good as dead; his eyes are closed." 3lbert 4instein

"0ithout "assion man is a mere latent force and "ossibility, like the flint which awaits the shock of the iron before it can give forth its s"ark." Henri,2r<d<ric 3miel, #wiss !hiloso"her and !oet "(t is the dim ha.e of mystery that adds enchantment to "ursuit." 3ntoine ivarol "The im"ortant thing is not to sto" 8uestioning. 'uriosity has its own reasons for e)isting. 1ne cannot hel" but be in awe when he contem"lates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. (t is enough if one tries to com"rehend a little of this mystery every day. 5ever lose a holy curiosity." 4dmund &urke "1ne thing life has taught me: (f you are interested, you never have to look for new interests. They come to you. 0hen you are genuinely interested in one thing, it will always lead to something else." 4leanor oosevelt "(s not life a hundred times too short for us to bore ourselves-" 5iet.sche "0e need a renaissance of wonder. 0e need to renew, in our hearts and in our souls, the deathless dream, the eternal "oetry, the "erennial sense that life is miracle and magic." 4. Merrill oot "4very man without "assions has within him no "rinci"le of action, nor motive to act." 'laude Helvetius "3re you bored with life- Then throw yourself into some work you believe in with all your heart, live for it, die for it, and you will find ha""iness that you had thought could never be yours." 7ale 'arnegie "4n6oyment is not a goal, it is a feeling that accom"anies im"ortant ongoing activity." !aul /oodman, 3uthor and !oet "0e are an intelligent s"ecies and the use of our intelligence 8uite "ro"erly gives us "leasure." 'arl #agan "0onder is what sets us a"art from other life forms. 5o other s"ecies wonders about the meaning of e)istence or the com"le)ity of the universe or themselves." Herbert 0. &oyer

"( would rather have a mind o"ened by wonder than one closed by belief." /erry #"ence, 3uthor

"0onder rather than doubt is the root of knowledge." 3braham +oshua Heschell "#ometimes success is due less to ability than to .eal." 'harles &u)ton "The world belongs to the energetic." al"h 0aldo 4merson "3 man can succeed at almost anything for which he has unlimited enthusiasm." 'harles M. #chwab "4nthusiasm is nothing more or less than faith in action." Henry 'hester "( have no s"ecial gift. ( am only "assionately curious." 3lbert 4instein "!eo"le travel to wonder at the height of the mountains, at the huge waves of the seas, at the long course of the rivers, at the vast com"ass of the ocean, at the circular motion of the stars, and yet they "ass by themselves without wondering." #aint 3ugustine "0e are all naturally seekers of wonders. 0e travel far to see the ma6esty of old ruins, the venerable forms of the hoary mountains, great waterfalls, and galleries of art. 3nd yet the world's wonder is all around us; the wonder of setting suns, and evening stars, of the magic s"ringtime, the blossoming of the trees, the strange transformations of the moth...." 3lbert !ike, writer

13. TAKING RESPONSIBLE RISKS

& e i n g a d v e n t u r e s o m e . . i v i n g o n t h e e d g e o f o n e " s c o m p e t e

"#ometimes you 6ust have to take the lea" and build your wings on the way down." *obi ;amada "0e can never discover new continents until we have the courage to lose sight of all coasts." 3ndr< /ide "There is a time for daring and a time for caution, and a wise man knows which is called for." +ohn *eating, Teacher in 7ead !oet's #ociety "(f you let your fear of conse8uence "revent you from following your dee"est instinct, your life will be safe, e)"edient and thin." *atharine &. Hathaway "The only man who never makes mistakes is the man who never does anything." 4leanor oosevelt "3dventure is worthwhile in itself." 3melia 4arhart "*ee" your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground." Theodore oosevelt "0e must dare, and dare again, and go on daring." /eorges +ac8ue 7anton "7o not go where the "ath may lead, go instead where there is no "ath and leave a trail." al"h 0aldo 4merson "The "ossibility that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the su""ort of a cause we believe to be 6ust." 3braham Lincoln "The only way of discovering the limits of the "ossible is to venture a little "ast them into the im"ossible." 3rthur 'larke

"0e should not let our fears hold us back from "ursuing our ho"es." +ohn 2. *ennedy "7on't be afraid to take a big ste" if one is indicated. ;ou can't cross a chasm in

two small 6um"s." 7avid Lloyd /eorge "1ne must have the adventurous daring to acce"t oneself as a bundle of "ossibilities and undertake the most interesting game in the world=making the most of one's best." Harry 4merson 2osdick "1nly those who will risk going too far can "ossibly find out how far one can go." T. #. 4liot "(n "arenting and teaching, let this be our aim: 5ot to make every idea safe for children, but every child safe for ideas." /erhardt 4. 2rost "2ind a way to engage the heart in the "roblem and you are likely to see the child rise naturally to his own o"timal levels of uncertainty, risk and relevance." ichard +ones "There are risks and costs to action. &ut they are far less than the long range risks of comfortable inaction." +ohn 2. *ennedy "(f there is something to gain and nothing to lose by asking=by all means askI" 0. 'lement #tone "The way to develo" self,confidence is to do the thing you fear." 0illiam +ennings &ryan "Dndertake something that is difficult; it will do you good. Dnless you try to do something beyond what you have already mastered, you will never grow." onald 1sborn "!eo"le don't always have the vision, and the secret for the "erson with the vision is to stand u". (t takes a lot of courage." 5atalie 'ole "The greatest mistake you can make in life is to be continually fearing you will make one." 4lbert Hubbard "7o not fear risk. 3ll e)"loration, all growth is calculated. 0ithout challenge "eo"le cannot reach their higher selves. 1nly if we are willing to walk over the edge can we become winners." The families of the 'hallenger #"ace #huttle 'rew

";ou may be disa""ointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don't try." &everly #ills " . . . if you don't risk anything, you risk even more." 4rica +ong "( say if it's going to be done, let's do it. Let's not "ut it in the hands of fate. Let's not "ut it in the hands of someone who doesn't know me. ( know me best. Then take a breath and go ahead." 3nita &aker " iskI isk anythingI 'are no more for the o"inions of others, for those voices. 7o the hardest thing on earth for you. 3ct for yourself. 2ace the truth." *atherine Mansfield "0e must have courage to bet on our ideas, to take the calculated risk, and to act. 4veryday living re8uires courage if life is to be effective and bring ha""iness." Ma)well Malt. "My advice to someone who wants to become a '41: Take risks and never sto" learning." &arry and '41, 3vis ental 'ar "The only way to discover the limits of the "ossible is to go beyond them into the im"ossible." 3rthur '. 'larke "To con8uer without risk is to trium"h without glory." !ierre 'orneille "There has been a calculated risk in every stage of 3merican develo"ment=the "ioneers who were not afraid of the wilderness, businessmen who were not afraid of failure, dreamers who were not afraid of action." &rooks 3tkinson "2ailure is always a safe, familiar, no,risk refuge, a known e)"erience; it focuses on testing no new res"onsibilities u"on one. #uccess, on the other hand, is unknown territory and a high,risk business; the very life,style it im"oses if full of relentless demands for even better "erformances and achievements." 3lan H. 1lmstead "(t takes as much courage to have tried and failed as it does to have tried and succeeded." 3nne Morrow Lindbergh "7o not fear adversity. emember, a kite rises against the wind rather than with it.

!eo"le are not willing to take risks when they feel afraid or threatened. &ut if you manage "eo"le by love=that is, if you show them res"ect and trust=they start to "erform u" to their real ca"abilities." +an 'arlson, !resident, #candinavian 3irlines #ystem. "4very creative "ro6ect ('ve "roduced re8uired courage and a trium"h over fear, but some "otential accom"lishments remain unreali.ed because of fear of failure, fear of re6ection, fear of ridicule, fear of error." 7r. 4dward ockey "The greatest barrier to innovationLcreativity is fear. 2ear of failure, fear of success, fear of ridicule or s"eculation or being noticed . . . whatever. +ust fear of reaching into the unknown, trying something different. The 'way it's always been' is safe. 'hange is scary and takes courage to initiate. Those who dare to say 'what if-' and take even the >st ste"s toward change are the bravest of souls." &everly Mardis "Looking back on my life, ( wish ('d ste""ed forward and made a fool of myself more often when ( was younger=because when you do, you find out you can do it." 0illiam #essions, 2ormer 2&( 7irector "4verything is sweetened by risk." 3le)ander #mith "( think we should follow a sim"le rule: if we can take the worst, take the risk." 7r. +oyce &rothers 1nly when we acce"t full res"onsibility for our lives will we have the confidence and courage to risk." #tacy 3llison, first 3merican woman to climb Mt. 4verest "( want to work with the to" "eo"le, because only they have the courage and the confidence and the risk,seeking "rofile that you need." Laurel 'utler ";ou'll always miss >AAU of the shots you don't take." 0ayne /ret.ky "0hy not go out on a limb- (sn't that where the fruit is-" 2rank #cully "(t is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult." #eneca

"!rogress always involves risks. ;ou can't steal second base and kee" your foot on first." 2rederick &. 0ilco) "0ho dares nothing, need ho"e for nothing." +ohann 2riedrich 9on #chiller "Twenty years from now you will be more disa""ointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. #o throw off the bowlines. #ail away from the safe harbor. 'atch the trade winds in your sails. 4)"lore. 7ream. 7iscover. Mark Twain "0hy not go out on a limb. (sn't that where the fruit is-" 2rank #cully "1nly those, who dare to fail greatly, can ever achieve greatly." obert 2. *ennedy "1nly those who will risk going too far can "ossibly find out how far one can go." T.#. 4liot "3ll men's gains are the fruit of venturing." Herodotus "&e always sure you're right, then go ahead." 7avy 'rockett "(f you're never scared or embarrassed or hurt, it means you never take any chances." +ulia #orel, 3uthor "7o not wait for ideal circumstances, nor the best o""ortunities; they will never come." +anet 4. #tuart "&egin somewhere; you cannot build a re"utation on what you intend to do." Li. #mith "'onditions are never 6ust right. !eo"le who delay action until all factors are favorable do nothing." 0illiam 2eather

"3n idea that is not dangerous is unworthy to be called an idea at all." 4lbert Hubbard

"0hen you cannot make u" your mind which of two evenly balanced courses of action you should take=choose the bolder." 0illiam +ose"h #lim, &ritish 2ield Marshall "Lea" and the net will a""ear." +ulie 'ameron ";es, risk taking is inherently failure,"rone. 1therwise, it would be called sure, thing taking." Tim McMahon "Take risks: if you win, you will be ha""y; if you lose, you will be wise." 3nonymous "(f you don't risk anything, you risk even more." 4rica +ong, 3uthor "(f you are not living on the edge, you are taking u" too much room." +ayne Howard "Take calculated risks. That is 8uite different from being rash." /eneral /eorge #. !atton "(f everything seems under control, you're 6ust not going fast enough." Mario 3ndretti "5othing ventured, something lost." 5eale 'la"", 'onsultant "(t is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult." #eneca ";ou miss >AAU of the shots you never take." 0ayne /ret.ky "The men who have done big things are those who were not afraid to attem"t big things, who were not afraid to risk failure in order to gain success." &. '. 2orbes "7o one thing every day that scares you." 4leanor oosevelt Lea" and the net will a""ear. Nen saying

"7o not go where the "ath may lead. /o instead where there is no "ath and leave a trail." al"h 0aldo 4merson "The mind, ever the willing servant, will res"ond to boldness, for boldness, in effect, is a command to deliver mental resources." 5orman 9incent !eale "astor, s"eaker, Q author "Looking back on my life, ( wish ('d ste""ed forward and made a fool of myself more often when ( was younger because when you do, you find out you can do it." 0illiam #essions, former 2&( 7irector " egret for the things we did can be tem"ered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable." #ydney +. Harris, #trictly !ersonal "(f you let fear of the unknown sto" you from taking chances, you will stifle your true "otential." #teve i..o, s"eaker, comedian, and author

14. FINDING HUMOR

/ i n d i n g t h e w h i m s i c a l, i n c o n g r u o u s a n d u n e ' p e c t e d . & e i n

"(f you can laugh at it, you can live with it." 4rma &ombeck "Laugh at yourself first, before anyone else can." 4lsa Ma)well "Laughter is the shortest distance between two "eo"le." 9ictor &orge "(t is not enough to "osses wit. 1ne must have enough of it to avoid having too much." 3ndr< Maurois "The most wasted day is that in which we have not laughed." #ebastien, och 5icolas de 'hamfort "('d rather be a failure at something ( en6oy than be a success at something ( hate." /eorge &urns "The human race has one really effective wea"on, and that is laughter." Mark Twain "!eo"le are at their most mindful when they are at "lay. (f we find ways of en6oying our work=blurring the lines between work and "lay=the gains will be greater." 4llen Langer "4ach day, and the living of it, has to be a conscious creation in which disci"line and order are relieved with some "lay and some "ure foolishness." May #arton "2un is about as good a habit as there is." +immy &uffet ";ou can increase your brain "ower three to fivefold sim"ly by laughing and having fun before working on a "roblem." 7oug Hall "Take time every day to do something silly." !hili"a 0alker "7on't take life too seriously, for you may "ass a good laugh along the wayI" *eith /usich

"Laughter is the music of life." #ir 0illiam 1sler "2un is going to enhance interest, because "eo"le don't feel incom"etent when they're having fun." Matthew #. ichter ";ou grow u" the day you have your first real laugh at yourself." 4thel &arrymore "Humor comes from self,confidence. There's an aggressive element to wit." ita Mae &rown "He deserves !aradise who makes his com"anions laugh." The *oran "He who laughs, lasts." Mary !ettibone !oole "3t the height of laughter, the universe is flung into a kaleidosco"e of new "ossibilities." +ean Houston "(magination was given to man to com"ensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is." #ir 2rancis &acon "3 day without laughter is a day wasted." 'harlie 'ha"lin "0ere it not for my little 6okes, ( could not bear the burdens of this office." 3braham Lincoln "3 good laugh is sunshine in a house." 0illiam Make"eace Thackeray "The one serious conviction that a man should have is that nothing is to be taken too seriously." 5icholas Murray &utler ";ou can think best when you're ha""iest." !eter Thomson, 3ustralian /olfer "3 "erson without a sense of humor is like a wagon without s"rings=6olted by every "ebble in the road." Henry 0ard &eecher

"Humor is a rubber sword=it allows you to make a "oint without drawing blood." Mary Hirsch "Humor has a way of bringing "eo"le together. (t unites "eo"le. (n fact, ('m rather serious when ( suggest that someone should "lant a few whoo"ee cushions in the Dnited 5ations." on 7entinger "Laughter and tears are both res"onses to frustration and e)haustion. ( myself "refer to laugh, since there is less cleaning u" to do afterward." *urt 9onnegut "( think the ne)t best thing to solving a "roblem is finding some humor in it." 2rank 3. 'lark "Laughter is a tran8uili.er with no side effects." 3rnold /lasow "Man, when you lose your laugh you lose your footing." *en *esey "3t the height of laughter, the universe is flung into a kaleidosco"e of new "ossibilities." +ean Houston "Laughter is an instant vacation." Milton &erle "3 "erson without a sense of humor is like a wagon without s"rings. (t's 6olted by every "ebble on the road." Henry 0ard &eecher "Humor is "erha"s a sense of intellectual "ers"ective: an awareness that some things are really im"ortant, others not; and that the two kinds are most oddly 6umbled in everyday affairs." 'hristo"her Morley "'ommon sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different s"eeds. 3 sense of humor is 6ust common sense, dancing." 0illiam +ames "The kind of humor ( like is the thing that makes me laugh for five seconds and think for ten minutes." 0illiam 7avis "Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it cro"s u", all our irritation and resentments sli" away, and a sunny s"irit takes their "lace."

Mark Twain "0arning: Humor may be ha.ardous to your illness." 4llie *at. "+oy in one's heart and some laughter on one's li"s is a sign that the "erson down dee" has a "retty good gras" of life." Hugh #idey "3 serious and good "hiloso"hical work could be written consisting entirely of 6okes." Ludwig 0ittgenstein "(magination was given to man to com"ensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is." 2rancis &acon "3 good laugh is good for both the mental and "hysical digestion." 3braham Lincoln "3 man isn't "oor if he can still laugh." aymond Hitchcock "4ven if there is nothing to laugh about, laugh on credit." 3nonymous 0hat soa" is to the body, laughter is to the soul. ;iddish !roverb "There is no defense against adverse fortune which is so effectual as an habitual sense of humor." Thomas 0. Higginson "Humor is the instinct for taking "ain "layfully." Ma) 4astman "!eo"le who laugh actually live longer than those who donMt laugh. 2ew "ersons reali.e that health actually varies according to the amount of laughter." +ames +. 0alsh "The most e)citing "hrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not '4urekaI' but 'That's funny....'" (saac 3simov Time s"ent laughing is time s"ent with the /ods. +a"anese "roverb

"(f you don't have wrinkles, you haven't laughed enough." !hyllis 7iller, comedienne "#hared laughter is like family glue. (t is the stuff of family well,being and all,is, well thoughts. (t brings us together as few other things can." 9alerie &ell, author "Humor is an affirmation of man's dignity, a declaration of man's su"eriority to all that befalls him." omain 'ary "Humor is not a "ostscri"t or an incidental afterthought; it is a serious and weighty "art of the world's economy. 1ne feels increasingly the height of the faculty in which it arises, the nobility of things associated with it, and the greatness of services it renders." 1scar 0. 2irkins, 1scar 2irkins: Memoirs and Letters "Humor is "erha"s a sense of intellectual "ers"ective: an awareness that some things are really im"ortant, others not; and that the two kinds are most oddly 6umbled in everyday affairs." 'hristo"her Morley, (nward Ho "0it is the lowest form of humor." 3le)ander !o"e, !ssa% on Criticism "Humor distorts nothing, and only false gods are laughed off their earthly "edestals." 3gnes e""lier, &oints of 'ie$ "Humor can hel" you to disagree without being disagreeable. The key in democracy is not necessarily that we agree, but that we "artici"ate....7es"ite all the heavy "roblems=domestic and international=there is humor. Humor transcends "artisanshi"." /erald 2ord "This ( conceive to be the chemical function of humor: to change the character of our thought." Lin ;utang

15. THINKING INTERDEPENDENTLY

& e i n g a b l e t o w o r k a n d l e a r n f r o m o t h e r s i n r e c i p r o c a l

"Take care of each other. #hare your energies with the grou". 5o one must feel alone, cut off, for that is when you do not make it." 0illi Dnsoeld, renowned mountain climber "The firmest friendshi"s have been formed in mutual adversity, as iron is most strongly united by the fiercest flame." 'harles 'aleb 'olton "3n unshared life is not living. He who shares does not lessen, but greatens, his life." abbi #te"hen #. 0ise "0e are, each of us angels with only one wing; and we can only fly by embracing one another." Luciano 7e 'rescen.o, 3uthor "How far you go in life de"ends on your being tender with the young, com"assionate with the aged, sym"athetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and the strong. &ecause someday in life you will have been all of these." /eorge 0ashington 'arver "4very "erson you meet=and everything you do in life=is an o""ortunity to learn something. " Tom 'lancy, 3uthor "To kee" your resolve, surround yourself with those who want you to succeed. The brain cannot do its 6ob of "rotecting the body without contact with other "eo"le." obert 1rnstein and 7avid #obel in The (ealing )rain "( refuse to acce"t the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of "eace and brotherhood can never become reality. ( believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word." ev. 7r. Martin Luther *ing, +r.

"#uccess de"ends above all, u"on "eo"le. &uild relationshi"s, teams, "artnershi"s=and motivate "eo"le to contribute. 'ultivate leadershi", creativity, e)cellence. Listen; seek new ideas and advice. " uth #cott "/ardens, scholars say, are the first sign of commitment to a community. 0hen "eo"le "lant corn they are saying, let's stay here. 3nd by their connection to the

land, they are connected to one another." 3nne aver "/etting along well with other "eo"le is still the world's most needed skill. 0ith itOthere is no limit to what "erson can do. 0e need "eo"le, we need the coo"eration of others. There is very little we can do alone." 4arl 5ightingale "4very function in . . . cultural develo"ment a""ears twice: 2irst, on the social level, and later on the individual level; first between "eo"le Einter"sychologicalF, and then inside Eintra"sychologicalF. This a""lies e8ually to voluntary attention, to logical memory, and to the formation of conce"ts. 3ll the higher functions originate as actual relationshi"s between individuals." Lev 9ygotsky "3nytime a change takes "lace in the future, it starts as a vision in someone's mind. The "erson draws other "eo"le into that vision and when enough "eo"le are drawn into share that vision, it e)"lodes into activity." 5ancy Hathaway "#nowflakes are one of nature's most fragile things, but 6ust look what they can do when they stick together." 9ista M. *elly "(t is good to rub and "olish our brain against that of others." Michael 7e Montaigne "/ood friendshi"s are fragile things and re8uire as much care as any other fragile and "recious thing." andol"h &ourne "The only service a friend can really render is to kee" u" your courage by holding u" to you a mirror in which you can see a noble image of yourself." /eorge &ernard #haw "(n hel"ing others, we shall hel" ourselves, for what ever good we give out com"letes the circle and comes back to us." Hora 4dwards

"Ha""iness in life is not measured by the things we achieve, the "laces we go, or the route that we take to get there. Ha""iness in life is measured by the "eo"le that we share all of our e)"eriences with." 'hris 5eedham

"The only true gift is a "ortion of yourself." al"h 0aldo 4merson "(t is a good idea to be ambitious, to have goals, to want to be good at what you do, but it is a terrible mistake to let drive and ambition get in the way of treating "eo"le with kindness and decency. The "oint is not that they will then be nice to you. (t is that you will feel better about yourself." obert Merton #olow "He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and shar"ens our skill. 1ur antagonist in our hel"er." 4dmund &urke "The finest gift you can give anyone is encouragement. ;et, almost no one gets the encouragement they need to grow to their full "otential. (f everyone received the encouragement they need to grow, the genius in most everyone would blossom and the world would "roduce abundance beyond our wildest dreams." #idney Madwed "3n authentic leader acts in ways which serve to elevate those around him." #ean M. /eorges "How can you have charisma- &e more concerned about making others feel good about themselves than you are making them feel good about you." 7an eiland "5ever doubt that a small grou" of thoughtful, committed citi.ens can change the world. (ndeed, it's the only thing that ever has." Margaret Mead "#hared values are the glue that holds this organi.ation together" #helly &rown "3 community is like a shi"; everyone ought to be "re"ared to take the helm." Henrik (bsen "(t may have ha""ened that, at some "oint in my life, ( took some "art of me out of the darkness and "laced it in the light for the eyes of another. (t may be that this other "erson did not understand, and ( ran full of regrets into a "ainful emotional solitude. ;et, there may have been other moments when someone heard my secret and acce"ted my confidence in gentle hands. ( remember the gentle "ressure that told me ( was understood. (t was a great and liberating e)"erience, and in its wake ( felt so much more alive. 3n immense need had been answered in me to be really listened to, to be taken seriously, and to be understood. (t is only through this kind of sharing that we come to know ourselves. (ntros"ection of itself is hel"less. 0e can confide all of our secrets to

the docile "ages of a "ersonal diary, but we can know ourselves and e)"erience the fullness of life only in the sharing with another "erson." +ohn !owell "5obody, but nobody 'an make it out here alone." Maya 3ngelou "He who knows others is wise; He who knows himself is enlightened." Lao,T.u "There is overwhelming evidence that the higher the level of self,esteem, the more likely one will be to treat others with res"ect, kindness, and generosity." 5athaniel &randen "4ach friend re"resents a world in us, a world "ossibly not born until they arrive, and it is only by this meeting that this new world is born." 3nais 5in "'ommunity is...a dynamic set of relationshi"s in which a synergistic, self, regulating whole is created out of the combination of individual "arts into a cohesive, identifiable, unified form." 'enter for the #tudy of 'ommunity, #anta 2e, 5ew Me)ico "The Master Mind "rinci"le: Two or more "eo"le actively engaged in the "ursuit of a definite "ur"ose with a "ositive mental attitude, constitute an unbeatable force." 5a"oleon Hill "(solation is a blind alley . . . . 5othing on the "lanet grows e)ce"t by convergence." Teilhard de 'hardin "The ultimate use of "ower is to em"ower others." 0illiam /lasser "'ommunities are "laces or entities where each member can give something, where they can contribute something that they feel es"ecially able to give, something that they are good at. The gift from each member is valued by the whole community and all gifts are uni8ue and individual. The gift that community gives back to each member is that of a role and a connection." 4d Margarson "True friendshi" is like sound health; the value of it is seldom known until it be lost." 'harles 'aleb 'olton

"7on't walk in front of me, ( may not follow. 7on't walk behind me, ( may not lead. 0alk beside me and be my friend." 3lbert 'amus "2riendshi" is one mind in two bodies." Mencius "('ll lean on you and you lean on me and we'll be okay." 7ave Matthews &and "4veryone hears what you say. 2riends listen to what you say. &est friends listen to what you don't say." 3nonymous "0e all take different "aths in life, but no matter where we go, we take a little of each other everywhere" Tim Mc/raw "&ecome the world's most thoughtful friend." H. +ackson &rown, +r., 3uthor "0e are all healers of each other. Look at 7avid #"iegel's fascinating study of "utting "eo"le together in a su""ort grou" and seeking that some "eo"le in it live twice as long as other "eo"le who are not in a su""ort grou". ( asked 7avid what went on in those grou"s and he said that "eo"le 6ust cared about each other. 5othing big, no dee" "sychological stuff,,"eo"le 6ust cared about each other. The reality is that healing ha""ens between "eo"le." achel 5aomi emen "0e "rovide both irritation and ins"iration for each other=the grist for each other's "earl making." #te"hen 5achmonovitch "(t takes two to know one." /regory &ateson "The miracle is this....The more we share, the more we have" Leonard 5imoy

7on't talk about your troubles. 5o one loves a sad face. 1h, Mom, the truth is 'heer isolates,

Humor defends, 'om"etence intimidates, 'ontrol se"arates, 3nd sadness, #adness o"ens us each to the other. &ill Moyers "The greatest single ste" in organic evolution was the aggregation of different bacteria to make the nucleated cell. #imilarly, the greatest ste" so far in our cultural evolution has been the aggregation of different cultures to make multi, cultures. There are many kinds of multi,culture, ranging from multinational cor"orations to ma6or cities like 5ew ;ork. &ut the self,com"lication of human culture will not sto" there, because it is a self,"ro"elled "rocess. Today's multi, cultures are like the creatures of a colony, coe)isting as more or less isolated Vghettos.' Tomorrow's multi,cultures will be more like genuine multi,cellular organism's, in which Ve)telligence' is s"eciali.ed like the different tissues of a com"le) animal. 1ur new communication technologies are beginning to knit all of the different multi,cultures into a new entity, a su"erculture: Humanity." (an #tewart and +ack 'ohen "3s we develo" soul in our work we need to recogni.e our dual identity: 0e are both individuals and members of a grou". (ndeed, finding the soul of work involves the balance and integration of a""arent o""osites, such as head and heart, intellect and intuition, and self and grou". This "rocess is not so much based on the 'shoulds' but u"on Vwhat is.' (t is my belief that as we attend to the soul of work, we will find we feel more com"lete." 7aryl !aulson "!eo"le are not willing to take risks when they feel afraid or threatened. &ut if you manage "eo"le by love=that is, if you show them res"ect and trust=they start to "erform u" to their real ca"abilities." +an 'arlson, '41, #candinavian 3irlines "Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accom"lishment toward organi.ational ob6ectives. (t is the fuel that allows common "eo"le to accom"lish uncommon results." 3nonymous ( desire that there be as many different "ersons in the world as "ossible; ( would have each one be very careful to find out and "reserve his own way. Henry 7avid Thoreau "3chievement is a we thing, not a me thing, always the "roduce of many heads and hands." +. 3tkinson

"Team members need to be able to sus"end disbelief, think the unthinkable, and let intuition and "remonitions flow freely. Therefore, a necessary skill in team members is tolerance for ambiguity." *ees van der Hei6den "Two are better than one, because they have a good reward for their toil. 2or if they fall, one will lift u" his fellow; woe to him who is alone when he falls and has not another to lift him u". 3gain, if two lie together, they are warm; but how can one be warm alone- 3nd though a man might "revail against one who is alone, two will withstand him. 3 threefold cord is not 8uickly broken." !cclesiastes $: P,>@ "3 uni8ue relationshi" develo"s among team members who enter into dialogue regularly. They develo" a dee" trust that cannot hel" but carry over to discussions. They develo" a richer understanding of the uni8ueness of each "erson's "oint of view." !eter #enge "3 "erson's friendshi"s are one of the best measures of his worth." 'harles 7arwin "He alone has lost the art to live who cannot win new friends." #. 0eir Mitchell "#ince there is nothing so worth having as friends, never lose a chance to make them." 2rancesco /uicciardini "3 man's growth is seen in the successive choir of his friends." al"h 0aldo 4merson "#olitude: 3 good "lace to visit, but a "oor "lace to stay." +osh &illing "3 friend knows the song in my heart and sings it to me when my memory fails." 7onna oberts Hel" your brother's boat across, and your own will reach the shore. Hindu "roverb "The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in service to others." Mahatma /andhi ";ou can get everything you want in life, if you 6ust hel" enough other "eo"le get what they want. " Nig Niglar

5ow this is the Law of the +ungle=as old and as true as the sky: 3nd the 0olf that shall kee" it may "ros"er; but the 0olf that shall break it must die. 3s the cree"er that girdles the tree,trunk the Law runneth forward and back= 2or the strength of the !ack is the 0olf, 3nd the strength of the 0olf is the !ack. 5ow this is the Law of the +ungle=as old and as true as the sky: 3nd the "layer that kee"s it shall "ros"er; &ut the "layer that breaks it must die. 3s the ball and the "arts it is made of 3re bound and held fast at the seam= The strength of the team is the "layer; 3nd the strength of the "layer the team. udyard *i"ling "0e need a s"irit of community, a sense that we are al in this together. (f we have no sense of community, the 3merican dream will wither." &ill 'linton "Here's what is e)citing about sharing ideas with others: if you share a new idea with ten "eo"le, they get to hear it once and you get to hear it ten times." +im ohn, #"eaker and 3uthor "( not only use all the brains ( have, but all ( can borrow." 0oodrow 0ilson "0e must learn to live together as brothers or "erish together as fools." ev. Martin Luther *ing, +r. "*nowledge, or anything else for that matter, really doesn't e)ist until it is shared. (ntelligent, kindWhearted "eo"le who freely share their knowledge an humanity in the work"lace will find the greatest success." +oel #chettler 0hen s"iders unite, they can tie u" a lion. 4thio"ian !roverb "5obody wins unless everybody wins." &ruce #"ringsteen "2riendshi" is the hardest thing in the world to e)"lain. (t's not something you learn in school. &ut if you haven't learned the meaning of friendshi", you really

haven't learned anything." Muhammad 3li The man who thinks he can live without others is mistaken; the one who thinks others can't live without him is even more deluded. Hasidic saying "5o man is wise enough by himself." !lautus (f a link is broken, the entire chain breaks. ;iddish "roverb "(ndividual commitment to a grou" effort, that is what makes a team work, a com"any work, a society work, a civili.ation work." 9ince Lombardi " elationshi"s are a "rere8uisite for "roducing results beyond ourselves. They e)"and our imaginations to infinite "ossibilities that cannot e)ist in a life of isolation." &rian *oslow "0e cannot swing u" on a ro"e that is attached only to our own belt." 0illiam 4rnest Hocking "The most needed, wanted, and "owerful activity in which you can engage on or off the 6ob is to authentically recogni.e, acknowledge, and a""reciate others." &rian *oslow "7ifference is the beginning of synergy." #te"hen . 'ovey, 3uthor "(n the long history of humankind Eand animalkind, tooF those who learned to collaborate and im"rovise most effectively have "revailed." 'harles 7arwin "5o man is so wise that he may not easily err if he takes no other counsel than his own. He that is taught only by himself has a fool for a master." &en +onson "oet, dramatist "/ood com"any and good discourse are the very sinews of virtue." (.aak 0alton "5o matter what accom"lishments you achieve, somebody hel"ed you." 3lthea /ibson, tennis cham"ion

"5one of us has gotten where we are solely by "ulling ourselves u" from our own bootstra"s. 0e got here because somebody. bent down and hel"ed us." Thurgood Marshall, D.#. #u"reme 'ourt +ustice "&y working together, "ooling our resources and building on our strengths, we can accom"lish great things." onald eagan, D.#. !resident "5ever, if "ossible, lie down at night without being able to say: ( have made one human being, at least, a little wiser, a little ha""ier, or a little better this day." 'harles *ingsley, author

1". REMAINING OPEN TO ONTINUOUS LEARNING

& e i n g p r o u d o f a d m i t t i n g w e d o n " t k n o w * r e s i s t i n g c o m p l a

"The only thing that we can know is that we know nothing and that is the highest flight of human wisdom." Leo Tolstoy "4ducation is a "rogressive discovery of our own ignorance." 0ill 7urant "'ertainty ends in8uiry." +acob &rownowski, The *scent of Man "To learn is to change." /eorge &. Leonard "( think success has no rules, but you can learn a lot from failure." +ean *err, 3merican 3uthor and !laywright "(n a humble state, you learn better. ( can't find anything else very e)citing about humility, but at least there's that." +ohn 7ooner, 'hairman and '41 of (nter"ublic "3dmitting errors clears the score and "roves you wiser than before." 3rthur /uiterman "4very "erson you meet=and everything you do in life=is an o""ortunity to learn something." Tom 'lancy, 3uthor "The man with insight enough to admit his limitations comes nearest to "erfection." /oethe "/rowth begins when we begin to acce"t our own weakness." +ean 9anier "3 failure is a man who has blundered, but is not able to cash in on the e)"erience." 4lbert Hubbard

"5o matter what you do, no matter how stu"id, dumb or damaging you 6udge it to be, there is a lesson to be learned from it. 5o matter what ha""ens to you, no matter how unfair, ine8uitable or wrong, there's something you can take from the situation and use for your advancement." !eter Mc0illiams, 3uthor

"There is nothing final about a mistake, e)ce"t its being taken as final." !hyllis &ottome "He that thinks himself the wisest is generally the least so." '.'. 'olton "(f ( could wish for my life to be "erfect, it would be tem"ting but ( would have to decline, for life would no longer teach me anything." 3llyson +ones "3n e)"ert is a fellow who is afraid to learn anything new because then he wouldn't be an e)"ert anymore." Harry # Truman "0e learn the ro"e of life by untying its knots." +ean Toomer "The ob6ect of education is to "re"are the young to educate themselves throughout their lives." obert Maynard Hutchins "The education of a man is never com"lete until he dies." obert 4. Lee "3rriving at one goal is the starting "oint to another." +ohn 7ewey "Learning is not com"ulsory. 5either is survival." 0. 4dwards 7eming "( know nothing e)ce"t the fact of my ignorance." #ocrates "To know that you do not know is the best. To "retend to know when you do not know is disease." Lao Tsu

"0e live in a time of such ra"id change and growth of knowledge that only he who is in a fundamental sense a scholar=that is, a "erson who continues to learn and in8uire=can ho"e to kee" "ace, let alone "lay the role of guide." 5athan M. !usey, !resident of Harvard Dniversity "(f you can react the same way to winning and losing, that's a big accom"lishment. That 8uality is im"ortant because it stays with you the rest of your life."

'hris 4vert "0hoever ceases to be a student has never been a student" /eorge (les "3nyone who sto"s learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. 3nyone who kee"s learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to kee" your mind young." Henry 2ord "The human body is a river of intelligence, energy and information that is constantly renewing itself in every second of its e)istence." 7ee"ak 'ho"ra "3 man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong, which is but saying... that he is wiser today than he was yesterday." 3le)ander !o"e "The beautiful thing about learning is that nobody can take it away from you." &. &. *ing " Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood." al"h 0aldo 4merson "2acts do not cease to e)ist because they are ignored." 3ldous Hu)ley "1ne of the most difficult "roblems of our age is that leaders, and "erha"s academics as well, cannot readily admit that things are out of control and that we do not know what to do. 0e have too much information, limited cognitive abilities to think in systemic terms and an unwillingness to a""ear to be in control and to have solutions for our "roblems. 0e are afraid that if we admit to our confusion, we will make our followers and students an)ious and disillusioned. 0e know we must learn how to learn, but we are afraid to admit it." 7onald Michael "(f you find a good solution and become attached to it, the solution may become your ne)t "roblem." 7r. obert 3nthony

"7id you ever notice how difficult it is to argue with someone who is not obsessed with being right-" 0ayne 0. 7yer "( don't divide the world into the weak and the strong, or the successes and the

failures, those who make it or those who don't. ( divide the world into learners and non,learners." &en6amin &arber "Those who succeed and do not "ush on to greater failure are the s"iritual middle, classers." 4ugene 1'5eill "1ne of the biggest things ('ve learned is that ( don't always have to be right." +effrey &. #wart. "The biggest room in the world is the room for im"rovement." 3nonymous "The to" of the hill is but the bottom of another mountain." 3nkit +amwal "3n e)"ert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field." 5iels &ohr "The way to learn to do things is to do things. The way to learn a trade is to work at it. #uccess teaches how to succeed. &egin with the determination to succeed, and the work is half done already." +.5. 2adenburg "1nly in growth, reform and change . . . "arado)ically enough . . . is true security to be found." 3nne Morrow Lindbergh "There are no mistakes. The events we bring u"on ourselves, no matter how un"leasant, are necessary in order to learn what we need to learn; whatever ste"s we take, they're necessary to reach the "laces we've chosen to go." ichard 7avid &ach "0hen you're through changing, you're through." &ruce &arton

"5otice the difference between what ha""ens when a man says to himself, '( have failed three times,' and what ha""ens when he says, '('m a failure.'" #. (. Hayakawa "#ome days you must learn a great deal. &ut you should also have days when you allow what is already in you to swell u" and touch everything. (f you never let that

ha""en, then you 6ust accumulate facts, and they begin to rattle around inside of you." 4. L. *onigsburg "3 life s"ent making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life s"ent doing nothing." /eorge &ernard #haw "The man who has ceased to learn ought not to be allowed to wander around loose in these dangerous days." M.M. 'oady "(t is necessary for us to learn from others' mistakes. ;ou will not live long enough to make them all yourself." Hyman ickover "'hallenges make you discover things about yourself that you never really knew. They're what make the instrument stretch=what make you go beyond the norm." 'icely Tyson "The first "roblem for all of us, men and women, is not to learn, but to unlearn." /loria #teinem " . . . this thing we call 'failure' is not falling down, but the staying down." Mary !ickford "7are to be naive." . &uckminster 2uller "+ust because something doesn't do what you "lanned it to do doesn't mean it's useless." Thomas 4dison "1ther "eo"le may not have had high e)"ectations for me . . . but ( had high e)"ectations for myself." #hannon Miller "*nowledge is the rediscovering of our own insight." !lato

"There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning." Louis L'3mour

"There is no finish line." 5ike 'or"oration "(n a time of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully e8ui""ed to deal with a world that no longer e)ists." 4ric Hoffer "3s we have come to view teaching, it begins with an act of reason, continues with a "rocess of reasoning, culminates in "erformances of im"arting, eliciting, involving, or enticing, and is then thought about some more until the "rocess can begin again" Lee #hulman "!erha"s for the first time in history, human,kind has the ca"acity to create far more information than anyone can absorb; to foster far greater interde"endency than anyone can manage, and to accelerate change far faster than anyone's ability to kee" "ace." !eter #enge "3 goal of education is. to assist growth toward greater com"le)ity and integration and to assist in the "rocess of self,organi.ation=to modify individuals' ca"acity to modify themselves." euven 2euerstein "Learning is a "rocess whereby a human being, or grou", or organi.ation, or society comes to understand and embody nature's "atterns." Tom +ohnson "(n due course we arrive, if wit can be said that we ever fully arrive. The truth is there are destinations beyond destinations and do the confirmed sailor goes on tacking forever." ichard &ode " . . . a "erson and an organi.ation must have goals, take actions to achieve those goals, gather evidence of achievement, study and reflect on the data and from that take actions again. Thus, they are in a continuous feedback s"iral toward continuous im"rovement. This is what V*ai.an' means." 0. 4dwards 7eming "( am forever on the way." Ma)ine /reene Live to learn and you will learn to live. !ortuguese "roverb. "#elf,"roduction: the characteristic of living systems to continuously renew

themselves and to regulate this "rocess in such a way that the integrity of their structure is maintained. (t is a natural "rocess which su""orts the 8uest for structure, "rocess renewal and integrity." Margaret 0heatley "0hat we call the beginning is often the end. 3nd to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from. 0e shall not cease from e)"loration and the end of all our e)"loring will be to arrive where we started and to know the "lace for the first time." T. #. 4liot "3fter the cheers have died down and the stadium is em"ty, after the headlines have been written and after you are back in the 8uiet of your room and the cham"ionshi" ring has been "laced on the dresser and all the "om" and fanfare has faded, the enduring things that are left are: the dedication to e)cellence, the dedication to victory, and the dedication to doing with our lives the very best we can to make the world a better "lace in which to live." 9ince Lombardi "Learning to e)"lain "henomena such that one continues to be fascinated by the failure of one's e)"lanations creates a continuing cycle of thinking, that is the cru) of intelligence. (t isn't that one "erson knows more than another, then. (n as sense, it is im"ortant to know less than the ne)t "erson, or at least to be certain of less, thus enabling more curiosity and less e)"laining away because one has again encountered a well,known "henomenon. The less you know the more you can find out about, and finding out for oneself is what intelligence is all about." oger #chank "There is only one thing . . . to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never e)haust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the thing for you." T.H. 0hite "(f a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties." 2rancis &acon "( am no longer afraid of becoming lost, because the 6ourney back always reveals something new, and that is ultimately good for the artist." &illy +oel "3 !h. 7. in living: ! is for '"oor in knowledge.' Those who live best reali.e that they can never learn enough.

"H is for 'hungry to learn.' Those who hunger for knowledge will always find "lenty to eat. "7 is for 'desire to succeed.' Those who desire to learn and im"rove, and those who "ersist in s"ite of obstacles, will live fully. " eali.e you're "oor in knowledge, become hungry to learn and desire to succeed. 4verybody and every occasion can become your teacher, and this is the !h. 7. that will o"en the door of success." 'harlie Hough "3 man doesn't know what he knows until he knows what he doesn't know." Laurence !eter "The greatest wisdom often consists in ignorance." &altasar /racian "Living is a form of not being sure, not knowing what ne)t or how. The moment you know how, you begin to die a little." 3gnes de Mille "3rriving at one goal is the starting "oint to another." +ohn 7ewey "Having to know the answers "uts one in terrible "ositions from which to learn." 7aniel *im "(t is a sign of strength, not of weakness, to admit that you don't know all the answers." +ohn !. Lougbrane "3nswers given with authority negate the search for truth." 5eil (nnes "2ailure is the condiment that gives success its flavor." Truman 'a"ote, 3uthor "( am not 6udged by the number of times ( fail, but by the number of times ( succeed. 3nd the number of times ( succeed is in direct "ro"ortion to the number of times ( can fail and kee" trying." Tom Ho"kins, #ales Trainer and 3uthor "( am always doing that which ( cannot do, in order that ( may learn how to do it." !ablo !icasso

0hen you en6oy becoming wise, there is ho"e for youI 3 bright future lies aheadI &ro+erbs %$:>@,>$ "( am learning all the time. The tombstone will be my di"loma." 4artha *itt ";ou can learn new things at any time in your life if you're willing to be a beginner. (f you actually learn to think like being a beginner, the whole world o"ens u" to you." &arbara #her, 3uthor "There is no "oint at which you can say, '0ell, ('m successful now. ( might as well take a na".'" 'arrie 2isher "The closer one gets to the to", the more one finds there is no Vto".'" 5ancy &arcus "0isdom is knowing how little we know." 1scar 0ilde "3im for success, not "erfection. 5ever give u" your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and to move forward with your life. " 7r. 7avid &urns, !sychiatrist and 3uthor "There is only one thing more "ainful than learning from e)"erience and that is not learning from e)"erience." 3rchibald McLeish, !oet "5othing is a waste of time if you use the e)"erience wisely." 3uguste odin "To lose is to learn." 3nonymous "2ailure is instructive. The "erson who really thinks learns 8uite as much from his failures as from his successes." +ohn 7ewey "4ducation is learning what you didn't know you didn't know." /eorge &oas

"The fact that you are willing to say, '( do not understand, and it is fine,' is the

greatest understanding you could e)hibit." 0ayne 7yer, 3uthor and #"eaker "'ertitude is not the test of certainty." 1liver 0endell Holmes, +r. "('ve learned that you'll never be disa""ointed if you always kee" an eye on uncharted territory, where you'll be challenged and growing and having fun." *irstie 3lley "The more the years go by, the less ( know. &ut if you give e)"lanations and understand everything, then nothing can ha""en. 0hat hel"s me go forward is that ( stay rece"tive, ( feel that anything can ha""en." 3nouk 3imee "My work, which ('ve done for a long time, was not "ursued in order to gain the "raise ( now en6oy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which ( notice resides in me more than in most other men." 3ntonie van Leeuwenhoek, enowned &iologist 5o matter how full the river, it still wants to grow. 'ongolese !roverb To be fond of learning is to be at the gate of knowledge. 'hinese !roverb "0hat you know is 6ust a "oint of de"arture. #o let's moveI" *eora"etse *gositsile, #outh 3frican !oet "3nyone who sto"s learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty." Henry 2ord "Learning is not attained by chance. (t must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence." 3bigail 3dams "/et over the idea that only children should s"end their time in study. &e a student so long as you still have something to learn, and this will mean all your life." Henry L. 7oherty "The im"rovement of understanding is for two ends: first, our own increase of knowledge; secondly, to enable us to deliver that knowledge to others." +ohn Locke "Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever." Mahatma /andhi

"5othing is so firmly believed as what we least know." Michel 4y8uem de Montaigne, 2rench 3uthor "3n education isn't how much you've committed to memory, or even how much you know. (t's being able to differentiate between what you do know and what you don't know." 0illiam 2eather, 3uthor and !ublisher "Living is a form of not being sure, not knowing what ne)t or how. The moment you know how, you begin to die a little. The artist never entirely knows, we guess. 0e may be wrong, but we take lea" after lea" in the dark." 3gnes de Mille "'ertainty generally is illusion, and re"ose is not the destiny of man." 1liver 0endell Holmes +r. " eal knowledge is to know the e)tent of one's ignorance." 'onfucius (f you understand everything, you must be misinformed. +a"anese !roverb "1f all our human resources, the most "recious is the desire to im"rove." 3nonymous 0hoever cares to learn will always find a teacher. /erman "roverb "(f you are not learning, no one will ever let you down." obert 3nthony "4very failure teaches a man something, to wit, that he will "robably fail again ne)t time." H.L. Mencken "The illiterate of the %>st 'entury will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." 3lvin Toffler "7are to be naive." &uckminster 2uller "Try to learn something about everything and everything about something." Thomas H. Hu)ley, &iologist

"The search for the lessons of the new science is still in "rogress, really in its infancy. (n this realm, three is a new kind of freedom, where it is more rewarding to e)"lore than to reach conclusions, more satisfying to wonder than to know, and more e)citing to search than to stay "ut. 'uriosity, not certainty, becomes the saving grace." Margaret 0heatley, E>PPPF Leadership and the #e$ Science: ,isco+ering Order in a Chaotic -orld. "( was still learning when ( taught my last class." 'laude M. 2uess, !hilli"s 3cademy educator "'uriosity is a willing, a "roud, an eager confession of ignorance." #. Leonard ubinstein "Dntil you are willing to be confused about what you already know, what you know will never become wider, bigger or dee"er." Milton 4rikson "(t's what you learn after you know it all that counts." +ohn 0ooden "'onversation would be vastly im"roved by the constant use of $ sim"le words: ( do not know." 3ndre Maurois, author "!eo"le never im"rove unless they look to some standard or e)am"le higher or better than themselves." Tyrone 4dwards, author "The best "eo"le know that there are two "hases in every crisis: the one where you manage it and the other where you learn from it. To succeed you have to do both." M. H. Mc'ormack "( do not try to dance better than anyone else. ( only try to dance better than myself." Mikhail &aryshnikov, dancer "3 man learns to skate by staggering about and making a fool of himself; indeed, he "rogresses in all things by making a fool of himself." /eorge &ernard #haw, "laywright "To know anything well involves a "rofound sensation of ignorance." +ohn uskin

"#uccess is the intelligent use of mistakes in self renewing schools. The moral im"erative of the school is for its members to move into their areas of incom"etence: if we already knew e)actly how to do this work, we would not have the "ur"oseless cycles of educational reform that schools are endlessly caught in. 0e all need to learn new roles and relationshi"s." 'arl /lickman "The true delight is in the finding out rather than in the knowing." (saac 3simov "The first ste" to knowledge is to know that we are ignorant." Lord 7avid 'ecil, literary critic and educator "#omewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." 'arl #agan, astronomer "There is no to". There are always further heights to reach." +ascha Heifet., violinist "(n every man there is something wherein ( may learn of him, and in that ( am his "u"il." al"h 0aldo 4merson "0e have to cross the boundary between knowing and not knowing many times before we achieve understanding." 7avid Hawkins "Learning is what most adults will do for a living in the %>st 'entury." #ydney +ose"h !erelman, writer