You are on page 1of 34

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Community Music Activity


cerdd gymunedol cymru community music wales

Resource Pack

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Contents
1. Introduction 2. Why Music? 3. Case Studies Drumming & Percussion Songwriting & Composition DJing Voice Digital Music 4. Picking the Right Activity 5. Group Work 6. Picking a Tutor 7. Contracting a Tutor 8. Preparing the Space 9. Equipment 10. Evaluation 11. Policies Further Reading 3 4 5 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32

1.

Introduction

Welcome to Community Music Wales Community Music Activity Resource Pack. This pack was designed for organisations already using, or wishing to use music as an engagement tool.
CMW embarked on this initiative in 2009, in response to an increase in requests made to us for advice and guidance. We carried out consultation across Wales with organisations, community music practitioners, local authorities and advisors. The aim was to research the extent to which music is currently being used within local communities, what level of training the practitioners have received and what barriers exist preventing the use of community music. Our findings demonstrated that there was little information available about community music practice, predominantly due to a lack of funding and resources. In response to this, using our twenty years of experience in developing and delivering community music training and activity, CMW designed the Community Music Activity Resource Pack to be used as a tool kit for community music delivery. The Community Music Activity Resource Pack helps identify suitable music activity for organisations by presenting case studies of different workshops and looking at the practical steps needed to set up this work. There is also a further reading section sign posting to other organisations for additional information such as: Child Protection, Health and Safety, and Musicians Union. The pack is free and will be available as a download from our website and in hardcopy on request. www.communitymusicwales.co.uk

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

2.

CMW believes that music can impact the lives of even the hardest to reach individuals. It can have a highly positive effect when delivered in a sensitive and client centred way, by trained community music tutors and practitioners. Music enriches lives; it can be liberating; exciting; soothing; joyful - the act of creating music is, in itself, empowering.
Music is suitable for all groups all ages, all abilities activity can be tailored to capture the imagination and interest of all people. Music is not just for people who are, or want to become musicians; it provides new opportunities for people to learn and to socialise. Using community music activities with groups can cross cultural divides and bridge age gaps whilst building cohesion and in doing so bring communities together. The aim of community music is not necessarily about the end product of a musical piece but the journey to get there. Along the way participants can increase their confidence, levels of basic skills, community cohesion and strengthen community ties, as well as develop practical skills. Music is easy to combine within larger creative projects using other art forms. Music activity can be linked to visual arts, film making, animation, dance and theatre, to name a few.

Why Music?

More opportunities for creativity Allow participants to try new things Increase more creative skills Increase awareness of work potential in the creative industries

3.

Case Studies
In this section we will examine a few basic workshops. These are by no means the only workshops that can be run and should be considered as a starting point rather than a template to follow.
The important thing with any workshop is to tailor the activity to the needs of your group, so use this section as a springboard for ideas and discussion. We will look at the principles of different kinds of activity, their aims and how work can be adapted to better suit your group.

Drumming & Percussion


What is it? Why choose drumming and percussion?
Using African or Samba drums and percussion instruments, create a drumming circle where members sit or stand and play rhythms together. Starting with simple rhythms and then moving to more complex rhythms the group creates their own original piece which can then be performed as a final piece -------------------------------------------------- This activity is suitable for people with different musical skills and abilities. Rhythms can be simple or complex and participants can meaningfully contribute at a level they are comfortable with The activity creates music instantly so that the sense of achievement is immediate Fun and enjoyable Increase confidence, self esteem and other transferable skills such as team work -------------------------------------------------- Increase numeracy. Participants are dealing with rhythms and through this counting, multiplying and working on numeric patterns Increase coordination Increase activity levels and overall fitness as the workshops can be quite active. Build mutual respect and encourage communication. The workshop relies on listening to others and cooperating with them to create music. The work is fundamentally a group activity but also allows for individual expression -------------------------------------------------- This activity can be done with a variety of ages from very small children to young people to older people; it is also suitable for multi age groups and can work particularly well with families and in inter generational work

What are the aims of this activity?


Age Group

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Size of groups

Time

Instruments

How flexible is the activity? How can the activity be adapted?


A drumming circle can range in size so this activity is suitable for both small and very large groups -------------------------------------------------- As drumming and percussion can be a very immediate activity, in that participants are involved as soon as they join the drumming circle, this activity can be done over a variety of time frames, from fixed 2 hour sessions to drop in activity. Groups can also create simple or complex pieces so that workshops can run over a period of several weeks building up original pieces of music. Can also work very well as drop in sessions -------------------------------------------------- A variety of Instruments can be used, such as larger drums mixed with small hand held percussion instruments, or combined with hand clapping or finger clicking and making sounds with the body -------------------------------------------------- Can be used with other kinds of music singing and vocal work lends itself well to this. You can play games with rhythm and peoples names, making up songs and playing with syllable forms -------------------------------------------------- Other art forms can be linked into this activity; samba work in particular has links to carnival and parade type performance so this activity can become part of a larger performance. Participants can engage with other art forms through creating costumes or accessories for the performance or, for example, create puppets to parade with them. This can be a very active workshop and collaborating with dance and movement works very well

Songwriting & Composition


What is it? Why choose songwriting?
Songwriting covers a huge range of musical styles and genres but at its heart is writing original music. This activity creates a piece of music and builds to an end performance or recording of the created piece -------------------------------------------------- Suitable for people with beginner and advanced music skills Suitable for those wishing to be musicians Can use instruments participants already play Increase confidence, self esteem and other transferable skills such as team work Fun and enjoyable Works towards an end piece giving sense of achievement -------------------------------------------------- Increase literacy - participants are writing lyrics meaning they have to consider structure, rhyme and language Increase musical skills Build mutual respect and encourage communication participants are working together to create their piece so must listen to one another and respect the ideas of others Increase self esteem and confidence

What are the aims of this activity?


////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Age Group Size of groups
This activity can work with many age groups. Its not always suitable for smaller children but can work very well with young people and adults -------------------------------------------------- These workshops need smaller groups as they depend on a sharing of ideas and the tutor being able to support each member of the group equally. Ideally you should use groups of 2-6; if you have more you could split the overall group into smaller groups who can then perform their work to one another, which can be very rewarding -------------------------------------------------- As this kind of workshop depends on some time commitment it doesnt work well as drop in sessions but can be very flexible over different groups of sessions, for example intensive two or three workshops or a couple of hours every week for 6 weeks. Songwriting builds so is best with some sustained time -------------------------------------------------- As this is composition work, any instruments can be used, from traditional instruments to instruments made from recycled waste, to combining more traditional rock instruments for example with turn tables. A computer loop can also be used to create a beat or backing track upon which participants can create a melody and lyrics -------------------------------------------------- Songwriting can work with a wide range of musical genres from creating rock and metal songs to acoustic or folk music, bhangra to rap. You can incorporate a variety of musical interests within each group This activity has a definite outcome a song is written. This song can be performed and we would encourage a final performance as it allows participants to show their work and gain a sense of achievement. Recording the song and/or performance can also add to the participants achievement An advantage of a songwriting workshop is that it can be used to explore specific issues, such as those that affect the participants or particular issues the project funder may be interested in -------------------------------------------------- Songwriting can work with all sorts of other art activities. Participants can compose pieces for dance, animation, film, theatre and many, many more. Compositions can work as part of overall performances, interlinking with the performance/piece and not just acting as a background

Time

Instruments

How flexible is the activity?

How can the activity be adapted?


DJing
What is it? Why choose DJing?
Using DJ turntables with vinyl, CD DJ Mixer and CDs or MP3 files and computer based mixing software, participants have the opportunity to learn to beat match, scratch, cut and beat juggle -------------------------------------------------- Suitable for people with beginner and advanced music skills Suitable for those wishing to be musicians Suitable for young people Suitable for small groups (1-3 participants) to work intensively Suitable for one or two hour sessions either as a one off session or as part of a longer course Increase confidence, self esteem and other transferable skills such as team work Fun and enjoyable Works towards an end piece giving sense of achievement -------------------------------------------------- Increases numeracy participants are working with rhythms and beats which will require thinking about beats per minute and how to play these within a rhythm Increase musical and ICT skills Build mutual respect and encourage communication Increase self esteem and confidence -------------------------------------------------- This activity may be more suited to young people and adults rather than children -------------------------------------------------- These workshops need smaller groups as they depend on a sharing of ideas and the tutor being able to support each member of the group equally. Ideally you should use groups of 2-6, if you have more you could split the overall group into smaller groups who can work separately -------------------------------------------------- As this kind of workshop depends on some time commitment it doesnt work well as drop in session but can be very flexible over different groups of sessions for example two or three intensive workshops or a couple of hours every week for 6 weeks

What are the aims of this activity?


Age Group Size of groups

Time

10

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Instruments
DJing with Vinyl: You will need two turntables, a mixer, headphones and vinyl. Amplifier and speakers are optional DJing with CDs: You will need a CD DJ mixer, CDs and headphones. Amplifier and speakers are optional DJing with MP3s: You will need a computer, music mixing software, mp3 music files and headphones. Amplifier and speakers are optional. Alternatively, software exists allowing you to emulate vinyl mixing with mp3s by linking vinyl turntables to a computer. The music files are lined up on the computer package but can be scratched, mixed or spun back on a dummy vinyl disc that produces an effect on the mp3 cued up -------------------------------------------------- This activity can provide a final performance or a recording -------------------------------------------------- DJing works well as a backdrop for performances such as theatre and dance. Scratch DJing can be integrated into a live band performance

How flexible is the activity? How can the activity be adapted?


11

Voice
What is it? Why choose voice?
Vocal workshops can be very broad and cover a large amount of different types of music genres. At its heart is using the voice to make sounds and melodies -------------------------------------------------- Suitable for people with beginner and advanced music and vocal skills Suitable for those wishing to be vocalists or musicians Suitable for one or two hour sessions either as a one off sessions or as part of a longer course Suitable for all ages Increase confidence, self esteem and other transferable skills such as team work. Fun and enjoyable -------------------------------------------------- Using the voice to create rhythmical sound or melody Contribute to an overall song or melody Build mutual respect and encourage communication Increase self-esteem and confidence

What are the aims of this activity?


12

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Age group

Size of groups Time

Instruments How flexible is the activity? How can the activity be adapted?

This activity is suitable for all ages -------------------------------------------------- This kind of activity often works best with large groups, as some people feel more comfortable singing in a crowd to begin with -------------------------------------------------- This activity can be done over a variety of time frames, from fixed 2 hour sessions to drop in activity. Groups can also create simple or complex pieces so that workshops can run over a period of several weeks, building up original pieces of music or song. It is possible to do some voice workshops as one off taster sessions. This is more likely to be based on warming up the vocal chords with exercises -------------------------------------------------- These workshops can run with no instruments at all -------------------------------------------------- Voice workshops are not just about singing, they can encompass rap, MCing and other exercises aimed at using the voice to make sounds -------------------------------------------------- Voice is the most adaptable workshop, running particularly with songwriting, digital music, drumming and percussion and DJ workshops and multi-arts projects such as animation, theatre, dance and many more

13

Digital Music
What is it? Why choose digital music?
Digital Music covers many areas. In this example we are showcasing recording music or sounds and then using a computer to manipulate those recordings to create musical compositions -------------------------------------------------- Suitable for people with beginner and advanced music skills Suitable for small groups (1-3 participants) to work intensively Suitable for all ages Suitable for one or two hour sessions either as one off sessions or as part of a longer course Increase confidence, self esteem and other transferable skills such as team work. Fun and enjoyable Works towards an end piece giving sense of achievement -------------------------------------------------- Increase musical skills Increase ICT skills Build mutual respect and encourage communication Increase self esteem and confidence Increase transferable skills such as team work -------------------------------------------------- This can work with any age group. Young children respond particularly well as they can enjoy playing with the sounds -------------------------------------------------- These workshops need smaller groups as they depend on a sharing of equipment and the tutor being able to support each member of the group equally. Ideally you should use groups of 2-4, if you have more you could split the overall group into smaller groups which can work separately -------------------------------------------------- As this kind of workshop depends on some time commitment it doesnt work well as drop in sessions but can be very flexible over different groups of sessions for example two or three intensive workshops or a couple of hours every week for 6 weeks

What are the aims of this activity?


Age group Size of groups

Time

14

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Instruments How flexible is the activity? How can the activity be adapted?
These workshops rely on having computers with suitable programmes -------------------------------------------------- This activity has a definite outcome a final piece is created. This can be shown/played allowing participants to show their work and gain a sense of achievement -------------------------------------------------- This kind of workshop can be used to explore specific issues, such as those that affect the participants or particular issues the project funder may be interested in This can work with all sorts of other art activities as participants can compose pieces for dance, animation, film, theatre and many, many more. Compositions can work as part of overall performances, interlinking with the performance/piece and not just acting as a background

15

4.

Picking the Right Activity


Music activity can be an excellent way of working with your group, but in order for it to be effective its important to consider what kind of activity is most appropriate for the people you are working with.
One of easiest ways to address this is to ask your participants what they want. Have a discussion over types of music theyre interested in; what level of skill they have if any; what kind of new things they might want to try. It may be useful to ask a community music tutor to talk through ideas for activity that has worked with similar groups. A consultation period can increase the effectiveness of your activity in engagement as it ensures that both the participants and your organisation get what they want. Taster sessions are often a good way of introducing different ways of making music. This will give you a clear indication of what your participants may engage in before you commit to a longer project.

16

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Have you carried out sufficient consultation with your potential participants? Is the planned activity appropriate for your participants? Have you thought about taster sessions?

17

5.

At its core, community music is about bringing groups together through the process of music making. In order to do this effectively CMW and many other community music organisations across the UK work primarily with groups rather than individuals.
Community music is not about directly teaching participants to play instruments better, but encouraging them to express themselves and communicate with those around them through music; they will inherently gain musical skills in this process but will also learn other valuable skills, such as team work, communication and mutual respect. Working with a group in this way presents different challenges as one key issue for the tutor/group leader is to ensure that all group members remain engaged with the activity. In order to do this it is important to consider the size of the group and the tutor-participant ratio. This is important to ensure all participants are receiving support and that the tutor is able to remain in control. Different activities are suitable for different size groups, for example drumming and percussion or singing workshops often work better with larger numbers (i.e. 10-20 participants) whereas rock, pop and DJ workshops are more effective with smaller groups (i.e. 3-6 participants). Additionally you should consider what role each participant has within the group; all members should be able to contribute in a way that is meaningful and rewarding to them. It is a good idea to ask what the participant would like to do and be flexible if they want to try something else throughout the workshop. One of the main differences between a community music tutor and other music workers is that they are trained to work with groups, with group interaction being their main focus. We use the term participant, rather than client or student because they should be taking part. A good community music tutor will be trained to ensure that they encourage participants who are more hesitant to take part and work with over confident participants to allow them space to express themselves, without taking over. It is key that the tutor doesnt become simply a demonstrator or a performer; the tutor should facilitate the activity.

Group Work

18

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Do you have the appropriate tutor to participant ratio? Is the activity suitable for the group? Are all participants taking part? Are the participants enjoying their experience? Is the group spending more time making music than the tutor?

19

6.

Picking a Tutor

Once you have decided what activity you want, you have a number of choices of how to introduce that activity to the group.
CMW and some other organisations can work with you to develop a project, either on a commission basis or through joint funding bids. In doing this the organisation would work on designing the project to your needs, take on the recruitment of a trained, experienced tutor, manage and provide contracts, insurance, equipment, risk assessment and look at carrying out a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) Enhanced Disclosure. Alternatively, a number of community music tutors work as freelancers, enabling them to move around and work with a diverse range of people and organisations. In working with a freelance tutor there are a number of things you need to look for. There is no national, recognised qualification that you can ask for. However CMW has run a Community Music Tutor Training Course since 1992, with trainees receiving accreditation from 1997 so you can ask if they have had this training. You should discuss the project with the tutor and check that they have experience of working both with your client group and with the musical genre you have chosen. You should also check with other groups they say they have worked with. If you take on a tutor you are responsible for carrying out a CRB check. A number of organisations, such as Black Voluntary Sector Network Wales, have artist databases but there is no dedicated national database of freelance community music tutors in Wales so most referrals happen through word of mouth.

20

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Has the tutor had any experience or received any training in working with groups using music? Ask for references. Check them out Does the music tutor have the relevant experience if working with specialist groups such as: Youth, Pre-School, Disabled, Welsh Language, Older People? Have you carried out a Criminal Records Bureau Enhanced Disclosure for the tutor? Is it current?

21

7.

Contracting a Tutor

Even if you have had discussions with your chosen tutor about the activity its important that you set out a contract with your tutor so that you are clear what you expect from them and vice-versa. It is a good idea to include a brief outline of the activity and its aims and if there are any specific issues relating to your group.
The contract should deal with dates, times, rates and method of pay but should also put the workshop in context with the organisation in a more general sense. You should include details such as who the tutor should report to, if members of the organisations staff will be in the session and so on. By making all these details clear before the session, you will have pre-empted any operational issues that might disrupt the workshop. Another important function of the contract is insurance. Your tutor will need to be covered by Public Liability and Employer Liability Insurance; you can check whether your own policy will cover them (often you will need a contract with them to ensure this cover). If not, you will need to see if the tutor has their own insurance which is appropriate to the job. An important point that is often left out is what action is to be taken in the event the tutor is late or has to cancel the session. Include details of who they should contact on the day if there is a problem. This should be someone who can make the necessary changes to your groups programme for the day relatively quickly so as to minimise the disruption. CMW recommend using the Musicians Union rates of pay for Visiting Teachers. CMW has worked extensively to train community music tutors and raise the standards of community music delivery across Wales. This is a skilled job which requires much more than the ability to play musical instruments.

22

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Brief outline of activity Date

Times include length Who is of session, providing the have you equipment? Is factored in it you or the setting up tutor? and packing away time? What is the cancellation Rate of pay policy? Venue Who should the tutor report to when they arrive? Who should the tutor report to if there are any problems? Who is the registered First Aider? Will Staff be present during the session? Is the tutor responsible for collecting registers/ evaluation forms?

Approximate size of the group/Ratio of participants to tutor

23

8.

Preparing the Space


Music activity can be incredibly versatile and can work in lots of different spaces, often using unexpected spaces can bring exciting results. You will need to prepare the space for the activity, bearing in mind your Health and Safety Policy and carry out any risk assessments.
Probably the biggest issue in terms of space and venue is sound. Groups will generally need a room of their own to work in for example having two groups working on different pieces in the same room will be disruptive for both. CMW combats this by using break out rooms where necessary. This will obviously depend on the space you have at your disposal but is an important consideration. Similarly, loud musical activity can be disruptive to other classes or neighbours. Sometimes in order to make a space suitable you will need to move or rearrange furniture, in this case you need to be clear who is responsible for this and when it will happen. Although it may seem a small job, rearranging a room can significantly eat into your workshop time especially if your staff or the tutor are unsure of where things are moving to/what can be moved etc. Clarifying these issues before will mean less time with participants hanging around waiting for the activity to start. Some workshops will require movement, particularly those involving a performance element. Work such as drumming and percussion where a drumming circle is used will need larger spaces. A final consideration would be the issue of audiences. Whilst audiences are great for a performance or at a gig, during the creative process it can be more problematic. Community music is both fun and challenging, introducing new experiences and practices which is an excellent way to increase confidence. Some participants might feel less inclined to try new things if they feel they are being watched (and implicitly judged) by others not partaking in the activity. CMW and a number of other organisations and freelance tutors will insist that everyone in the room should part take in the activity. This encourages those who are less confident and promotes group cohesion. Some people will not want to take part, but workshops are about participating not spectating; everyone should take part to an extent they are comfortable with.

24

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Is the room big enough for the group? Do you need breakout rooms? Are other groups using the space at the same time? Is the workshop going to disturb other classes/ neighbours? Do you need to move furniture? If so, who will do this and when?

25

9.

Equipment
A crucial element of musical delivery is musical equipment. Whilst some vocal workshops do not require any equipment, just about every other kind of workshop will require some.
You may have equipment which you have bought or has been donated to you. If this is the case it is worth checking the equipment is in working order before the workshop. You can do this by ensuring electrical equipment is PAT tested and trying out acoustic equipment to ensure it still works. Check for broken strings or broken skins on drums, also check for any jagged edges/ obvious faults. A tutor will be able to help you restring equipment if you arrange with them beforehand to do so. Alternatively some tutors will provide their own equipment which you may have to pay an additional fee to hire. In either case you should take advice to establish that you have enough appropriate equipment for your chosen activity. Some participants may want to bring their own (typically guitars or amplifiers). We would encourage them to do so if practical. The only danger in relying on participants bringing their own equipment is if they are unable to at the last minute, leaving you without an alternative. They also may not wish to share their equipment with other participants. Do not feel pressured into buying musical equipment for an activity, it is a major capital investment and you need to be sure that any equipment you do buy is suitable. Taster sessions can help you determine what equipment would be best should you wish to make that investment. In buying equipment a huge factor is durability. You should also bear in mind the cost of insuring any purchases. Depending on the activity you are undertaking and your Health and Safety policy, you may need to provide earplugs for participants and staff. These can be bought relatively cheaply from a number of outlets, including supermarkets and pharmacies. If you are in doubt your community music tutor will be able to advise you.

26

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Who is supplying the equipment? Does it need PAT Testing? Can anything cause harm (splinters etc)? Have you factored in time to check the equipment before for use? Do you need to provide earplugs? Dont buy equipment if you are unsure If you are buying consider durability Is the equipment covered by insurance?

27

10.

Evaluation
Once you have planned your activity you should consider how and when you will evaluate the work. Good evaluation processes are essential to ensure engaging and effective projects. At best evaluations can help participants to guide projects, provide new ideas, reinforce the positive work of your organisation and help participants understand the achievements theyve made throughout a project.
Evaluation should be useful to both you (the organisation) and your participants, so its important to think carefully about how to evaluate in the most appropriate manner. How you introduce the evaluation process to the group should also be considered; discuss with them why you want their input and how they would prefer to give it. Often this consultation itself can produce unique effective evaluation processes. If your activity takes place over a significant period of time, you may find it useful to evaluate at key stages. There are many different forms of evaluation such as face to face discussion, group discussion and written evaluation forms. Whether you choose written or discussion based evaluation you should think about why you are asking the questions you are asking and what sort of answers you want. For example asking did you enjoy the activity? will give you a yes/no answer, whereas what did you most enjoy about the activity? will allow you to focus on what elements of the project were most successful. If you are using verbal evaluation, think about how you will record comments for your own use. Staff and tutors working on the project will be able to provide valuable insight into the activity so it is worth asking them for feedback on their experience. You may want to use some of the comments on your website or in the press; you will need permission to do so. One way to do this is to include a statement on the evaluation form itself saying you may use comments but that you will take steps to ensure anonymity if required. Some participants may want to make a comment but wont want to make it directly to the community music tutor (particularly if you are asking about the tutor). You can address this by asking for evaluation forms to be placed into an envelope which is then sealed in front of participants and then opened in private away from the workshop. Similarly if you are using groups or face to face discussion for evaluation, you should offer an alternative for individuals who may want to give their evaluation anonymously.

28

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Do you have a clear idea of what you want from the evaluation? Is the language of the forms appropriate to the group? Do the participants understand why you are asking them to evaluate? How are you collecting the evaluations? Are the participants being put under pressure to make particular choices? Is there a requirement for anonymous feedback? If so what steps are you taking? Do you have permission to use comments in your publicity? Do you have an action plan to address you findings?

29

11.

Policies

Good, trained tutors will know the importance of adhering to your policies and procedures so as to safeguard them and the participant they are working with. They will expect to be provided with copies to read before any work.

You understand your own group and its needs best so having your own tailored policies for your workers/freelance tutors can make a huge difference. You may feel some of your procedures are obvious but procedures can differ vastly from organisation to organisation and its best to clarify the situation for any freelance workers. Some organisations, such as the WCVA can help you to create new policies if you need to please see our Further Reading section for more information.

30

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The kind of policies tutors should expect to see would be: Safeguarding - Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults (including Cyber Safety* and handling disclosure) Equality and Diversity Code of Conduct for freelance/ contract workers Handling Disclosure (this could be part of your Child Protection Policy) Complaints/ Grievance Policy Health and Safety Risk Assessment
*Many companies have yet to devise these policies or include them in their Child Protection Policy, but with increased use of social networking websites its important you address this.

31

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Further Reading
Arts Council Wales: www.artswales.org.uk
For further information on arts activity and strategy, and small grants.

Black Voluntary Sector Network Wales: www.bvsnw.org.uk


Has a BME artists database

Community Music Wales

Resource section and information on workshops and training

www.communitymusicwales.co.uk

Criminal Records Bureau: Health & Safety at Work: www.hse.gov.uk

Outlines the process and provides information. For details of health and safety legislation and information on carrying out risk assessment. For up to date rates.

www.direct.gov.uk and www.businesslink.gov.uk

Musicians Union: www.musiciansunion.org.uk NSPCC:

A wealth of resources in their Help and Advice section, to help ensure that children involved in community activities are safe from harm.

www.nspcc.org.uk Sound Sense:

Professional association promoting community music and supporting community musicians.

www.soundsense.org WCVA:

Information and support for voluntary organisations. The Information section contains sheets on a variety of subjects which can be downloaded. Also has an extensive funding section.

www.wcva.org.uk

32

Community Music Wales is a community arts organisation with 20 years experience of delivering high quality arts activity, touching the lives of over 40,000 people and transforming the landscape of community music in Wales. The organisation is highly regarded both nationally and internationally for its commitment to excellence, innovation, and combination of strategic planning and grass roots activity.
CMW works across Wales in a variety of dynamic ways. We engage with a cross section of the community from small local groups, organisations and charities, to local authorities and the Welsh Assembly Government. We provide specialised activities including participatory workshops, taster sessions, DJing and music technology, drumming and percussion sessions, multi arts workshops, music industry mentoring, professional development and training. CMWs fundamental aim is to contribute to the empowerment of disadvantaged groups and individuals through enabling them to participate in creativity and learning, initially and primarily through participation in music making. We do this through: Participatory music activities which give people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities the opportunity to make music Providing accredited training and professional development for Community Music Tutors Helping other organisations through advice and support to ensure Wales has a network of high quality community music delivery Working internationally as an advocate of community music and to share best practice 33

cerdd gymunedol cymru community music wales

If you would like any further details on the information featured in this pack, or would like to know more about workshops or our training courses, please contact us:

South Wales, Head Office North Wales Office

Telephone: 02920 838060 Fax: 02920 566573 Email: admin@communitymusicwales.org.uk Address: Unit 8, 24 Norbury Road, Fairwater, Cardiff, CF5 3AU Telephone: 01286 685248 Fax: 01286 678140 Email: admin@communitymusicwales.org.uk Address: Unit 20, Galeri, Victoria Dock, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, LL55 1SQ

WEBSITE: TWITTER:

www.communitymusicwales.co.uk www.twitter.com/CMW_CGC

FACEBOOK: Find our fan page:

Community Music Wales/Cerdd Gymunedol Cymru


Registered charity no 1009867. Company limited by guarantee 2695368