Sie sind auf Seite 1von 61

W. D.

Gann on

THE LAW OF VIBRATION


This E-Book is not to be sold.
It is a free educational service in the public interest published by

Gann Study Group


Prepared in honor of the ninth anniversary of the founding of the Gannstudygroup

W. D. Gann on

CONTENTS

Preface Gann Statements about The Law of Vibration Appendix ! Sources of Gann"s Tic#er $uotes Appendix Appendix ! The Predictive Power of 'umbers ! *armonics

3 7 %& () (+ +)

Appendix V! Gann a ,aster Astro-oger Among ,asters

The cover i--ustration is the frontispiece from .ranchino Gaffurio/ De Harmonia musicorum instrumentorum/ )()01 'ote! Typographica- errors from newspaper artic-es reproduced herein have been corrected1

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

PREFACE
To understand the mar#et ana-ysis of 21 31 Gann/ it is important first of a-- to bear in mind at a-- times that he was a cyc-e student1 This he ma#es $uite c-ear in his writings1 4Since a-- great swings or movements of the mar#et are cyc-ic they act in accordance with periodic -aw14) 45very movement in the mar#et is the resu-t of a natura- -aw/ and a 6ause which exists -ong before the 5ffect ta#es p-ace and can be determined years in advance1 111 5verything moves in cyc-es as a resu-t of the natura- -aw of action and reaction1 7y a study of the past/ have discovered what cyc-es repeat in the future148 4111 everything wor#s according to past cyc-es 111 history repeats itse-f in the -ives of men/ nations and the stoc# mar#et14 3 Gann used a variety of cyc-es1 Some of these cyc-es were astro-ogica- or astronomica- in character1 As ear-y as )9)%/ and probab-y before that time/ Gann sat on a board of extreme-y accomp-ished astro-ogers1% The respected :ourna- of 6ommerce stated in )98) that Gann used astro-ogy in his wor#1 n )987/ Gann wrote a noveentit-ed The Tunnel Thru the Air: Looking Back from 1940 / which he said contained 4a va-uab-e secret/ c-othed in vei-ed -anguage41 The boo# in very unvei-ed fashion repeated-y made pointed reference to the enthusiasm of its hero/ ;obert Gordon/ for the study of astro-ogy1 .or examp-e/ Gann wrote/ 4;obert was a great be-iever in Astro-ogy because
) Gann $uoted in The Tic#er and nvestment 3igest/ 3ecember )9&9/ p1 (31 8 Gann/ <.orecasting= course/ p1 )1 3 Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ p1 7+1 .re$uent mention to this boo# wi-- be made in this paper/ as it is the on-y #nown Gann boo# or course avai-ab-e to the pub-ic in which he refers again to the Law of Vibration by name1 % See Appendix V1

W. D. Gann on

he had found this great science referred to so many times in the *o-y 7ib-e1 111 *e had made notes as he read the 7ib-e at different times where it referred to Astro-ogy or the signs in the heavens and was thorough-y convinced that the inf-uence of the heaven-y bodies govern our -ives14( 7ut Gann"s wor# was not tota--y astro-ogica- or astronomica-1 Gann a-so did cyc-ic studies using what he termed the Law of Vibration1 t not infre$uent-y happens that students who have heard that 21 31 Gann was an astro-oger/ and who then read the interview with Gann that was pub-ished in The Tic#er and nvestment 3igest in 3ecember )9&9/ associate the Law of Vibration with astro-ogy1 Gann himself did not make this association! n an artic-e about Gann written near-y nine years after the Tic#er interview/ presented here to the genera- Gann pub-ic for the first time/ the @ourna-ist who interviewed Gann writes! 42i--iam 31 Gann/ a 2a-- street bro#er/ is the discoverer of the -aw of vibration and its app-ication to matters mundane A <111 his researches showed that the ancients had #now-edge of natura- -aws of which we can scarce-y dream/ that in a sense they were wiser than we are today1 The fact that the ancients wrote their numbers and -etters in geometrica- figures opened the way to his discovery of the -aw that ru-es a-- things1 *e found that every -etter and every number was written in a geometrica- ang-e that determined the power of its vibration1 Bnowing this vibration in the -etters of an individua-"s name/ in the -etters contained in the name of a stoc# or in the -etters of the name of a country or a ru-er/ the destiny of that individua-/ that stoc# or that ru-er and country can be correct-y seen1 111 <,r1 Gann does not care much for money except to meet his dai-y
( Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ p1 )781

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

needs/ and these are simp-e1 *e made a fortune simp-y that he might have the -eisure necessary for him to fo--ow his ambition C to study mathematics and de-ve into the #now-edge he-d by the ancients1 *e does not want to be regarded as a prophet or a seer/ but rather as a man of science1 <"An astronomer can predict to the minute when a ec-ipse is going to occur/" he said/ but you wou-d not consider him a prophet/ wou-d youD Ef course not1 *e simp-y ma#es use of mathematics based on #nown -aws of the movements of the p-anets in their orbits1 have found in my researches that the 6hinese understood a-- those -aws and computed the coming of ec-ipses thousands of years before the 5gyptians and 6ha-deans1 t is marve-ous the #now-edge that these ancients had1 n ma#ing my predictions used geometry and mathematics @ust as an astronomer does/ based on immutab-e -aws which have discovered1 There is nothing supernatura- or weird about it1 Some wee#s ago read an interesting artic-e on the fai-ure of astro-ogers in their predictions regarding the war1 <"'ow there is a great dea- in the vibrations of the p-anets/ but to ma#e accurate predictions the great -aw behind it a--/ which the ancients understood/ but which they purpose-y refrained from putting in their boo#s/ as they wanted to #eep the secret for themse-ves/ must enter into the ca-cu-ation1 That is why astro-ogy fai-s for nothing can be accurate that is not based on mathematics C and so few astro-ogers are mathematicians1=+ Gann to-d this interviewer that he had discovered the Law of Vibration through the way in which numbers and -etters were written/ not through astro-ogy or the p-anets1 .urthermore/ Gann says here p-ain-y that p-anetary ca-cu-ations are not sufficient to predict the futureF <the great -aw behind it a--= C the Law of Vibration C must a-so <enter into the ca-cu-ation=1 n other words/ something must be used in addition to astro-ogy that is not astro-ogy and that something is the Law of VibrationG Gann then adds that <astro-ogy fai-s/= and whyD 7ecause
+ The Anaconda H,TI Standard/ :an1 )9/ )9)9/ p1 ) of the 5ditoria- section1

W. D. Gann on

<nothing can be accurate that is not based on mathematics=1 Thus/ Gann imp-ies/ the Law of Vibration C <the -aw that ru-es a-- things= C is a mathematica- -aw1 *ere we have on-y to determine what mathematics are invo-ved C what Gann means by the term mathematics C and we wi-be in a position to attempt to -oo# at the mar#ets as Gann himse-f -oo#ed at them1 2e wi-- have begun to understand the Law of Vibration1 ;omeman August )7/ 8&))

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

Gann Statements About the Law of Vibration


The follo ing is the !art of the famous Ticker inter"ie D$ Gann gi"es his e%!lanation of the La of &i'ration$ in hich #$

4.or the past ten years have devoted my entire time and attention to the specu-ative mar#ets1 Li#e many others/ -ost thousands of do--ars and experienced the usua- ups and downs incidenta- to the novice who enters the mar#et without preparatory #now-edge of the sub@ect1 4 soon began to rea-iJe that a-- successfu- men/ whether -awyers/ doctors/ or scientists/ devoted years of time to the study and investigation of their particu-ar pursuit or profession before attempting to ma#e any money out of it1 47eing in the bro#erage business myse-f and hand-ing -arge accounts/ had opportunities se-dom afforded the ordinary man for studying the cause of success and fai-ure in the specu-ations of others1 found that over ninety per cent of the traders who go into the mar#et without #now-edge or study usua--y -ose in the end1 4 soon began to note the periodica- recurrence of the rise and fa-in stoc#s and commodities1 This -ed me to conc-ude that natura- -aw 7
7 4111 St1 Augustine seems to have been the first of the H6hurchI .athers to have a distinct conception of the fact that the wor-d is under the reign of -aw/ and that God in the government of the physica- universe acts not direct-y or immediate-y/ but indirect-y and through the agency of secondary causes/ or what we are p-eased to denominate "the -aws and forces of nature1" *is -anguage on this sub@ect is so exp-icit that it cannot be mista#en1 n his commentaries on Genesis/ in his "6ity of God/" as we-- as in his other wor#s/ he is continua--y spea#ing of the -aws of nature KK leges natur( KK by which created things are governed A *e insists on it that we shou-d exp-ain the phenomena of the physica- wor-d in conformity with the nature of things KK naturas rerum KK and not by the constant intervention of mirac-es/ and emphasiJes the fact that the A-mighty has "ordained a-- things in measure and number and weight1"4 :ohn Augustine Lahm/ Bi'le) *cience) and +aith >:1 ,urphy/ )09%?/ pp1 79K0&1 Augustine"s -ast $uote is from a verse in 2isdom of So-omon >an apocrypha- boo# of the 7ib-e?! 2is1 ))!8) >;oman 6atho-ic version? or 2is1 ))!8& >Protestant version?1

W. D. Gann on

was the basis of mar#et movements1 then decided to devote ten years of my -ife to the study of natura- -aw as app-icab-e to the specu-ative mar#ets and to devote my best energies toward ma#ing specu-ation a profitab-e profession1 After exhaustive researches and investigations of the #nown sciences/ discovered that the Law of Vibration enab-ed me to accurate-y determine the exact points to which stoc#s or commodities shou-d rise and fa-- within a given time1 The wor#ing out of this -aw determines the cause and predicts the effect -ong before the Street is aware of either1 ,ost specu-ators can testify to the fact that it is -oo#ing at the effect and ignoring the cause that has produced their -osses1 4 t is impossib-e here to give an ade$uate idea of the Law of Vibration as app-y it to the mar#ets/ however/ the -ayman may be ab-e to grasp some of the princip-es when state that the Law of Vibration is the fundamenta- -aw upon which wire-ess te-egraphy/ wire-ess te-ephones and phonographs are based1 2ithout the existence of this -aw the above inventions wou-d have been impossib-e1 0

Ene might natura--y wonder why Gann said the financia- mar#ets/ which are genera--y perceived to be random/ are in any way connected with 4natura- -aw4 such as here described by St1 Augustine1 The astro-oger Sepharia-/ who was a-so a numbers expert/ says that he has the answer! 4Astronomers 111 observe that there are cyc-es and periods within which 'ature repeats her phenomena/ from the rising of the sun to the apparition of a comet1 These observations submit readi-y to a mathematica- -aw/ and the recurrence of simi-ar ce-estia- phenomena are therefore predicab-e1 t is from this basis that sha-- be ab-e to demonstrate that matters apparent-y governed by chance are sub@ect to a -i#e periodicity to that which we observe in 'ature/ and for the reason that they/ too/ are governed by natura- -aws14 ,a'ala of -um'ers/ Part / p1 )&%1 Sepharia- was a deep student of cyc-es and was the author whose boo#s most often appeared on Gann"s List of 7oo#s for Sa-e to students1 As a conse$uence/ he wi-- be $uoted herein fre$uent-y1 0 4 n ma#ing my ca-cu-ations on the stoc# mar#et/ or any future event/ get the past history and find out what cyc-e we are in and then predict the curve for the future/ which is a repetition of past mar#et movements1 The great -aw of vibration is based on -i#e producing -i#e1 Li#e causes produce -i#e effects1 2ire-ess te-egraphy/ the phonograph and the radio are based on this -aw1 The -imit of future predictions based on exact mathematica- -aw is on-y restricted by -ac# of #now-edge of correct data on past history to wor# from1 t is @ust as easy to figure )&& years or )&&& years in the future as one or two years ahead/ if you have the correct starting point and #now the cyc-e which is going to be repeated14 Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ pp1 7+K771

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

4 n order to test out the efficiency of my idea have not on-y put in years of -abor in the regu-ar way/ but spent nine months wor#ing night and day in the Astor Library of 'ew Mor# and in the 7ritish ,useum of London/ going over the records of stoc# transactions as far bac# as )08&1 have incidenta--y examined the manipu-ations of :ay Gou-d1 3anie- 3rew/ 6ommodore Vanderbi-t/ and a-- the other important 2a-Street manipu-ators from that time to the present day1 have examined every $uotation of Nnion Pacific prior to and from the time of 51 *1 *arriman"s securing contro-/ and can say that of a-- the manipu-ations in the history of 2a-- Street/ ,r1 *arriman"s was the most master-y1 The figures show that/ whether unconscious-y or not/ ,r1 *arriman wor#ed strict-y in accordance with natura- -aw1 9 4 n going over the history of mar#ets and the great mass of re-ated statistics/ it soon becomes apparent that certain -aws govern the changes and variations in the va-ue of stoc#s and there exists a periodic or cyc-ic -aw/ which is at the bac# of a-- these movements1 )& Ebservation has shown that there are regu-ar periods of intense activity on the 5xchange fo--owed by periods of inactivity1 ,r1 *enry *a--/ in his recent boo# devoted much space to "6yc-es of Prosperity and 3epression" which he found recurring at regu-ar interva-s of time1 )) The -aw which have app-ied wi-- not on-y give these -ong cyc-es or swings/ but the dai-y and even hour-y movements of stoc#s1 7y #nowing the exact vibration of each individua- stoc# am ab-e to determine at what point each wi-receive support and at what point the greatest resistance is to be met1 4Those in c-ose touch with the mar#ets have noticed the phenomena of ebb and f-ow/)8 or rise and fa-- in the va-ue of stoc#s1 At
9 2hat Gann here ca--s <natura- -aw= he ca--s <harmonic ana-ysis= in his nove- The Tunnel Thru the Air$ See Appendix 1 )& 42hat we #now in science as the -aw of periodicity is but another instance of the rhythmic se$uence of vibrations/ another name for the Baba-istic doctrine of numericase$uence1 A f 'ature observes these cyc-ic and periodic -aws/ then assured-y man must ref-ect them in his constitution/ and/ through his dependence on physica- conditions/ in his thought a-so14 Sepharia-/ ,a'ala of -um'ers/ Part / p1 %01 11 The boo# Ho .one/ is .ade in *ecurit/ 0n"estments by *enry *a-- is avai-ab-e in various editions on-ine at The nternet Archive and at Goog-e 7oo#s1 )8 5bb and f-ow are words associated with the tides1 n Gann"s day/ harmonic ana-ysis >a term he uses a few sentences -ater in this interview? was used in predicting tides!

W. D. Gann on

certain times a stoc# wi-- become intense-y active/ -arge transactions being made in itF at other times this same stoc# wi-- become practica--y stationary or inactive with a very sma-- vo-ume of sa-es1 have found that the Law of Vibration governs and contro-s these conditions1 have a-so found that certain phases of this -aw govern the rise in a stoc# and an entire-y different ru-e operates on the dec-ine1 42hi-e Nnion Pacific and other rai-road stoc#s which made their high prices in August were dec-ining/ Nnited States Stee- common was steadi-y advancing1 The Law of Vibration was at wor#/ sending a particu-ar stoc# on the upward trend/ whi-st others were trending downward1 4 have found that in the stoc# itse-f exists its harmonic or inharmonic re-ationship to the driving power or force behind it1 )3 The secret of a-- its activity is therefore apparent1 7y my method can determine the vibration of each stoc# and by a-so ta#ing certain time va-ues into consideration can in the ma@ority of cases te-- exact-y what the stoc# wi-- do under given conditions1 4The power to determine the trend of the mar#et is due to my
4*armonic Ana-ysis1 O About forty years ago Sir 21 Thompson >now Lord Be-vin? suggested that the princip-e of harmonic ana-ysis might with advantage be app-ied to the reduction of these tida- constituents and to the simp-ification of the ca-cu-ationsF and at the 7ritish Association meeting of )0+0 he made a report describing his proposed method of procedure1 4As harmony in music may be described as the union of sounds which individua--y appear different/ but when b-ended together form a co--ective chord/ or as the f-owing together of severa- sounds into one/ so the ob@ect of the harmonic ana-ysis of the different tida- constituents is to reduce "the comp-icated motions of the tides into a series of simp-e harmonic motions or waves in different periods and with different amp-itudes/ or rangesF and these simp-e harmonic constituents added together give the aggregate tide1" 45ach ine$ua-ity of any one of the tida- constituents is regarded as a sma--er superimposed tide of period approximate-y e$ua-/ producing with the chief tide a compound effect which corresponds to the discord of two simp-e harmonic notes in music approximate-y in unison with one another14 2i--iam *enry 2hee-er/ A 1ractical .anual of Tides and #a"es >Longmans/ Green/ and 6o1/ )9&+?/ p1 )+)1 )3 See Appendix 1

10

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

#now-edge of the characteristics of each individua- stoc# and a certain grouping of different stoc#s under their proper rates of vibration1 Stoc#s are -i#e e-ectrons/ atoms/ and mo-ecu-es/ which ho-d persistent-y to their own individua-ity in response to the fundamenta- Law of Vibration1 Science teaches "that an origina- impu-se of any #ind fina--y reso-ves itse-f into periodic or rhythmica- motion/" )% a-so "@ust as the pendu-um returns again in its swing/ @ust as the moon returns in its orbit/ @ust as the advancing year ever brings the rose of spring/ so do the properties of the e-ements periodica--y recur as the weight of the atoms rises1" )( 4.rom my extensive investigations/ studies and app-ied tests/ find that not on-y do the various stoc#s vibrate/ but that the driving forces contro--ing the stoc#s are a-so in a state of vibration1 These vibratory forces can on-y be #nown by the movements they generate on the stoc#s and their va-ues in the mar#et1 Since a-- great swings or movements of the mar#et are cyc-ic they act in accordance with periodic -aw1 4Science has -aid down the princip-e that "the properties of an e-ement are a periodic function of its atomic weight1" )+ A famous scientist has stated that "we are brought to the conviction that diversity in phenomena- nature in its different #ingdoms/ is most intimate-y
)% See Appendix for the source of this $uote1 Periodic motion is studied in harmonic ana-ysis and invo-ves vibration1 4*A;,E' 6 A'ALMS S/ in mathematics/ the name given by Sir 2i--iam Thomson >Lord Be-vin? and P1 G1 Tait in their treatise on -atural 1hiloso!h/ to a genera- method of investigating physica- $uestions/ the ear-iest app-ications of which seem to have been suggested by the study of the vibrations of strings and the ana-ysis of these vibrations into their fundamenta- tone and its harmonics or overtones1 4The motion of a uniform stretched string fixed at both ends is a periodic motionF that is to say/ after a certain interva- of time/ ca--ed the fundamenta- period of the motion/ the form of the string and the ve-ocity of every part of it are the same as before/ provided that the energy of the motion has not been sensib-y dissipated during the period1 4There are two distinct methods of investigating the motion of a uniform stretched string1 Ene of these may be ca--ed the wave method/ and the other the harmonic method14 The 2nc/clo!edia Britanica/ 5-eventh 5dition/ vo-1 )8/ p1 9(+1 )( See Appendix for the source of this $uote1 )+ See Appendix for the source of this $uote1

11

W. D. Gann on

associated with numerica- re-ationship1 The numbers are not intermixed/ chaotica--y and accidenta--y/ but are sub@ect to regu-ar periodicity1 The changes and deve-opments are a-so seen to be in many cases undu-atory1")7 4Thus/ affirm/ every c-ass of phenomena/ whether in nature or in the stoc# mar#et/ must be sub@ect to the universa- -aw of causation and harmony1 5very effect must have an ade$uate cause1)0 4 f we wish to avert fai-ure in specu-ation we must dea- with causes1 5verything in existence is based on exact proportion and perfect re-ationship1 There is no chance in nature/ because mathematicaprincip-es of the highest order -ie at the foundation of a-- things1 .araday said! "There is nothing in the Nniverse but mathematica- points of force1")9 4Vibration is fundamenta-F nothing is exempt from this -awF it is universa-/ therefore app-icab-e to every c-ass of phenomena on the g-obe1 4Through the Law of Vibration every stoc# in the mar#et moves in its own distinctive sphere of activities/ as to intensity/ vo-ume and directionF a-- the essentia- $ua-ities of its evo-ution are characteriJed in its own rate of vibration1 Stoc#s/ -i#e atoms/ are rea--y centers of energies/ therefore they are contro--ed mathematica--y1 Stoc#s create their own fie-d of action and powerF power to attract and repe-/ which princip-e exp-ains why certain stoc#s at times -ead the mar#et and "turn dead" at other times1 Thus to specu-ate scientifica--y it is abso-ute-y necessary to fo--ow natura- -aw1 4After years of patient study have proven to my entire satisfaction as we-- as demonstrated to others that vibration exp-ains every possib-e
)7 See Appendix for the source of this $uote1 See Appendix for comments on the predictive power of numbers1 )0 *ere Gann is $uoting the Law of 6ausation ><5very effect must have an ade$uate cause=? as it is stated by theo-ogians and phi-osophers1 The -anguage is $uite o-d1 t is found/ for examp-e/ in *enry Lee/ Anti3*ke!ticism >;1 6-ave- and 61 *arper/ )7&8?/ p1 3)1 )9 See Appendix for the source of this $uote >apparent-y not .araday himse-f?1

12

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

phase and condition of the mar#et148& PPP This concludes the !art of the Ticker inter"ie s!eaking in the first !erson$ in hich Gann is

Let us no turn our attention to a series of ritings) se"eral !resented for the first time to a 'road !u'lic interested in Gann4s ork) in hich he discusses the la of "i'ration in relation to letters$ Gann) as it ill 'e seen) claims that he disco"ered the La of &i'ration through the angles of letters and num'ers as used in ancient times$ The Gann student kno s) from courses such as 5.aster 6harts7) that Gann used num'ers in some a/$ There has 'een much less attention gi"en to his use of letters and /et from the collection that follo s) it ould a!!ear that he 'elie"ed there as great !redicti"e !o er in them$ The reader ill note that Gann re!eatedl/ s!eaks of the 5"i'ration7 of letters and num'ers$ The follo ing article) !u'lished in 1919) a!!arentl/ came originall/ from the -e 8ork Herald$ This !iece earl/ focuses on the German ,aiser) #ilhelm 00) ho a'dicated on -o"$ 9) 1919 and fled into e%ile in The -etherlands the ne%t da/$ He died there in 1941 at the age of 9:$ S55S T*5 BA S5; S*ET 2* L5 T;M 'G TE .L55 There is nothing to anything save and except that -aw of vibration1 Vibration is fundamenta-/ exact/ universa-1 'othing is exempt from it1 Mou can watch it carefu--y and then own a-- the money in the wor-d1 Mou can study it for a few decades and become a prophet1 Mou can predict events C before or afterF you can become a first or second guesser/ @ust as you choose1 Mou can even forete-- what is going to be done with the man named *ohenJo--ern/ who once was a great war -ord and most high admira- of the At-antic1
8& 5xcerpted from ;ichard 31 2yc#off/ <2i--iam 31 Gann! An Eperator 2hose Science and Abi-ity P-ace *im in the .ront ;an# C *is ;emar#ab-e Predictions and Trading ;ecord/= The Tic#er and nvestment 3igest/ 3ecember )9&9/ pp1 ()K(31

13

W. D. Gann on

And it is a-- so simp-e1 This is the secret of the -aw of vibration! .ind exact-y by a study of geometrica- ang-es what is meant by each -etter in a man"s name and his destiny is at once an open boo# to you1 The same goes in regard to countries and ru-ers1 That is a-- there is to it1 'ow/ to exp-ain! 2i--iam 31 Gann/ a 2a-- street bro#er/ is the discoverer of the -aw of vibration and its app-ication to matters mundane/ says the 'ew Mor# *era-d1 n its particu-ar re-ation to the man *ohenJo--ern/ ,r1 Gann wrote as fo--ows! 42i-he-m *ohenJo--ern/ the infamous imperia- scoundre-/ whose crimes against women and chi-dren have debauched and shoc#ed the civi-iJed wor-d and caused him to be the most hated and despised man in history/ was born :an 87/ )0(91 *is mother/ Princess Victoria Ade-aide/ ,ary Louisa 2ettin/ was born 'ov 8)/ )0)&1 4A study of the mother"s maiden name/ which a-ways revea-s the secret nature and future destiny of the ma-e chi-d more than the father"s name/ indicates the remar#ab-e events in the #aiser"s -ife1 *er name shows that the husband -ac#ed -ove and sympathy for her/ which is fu--y manifested in the depraved fee-ings and unsympathetic nature of her son1 The name *ohenJo--ern shows that he wou-d inherit from his father an unba-anced mindF that he wou-d be an egotist/ a braggart and a se-fish coward1 'o one doubts that none other than a depraved and insane mind cou-d have conceived the idea of wor-d dominion1 'o sane man wou-d have antagoniJed the Nnited States and be-ieved he cou-d defeat the country whose co-ors have never yet trai-ed the dust1 4*is name and numbers indicated that he wou-d inherit a throne/ property and wea-th and then -ose them a-- in his own acts1 *is numbers revea- the fact that a-- vain hopes wou-d be defeated in the
14

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

end1 PE25;.NL 6E,7 'AT E'1 4The -etter 2 is a twin -etter or a -etter with a dua- nature1 2hi-e it is one of @ustice and fairness/ when aff-icted it becomes one of the most se-fish and debased inf-uences1 The -etter ' is the most powerfu- -etter for producing wea-th and fame/ especia--y when the surname begins with 2 and ends with '1 t overcomes a-- obstac-es and wins in the end1 A name ending with ' -eaves a record which is famous -ong after death/ as in the case of George 2ashington/ Abraham Linco-n/ 3u#e of 2e--ington and 2oodrow 2i-son1 2hen * is the initia- -etter/ it attempts to create a position of wea-th and power through destruction1 t aff-icts or opposes 2 and '1 The evi- tendencies 2i--iam *ohenJo--ern inherited from his father"s name caused him to brea# the heart of his mother/ whose nob-e $ua-ities were shown by the fact that her name began with 2 and ended with '1 *ad the former #aiser understood the science of -etters and numbers he wou-d have rea-iJed that he wou-d meet his 2ater-oo through 2oodrow 2i-son/ whose name stands for @ustice and -iberty1 4The numbers "(/" "7" and "9" are very unfavorab-e for him1 The fifth/ seventh and ninth months of the year/ as we-- as the fifth/ seventh and ninth months from his birthday/ are very evi- and eventfu- in his -ife1 Ebserve that he abdicated on his evi- day/ the ninth/ in his evi- month/ 'ovember1 4*is sixtyKfirst year/ )9)9/ wi-- prove to be the most unfortunate in his career/ and very serious-y doubt if he wi-- -ive to see the end of the year1 *e wi-- suffer the a-most comp-ete -oss of his wea-th1 The death of one of his sons/ probab-y the crown prince/ is indicated1 There is a-so danger of imprisonment and severe i--ness1 The fo--owing are his most evi- periods for this year! ,arch 8& to 87/ ,ay )& to )%/ :u-y 8 to (/ Aug1 83 to 8(/ Ect1 )& to )3 and 'ov1 7 to )31 H4I.rom :an1 87/ his birthday/ unti- .eb1 9/ wi-- prove to be a very unfortunate period/ when he wi-- be sic# in mind and body1 *e wi-- have
15

W. D. Gann on

thoughts of ta#ing his -ife and may attempt it1 The a--ies wi-- probab-y as# for his extradition1 6; T 6AL P5; E3S1 4Three critica- periods are indicated! 4Apri- 9 to ,ay 9 wi-- be one of the most unfavorab-e periods/ when his -ife and -iberty wi-- be serious-y threatened1 *is hea-th wi-- be very bad and his mind a-most unba-anced1 *e wi-- probab-y be brought to tria- at this time/ and if he receives the sentence it wi-- possib-y prove to be his death b-ow1 4August wi-- be most unfortunate1 *e wi-- be much depressed from imprisonment or restraint1 *e wi-- meet with opposition on every hand and reap as he has sown1 4Ectober and 'ovember are the most evi- months1 This third period wi-- be most fata- and there is strong evidence that if he is sti-- a-ive a vio-ent death may ta#e p-ace1 4*is name revea-s strong testimony that when brought to tria- the death pena-ty wi-- be inf-icted/ un-ess 2oodrow 2i-son intercedes in his beha-f and on humane princip-es as#s for -ife imprisonment/ and it is strong-y indicated that he wi--1 t is a sure thing that the #aiser wi-receive extreme punishment and spend the ba-ance of his -ife under -imitations and restraints1 *e wi-- be confined either in a prison or in an asy-um1 The end wi-- come sudden-y and not be a natura- death1 There is an indication that he wi-- ma#e an attempt to escape/ but in so doing wi-- -ose his -ife14 ,r1 Gann is un#nown to the genera- pub-ic/ but his name and persona-ity have -ong been fami-iar to 2a-- street1 *e predicted both e-ections of President 2i-son when the @udgment of #een/ shrewd men favored that of his opponent1 *e foreto-d the end of the wor-d war and the abdication of the #aiser to the day it occurred/ and his predictions regarding the movements of big stoc#s have been for years the ta-# of
16

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

the bro#ers1 ,r1 Gann is modest and unassuming and -oo#s more -i#e a deep student than the financier as the pub-ic mind usua--y portrays him1 2hen as#ed about his discovery and his predictions he tried to evade the sub@ect at first/ but fina--y agreed to te-- something about his wor#1 *e made his discovery about 8& years ago/ after wee#s and months of research into geometry and mathematics in ancient boo#s and at a cost of Q8(/&&&1 PEN'3S E. 6AL6NLAT E'S1 *e consumed 0& pounds of paper in figuring/ and his geometricadeductions and ca-cu-ations are contained on a ro-- which/ when unwound/ wou-d reach from 2a-- street to the 7attery1 .rom a-- these numbers ,r1 Gann erects his geometrica- figures1 *e has a big ponderous vo-ume fi--ed with these figures KK s$uares/ ang-es/ pyramids and circ-es KK and whenever he wants to #now anything he turns to a certain geometrica- figure and puts his finger on the answer1 ,r1 Gann/ who is a native of Texas/ gave the fo--owing account of his experience and methods! 4 t is impossib-e now to give any ade$uate idea of the -aw of vibration as app-y it to my business/ however/ the -ayman may be ab-e to grasp some of the princip-es when state that this is the fundamenta-aw upon which wire-ess te-egraphy/ wire-ess te-ephones/ phonographs and a-- other great inventions are based1 2ithout the existence of this -aw these inventions wou-d have been impossib-e1 4 n order to test my idea/ have not on-y put in years of -abor in the regu-ar way/ but spent nine months wor#ing night and day in the o-d Astor -ibrary and in the 7ritish museum/ in London/ poring over ancient boo#s on mathematics and geometry/ as we-- as the records of stoc# transactions as far bac# as )08&1 have/ incidenta--y/ examined the manipu-ations of :ay Gou-d/ 3anie- 3rew/ 6ommodore Vanderbi-t and a-- other important 2a-- street manipu-ators from that time to the
17

W. D. Gann on

present time1 4Vibration is fundamenta-F nothing is exempt from this -awF it is universa-/ therefore app-icab-e to every c-ass of phenomena/ animate or inanimate/ on the g-obe14 ,r1 Gann added that his researches showed that the ancients had #now-edge of natura- -aws of which we can scarce-y dream/ that in a sense they were wiser than we are today1 The fact that the ancients wrote their numbers and -etters in geometrica- figures opened the way to his discovery of the -aw that ru-es a-- things1 *e found that every -etter and every number was written in a geometrica- ang-e that determined the power of its vibration1 Bnowing this vibration in the -etters of an individua-"s name/ in the -etters contained in the name of a stoc# or in the -etters of the name of a country or a ru-er/ the destiny of that individua-/ that stoc# or that ru-er and country can be correct-y seen1 2*AT"S ' A 'A,5D 4There is everything in a name or in a word/4 said ,r Gann/ the strong -ines of his face re-axing in a genia- smi-e/ 4despite a-- that Sha#espeare has said1 There is no such thing as chance in this universe/ and the names which we give our chi-dren are governed by this great -aw1 2e have a-- heard the story of Vo-taire/ who on-y became great and famous after he had changed his name to what we #now it today1 Perhaps he was adept in the wor#ings of this -aw14 ,r1 Gann was as#ed how he made his remar#ab-e predictions regarding the #aiser and how he determined the exact days mentioned1 47y the -etters of his name and the name of his mother/4 he rep-ied1 4 n this manner the future of any individua- can be to-d1 The first thing do is get the mathematica- ang-e/ the -ength of the ang-e of his or her name and then that of the mother"s name1 Then you get the ang-e of the father"s name/ because that name you carry through -ife1 .o--owing this ta#e the 6hristian or given name/ which is forced on you/ so to spea#/ and ca-cu-ate whether it is harmonious or inharmonious1 There are @ust
18

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

two things to everything KK harmony or inharmony/ positive or negative/ -ight or dar#ness/ beauty or ug-iness1 f the name given you is out of harmony then you have got to wor# through that unti- you come into harmony1 The given name gives the vibration set up in the body1 5verything is based abso-ute-y on geometry and mathematics1 Mou have got to prove everything in a circ-e/ in a s$uare or in an ang-e1 Mou have got to #now how a pyramid stands to a circ-e/ a circ-e to a s$uare and how they a-- "match up1"4 Spea#ing of the vibratory power of -etters/ ,r1 Gann made out a -ist of the names of the presidents of the Nnited States1 The -etters 2 and '/ he said/ were the most important of a--1 The -etter 2 is of a dua- nature and the ancients so indicated it in their origina- symbo-1 t is the most powerfu- -etter according to its position in a name1 t wor#s either for @ustice and the -oftiest of idea-s/ or it tends to destruction and ruin1 A person whose name begins with a 2 and terminates in an ' wi-- ho-d a most exa-ted position in -ife and wie-d great power1 As an examp-e who estab-ished the Nnion/ and going down the who-e -ist of presidents that combination of -etters does not occur again unti- we reach the name of 2oodrow 2i-son1 The g-ance over the fo--owing names of presidents wi-show this! George 2ashington/ :ohn Adams/ Thomas :efferson/ :ames ,adison/ :ames ,unroe/ :ohn R Adams/ Andrew :ac#son/ ,1 Van 7uren/ 2i--iam * *arrison/ :ohn Ty-er/ :ames B1 Po-#/ L Tay-or/ ,i--ard .i--more/ .ran#-in Pierce/ :ames 7uchanan/
19

W. D. Gann on

Abraham Linco-n/ Andrew :ohnson/ N1 S1 Grant/ ;1 71 *ayes/ :ames A Garfie-d/ 6hester A1 Arthur/ Grover 6-eve-and/ 7en@amin *arrison/ Grover 6-eve-and/ 2i--iam ,cBin-ey/ Theodore ;ooseve-t/ 2i--iam *1 Taft/ 2oodrow 2i-son 3EN7L5 2"s1 President 2i-son"s name/ ,r1 Gann says/ is even more potent than that of 2ashington/ for his given name a-so begins with a 42/4 and his position in the wor-d today is the materia-iJation of the great vibratory power that is inherent in these -etters1 n the -ist of presidents it wi-- be noted that where the 424 does not appear the -etter 4'4 p-ays an important ro-e/ such as/ for instance/ the names of :efferson/ ,adison/ Andrew :ac#son/ Linco-n KK which contained two 4'"s4 KK and so on1 As another stri#ing examp-e of the power of these -etters/ ,r1 Gann cited that of 'apo-eon/ whose name began with an 4'4 and ended with it1 *ere was a combination hard to beat/ but he was beatenF and by none other than 2e--ington/ the 424 and "'" combination KK the beginning and the end1 t must be remembered/ however/ that not a-persons whose names may be 2i-son/ or Linco-n or 2e--ington wi-- be e$ua--y as great1 They wi-- more or -ess p-ay an important part in their various spheres/ but the date of birth is what determines the other ang-e and a-so comp-ete the circ-e or the s$uare1 .rom a-- this data ,r1 Gann ca-cu-ates the 4#ey number4 which governs him through -ife1 That 4#ey number4 is the who-e secret of ,r1 Gann"s discovery/ and this secret he
20

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

#eeps within himse-f1 .or instance/ the 4#ey number4 of President 2i-son"s name is 480/4 and curious-y enough he is the twentyKeighth president of the Nnited States1 Therefore/ the numbers 484 and 40/4 or their tota- 4)&/4 wi-- show events of importance in ,r1 2i-son"s career1 Another instance of a man of prominence in this country who has wie-ded a powerfu- inf-uence is that of *enry 2atterson/ editor emeritus of the Louisvi--e 6ourierK:ourna-/ whose name begins with a 424 and terminates in an 4'14 And so it wi-- be seen that in a-- names of prominent persons in every wa-# of -ife/ the 424 and 4'4 are rare-y absent/ and in the cases of big men where neither -etter appears in the 6hristian or given name the #ey wi-- be found in the day and year of birth1 'ET A P;EP*5T1 ,r1 Gann does not care much for money except to meet his dai-y needs/ and these are simp-e1 *e made a fortune simp-y that he might have the -eisure necessary for him to fo--ow his ambition C to study mathematics and de-ve into the #now-edge he-d by the ancients1 *e does not want to be regarded as a prophet or a seer/ but rather as a man of science18) 4An astronomer can predict to the minute when a ec-ipse is going to occur/4 he said/ 4but you wou-d not consider him a prophet/ wou-d youD Ef course not1 *e simp-y ma#es use of mathematics based on #nown -aws of the movements of the p-anets in their orbits1 have found in my researches that the 6hinese understood a-- those -aws and computed the coming of ec-ipses thousands of years before the 5gyptians and 6ha-deans1 t is marve-ous the #now-edge that these ancients had1 n ma#ing my predictions used geometry and mathematics @ust as an astronomer does/ based on immutab-e -aws
8) ,any of Gann"s pub-icity materia-s confirm this statement1 An advertisement for Gann"s news-etter/ pub-ished in the P-ain 3ea-er of 6-eve-and E* on Apri- 9/ )988/ said in the opening paragraph! 43on"t try to guess the topF $uit gamb-ing on hopeF fo--ow Science and #nowF then you wi-- have no regrets14 At the time of the )989 crash and the ear-y years of the 3epression that fo--owed/ Gann"s company was in fact ca--ed 21 31 Gann Scientific Service/ nc1 or 21 31 Gann Scientific nc1

21

W. D. Gann on

which have discovered188 There is nothing supernatura- or weird about it1 Some wee#s ago read an interesting artic-e on the fai-ure of astro-ogers in their predictions regarding the war1 'ow there is a great dea- in the vibrations of the p-anets/ but to ma#e accurate predictions the great -aw behind it a--/ which the ancients understood/ but which they purpose-y refrained from putting in their boo#s/ as they wanted to #eep the secret for themse-ves/ must enter into the ca-cu-ation1 That is why astro-ogy fai-s for nothing can be accurate that is not based on mathematics C and so few astro-ogers are mathematicians183 4 n ,arch -ast severa- of my friends in 2a-- street as#ed me why did not ma#e a prediction on how -ong the war wou-d -ast1 had been $uite busy a-- a-ong with my regu-ar wor# in 2a-- street/ and my evenings were given to ca-cu-ating events for friends14 ,r Gann here -ifted a -arge bund-e of -etters from his des#1 They were from men of prominence a-- over the country KK from governors of states/ big pub-ic men in 2ashington and others/ than#ing him for his #indness in wor#ing out a geometrica- figure of their -ives and commenting upon his amaJing accuracy1 H4IThese are the things that #eep me busy4 he added/ with a -augh1 47ut it is what -i#e to doF it is my p-ay/ my recreation1 *owever/ went to wor# on that end of the war ca-cu-ation and on Apri- + sent out a typewritten statement to my friends1 2e--/ the resu-t is #nown now1 4The Nnited States went into the war on Apri- +1 Apri- has a-ways been very eventfu- in the history of this country1 .ort Sumter was fired on in the month of Apri-/ and if you -oo# bac# over history you wi-- find that many of the important events begin or end in the month of Apri-1
88 The opening paragraph of 6hapter V in Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air >.inanciaGuardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ p1 7(/ is virtua--y identica- to this sentence1 83 n ma#ing this statement/ Gann must have had particu-ar mathematica- #now-edge in mind1 To cast a horoscope re$uires the app-ication of $uite a bit of mathematics1 A-astro-ogers in Gann"s day had to cast horoscopes by hand1 There were no computer programs to do the wor#1 Met he says <so few astro-ogers are mathematicians=G

22

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

soon found that the -etters and numbers in the names of President 2i-son and the #aiser revea-ed some very remar#ab-e indications1 Strange-y enough found that the numbers "(/" "7" and "9" are very eventfu- and important in the history of this country1 These same numbers are fata- numbers for Baiser 2i-he-m/ and showed that his evimonths this year were Ectober and 'ovember1 2ith a-- the "'"s" in his name he cou-d not beat that powerfu- "2" and "'" combination/ nor cou-d 'apo-eon1 42e cannot wor# against the -aw/ but we can wor# with the -aw1 .or instance/ one of my friends came to me recent-y very much depressed1 found he was passing through a hard period1 *ea-th and business were affected1 again tested my discovery1 to-d him not to invest or specu-ate in any stoc# that was due for a rise/ for he was bound to -ose/ but advised him to se-ect a stoc# that was itse-f depressed and se-- short1 *e did this and made money in a time when conditions were against him1 That is what mean by wor#ing with the -aw48% PPP The res!ected ;ournal of 6ommerce) in an article t o /ears later) confirms se"eral of the statements made a'o"e: ,r1 Gann has made noteworthy prognostications of the mar#ets which proved to be true in course of time1 *is ca-cu-ations are based on the Science of Letters/ 'umbers and Astro-ogy18( n )9&9 his record in specu-ation created a sensation1 The 4Tic#er ,agaJine4 and many newspapers throughout the country commented on his accurate forecasts and trading record1 And since that year his predictions on the movements of stoc#s have been @ust as remar#ab-e1 *e sends out forecasts twe-ve months in advance and at the beginning of )9)9 he predicted the bu-- mar#et that year and the big dec-ine in 'ovember of
8% The Anaconda H,TI Standard/ :an1 )9/ )9)9/ p1 ) of the 5ditoria- section1 8( The hierarchy here is first -etters/ then numbers/ then astro-ogy1 n Gann"s List of 7oo#s for Sa-e/ the order of the categories was first 'umero-ogy/ then Astro-ogy/ then Scientific and ,isce--aneous1 Thus he put numbers above astro-ogy/ but -etters above numbers1

23

W. D. Gann on

the same year1 *e foreto-d the advance in stoc#s -ast Apri- and the severe dec-ine in 'ovember and 3ecember -ast year1 En the genera- run of stoc#s for -ast year/ a-- his predictions/ which were made at the beginning of )98&/ came true1 *e spo#e with emphasis of the dec-ining mar#et which cou-d be expected at the end of -ast year1 *appenings proved that his predictions were correct1 111 This gent-eman has made some important predictions in this day1 *e foreto-d about nine months in advance the exact day of the Baiser"s abdication/ and the end of the 2or-d 2ar1 ,r1 Gann a-so predicted the e-ections of both President 2i-son and that of *arding1 *e has forecast events in the -ives of persons who are prominent in the po-itica- and business affairs of this nation/ and these men testify to the accuracy of ,r1 Gann"s predictions1 *e showed the writer numerous -etters from men high in the army and navy1 State executives/ ban#ing officia-s/ we--K #nown c-ergymen/ and hosts of others whose signatures to -etters mean that the truth has been spo#en1 They are a-- men whose position and standing cou-d not afford them to write or say anything un-ess they #new the true facts about which they were writing1 This a great credit to ,r1 Gann and it proves that he #nows whereof he spea#s1 8+ PPP Poor 7usiness/ 3amaged 6rops/ Stri#es and 7an# .ai-ures in )983 Predicted by Prophet 2i--iam 31 Gann s 0( Per 6ent ;ight in *is .orecasts/ *is .o--owers 3ec-are1 S A ,AT*5,AT 6AL S55; .oresaw 3ate of 5nd of 2ar and 5-ection of *arding
8+ 5xcerpt from an artic-e appearing in The :ourna- of 6ommerce/ :an1 )(/ )98)1

24

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

and 2i-son1 4 #new you wou-d be coming in toKday/4 was the greeting the unhera-ded reporter received on entering the office of 2i--iam 31 Gann at 'o1 %9 7roadway1 42hen -oo#ed at the ca-endar this morning and saw it was the third day of the third month of the year )983 #new wou-d receive ca--ers from newspaper and pub-icity peop-e14 ,r1 Gann predicts other and more important things/ such as stoc# $uotations/ end of wars and e-ections of Presidents/ with an accuracy that has made him a recogniJed authority in 2a-- Street1 *e predicted the e-ection of 2i-son and of *arding/ and he to-d of the abdication of the Baiser and the end of the war to the exact date six months beforehand1 0( P5; 65'T 6E;;56T1 *is dai-y Supp-y and 3emand -etter gives to his c-ients scientific forecasts on stoc#s/ cotton and grain1 And the c-ients who have fo--owed his advice for twenty years testify that eightyKfive per cent of his predictions are correct1 4 figure things by mathematics/4 ,r1 Gann exp-ained1 4There is nothing mysterious about any of my predictions1 f have the data can use a-gebra and geometry and te-- exact-y by the theory of cyc-es when a certain thing is going to occur again14 4 f we wish to avert fai-ure in specu-ation we must dea- with causes1 5verything in existence is based on exact proportion and perfect re-ationship1 There is no chance in nature/ because mathematicaprincip-es of the highest order -ie at the foundation of a-- things1 .araday said! KK "There is nothing in the universe but mathematicapoints of force14 ,r1 Gann"s business out-oo# for )983 forecasts a genera--y -ow average caused by stri#es and threats of war in foreign -ands and poor crop conditions1
25

W. D. Gann on

ENTLEEB 'ET 5'6EN;AG 'G1 42hi-e there wi-- be spurts of activity and some fair-y good business during the spring and -ater summer/ the genera- out-oo# is not encouraging and there is no indication of any boom in business this year1 4The foreign situation wi-- p-ay an important part in our business affairs as our government wi-- have a -ot of troub-e on account of secret enemies in foreign countries1 4.rom Apri- to :une a serious fa--ing off in business and financiatroub-es and ban# fai-ures are indicated1 3uring Apri- the -aboring c-asses wi-- be very much dissatisfied and stri#es are threatened1 43uring the fa-- a serious business depression wi-- set in and the genera- out-oo# becomes c-oudy1 STE;,S TE *N;T 6;EPS1 4The summer wi-- see storms that wi-- damage crops and by Ectober business conditions wi-- be bordering on a panic1 4 n 3ecember -oss of confidence on the part of the pub-ic and dissatisfaction with the administration at 2ashington wi-- cause a serious wave of pessimism to fa-- over the entire country14 n )98) ,r1 Gann predicted that President *arding wou-d be a war President/ and he sti-- ho-ds to that prediction1 4 hope am wrong/4 he said/ 4but the forecast sti-- stands and has unti- )98% to be fu-fi--ed and mathematics do not -ie14 ,r1 Gann predicted the e-ection of 2oodrow 2i-son because the cyc-e had come bac# again to a man with a name beginning with 2 and ending with '/ 2ashington having been the first and -ast President with
26

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

those two -etters p-aced in that way1 The forecast which to-d of *arding"s e-ection has been exp-ained by ,r1 Gann as fo--ows! KK Senator 2arren G1 *arding was born 'ovember 8/ )0+(1 *is name contains some of the most powerfu- fame and wea-thKproducing -etters1 The name 2arren beginning with 2 and ending with '/ is very fortunate and gives him power to overcome obstac-es and opponents1 *is name and numbers show that he wi-- be conservative and act on-y after due consideration1 *is foreign po-icy wi-- he-p him to win1 4*is fortunate numbers are 8/ %/ +/ 0 and ))1 'ote that the 3ec-aration of ndependence on :u-y % and inauguration day on ,arch % both fa-- on one of his fortunate numbers1 The e-ection ta#es p-ace on the second day of the e-eventh month/ both fortunate numbers for him14 *E2 *5 2E;BS T ENT1 En the other hand ,r1 Gann predicted the defeat of Governor 6ox because his name contained on-y one fortunate -etter1 There has never been but one President with the initia- 61 That was 6-eve-and1 7ut the -etter * recurs every tenth cyc-e1 2i--iam *1 *arrison was the ninth President1 ;1 71 *ayes was the nineteenth President/ so there was nothing -eft by for 2arren G1 *arding to be the twentyKninth1 t might be we-- for the po-itica- parties to consu-t ,r1 Gann before the nominations are made in )98% to find out what -etter is due to win in this e-ection1 They cou-d then choose a man with the right #ind of -etters in his name1 ,r1 Gann gets ca--s every day from men and women prominent in a-- wa-#s of -ife as#ing him to cast their horoscope1 *e te--s po-iticians whether or not they wi-- be e-ected and so-ves other prob-ems for c-ergymen/ ban#ers and statesmen1 HPhoto captionI! 2i--iam 31 Gann/ mathematica- seer/ whose forecasts
27

W. D. Gann on

are fo--owed by thousands/ sees poor year ahead1 87 PPP The follo ing item is 6ha!ter <&000 from Gann4s no"el The TunneThru the Air/ ritten in 19:= 'efore the 19:9 !residential election$ Gann here sa/s that >Go"ernor Alfred *mith is not likel/ to 'e nominated> '/ the Democrats and that >a ?e!u'lican ill not 'e elected>$ The ne%t /ear) Her'ert Hoo"er and Alfred 2$ *mith 'ecame the ?e!u'lican and Democrat nominees) and the ?e!u'lican Hoo"er on the election '/ a landslide$ Gann correctl/ !redicted that *mith 5if nominated ould not 'e elected$7 A.T5; ma#ing his ca-cu-ations on the Presidentia- e-ection in )980/ ;obert sent the fo--owing .orecast to ,r1 Benne-worth! :u-y 8&/ )9871 )980 P;5S 35'T AL 5L56T E' n order to determine the conditions that wi-- prevai- during )980 and who wi-- be e-ected/ we must -oo# up past cyc-es1 refer you to 5cc-esiastes 3! )( C 4That which hath been is now and that which is to be hath a-ready been/ and God re$uireth that which is past14 2e #now that we are repeating past cyc-es as referred to in 5Je#ie-"s Prophecy C 6hapter 8&! %+ C 4Son of man set thy face toward the south/ and drop thy word toward the south/ and prophesy against the forest of the south fie-d/ and say to the forest of the south/ *ear the word of the Lord/ Thus saith the Lord God/ 7eho-d/ wi-- #ind-e a fire in thee and it sha-- devour every green tree in thee and every dry tree/ the f-aming f-ame sha-- not be $uenched/ and a-- faces from the south to the north sha-- be burned therein14 The troub-es in 'icaragua/ the destructive f-oods and storms which have visited .-orida/ and the destruction by the f-oods a-ong the ,ississippi during the past Spring a-- show that troub-es are starting in
87 The 5vening Te-egraph of 'ew Mor#/ ,arch (/ )983/ p1 31

28

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

the south1 2e are in a cyc-e which wi-- repeat and cause wars which wi-start from the south and southwest/ probab-y ,exico1 A-- of these events wi-- have a great bearing on the Presidentia- e-ection in )980/ because war wi-- be in the air and the peop-e wi-- be very much upset1 As referred to in 5xodus 38! )7 C 4And when :oshua heard the noise of the peop-e as they shouted/ he said unto ,oses/ There is a noise of war in the camp14 There wi-- be po-itica- wars and revo-utionary changes in the Nnited States in )9801 Peop-e wi-- want to choose new -eaders1 ;ead :udges (! 0 C 4They chose new godsF then was war within the gates! was there a shie-d or spear seen among forty thousand in srae-D4 The peop-e wi-- need to choose an ab-e -eader to prepare for the great war in the air1 have made a study of President 6oo-idge"s date of birth/ name and numbers1 *e is the strongest man that the ;epub-icans have/ but he has not wanted to accept the nomination and wi-- probab-y not if he can get out of it1 *e has the best chance of any ;epub-ican for being e-ected1 A-ong about ,arch or Apri-/ )980/ some important event wi-- happen which is -i#e-y to cause President 6oo-idge to refuse to accept the nomination1 2hen the convention meets in :une or :u-y there wi-- be -ong de-ays/ dissatisfaction and fights among the o-d ;epub-ican -eaders as to whom they wi-- nominate1 .rom the cyc-e that we are repeating/ there is a strong indication that President 6oo-idge wi-- not be renominated1 *e wi-- do something which wi-- cause -arge financiainterests and moneyed men to withdraw their support from him1 Since God re$uires that which is past/ then past cyc-es and events in the history of the Nnited States must repeat1 2e -oo# up the names and dates of birth to determine when certain names or initia- -etters shou-d repeat1 The -etter 464 is one which repeats in events of the Nnited States as shown by the e-ection of Grover 6-eve-and the second time in )0981 President 6a-vin 6oo-idge/ with the 464 strong in both names/ succeeded President *arding/ August 8/ )983/ and was e-ected in )98%1 This was rea--y a repetition of the -etter 464 the same as 6-eve-and"s second e-ection/ and in view of the fact that President 6oo-idge has served about + years/ the -etter 464 is not due to repeat its vibration in
29

W. D. Gann on

)980/ but might repeat in )938 when President 6oo-idge cou-d possib-y be e-ected again fo--owing the war and troub-esome times1 The most favorab-e -etters for the ;epub-ican Party which cou-d repeat in )980 are 7/ :/ ./ and L1 n view of the cyc-e which indicates war from )980 to )938/ there is a strong indication that the -etter 4L4 wi-- repeat as it did during the 6ivi- 2ar when Linco-n was President1 This might mean the nomination of 7orah/ 7ut-er/ :ohnson or Lowden1 haven"t the dates of birth of any of these men/ therefore/ am unab-e to say before the nominations ta#e p-ace and we #now whom their opponents wi-- be/ whether any of them wou-d be e-ected or not1 n regard to the 3emocratic nomination/ the cyc-e indicates a strong possibi-ity of victory for the 3emocrats or a new party1 Governor A-fred Smith is not -i#e-y to be nominated and if nominated wou-d not be e-ected1 The -etter 4S4 has never appeared in the surname of any president of the Nnited States/80 and as we are on-y due to repeat past events/ he has a very s-im chance of being e-ected1 The -etters ./ , and ; are due to repeat for the 3emocrats1 This might mean .ord/ ,cAdoo or ;eed1 According to the date of birth/ cyc-e and numbers/ ,cAdoo wou-d have a much better chance of getting the nomination than Smith1 ;eed -oo#s stronger than either of them1 Governor Smith wi-- continue popu-ar and the possibi-ities of him being nominated wi-- -oo# promising unti- about ,ay/ )980/ when there wi-- be a sudden change of pub-ic opinion against him1 Support wi-- be withdrawn and some of the strong 3emocratic -eaders wi-- turn to other possib-e candidates1 Smith"s name wi-- no doubt come before the convention/ but see no chance of him being nominated1 There is a strong indication that the man who wi-- be nominated
80 The surname is the -ast name or fami-y name >e1g1 Gann?1 Since Gann cou-d scarce-y have over-oo#ed presidents -i#e 2ashington/ :efferson/ and :ac#son/ in whose surnames the <s= appears/ not to mention 2i-son/ to whom he refers repeated-y/ it must be presumed that he means that the Nnited States has never had a president whose -ast name began with <s=1 ndeed/ not on-y in the history from the e-ection of George 2ashington up to the time this was written >)987? had this not occurred/ but in the 0% years since Gann wrote this chapter/ no president"s -ast name has begun with <s=1

30

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

wi-- be a 4dar# horse/4 a man probab-y born in ,ay or :une1 ;evo-utionary changes are indicated1 The $uestion of the )0th Amendment is -i#e-y to sp-it both of the o-d parties1 A farm and -abor party or some other po-itica- party may spring up and defeat both of the o-d parties1 The pub-ic wi-- be very much divided and sentiment wi-- be bad-y mixed in the summer and fa-- of )9801 2ith the present data in hand and the events that are to fo--ow the next Presidentia- e-ection/ my @udgment is that a ;epub-ican wi-- not be e-ected1 The President who ta#es office in ,arch/ )989/ wi-- start under very unfavorab-e conditions simi-ar to those which faced President 2i-son at the time he entered his second term and a-so conditions wi-repeat simi-ar to those that fo--owed the e-ection of Abraham Linco-n in )0+)1 There wi-- be troub-e with foreign countries over immigration -aws1 Tariff wi-- be a sore spot and cause disagreements with foreign countries1 wi-- have my ca-cu-ations made up for the stoc# and commodity mar#ets for )980 and )989 soon and when they are comp-eted wi-- send a copy of them1 There wi-- be some big opportunities for -ong pu-- trading in stoc#s and commodities during )9801 want you to be in on the dea-s with me and hope can he-p you ma#e a mi--ion do--ars1 ;E75;T GE;3E'189

89 Gann) The Tunnel Thru the Air @+inancial Guardian 1u'lishing 6o$) 19:=A) pp1 8)0K88)1

31

W. D. Gann on

Advertisement for Gann"s novein the 3a--as >TS? ,orning 'ews/ ,ay 3)/ )93)1 s one of the divine -aws contained therein the Law of VibrationD PPP 0n the 19B: !residential election) +ranklin Delano ?oose"elt as elected and su'seCuentl/ 'ecame the onl/ Dnited *tates !resident to 'e elected to four terms in office$ Gann as fer"entl/ o!!osed to ?oose"elt4s -e Deal$ ?ight 'efore the 19BE election) Gann rote: >The !resent Administration at #ashington ith its -e Deal) or 0 think it ould 'e more !ro!er to name it the 4ra deal)4 decided to make it their 'usiness to run e"er/ other man4s 'usiness) regardless of hether the/ kne
32

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

an/thing a'out it or not$ .ost !oliticians and 4'rain3trusters4 kno nothing a'out running an/ kind of 'usiness$> B0 0n the follo ing !ress !iece) Gann !redicts the electoral defeat of ?oose"elt in the !residential election of 19BE$ He !redicts that >Alfred .$ Landon ill 'e elected $$$ '/ an o"er helming maForit/$> #hen the election came) ?oose"elt on nearl/ E1G of the !o!ular "ote and more than 99G of the electoral "ote$ The Lighter Side 'N,75;S A'3 L5TT5;S The Literary 3igest/ which is even now preparing for the greatest straw vote of a-- time/ might @ust as we-- tear up its cards and discharge its computers/ for the outcome of the presidentia- e-ection is sett-ed1 ,r1 21 31 Gann has compared the -etters and numbers in the names ;ooseve-t and Landon and has decided that the -atter cannot he-p but be e-ected next fa--1 'o matter how you and your fe--ow citiJens vote/ the resu-t wi-- not be affected1 *ere is part of ,r1 Gann"s exp-anation! 4The names containing "EE" never repeat more than four times in a cyc-e of 3& years and se-dom more than three times1 The "EE" has repeated three times in succession! 6a-vin 6oo-idge/ *erbert *oover/ .ran#-in 3e-ano ;ooseve-t1 *oover was the third after 2oodrow 2i-son whose name contained "EE" and he was defeated1 .ran#-in 31 ;ooseve-t is the third fo--owing 6oo-idge and the cyc-es and Letters and 'umbers forete-- his defeat1 4The vibrations of Letters and 'umbers are very important1 A study of the vowe-s and consonants revea- some remar#ab-e events in history1 'apo-eon 7onaparte/ whose name began with "'" and ended with "'" had the greatest rise of any genera- in history and met with the greatest defeat/ dying in prison1 *is opponent was the 3u#e of 2e--ington/ whose
3& Gann/ -e *tock Trend Detector >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )93+?/ p1 )301

33

W. D. Gann on

name began with "2" and ended with "'1" 'apo-eon met his defeat at 2ater-oo/ beginning with "2" and ending with "EE1" 4The vowe-s a-ways produce expansion and booms/ especia--y "E/" whi-e "*" and "'" are strong for both expansion and contraction and are fameKproducing -etters which wind up with crash and defeat1 .or examp-e! Nnder Theodore ;ooseve-t we experienced a great boom in business and the stoc# mar#et in )9&(K)9&+ but one of the severest panics in )9&71 Nnder 2oodrow 2i-son we had a boom in business but war panic fo--owed1 Nnder 2arren G1 *arding we started a business recovery/ but the -etter "*" in his -ast name and "2" and "'" in his first name indicated sudden death1 Nnder 6a-vin 6oo-idge we had the greatest boom in business in this country and the stoc# mar#et/ but when the "*" in *oover"s name and the "EE" again repeated we had the worst panic in the history of this country1 The consonants "*" and "*" indicated extreme depression1 *erbert *oover was a chi-d of destiny and fate decreed that he must bear the b-ame and the resu-ts of the aftermath of war and rec#-ess specu-ation1 4.ran#-in 31 ;ooseve-t came into office under various adverse conditions and was forced to c-ose a-- the ban#s in the Nnited States1 .o--owing that we had a boom in business and the stoc# mar#et which cu-minated in :u-y/ )933F then a recession in business and the stoc# mar#et/ and in )93( and )93+ we had another boom in business and the stoc# mar#et1 A second and worse ;ooseve-t panic is yet to come1 am sure that before the end of )93+ and during the ear-y part of )937/ business wi-- fee- the mista#es of the 'ew 3ea- and we wi-- have to go through another period of depression and read@ustment as a resu-t of ;ooseve-t"s waste/ extravagance and mista#es1 4These are the wor#ings of a 'atura- Law and time cyc-es1 The more mista#es po-itica- -eaders ma#e/ the more business and the country suffer1 t wi-- be important to watch what happens around August )(/ September )% to )+/ and Ectober 87 to 89/ )93+/ which according to my time cyc-es indicate critica- times for the Nnited States and reverses for President ;ooseve-t1 3uring the month of August ;ooseve-t is -i#e-y to ma#e some speech or do something that wi-- cause
34

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

voters to turn against him1 :ust as a panic fo--owed in )9&7 in the -ast year of Theodore ;ooseve-t"s Administration/ a panic in the stoc# mar#et and depression in business is -i#e-y to wind up the -ast year of .ran#-in 31 ;ooseve-t"s Administraion1 4Abraham Linco-n was the )+th President of the Nnited States and up to this time the on-y man e-ected President of the Nnited States whose name began with "L" and ended with "'1" 'ames beginning with "L" repeat at rare interva-s and usua--y either in 30 or 7+ years1 A-fred ,1 Landon"s first name/ -i#e Linco-n/ begins with "A" and -ast name begins with "L" and ends with "'" and a-so contains "E" in the midd-e name and "E" in the -ast name1 The -etter "L" is an important -etter that wi-- repeat the cyc-e fo--owing President Abraham Linco-n1 4The President e-ected in )93+ wi-- be the thirdKthird President of the Nnited States1 "ThirtyKthree" is a number that wor#s strong with "sixteen" and the -etter "L" strong-y opposes the -etter ";1" The -etter "A" in A-fred opposes "." and "3" in ;ooseve-t"s name1 President .ran#-in 31 ;ooseve-t was born :anuary 3&/ )008 and Governor A-fred ,1 Landon was born September 9/ )0071 The month of September contains nine -etters1 Landon was born on the 9th day of the 9th month and the year )007 reduced to its -owest digit is six1 The numbers "three/" "six/" and "nine" are fortunate and eventfu- for him1 )93+ is the 3+th year in the Twentieth 6entury1 ThirtyKsix added together e$ua-s nine1 This is Landon"s year and Landon"s vibration1 3uring the month of September/ )93+/ soon after Governor Landon"s birthday/ he wi-- ma#e some speech or say something that wi-- cause the tide to turn strong-y in his favor1 4Governor Landon was nominated in 6-eve-and/ Ehio1 The name of the state beginning with "E" and ending with "E" are fortunate for Governor Landon1 President ;ooseve-t was nominated in Phi-ade-phia/ Pa1 The name of the town and the state beginning with "P" and ending with "A" are unfortunate and opposing -etters for President ;ooseve-t1 4This country went through great strugg-es and had wars under George 2ashington1 Again we passed through unsett-ed conditions and were forced to go into the 2or-d 2ar under 2oodrow 2i-son1 Abraham
35

W. D. Gann on

Linco-n was e-ected at a critica- period in the history of the Nnited States and 6ivi- 2ar fo--owed1 A-fred ,1 Landon wi-- be e-ected at a critica- period of the Nnited States fo--owing a greater period of Government extravagance and expenditure than has ever occurred during war times1 The country wi-- pass through a very trying period under A-fred ,1 Landon/ because he wi-- be forced to ta#e office under adverse conditions brought about by the previous Administration1 *owever/ Landon"s Administration wi-- prove to be good for the country in the -ong run @ust as Abraham Linco-n"s po-icy of freeing the s-aves proved to be the measure at that time1 4.rom my study of Letters/ 'umbers and cyc-e theory/ am confident that Landon wi-- be e-ected 'ovember 3/ )93+ by an overwhe-ming ma@ority14 21 31 GA'' So/ you see/ the e-ection is as good as over1 The on-y thing -eft to do is to as# the stars which 6ongressmen wi-- be e-ected1 21 :1 .13) PPP 0n 1940) at the time of ?oose"elt4s third cam!aign for office) Gann launched a fresh "olle/ against the -e Deal$ 4,ista#es have to be paid for and there have never been more mista#es made in any administration of the Nnited States than have been made by the 'ew 3ea- 111 The 'ew 3ea- is no -onger adhering to former -aws or the 6onstitution1 111 t is on-y by facing facts and ta#ing prompt action that we can prevent the 'ew 3ea-ers from accomp-ishing their purpose and ruining the country1 111 *ave we never had smart men before and why is it that President ;ooseve-t and the 'ew 3ea-ers are the smartest men in the wor-dD 111 the 'ew 3ea-ers do nothing but
3) The *artford 6ourant Aug )/ )93+/ p1 +1

36

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

continue to run the government into debt and wi-- not stop unti- we face ban#ruptcy1 111 nothing the 'ew 3ea- does is safe1 5verything is rec#-essness1 111 The 'ew 3ea- has ruined the mar#et for our commodities and hurt the farmer1 2e have -ost the cotton mar#et of the South and wi-- never regain it1 111 'ew 3ea-ers want comp-ete controand want dictatorship1 They have proved that from start to finish by ta#ing away the rights of the peop-e restricting and -imiting business of a-- #inds1 111 f the 'ew 3ea- wins in 'ovember/ )9%&/ the -ast hope for America is gone1438 Gann4s arning ent unheeded and ?oose"elt on the 1940 election$ 0n the follo ing letter to the editor) Gann tells us) no dou't ith a sense of relief '/ this time) that ?oose"elt4s 1940 "ictor/ indicates >the end of the ?oose"elts in the office of 1resident of the Dnited *tates> and that +D? > ill not ser"e a fourth term$> Histor/ again sho ed differentl/$ +ranklin Delano ?oose"elt on re3election to the office of 1resident of the Dnited *tates in 1944) as inaugurated to that office on ;an$ :0) 194H) and died in office on A!ril 1:) 194H$ 'E 6*A'65 .E; ;EES5V5LT To the 5ditor of The ;epub-ican! C .rom the time George 2ashington was President unti- 2oodrow 2i-son was e-ected/ there was no other President e-ected with the first -etter of his name beginning with 4214 .rom 2ashington to ,cBin-ey/ there was no President e-ected who had 4oo4 in his name1 ,cBin-ey was e-ected for the first time in )09+ and for the second time in )9&&/ at the end of the century ending in 4&&14 Theodore ;ooseve-t was e-ected viceK president/ the first time that 4oo4 had appeared in the name of a President or a viceKpresident1 n )9&) ,cBin-ey died and ;ooseve-t became President1 n )9&% Theodore ;ooseve-t was e-ected President/ thus repeating the second time the 4oo4 in a name of a President1 n )9&0 2i--iam *oward Taft was e-ected President1 n )9)8
38 Gann/ <.ace .acts AmericaG=/ pp1 )8/)%K)+/ 8&/ 83/ 8(/ 8+/ 301

37

W. D. Gann on

2oodrow 2i-son was e-ected President1 *is name contained the 4oo4 in the first name and 4o4 in the second1 n )9)+ 2oodrow 2i-son was e-ected for the second time1 n )98& 2arren G1 *arding was e-ected President1 .ran#-in 3e-ano ;ooseve-t ran for viceKpresident that year on the 3emocratic tic#et and was defeated1 6a-vin 6oo-idge was e-ected viceKpresident in )98&1 *is name contained 4oo14 *e became President in )983/ after the death of *arding1 n )98% 6oo-idge was e-ected President1 n )980 *erbert *oover was e-ected President1 *is name contained 4oo14 n )938/ )93+ and )9%& .ran#-in 3e-ano ;ooseve-t was e-ected President of the Nnited States1 *is midd-e name contained 4o4 and the -ast name 4oo14 .rom the above/ you can see that from )98& to )9%%/ or 8% years/ 4oo4 has appeared in the name of the President and that the cyc-e which began in )9&& started 4oo4 in the name of the President and has continued for %% years1 .ran#-in 3e-ano ;ooseve-t first too# oath of office as President of the Nnited States in )933/ a year ca--ed by the ancients as the doub-e 4314 *e wi-- run for office again in )9%%/ the year #nown as the doub-e 4%14 *e has had three terms or )8 years in office1 *e wi-- not serve a fourth term/ as the cyc-e for the 4oo4 has run out and the time cyc-es and the science of numbers do not promise for President ;ooseve-t a fourth term in office1 .rom the time Theodore ;ooseve-t was e-ected viceKpresident in )9&& to the e-ection of .ran#-in 31 ;ooseve-t in )938 was 38 years1 .rom the first e-ection of Theodore ;ooseve-t to the -ast e-ection of .ran#-in 31 ;ooseve-t in )9%& was %& years1 This cyc-e indicates the end of the ;ooseve-ts in the office of President of the Nnited States1 21 31 GA''1 'ew Mor# city/ September )7/ )9%%1
38

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

5ditor"s note KK This correspondent/ 2i--iam 31 Gann/ a 2a-- street operator for more than a $uarter of a century/ is said to be we-- #nown for his prognostications of wor-d happenings1 33

33 Springfie-d H,AI ;epub-ican Sept1 83/ )9%%/ p1 +1

39

W. D. Gann on

Appendix

Sour!es of Gann"s Ti!#er $uotes


0n the Ticker inter"ie ) #$ D$ Gann !ro"ides fi"e Cuotations in su!!ort of his statements concerning the La of &i'ration$ The last Cuote is attri'uted to .ichael +arada/I the other Cuotes are "aguel/ sourced) if at all$ The fi"e Cuotes are:

Juote 1: 4That an origina- impu-se of any #ind fina--y reso-ves itse-f into periodic or rhythmica- motion4 Juote :: 4:ust as the pendu-um returns again in its swing/ @ust as the moon returns in its orbit/ @ust as the advancing year ever brings the rose of spring/ so do the properties of the e-ements periodica--y recur as the weight of the atoms rises14 Juote B: 4The properties of an e-ement are a periodic function of its atomic weight14 Juote 4: 42e are brought to the conviction that diversity in phenomena- nature in its different #ingdoms/ is most intimate-y associated with numerica- re-ationship1 The numbers are not intermixed/ chaotica--y and accidenta--y/ but are sub@ect to regu-ar periodicity1 The changes and deve-opments are a-so seen to be in many cases undu-atory14 Juote H: 4There is nothing in the Nniverse but mathematicapoints of force14

0f e kne the sources of these Cuotations) e might ha"e an ad"antage o"er other readers of this inter"ie and gain greater insight into Gann4s meaning$ 0t is 'elie"ed that the source of e"er/ one of these Cuotations has 'een found$ The most trou'lesome of all the Cuotes is Juote H$ 0t seems that the
40

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

onl/ !laces in hich +arada/ is found making this statement is in Gann4s ritings or in the ritings of other !eo!le Cuoting Gann$ 0f 'iogra!hies of +arada/ and if +arada/4s o n ritings do not contain this Cuote) e are left to onder a'out its authenticit/ as a statement made '/ +arada/ himself$ #$ D$ Gann as on the Kodiac 6ouncil of the Astrological *ociet/ of -e 8ork$ #e kno he as a mem'er as earl/ as 1914) from a !age from the Astrological Bulletina) re!roduced hereinI B4 this does not !reclude his 'eing a mem'er 'efore that time$ A fello mem'er of the 6ouncil at that time ith Gann as L/man 2$ *to e$ BH Here are t o !aragra!hs from an address '/ *to e gi"en Fust months 'efore the Ticker inter"ie as !u'lished: Said Sir saac 'ewton/ < be-ive a-- of the matter in the universe can be compressed into a g-obe one inch in diameter/ and if to that why not to the siJe of a cherry/ a pea/ a grain of sand/ there is nothing in the universe but mathematica- points1= .araday went 'ewton one bettr/ he dec-aired there is nothin% in the uni&erse but mathemati!a' ipoints of for!e(3+ *to e4s ords 5there is nothing in the uni"erse 'ut mathematical !oints of force7 are the e%act ords that Gann attri'utes to +arada/$ *to e) ho e"er) does not use Cuotation marks) hich ould im!l/ that he is !ara!hrasing +arada/4s general thought) rather than Cuoting him directl/$B= 0n the a'sence of !roof to the contrar/) e must assume that
3% See Appendix V1 3( Stowe is the fina- name in the Aries series in the image in Appendix V1 36 .rom 4The *and of 3estiny or 2here did we come from/ 2hat are we here for/ and 2here are we going toD A -ecture de-ivered by Prof Lyman 5 Stowe/ before The .irst Spiritua-ist 6hurch of 3etroit ,ich at their temp-e/ Sunday evening ,ay )+th )9&9/4 in Lyman 51 Stowe/ ,armeniaI or) #hat the *!irit Told .e >se-fKpub-ished/ )9)0?/ p1 8(1 The spe--ing and typographica- errors are reproduced as they appeared in the boo#1 7o-d emphasis was added to high-ight the $uote used by Gann1 37 n )079/ 3& years before Stowe"s -ecture/ 6har-es 7eecher/ a 6ongregationa-ist minister/ wrote/ in a boo# addressed to the same type of peop-e that Stowe was spea#ing to himse-f/ 4Ab-e minds/ such as LeibnitJ/ 7oscovitch/ Priest-ey/ .araday/ and others/ have maintained that a-- materia- phenomena can be accounted for on the theory that partic-es

41

W. D. Gann on

Gann4s source for this Cuote +arada/ Cuote at all$

as *to e and that it therefore

as not a

Juotes B and : are more easil/ accounted for$ The/ a!!eared in a 'ook of !o!ular science in the follo ing section: T*5 P5; E3 6 LA21 The Periodic System of the 5-ements/ as we now have it/ was discovered independent-y and a-most simu-taneous-y by the ;ussian/ ,ende-eeff/ and the German/ Lothar ,eyerF though the germ of the discovery undoubted-y -ay in the Ectaves of 'ew-ands1 n )0+3 ,r1 :ohn 'ew-ands pointed out in a brief -etter to the 6hemica- 'ews that if the e-ements be arranged in the order of their atomic weights/ beginning with hydrogen T )/ and ending with uranium T 8%&/ in a tabu-ar form/ they natura--y fa-- into such groups that e-ements simi-ar to one another in chemica- behaviour occur in the same co-umnsF and that/ moreover/ the number of e-ements between any one and the next simi-ar one is seven1 n other words/ members of the same groups stand to one another in the same re-ation as the extremities of one or more octaves in musicG30 This -eads us to thin# that not on-y may there be a re-ation between these -itt-e fundamenta-s of the universe but a veritab-e harmony1 7rief-y and technica--y/ the -aw states that 4the properties of an e'ement are a periodi! fun!tion of its atomi! wei%ht()*+

are mathematica- points of force14 6har-es 7eecher/ *!iritual .anifestations >Lee and Shepard/ )079?/ p1 )+1 To go from 4a-- materia- phenomena4 to 4nothing in the universe4 may not have seemed a great -eap to Stowe/ who appears to have been anything but a scho-ar1 38 The fina- sentence in ,r1 'ew-ands"s 4brief -etter to the 6hemica- 'ews4 was/ 4This pecu-iar re-ationship propose to provisiona--y term the "Law of Ectaves1"4 :ohn A1 ;1 'ew-ands/ Ln the Disco"er/ of the 1eriodic La and on ?elations Among the Atomic #eights >51 U .1 '1 Spon/ )00%?/ p1 )%1 39 According to ,arion 5rwin/ The Dni"erse and The Atom >31 Van 'ostrand/ )9)+?/ p1 8+0/ this proposition was demonstrated by Lothar ,eyer and 3mitri ,ende-eev1

42

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

This is a very concise statement indeed of an extraordinary fact1 The statement means no more nor -ess than this! That if you #now the weight of the atom of the e-ement you may #now/ if you -i#e/ its properties/ for they are fixed1 ,ust as the pendu'um returns a%ain in its swin%- .ust as the moon returns in its orbit- .ust as the ad&an!in% /ear e&er brin%s the rose of sprin%- so do the properties of the e'ements periodi!a''/ re!ur as the wei%hts of the atoms rise( To demonstrate this fact/ ta#e some one specific property/ for examp-e/ the atomic vo-ume/ which is the atomic weight divided by the specific gravity of the so-id e-ement/ and arrange a tab-e on a piece of engineering paper in which the atomic weights read from -eft to right >the abscissas?/ whi-e the atomic vo-umes read from bottom to top >the ordinates?1 'ow construct a curve by pric#ing out the position of the different e-ements in accordance with both their atomic vo-umes and atomic weights/ and you wi-- find yourse-f in possession of a tab-e such as .ig1 81

43

W. D. Gann on

2e see at once from this curve that the atomic vo-ume is a periodic function of the atomic weight1 As the atomic weight increases/ the atomic vo-ume a-ternate-y increases and decreases1 The periodicity proc-aims itse-f in the regu-ar-y recurring hi--s and va--eys which constitute the curve1 5-ements which occupy simi-ar positions on the five hi--s and va--eys have mar#ed-y simi-ar properties1 Thus/ you wi-notice at the summit of each of the five hi--s/ the symbo-s of the e-ements -ithium/ sodium/ potassium/ rubidium and caesium/ a-- of these e-ements possessing amaJing-y simi-ar properties1 Er/ again/ find the -itt-e dot mar#ed S >signifying su-phur? on the s-ope of the third hi--/ and you wi-- then notice a -itt-e dot mar#ed Se >se-enium? and another Te >te--urium? in a corresponding-y simi-ar position on the other two hi--s respective-y1 These e-ements have stri#ing-y simi-ar properties1 Ta#e now another property a-together/ -et us say the me-tingKpoint of the e-ements/ and ma#e a simi-ar diagram >.ig1 3?1

Mou get a curve remar#ab-y -i#e the first one/ with this exception/ that the e-ements which were at the top of the first curve are now at the bottom1 The me-tingKpoint curve is as strict-y periodic as the vo-ume curve and of the same genera- shape1 'otice the regu-ar irregu-arity of the two curves/ and notice a-so/ if you wi--/ that there is not on-y a periodicity but a doub-e periodicity/ as shown in the -itt-e hump on the s-ope of each hi-- of the curve1 Simi-ar curves may be constructed for many other properties1 6an we imagine/ then/ that these atoms/ these -itt-e invisibi-ities/ in which we a-- -ive and move and have our being/ are separate-y created/ arbitrari-y made/ unre-ated individua-sD *ard-y so/ for they are obvious-y created in accordance with some scheme1 2ou-d that we might understand this scheme a-- and in a--G t wou-d be a veritab-e g-impse behind the vei- of existence1 7ut if
44

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

we cannot read from A-pha to Emega/ we may spe-- out what we can/ -eaving future -etters for future menF perforce content that if in this cryptogram of the universe we #now indubitab-y that there is a cryptogram to be read/ we have at -east come to the beginnings of #now-edge1%& #e no ha"e to account for Juotes 1 and 4$ +or these) e must turn to the Lccult ?e"ie of ;ul/ 190E) in hich 2d ard T$ Bennett rote an article entitled >The .agic of -um'ers$> 0t a!!eared in t o !arts) the second !art 'eing carried o"er to the ne%t num'er of the magaMine$ Both Cuotes used '/ Gann a!!ear in the first !art$ The article o!ened as follo s: 4This appears to be a fundamenta- -aw of the Nniverse! KK name-y/ that an ori%ina' impu'se of an/ #ind fina''/ reso'&es itse'f into periodi! or rh/thmi!a' motion(4 KK P;E.5SSE; 21 .1 7A;;5TT/ .1;1S1 >)07&?1 The .agic of -um'ers as the Basis of all Di"ersit/ and A!!arent +ate is the tit-e of a boo# pub-ished at Vienna in the year )0081 The preface is dated .ebruary/ in curious-y exact coincidence with the formation of the Society for Psychica- ;esearch1 The writer is L1 71 *e--enbach/ usua--y designated 7aron *e--enbach1 111 Bennett then sa/s that he ill !resent >an a'stract> of the 'ook in his o n ords >to con"e/ the ideas of their riter) as far as !ossi'le in his o n !hraseolog/$> After a section that he calls >0ntroductor/)> Bennett o!ens a ne section of his article entitled >1eriodicit/> and therein returns to a discussion of 1rof$ Barrett: 6urious correspondences exist between Sound and Light/ between the number of vibrations producing musica- interva-s and those which
%& ;obert Bennedy 3uncan/ The -e ,no ledge: A *im!le 2%!osition of the -e 1h/sics and the -e 6hemistr/ in Their ?elation to the -e Theor/ of .atter >A1 S1 7arnes U 6o1/ )9&0?/ pp1 88K8(1 The bo-d emphasis/ not in the origina-/ has been added to indicate the passages $uoted by Gann in the Tic#er interview1

45

W. D. Gann on

produce co-our1 These add to the 4,agic14 Professor 21 .1 7arrett/ .1;1S1/ of 3ub-in/ has been #ind enough to ca-- my attention to a Paper he wrote under the tit-e C 4Light and Sound! An 5xamination of their reputed Ana-ogy/4 which appeared in The Juarterl/ ;ournal of *cience as -ong ago as :anuary/ )07&1 Professor 7arrett was the first to p-ace this ana-ogy on a definite basis1 n his paper he refers to the vague ideas on this sub@ect which had been a matter of specu-ation from very ear-y times/ and then says! C 4The fo--owing considerations wi-- show not on-y that the ana-ogy has some foundation/ but that it is far more wonderfuthan has hitherto been suspected14 The fascinating detai-s cannot be $uoted here1 t must suffice to say that when the waveK-engths of the musica- interva-s are compared with the waveK-engths of the co-our interva-s/ a definite correspondence is seen to exist1 This correspondence does not re-ate to abso-ute va-ue/ the co-our waves being infinite-y sma-- compared with the sound waves1 t consists in the ratio of one to the other1 The proportion between the different -engths of the waves of the notes of the musica- sca-e and of the seven co-ours of the rainbow is a-most identica-1 Another stri#ing examp-e of the .agic of -um'ers1 Professor 7arrett says further at the end of his Paper! C 4A musicachord thus becomes both a representative picture and an acoustic painting/ whi-e the musica- sca-e is -itera--y a rainbow of sound1 t is hard-y too much to say that we might possib-y trans-ate into a musicame-ody/ a sunset/ a f-ower/ or a painting by a ;ubens or a ;aphae-14 n four chapters dea-ing with what 7aron *e--enbach ca--s Periodicity >3ie PeriodicitVt? he discusses at -ength the facts on which the above paragraphs are based1 *e be-ieves that he a-so finds a simi-ar Periodic system in the science of chemistry1 To what extent the researches of the -ast twentyKfive years into the mo-ecu-ar constitution of matter/ and into the nature of the ether/ have strengthened or otherwise the views which 7aron *e--enbach puts forth with regard to 6hemistry/ cannot say1 n the conc-uding paragraphs of this section of his boo# he ma#es some interesting remar#s/ the substance of which wi-- endeavor to give1
46

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

n ,usic/ or rather in ,e-ody/ we have found an anchor for our specu-ations which strengthens our argument for the existence of Periodicity1 2e find a Periodicity which is the necessary antecedent of definite diversity1 0e are brou%ht to the !on&i!tion that the di&ersit/ in phenomena' Nature- in its different #in%doms- is most intimate'/ asso!iated with numeri!a' re'ationship( The numbers are not intermixed- !haoti!a''/ and a!!identa''/- but are sub.e!t to a re%u'ar periodi!it/( The !han%es and de&e'opments are a'so seen to be- in man/ !ases- undu'ator/( 2e wi-- now ma#e the attempt/ as far as our powers wi-- permit/ to soar into a transcendenta- wor-d/ in order to obtain a wider view of this Periodicity1 %) #hile these three sources full/ and satisfactoril/ account for the fi"e Cuotations offered '/ #$ D$ Gann in his Ticker inter"ie ) Juote 1 as also used in a 'ook on forecasting e"ents in the Dnited *tates through the
%) 5dward T1 7ennett / 4The ,agic of 'umbers/4 The Eccu-t ;eview/ :u-y )9)+/ pp1 7/ )&/ ))1 The bo-d typeface has been added to identify $uotes from the Tic#er interview1 7ennett was assistant secretary to the Society of Psychica- ;esearch from )008 to )9&81 'ote that the $uote we have identified as Ruote % is not a direct $uote/ as Gann imp-ies/ but is 5dward T1 7ennett"s paraphrase of a statement in German by L1 71 *e--enbach1 The man that Gann ca--s a <famous scientist= C 7aron LaJar von *e--enbach C was an obscure 5ast 5uropean thin#er who became associated with the Spiritua-ist and Theosophica- movements of his time >see 5duard *errmann/ <7aron LaJar von *e--enbach/= The 2ord/ Vo-1 8& 'o1 )/ Ectober )9)%/ pp1 %K)(/ for a s#etch of his -ife and thought?1 The founder of Theosophy has written! 4 t is need-ess to refer in detai- to the number of vibrations constituting the notes of the musica- sca-eF they are strict-y ana-ogous to the sca-e of chemica- e-ements/ and a-so to the sca-e of co-our as unfo-ded by the spectroscope/ a-though in the -atter case we dea- with on-y one octave/ whi-e both in music and chemistry we find a series of se"en octaves represented theoretica--y/ of which si% are fair-y comp-ete and in ordinary use in both sciences1 Thus/ to $uote *e--enbach! H"I t has been estab-ished that/ from the standpoint of phenomena- -aw/ upon which a-- our #now-edge rests/ the vibrations of sound and -ight increase regu-ar-y/ that they divide themse-ves into se"en co-umns/ and that the successive numbers in each co-umn are c-ose-y a--iedF i$e$/ that they exhibit a c-ose re-ationship which not on-y is expressed in the figures themse-ves/ but a-so is practica--y confirmed in chemistry as in music/ in the -atter of which the ear confirms the verdict of the figures1 1 1 1 The fact that this periodicity and variety is governed by the number se"en is undeniab-e/ and it far surpasses the -imits of mere chance/ and must be assumed to have an ade$uate cause/ which cause must be discovered1H"I4 *1 P1 7-avats#y/ The *ecret Doctrine: The */nthesis of *cience) ?eligion) and 1hiloso!h/ Vo- Anthropogenesis >The Theosophica- Pub-ishing *ouse/ )093?/ p1 ++%1

47

W. D. Gann on

use of num'ers$ *ince Gann himself as a forecaster of all kinds of e"ents) it is interesting to see the conte%t in hich the Cuote a!!ears: ,any years ago the present author composed and pub-ished a vo-ume%8 in which an attempt was made to show/ that the number of degrees in each and every comp-ete sca-e of evo-ution/ is se"en! that the order of their se$uence is the same as the order of the seven notes of the diatonic sca-e in music/ and the seven co-ors of the rainbow/ with their harmonics and comp-ementary re-ationsF and that the who-e system of creation/ constructed on this p-an/ presents a grand series of octa"es any one of which/ being ascertained/ wou-d/ in a genera- way/ serve as a type and exponent of a-- the others/ whether upon a higher or -ower sca-e1 The conception and demonstration of this grand -aw bro#e sudden-y upon the writer"s mind so -ong ago as the year )0%0/ in a manner and under circumstances which need not here be described1 7ut since then/ scientific men have independent-y discovered and demonstrated so much of this -aw as re-ates to the correspondence of colors and musical sounds/ found respective-y in the structure of the rainbow or prismatic spectrum/ and in that of the musica- sca-e1 So far as we #now/ the first exposition of this truth that was given to the wor-d through the current @ourna-s of science was pub-ished by Prof1 21 .1 7arrett/ in the London Juarterl/ ;ournal of *cience for :anuary/ )07&1 The writer i--ustrates his sub@ect by a diagram/ in which the co-ors of the rainbow/ and the notes of the diatonic sca-e/ with the -engths of the waves in the vibrations in each/ are set opposite each other/ and expressed by numbers1%3 The -engths of the waves of -ight are expressed in mi--ionths of a mi--imeter/ and the -engths of the waves of sound in the tenor octave/ are expressed in numbers of inchesF and then both are reduced to a common sca-e of representative numbers of which the first
%8 H.ootnote in the boo# itse-f!I The ,acrocosm and ,icrocosmF or the Nniverse without and the Nniverse within1 >This boo# is now out of print1? %3 4Sir saac 'ewton/ in the course of his investigations of the properties of -ight/ discovered that the -engths of the spaces occupied in the spectrum by the seven primary co-ours/ exact-y correspond to the -engths of chords that sound the seven notes in the diatonic sca-e of music A4 6har-es *utton/ A .athematical and 1hiloso!hical Dictionar/ Vo-1 >:1 :ohnson and G1 G1 and :1 ;obinson/ )79(?/ p1 80&1

48

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

is )&&/ KO running thus!

Ef course the ra!idit/ of vibrations increases in precise-y the ratio in which the -ength of the waves decreases1 Thus/ if in the music sca-e/ the -owest 6 of the seven octave piano gives 38 vibrations to the second/ >which is the fact?/ the octave 6 next above wi-- give +% in a second/ and the next octave above that wi-- give )80F and so on throughout1 And so a-so of the ratio of increase in intermediate gradations1 The sca-es thus being p-aced in @uxtaposition/ with the series of indicative numbers in each/ it is seen that the progressions and proportions are substantia--y the same in both/ as we-- as the numerica- steps of the series1 En the basis of these facts/ Professor 7arrett and scientists genera--y have conc-uded that the la is the same in both sca-es1 And this is farther and sti-- more abso-ute-y proved by facts which these scientists seem to have over-oo#ed KO name-y/ that in both sca-es/ the first/ third and fifth/ are harmonics1 That is/ in the color sca-e/ the red/ ye--ow and b-ue are harmonic co-orsF and in the music sca-e/ the 6/ 5 and G/ are harmonic sounds1 ,oreover/ in the co-or sca-e/ the first and fourth/ the second and fifth/ and the third and sixth/ are com!lementar/ colors/ so ca--edF and this remar# appears to app-y e$ua--y to the first and fourth/ the second and fifth and the third and sixth notes of the music sca-e1 After pointing out the correspondences in the series and
49

W. D. Gann on

progressions in the two sca-es/ Prof1 7arrett adds/ in a foot note/ this stri#ing remar#! 4This/4 says he/ 4appears to be a fundamenta- -aw of the universe/ viJ! That an ori%ina' impu'se of an/ #ind fina''/ reso'&es itse'f into periodi! motion( 3oes this not throw -ight upon the periodic motion of the p-anets as we-- as the vibratory motion of atomsD 1ossi'l/ in some such a/ e ma/ hereafter learn to understand the musical rNle of nature$> :ust so/ and this is precise-y the prob-em we sha-- endeavor to so-ve1%%
%% 2i--iam .ishbough/ The 2nd of the Ages >6ontinenta- Pub-ishing 6ompany/ )090?/ pp1 0K ))1 The emphasis is in the origina-/ except for the bo-d emphasis to indicate the $uote used by Gann1 .ishbough/ a former Nniversa-ist minister/ was at the time of writing this boo# a we--K#nown editor of Spiritua-ist pub-ications1 2i--iam .-etcher 7arrett/ the source of one of Gann"s citations in the Tic#er interview/ was a student of the eminent scientist :ohn Tynda--/ but was a-so in )008 the founder of the Society for Psychica- ;esearch1 7arrett is $uoted as saying/ 4 #now and re@oice in the b-essing Spiritua-ism has been to my own faith/ and to that of severa- dear friends of mine14 The Psycho-ogica- ;eview >a Spiritua-ist magaJine?/ 'ov1 )00)/ p1 )991 2e have seen Spiritua-ist associations a-so in the cases of Lyman 51 Stowe and 7aron LaJar von *e--enbach1 These facts may be of interest/ in that ;obert Gordon/ the hero of Gann"s nove-/ is advised by an astro-oger! 4 f you wi-- visit cities near beautifu- watering p-aces in the South or Southwest/ and cou-d come in contact with an honest spiritua-ist or c-airvoyant/ it may be of some benefit and he-p in some way to so-ve the mystery H-ong confronting GordonI14 2e are to-d that Gordon proceeded to go 4direct-y to Pa-m 7each/ .-orida/ HwhereI he met some friends of 6onan 3oy-e"s who were very much interested in spiritua-ism14 Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air/ >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ pp1 8%7/ 8%0/ 8(&1 Sir Arthur 6onan 3oy-e/ the creator of the fictiona- character Sher-oc# *o-mes and a we--K#nown Spiritua-ist/ @oined 7arrett"s Society for Psychica- ;esearch in )093 and was probab-y its mostKfamous member unti- his resignation short-y before his death in )93& under his newKfound conviction that the group was 4antiKSpiritua-ist41 >Time/ ,arch 3)/ )93& and The 'ew Mor# Times/ :u-y 0 )93&1? 'one of this is in any way meant to imp-y that ,r1 Gann had any Spiritua-ist connection or affi-iation himse-f1 A pub-icity brochure about Gann"s wor#/ issued at the end of his -ife/ stated! 421 31 Gann is a 6hristian/ a member of the ,asonic Erder and a Shriner1 Specia- consideration and terms wi-- be arranged for members of the ,asonic Erder to H>sic?F shou-d be "who"I wish to ta#e a course14 4,AT*5,AT 6AL .E;,NLA .E; ,A;B5T P;53 6T E'S! Time 6yc-es Te-- the Trend of 6ommodities/ Stoc#s and 7usiness/4 >undated but pub-ished after ,ay )9/ )9(%?/ p1 )%1

50

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

Appendix

The Predi!ti&e Power of Numbers


0n his course 5.aster 6harts)7 Gann states em!haticall/: 4111 numbers do determine everything in the future 1114 %( Lnce again) ancients: e find Gann to 'e follo ing the teachings of the

Ages -ong ago men rec#oned the cyc-es of nature by numbers/ and numbers became symbo-s of natura- -aw and of spiritua- idea-s manifested in nature1%+ That events move in cyc-es and are ru-ed by numbers/ was once firm-y be-ieved in the o-d days of astro-ogers1 %7 111Themistius) and Boethius) and A"errois the Ba'ilonian/ together with 1lato) do so exto-- numbers/ that they thin# no man can be a true Phi-osopher without them1 'ow they spea# of a rationa--/ and forma-number/ not of a materia--/ sensib-e/ or voca--/ the number of ,erchants buying/ and se--ing/ of which the 1/thagoreans/ and 1latonists/ and our Austin HAugustineI ma#e no rec#oning/ but app-y it to the proportion resu-ting from it/ which number they ca-- natura--/ rationa--/ and forma--/ from which great mysteries f-ow/ as we-- in natura--/ as divine/ and heaven-y things1 7y it is there a way made for the searching out/ and understanding of a-- things #nowab-e1 7y it the next access to natura-- prophesying is had! and the A''ot ;oachim Hof .ioreI proceeded no other way in his Prophecies/ but by forma-- numbers1%0
21 31 Gann/ 4,aster 6harts4 >second part? p1 W( ,161 *erman Gay-ord 2ood/ 0deal .etrolog/ in -ature) Art) ?eligion and Histor/ >se-fK pub-ished/ )9&0?/ p1 ))1 47 6har-es ,c6-e--an Stevans/ 6ora Linn >,orrison? 3anie-s/ editors/ 2nc/clo!aedia of *u!erstitions) +olklore) and the Lccult *ciences of the #orld Vo-1 >:1 *1 Mewda-e U Sons 6o1/ )9&3?/ p1 )+391 %0 *enry 6orne-ius Agrippa/ The *econd Book of Lccult 1hiloso!h/) or .agick / 6hapter 1 The founder of Theosophy commented/ centuries -ater! 4A-- beings/ from the first divine
45 46

51

W. D. Gann on

*ebrew thought/ even in its c-assic times/ fo--owed the fundamenta- princip-e of ancient phi-osophy/ that the mystery of the wor-d -ay concea-ed in number/ whi-st modern science/ occupied in the ana-ysis of bodies/ derives the -ife in the wor-d from the properties of things1 The gaJe of anti$uity was directed rather to the superficiaaspect of things/ and what especia--y caught the eye was/ that things were thus measured off/ divided and counted1 %9 The re-ativity of things appeared to it to be the ground of the cosmic arrangement1 The wor-d consists of a sum of magnitudes/ and in the mysterious re-ation of the magnitudes to one another was sought the ground of their arrangement and conformity to Law1 7ut re-ation is a-ways a re-ation of magnitude/ i1e1 number1 As we now exp-ain the operations of the wor-d from our conception of <force/= <property/= so the ancient wor-d exp-ained them from that of <number1= The harmony of numbers was the wor-d"s mystery/ and the mathematica- re-ations of each thing were the ground and essence of its nature1 The universe rests upon one great hidden system of numbers/ and the separate bodies rest upon the combination and configuration of the separate numbers1 Npon the ground of this idea of the nature of numbers rested a-so the significance of the separate numbers1 The most important and sacred number was even in ancient times that of seven 111(&
emanation/ or "God manifested/" down to the -owest atomic existence/ "have their particu-ar number which distinguishes each of them and becomes the source of their attributes and $ua-ities as of their destiny1" 6hance/ as taught by 6orne-ius Agrippa/ is in rea-ity on-y an un#nown progressionF and time but a succession of numbers1 *ence/ futurity being a compound of chance and time/ these are made to serve Eccu-t ca-cu-ations in order to find the resu-t of an event/ or the future of one"s destiny14 *1 P1 7-avats#y/ The *ecret Doctrine: The */nthesis of *cience) ?eligion) and 1hiloso!h/ Vo-1 >The Theosophica- Pub-ishing Society/ )097?/ p1 )&)1 %9 H.ootnote in the origina- text!I 4Thou hast ordered a-- things in measure and number and weight/4 says the 2isdom of So-omon/ xi1 8&/ where we shou-d say/ Thou hast p-aced a-- these forces in things1 So 5cc-esiasticus xvi1 8+ ! 4The wor#s of the Lord are done in @udgment from the beginningF and from the time he made them he disposed the parts thereof1 *e disposed his wor#s upon every side/ and the chief of them unto a-generations14 6ompare a-so saiah x-1 )8! 42ho hath measured the waters in the ho--ow of his hand/ and meted our heaven with the span/ and comprehended the dust of the earth in a measure/ and weighed the mountains in sca-es/ and the hi--s in a ba-ance D4 50 Ado-f *ausrath/ A Histor/ of the -e Testament Times Vo-1 >2i--iams and 'orgate/ )070?/ pp1 ))7K))01

52

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

The follo ing e%cer!ts from *e!harial4s ritings sho his li"el/ interest in the use of num'ers for !redicti"e !ur!oses and his a!!arent familiarit/ the techniCues in"ol"ed: f/ as Pythagoras said! 4The wor-d is "bui-t upon the power of numbers/4 then numbers must be the #ey to the understanding of the wor-d1 That many remar#ab-e prophecies have been/ and can be/ made by means of numbers is certain/ and both 'ostradamus and -"AbbX Goachim H:oachim of .ioreI made use of them for this purpose1 () ,y ob@ect is not to formu-ate a system/ but to show affinity of numbers and the wor#ing of a -aw of numerica- ratios in matters ordinari-y re-egated to the domain of 6hance1 This can a-ways and most certain-y be done/ but not in a boo# intended for pub-ic circu-ation1 *ere it is on-y possib-e to give hints that are va-uab-e in proportion to the inte--igence and interest of the reader1(8 Some years ago pub-ished a curious Baba-a #nown as 4The Secret Progression/4 by which numbers in -otteries and other affairs apparent-y governed by chance might by di-igence be discovered1 There was at one time a circ-e of occu-tists who had their headK$uarters in a certain p-ace in ta-y1 Prominent among the members of this fraternity was Giuseppe 7a-samo/ 6omte di 6ag-iostro whose wea-th >ac$uired none #new how? not -ess than his -earning/ was the marve- of a-- with whom he had re-ations1 .or a short time he daJJ-ed the 6ourts of 5urope/ and disappeared with the suddenness of a meteor1 t has been said that he died in prison by poisoning/ but am not now concerned with his history1 *e was at a-- events a past master in the magic of 'umbers/ as is evident from the fact that on three separate occasions he gave ,adame de -a ,otte the winning number in the Paris -otteries1 7y the Baba-a of the Secret Progression it is possib-e/ when a series of numbers is #nown/ to determine the next1 (3
() Sepharia-/ ,a'ala of -um'ers/ Part / pp/ 8(K8+1 (8 Sepharia-/ ,a'ala of -um'ers/ Part / p1 )(81 (3 Sepharia-/ A .anual of Lccultism/ p1 )001

53

W. D. Gann on

The on-y possib-e means outside of the Secret Progression/ which is a #aba-istic expression of the cyc-ic -aw in numerica- se$uences/ by which one may determine the forthcoming numbers in a -ottery/ is by reference to their gravities/ as indicated by the horary e$uiva-ents of the disposing factors at the time of the drawing/ and this method is not to be understood by those who have had no preparation in astronomicastudies1 Sufficient/ however/ has been said in this p-ace to indicate the existence of a numerica- se$uence by which we may argue from coincidence to -aw1(% sha-- A attempt the demonstration of a numerica- -aw of se$uence in regard to mundane events 111 Ta#e/ for instance/ the common experience of winning numbers in -otteries1 Ene wou-d not thin# that there are any -aws governing these apparent-y chance resu-ts/ or the name of any raceKhorse which wins at a given time on any date1 f you imagine for a moment that these things are the resu-t of mere chance as distinguished from -aw/ can te-- you at once that you are entire-y wrong1 'othing happens by chance in a universe that is governed by -aw1 Mou may cover up your ignorance of that -aw by a -abe- with a name on it/ but that wi-- not prevent the -aw from determining the event @ust as it is bound to happen/ nor prevent those who understand the -aw from predicting the nature of the event1 111 *undreds of instances might have been given to show that this -aw of vibratory se$uence is not on-y direct-y -in#ed up with p-anetary se$uences KK the order of the p-anets being a-ways that of their re-ative apparent motions KK but that the se$uence is e$ua--y expressed in tone/ co-our/ and number1 111 Those who be-ieve in <-uc#= wi-- do we-- in the -ight of these pages to reform their notions and change their -abe-s so as to inc-ude the estab-ished fact of numerica- se$uence and the -aw of periodicity in a
(% Sepharia-/ ,a'ala of -um'ers/ Part / p1 )(31

54

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

universe that is a-- -ife and vibration/ where nothing of chance can set its foot/ and where <-uc#= is on-y another name for persona- resonance or response to the cease-ess interp-ay of cosmic forces1 Those who have patient-y studied the various aspects of this great -aw of 'umerica- Se$uence in dai-y -ife wi-- improve their #now-edge immense-y by the study of my <Arcana/= which finds its pub-ic on-y by persona- re$uest and by private circu-ation under a binding agreement1((

(( Sepharia-/ +ortune Telling '/ -um'ers: Being an 0ntroduction to the Art of the ,a'alists / pp1 9/ (%K((/ (7/ +&1

55

W. D. Gann on

Appendix

1armoni!s
Harmonics is an area of Gann stud/ to hich he refers '/ name rarel/$ He s!eaks of it in the Ticker 0nter"ie and in his no"el The TunneThru the Air$ 0n the Ticker 0nter"ie ) Gann sa/s: have found that in the stoc# itse-f exists its harmonic or inharmonic re-ationship to the driving power or force behind it1 The secret of a-- its activity is therefore apparent1 A 5verything in existence is based on exact proportion and perfect re-ationship1 There is no chance in nature/ because mathematica- princip-es of the highest order -ie at the foundation of a-- things1 (+ Gann adds) in The Tunne- Thru the Air! 111the cyc-e theory/ or harmonic ana-ysis/ is the on-y thing that we can re-y upon to ascertain the future1(7 These "er/ 'old and inclusi"e comments @the 5secret of all its Oa stock4sP acti"it/7I 5the onl/ thing e can rel/ u!on to ascertain the future7A suggest that harmonics is indeed a su'Fect of some moment in Gann theor/$ 0t is interesting to look once again at ho these things: the ancients thought of

Among the ancient 6ha-deans/ 5gyptians/ and *ebrews/ science and re-igion were forma-iJed by mystica- numbers and symbo-s/ which were inte--igib-e on-y to the initiated1 They -ay at the basis of the 5gyptian mysteries1 They entered into the prophecies and formaworship of the :ewsF they were taught in the phi-osophica- systems of
(+ ;ichard 31 2yc#off/ <2i--iam 31 Gann! An Eperator 2hose Science and Abi-ity P-ace *im in the .ront ;an# C *is ;emar#ab-e Predictions and Trading ;ecord/= The Tic#er and nvestment 3igest/ 3ecember )9&9/ p1 (31 (7 Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ p1 771

56

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

Pythagoras/ P-ato/ Aristote-es/ Aristoxenes/ 6icero/ and P-otinus1 The creation and operation of the universe/ the -aws of astronomy/ the character of the e-ements were founded upon them1 They entered into a-- the theories of art1 n music/ which is the most idea- of the arts/ and the on-y one which has been reduced to science/ they had their most perfect expression! whi-e in the other arts/ the -aws of symmetry and proportion were a-ways assumed to be abso-ute/ not re-ative/ and susceptib-e of exact geometrica- and numerica- statement1(0 Gann) in a comment in a 'rief essa/ of his) echoes this "ie : >$$$ an/thing that can 'e !ro"ed in an/ a/ or '/ an/ science is not correct unless it can 'e !ro"ed '/ num'ers and '/ geometr/$> H9 1ro!ortion as an o'session among medie"al thinkers) their ideas from the ancients$E0 ho deri"ed

The term arithmetic Hduring the twe-fth and the first ha-f of the
(0 2i--iam 2etmore Story/ The 1ro!ortions of the Human +igure) According to a -e 6anon) for 1ractical Dse/ p1 %&1 (9 Gann/ <The *uman 7ody/= a oneKpage essay dated :an1 )7/ )93)1 +& n the ,idd-e Ages/ many thin#ers sought out the teachings of the ancients/ @ust as Gann did in his day/ specifica--y on the issue of proportions1 Proportions were on the minds of the cathedra- bui-ders >as seen in Etto Georg Von Simson/ The Gothic 6athedral/ Princeton Nniversity Press/ )900/ and Son@a N-ri#e B-ug/ Gotico *egreto: sa!ienMa occulta nella cattedrale/ 5diJioni Ar#eios/ 8&&3?1 They were found in the textboo#s of 7oethius on music and arithmetic used throughout medieva- times >,ichae- ,asi/ Boethian -um'er Theor/: A Translation of the 3e nstitutione Arithmetica/ ;idopi/ )903/ is a modern trans-ation of one of these boo#s?1 7oethius got many of his ideas from 'icomachus of Gerasa/ an ancient Gree# who a-so wrote treatises on music and arithmetic >.-ora ;1 Levin/ The .anual of Harmonics of -icomachus the 1/thagorean) Phanes Press/ )90%/ is a modern trans-ation of one of these boo#s?1 Ene scho-ar who trans-ated count-ess texts by the ancients even wrote a boo# on the o-d way of -oo#ing at numbers >Thomas Tay-or/ Theoretic Arithmetic/ se-fKpub-ished/ )0)+?1 The boo#s of 7oethius were used as textboo#s in two of the four discip-ines contained in the Ruadrivium of medieva- universities >S1 B1 *eninger"s Touches of * eet Harmon/: 1/thagorean 6osmolog/ and ?enaissance 1oetics / *untington Library/ )97%/ inc-udes an exce--ent treatment of this curricu-um?1 n their spare time/ students cou-d be app-ying the number re-ationships taught by 7oethius whi-e at p-ay >Ann 51 ,oyer/ The 1hiloso!hers4 Game: ?ithmomachia in .edie"al and ?enaissance 2uro!e/ The Nniversity of ,ichigan Press/ 8&&)?1 5ven as -ate as the ;enaissance/ architects wor#ed according to harmonic proportions dictated by the ancients >an outstanding reference is ;udo-f 2itt#ower/ Architectural 1rinci!les in the Age of Humanism/ 21 21 'orton U 6o1/ )97)?1

57

W. D. Gann on

thirteenth centuryI was used in the Gree# sense/ and meant the study of the properties of numbersF and particu-ar-y of ratio/ proportion/ fractions/ and po-ygona- numbers1 t did not inc-ude the art of practicaca-cu-ation/ which was genera--y performed on an abacusF and though symbo-s were emp-oyed to express the resu-t of any numericacomputation they were not used in determining it1 +) The writings of ,acrobius/ 6ape--a/ 6assiodorus/ and 7oethius 111 -ost sight of the practica- needs of the times/ and returned to the study of the theory of proportions as deve-oped by the aid of arithmetic and geometry1 5ven the pious 7oethius/ in his -abored wor#/ de .usica/ does not once refer either to the use of instruments/ to the voice as used in the singing of the sanctuary/ or to any practica- app-ication of his abstruse specu-ations1 *e was a c-ose adherent of the Pythagorean theory/ that consonances or harmonies are to be determined by mathematica- ratios and not by the ear1+8 0t is note orth/ that Gann) in all his for !raise: 2$ H$ Harriman$ ritings) singles out one trader

0n the Ticker inter"ie he sa/s 5.r$ Harriman orked strictl/ in accordance ith natural la 7I 'ut in The Tunne- Thru the Air he tells us Cuit directl/ that Harriman4s trades 5conform closel/ to the la of harmonic anal/sis7$ Here) again) is hat Gann sa/s a'out Harriman in the Ticker inter"ie : 4 have incidenta--y examined the manipu-ations of :ay Gou-d/ 3anie- 3rew/ 6ommodore Vanderbi-t/ and a-- the other important 2a-Street manipu-ators from that time to the present day1 have examined every $uotation of Nnion Pacific prior to and from the time of 51 *1 *arriman"s securing contro-/ and can say that of a-- the manipu-ations in the history of 2a-- Street/ ,r1 *arriman"s was the most master-y1 The figures show that/ whether unconscious-y or not/ ,r1 *arriman wor#ed
2a-ter 2i--iam ;ouse 7a--/ A Histor/ of the *tud/ of .athematics at 6am'ridge >6ambridge Nniversity Press/ )009?/ p1 81 62 6har-es 2es-ey 7ennett/ 6hristian Archaeolog/ >Phi-ips U *unt/ )000?/ p1 3)&1
61

58

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

strict-y in accordance with natura- -aw14+3 0n The Tunnel Thru the Air) hich is the onl/ !lace in his ritings that Gann re"isits the stor/ of Harriman) the hero ?o'ert Gordon asks >an old man '/ the name of Henr/ #atson ho as a "eteran of #all *treet) no o"er =0 /ears of age)> a'out ho to 'e successful in the markets$ <*as any man ever made a -arge fortune out of 2a-- Street and #ept it/ ,r1 2atsonD= <Eh/ yes/= he rep-ied/ <if there were not exceptions to the ru-e/ business wou-d not continue to run1 cou-d te-- you of doJens of them/ but one stri#ing examp-e is that of the -ate 51 *1 *arriman who died worth about three hundred mi--ion do--ars1 *e had probab-y made out of the mar#et a hundred mi--ion do--ars in the -ast three or four years of his -ife1= ;obert as#ed/ <*ow did he do itD= ,r1 2atson answered/ <*e stuc# to one c-ass of stoc#s C rai-roads1 *e studied them day and night/ never diverted his attention to other -ines1 be-ieve that he possessed some mathematica- method +% which enab-ed him to forecast stoc#s many months and years in advance1 have gone over his manipu-ations and the stoc#s he traded in/ and found that they conform c-ose-y to the -aw of harmonic ana-ysis1 *e certain-y #new something about time and season because he bought at the right time and so-d at the right time1H=I+( Lnl/ a fe /ears after Gann ga"e the Ticker inter"ie ) a 'ook '/ *amuel 6olman) a noted artist of the Hudson ?i"er *chool) as !u'lished entitled 'ature"s *armonic Nnity! A Treatise on its ;e-ation to Proportiona- .orm1 As might 'e e%!ected in a 'ook '/ an artist riting on this su'Fect) illustrations a'ound on hich circles) sCuares) triangles) and "arious lines at certain angles ha"e 'een dra n in order to illustrate harmonic !rinci!les in action$
+3 ;ichard 31 2yc#off/ <2i--iam 31 Gann! An Eperator 2hose Science and Abi-ity P-ace *im in the .ront ;an# C *is ;emar#ab-e Predictions and Trading ;ecord/= The Tic#er and nvestment 3igest/ 3ecember )9&9/ p (81 +% Gann said ear-ier in the boo#/ 4,y ca-cu-ations are based on the cyc-e theory and on mathematica- se$uences1 *istory repeats itse-f1 111 ,y authority for stating that the future is but a repetition of the past is found in the 7ib-e14 Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air >.inancia- Guardian Pub-ishing 6o1/ )987?/ p1 7(1 +( Gann/ The Tunnel Thru the Air) pp1 8&&/ 8&%K8&(1

59

W. D. Gann on

0n the o!ening !aragra!h of the !reface) 6olman states: ,any years ago became profound-y interested in the study of the -aws governing proportiona- form/ both in 'ature and in the arts and sciences/ and the further these investigations were pursued the firmer became the conviction that the -aws of proportion/ as exemp-ified in 'ature/ were start-ing-y uniform/ whatever might be the comp-exity of the app-ication1 n the course of these investigations covering a vast number of 'ature"s forms and phenomena/ and of the -aws governing proportiona- form/ the crysta- was found to be their most perfect interpreter/ but in the f-ower/ the she--/ and many other forms of varying origin or organism/ the same constructive princip-es were recogniJed/ and these it wi-- be my endeavor in this wor# to exp-ain1 As these princip-es are the fundamenta- e-ements by which 'ature creates harmony/ corre-ating the parts of her formKcompositions into a perfect who-e/ they must be of interest to the student of beauty and of use to the professiona- artist1 ,any of these -aws were un$uestionab-y among the va-ued and guarded secrets of the ,asonic Erder and of the ancient gui-ds/ and as time went on were/ unfortunate-y/ guarded not wise-y but so we-- that for generations they have been -ost to the use not on-y of the wor-d/ but to those very architects and masons who most treasured them as we--1 +urther on) in the second cha!ter) as if to enlarge u!on the ideas of ;ohn -e lands concerning the !eriodic ta'le in chemistr/) 6olman adds: A a system of "octaves" c-ose-y corresponding to the theory of music 111 is the basic e-ement of a-- growth in 'ature A ++

++ Samue- 6o-man/ -ature4s Harmonic Dnit/: A Treatise on its ?elation to 1ro!ortional +orm >G1 P1 Putnam"s Sons/ )9)8?/ pp1 v/ )31 See 6hapter Seven of P1 31 Euspens#y/ 0n *earch of the .iraculous/ for a further discussion of 4the -aw of octaves4 g-eaned from his studies with ;ussian esotericist George Gurd@ieff1

60

THE LAW OF VIBRATION

Appendix V

GANN A 2ASTER ASTROLOGER A2ONG 2ASTERS

mage of the cover of an issue of The Astro-ogica- 7u--etina

61