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Arnold & Son Catalogue 2013 / 2014

Content
INTRODUCTION .............................................................. 3 HISTORY ........................................................................... 4 John Arnold ................................................................. 6 At the court of King George III ........................................ 8 To the applause of his fellow-citizens ............................. 10 Arnold and Breguet ............................................................ 12 The East India Company .................................................. 14 History timeline .......................................................... 16 MANUFACTURE .............................................................. 20 MTIERS DART .............................................................. 26 ARNOLD & SON COLLECTIONS ................................ 32 ROYAL COLLECTION ................................................. 36 TB88 ............................................................................ 42 TE8 .............................................................................. 52 TE8 Mtiers d'Art I ....................................................... 6 0 HM Perpetual Moon ..................................................... 66 HMS1 ........................................................................... 76 HMS1 Royal Blue .......................................................... 86 HMS1 Dragon ............................................................... 88 HMS Victory Set............................................................ 9 0 HMS Lady..................................................................... 92 Hornet World Timer Skeleton ........................................ 98 INSTRUMENT COLLECTION ..................................... 102 DBS .............................................................................. 1 08 DBG ............................................................................. 114 UTTE ........................................................................... 1 20 Time Pyramid ............................................................... 1 28 TBR .............................................................................. 1 34 TB Victory .................................................................... 1 40 East India Company Set .............................................. 1 44 CALIBRES OVERVIEW .............................................. 1 50

CONTENT 1

Dear Reader
Arnold & Sons will celebrate its 250 th anniversary in 2014 and launch different special editions to commemorate this important event and pay tribute to the achievements of John Arnold and his son. In retrospect, it is clear that John Arnold was one of the greatest watchmakers who ever lived and that he, together with Abraham-Louis Breguet, largely invented the modern mechanical watch. From the outset, the brand combined traditional watchmaking skills with innovative air. Today, our watchmakers uphold that heritage, creating complicated, original movements with state-of-the-art technologies and materials to produce exquisitely crafted timepieces. Based on the history of Arnold & Son our range is divided into two distinct segments: the Royal Collection and the Instrument Collection. The Royal Collection is a reection of elegance and sophistication in the inimitable English style, and has been extended to include several new models. It was inspired by and pays tribute to the timepieces made by John Arnold for King George III and members of the royal court. The Instrument Collection, on the other hand, was inspired by the timepieces developed when John Arnold and his son Roger focused on chronometry and helped solve the problem of determining longitude at sea. So successful were they that Arnold & Son became principal suppliers of marine chronometers to the British Royal Navy. All these achievements are reected in our unending quest to create exceptional timepieces that are true to the brands heritage and meet the needs and expectations of discerning watch lovers the world over. For this reason we are delighted to welcome you to the world of Arnold & Son and proudly invite you to browse this latest edition of our annual catalogue.

Philippe Boven Arnold & Son SA

INTRODUCTION 3

H I S T O R Y
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John Arnold

John Arnold A finger on the pulse of his time

John Arnold was born in Cornwall in 1736. His father was a watchmaker and his uncle a gunsmith, which probably explains his early interest in precision engineering and metalwork. A talented craftsman and scholar, he left England for the Netherlands at the age of 19 after completing his apprenticeship to hone his watchmaking skills. He returned two years later speaking excellent German, which stood him in good stead later at the court of King George III, and had established himself as a watch maker of repute in Londons Strand by his mid-twenties. After Arnold presented the smallest repeating watch ever made to King George III and to the court, he rapidly acquired a wealthy clientele. He was one of the most

 T he Trustees of the British Museum

 National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, UK

 Christies Bridgeman Giraudon

John Arnold, half-quarter repeater, gold John Arnold, pocket chronometer, and enamel cased cylinder pocket watch, No. 1/36, London, 1778 No. 253, London, 1775

John Roger Arnold, spring detent pocket chronometer, No. 1818, London, 1801

inventive watchmakers of his day and held patents for a detent escapement, bimetallic balance, helical balance spring and overcoil balance spring. Arnolds No. 36 was the rst timepiece to be called a chronometer, a term reserved for unusually precise watches to this day. Arnold also played a central role in the events of his day. Along with other watchmakers, he addressed the problem of determining longitude, and won several grants and awards offered by the British Parliament. He enjoyed such respect in his profession that he became a close friend of AbrahamLouis Breguet. They exchanged ideas and even entrusted their sons to each other for their apprenticeships.

This is a story worth telling. Starting with this catalogue, we shall look at some of the achievements that assured John Arnold and his son of their place in watchmaking history. Following with the stories, we shall read how his timepieces accompanied famous explorers on their voyages of discovery, helped the East India Company establish its empire and how Napoleon Bonaparte himself presented an Arnold clock to the Observatory of Milan in 1802. For more about Arnold and his son, a complete col lection of these stories can be found on our website at www.arnoldandson.com.

HISTORY 7

At the court of King GeorgeIII

King George III

Anne, Queen of Great Britain, who died in 1714, left no Protestant heir apparent to the throne, as stipulated in the English Act of Settlement of 1701. As a result, advisers resorted to the Queens family tree and George, princeelector of Hanover, succeeded her as monarch. GeorgeI and his wife spoke only German. Their son, George Augustus, who became GeorgeII of Great Britain in 1727, was raised and married in Germany. In other words, when he died in 1760 and his grandson, George III, ascended the throne, German was the chief language spoken at the English court. GeorgeIII, no doubt aware that a monarch should respect the customs of his country, began to learn English. Nevertheless, in 1761 he married Duchess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who had been born and spent her life in Germany. Fortunately, John Arnold spoke German, a skill acquired when he moved to the Netherlands for two years at the age of 19. It certainly helped him in 1764, when he was summoned to meet the King and present him with an

exceptional timepiece. The meeting was a great success, as documented by this account: Arnold is also celebrated for the manufacture of the smallest repeating-watch ever known; it was made for his majesty George III, to whom it was presented on his birthday, the 4th of June 1764. Although less than six-tenths of an inch in diameter, it was perfect in all its parts, repeated the hours, quarters and half-quarters, and contained the rst ruby cylinder ever made. [...] The king was so much pleased with this rare specimen of mechanical skill, that he presented Mr. Arnold with 500 guineas; and the em per or of Russia afterwards offered Mr. Arnold 1000 guineas for a duplicate of it, which he declined. (1) The ruby cylinder found in this repeating watch was so remarkable that the King, himself a connoisseur of horology, asked Arnold to make him another so that he could admire it. After this favourable reception, John Arnolds career took off. He was renowned for his complicated watches, including minute repeaters and calendar watches, and a clientele

of rich European aristocrats thronged to his workshop on St. Jamess Street in London. He employed the citys best craftspeople: James and Mary Reasey of Soho supplied sumptuously decorated watch cases of enamel and gold guilloch, and James Drury of Islington made him gongs in the best alloys for his repeating watches. Despite this success, John Arnold was not content to manufacture beautiful watches alone. Encouraged by GeorgeIII himself, he set about solving the problem of calculating longitude using a chronometer and, from 1770 onwards, dedicated himself to this task entirely.

(1) R  eligious Tract Society (Great Britain), The Visitor or Monthly Instructor (London, 1847)

HISTORY 9

To the applause of his fellow-citizens

The Trustees of the British Museum

John Arnold, marine chronometer No. 12, London, 17781779

John Arnold rapidly established a reputation for outstanding mechanical expertise and was the first watchmaker to produce a jewelled ruby cylinder escapement. He showcased this in an exceptionally small half-quarter repeating watch mounted in a ring, which he offered to King George III. His growing fame attracted an afuent clientele. He could easily have lived comfortably, making exquisite repeating watches and calendar watches. But John Arnold was relentlessly driven by the greatest watchmaking challenge of his age: to build a timepiece that would enable ships to navigate safely, transform science and roll back the boundaries in astronomy. That challenge was precision, and Arnold made it his passion. Between 1770 and 1790, he painstakingly refined the art of watchmaking, introducing decisive improvements that heralded the arrival of chronometry. It is to him we owe a series of trailblazing inventions that included a detent escapement, a helical balance spring, terminal curves that make the helical balance spring isochronous, the first-ever use of gold for balance springs, and a range of bimetallic balances that offset errors caused by temperature fluctuations.

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Arnolds chronometers were used by some of the greatest explorers and navigators of his time on their epic voyages. His regulators and their continual renement bear witness to the colossal progress of science and astronomy across Europe. Arnold was also heir to a series of exceptional English watchmakers, each of whom advanced the art of watchmaking in his own way: George Graham, Thomas Tompion, Thomas Mudge and John Harrison. Arnold, however, was the rst to usher watchmaking into the modern era by designing highprecision, reliable watches that were also relatively easy to manufacture. In its report on Arnolds pocket chronometer No. 2 in 1780, the Board of Longitude had this to say: So far as this watch has been tried, it must be acknowledged by all, that it is superior to every one that had been made before it. Nothing therefore seems to remain but for Mr. Arnold to make other watches to entitle him to the second reward offered by Parliament for improvements in this branch of mechanics, and also to the universal approbation and applause of his fellow-citizens. (2)
(2) The Monthly Review or Literary Journal, vol. 58 (London, 1780)

HISTORY 11

Arnold and Breguet A tale of two watchmakers

The Trustees of the British Museum

John Arnold and A.-L. Breguet, silver cased chrono meter with tourbillon and spring-detent escapement, London, England, 1774 and Paris, France, 1808

Abraham-Louis Breguet left his native Switzerland for Paris at the age of 15 to pursue his dream of becoming a watchmaker. Unlike Arnold, whose only real teacher had been his father, Breguet was trained by two watchmakers who were exceptional in their own right: Ferdinand Berthoud and Jean-Antoine Lpine. When Breguet arrived in Paris in 1775 he, like Arnold in London, quickly attracted a wealthy clientele from all over Europe. His success was due mainly to his self-winding perpetual watches. One of his rst customers was the Kings cousin, the Duke of Orlans, a great connoisseur of horology and friend of John Arnold. It was he who arranged for the two great inventors to meet: The Duke of Orlans had given Arnold a watch designed by Breguet. Arnold was so stunned by its perfection that he made the spontaneous decision to travel to Paris to see the craftsman who had created it. Arnold arrived in Paris, where he received a tting welcome from our famous watchmaker. The art of watchmaking became all the richer for this relationship between two men whose meeting could be described as destiny. (3)

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So deep was their mutual respect that they entrusted the training of their sons to each other, John Roger spending two years as an apprentice in Paris and Breguets son, Antoine-Louis, doing his training in London under Arnold. The friendship between the two never waned. In 1789, Breguet went to London to visit Arnold. He wrote to his partner, Xavier Gide, telling him how much he enjoyed his discussions with the inventor of the helical balance spring. They even exchanged trade secrets, as this letter from Arnolds son, John Roger, to Breguet in 1796 reveals: If you want to make the metal for expansion you must take two parts of silver and one of zinc. Melt the silver thoroughly, and when it is melted add the zinc and dont forget to stir it with a stick. As to the hair-springs, it has been found that platinum is not satisfactory; there are impurities in it and it often breaks. Nowadays, only hair-springs made of gold are used. (4) John Arnolds death in 1799 affected Breguet profoundly. As a sign of his esteem, Breguet modied one of Arnolds pocket chronometers by adding the rst tourbillon escapement ever designed. Today, this exceptional watch, given

as a present to John Arnolds son in 1808, is a highlight of the British Museums collection in London, and bears the following inscription on a tiny plate in the movement:
1ER REGULATEUR A TOURBILLON DE BREGUET RUNI A UN DES PREMIERS OUVRAGES DARNOLD. HOMMAGE DE BREGUET, A LA MMOIRE RVRE DARNOLD, OFFERT A SON FILS AN 1808

The rst tourbillon regulator by Breguet incorporated in one of the rst works of Arnold. Breguets homage to the revered memory of Arnold. Presented to his son in 1808. (5)

The Trustees of the British Museum

(3) B  reguet, Emmanuel, Breguet: Watchmakers since 1775 [English trans. of Breguet: Horloger depuis 1775], ed. Alain de Gourcuff (Paris, 1997) (4) Le Globe, Journal littraire, vol. 3/1 (Paris, 24 December 1825) (5) Mercer, Vaudrey, John Arnold & Son, supplement (London, 1975)

HISTORY 13

The East India Company

National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, UK

Numerous commercial companies were founded in the 17th and 18th centuries in order to prot from trade expansion between Europe, the Americas, the Indian continent and China. However, none was as famous and as powerful as Great Britains Honourable East India Company. Established very early on, in 1600, it traded predominantly in spices, silk, cotton, tea and opium. Its power became so great that it eventually exercised military power and conquered vast territories, particularly in India, subsequently assuming administrative functions and organizing civil society. The strength of the East India Company lay, above all, in its fabulous ships, known as Indiamen. Ofcially, these exceptional boats were mighty trading ships, capable of transporting many passengers and large amounts of goods. However, they were also formidable, heavily armed war machines, able to resist attacks by pirates, so much so that the Royal Navy called on their services regularly. If the Indiamen had always enjoyed an edge over their competitors, it was also due to their having experienced sailors

East Indiamen in the China seas. Oil on canvas, painting by William John Huggins, 1820-1830

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and intrepid captains, who were keenly aware of the opportunities offered by the marine chronometer. Here are two examples of such individuals: Possessed of a good chronometer made by Arnold (No. 64), having great dependence on my instrument, and losing no opportunity of ascertaining our precise situation each noon by meridional double altitudes and lunar observations, day and night, I am in hopes that navigators, failing in my track, will nd in it but few errors. Captain Thomas Butler of the Walpole, on the subject of his voyage from the Cape of Good Hope to China in 1794. It is the most dangerous shoal I ever beheld, and the water is so very smooth, owing no doubt to its eastern extent, that a ship might be on the reef presently, and almost with the best look-out. I have ascertained the longitude of its northwest extreme by a very good Arnolds time-keeper, whose rate agrees with our lunar observations as nearly as possible. Captain Hogan on the Marquis Cornwallis, during his voyage to the New Hebrides in 1796.

The East India Company was dissolved in 1874. However, the Indiamen continued to plough the seas with their precious chronometers on board until the beginning of the 20th century.
Bibliography: Huddart, Joseph, Captain, The Oriental Navigator (London, 1801)

HISTORY 15

Arnold & Son A timeline

1736  John Arnold is born in Cornwall. At the age of 19,


after completing an apprenticeship as a watch-maker with his father, he leaves for the Netherlands, where he learns German.

1762  John Arnold opens his rst workshop, in Londons


Strand, and gains immediate recognition when he repairs a repeating watch owned by William McGuire, a renowned watch connoisseur.

1764  John Arnold makes a ring containing a half-quarter


repeater, which he presents to King George III, and instantly creates a wealthy clientele. This watch contains the rst ruby cylinder ever made and is, like the watch itself, unbelievably small.

1770  John Arnold presents his rst marine chronometer


to the Board of Longitude. Impressed by the watchs quality, the Board promptly awards him a grant of 200, the rst of many he is to receive.
Science Museum, Science & Society Picture Library

1771  Admiral Harland uses the rst Arnold chronometer


John Arnold and his son. Oil on canvas, painting by Robert Davy, 1775

on his voyage to Madagascar.

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1772  Arnolds No. 3 chronometer is aboard when Captain


Cook sets out on his second voyage to the Pacic.

1780  A n Arnold astronomical pendulum clock is installed


at the Observatory of Mannheim, Germany.

1773  Following the invention of a detent escapement and


other signicant design improvements, John Arnold builds his rst pocket chronometer (No. 8).

1780  T he Board of Longitude presents Arnolds chronometer No. 2, declaring it superior to any watch produced previously.

1773  Captain Phipps chooses an Arnold chronometer for


his voyage towards the North.

1782  John Arnold is granted patents for helical spring terminal curves, a spring detent and epicycloidal teeth.

1775  John Arnold is awarded patents for the helical spring


and an improvement to the bimetallic balance.

1788  An Arnold chronometer is used by George Robertson


to chart the China Sea.

1778  John Arnold creates a minor storm in precision


timekeeping with the Arnold No. 36. The time -piece reviewed at Greenwich is applauded for its precision. Following this success, Arnold advertises his achievement with a document in which he calls the timekeeper a chronometer, a term that subsequently became general currency and is still used to this day to denote a supremely accurate timepiece.

1792  John Roger Arnold studies in Paris for two years


under his fathers friend, Abraham-Louis Breguet.

1792  A rnolds No. 4 chronometer is the instrument of


choice for Captain George Vancouvers voyage to Americas west coast.

HISTORY 17

1794  A rnolds No. 64 chronometer accompanies Captain


Thomas Butler on his voyage to China.

1818  Two Arnold chronometers (Nos. 25 and 369) accompany Captain John Ross on his voyage to Bafn Bay.

1796  John Roger Arnold joins his fathers rm. Arnold &
Son quickly becomes the leading supplier of timepieces to the Royal Navy.

1820  John Roger Arnold is awarded a patent for his


keyless winding system.

1799  John Arnold dies. 1802  Napolon Bonaparte offers an Arnold astronomical
clock to the Milan Observatory.

1820  A rnolds No. 2109 chronometer goes with Captain


Edward Perry on his voyage toward the North Pole.

1821  John Roger Arnold receives a patent for the


U-type balance.

1806  Baron Von Krusenstern takes two Arnold chronometers (Nos. 128 and 1856) with him for his circumnavigation of the world.

1830  John Roger Arnold and Edward John Dent


(another London clockmaker) nalize a 10-year partnership contract.

1808  In reverent memory of John Arnold, Breguet presents his son, John Roger, with his first tourbillon escapement, mounted in one of Arnolds rst pocket chronometers. Today, this exceptional watch is a highlight of the British Museums collection in London, and bears a personal inscription.

1843  J ohn Roger Arnold dies and Arnold & Son is


repurchased by Charles Frodsham.

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1845  Sir John Franklin sets out with a crew of 130 to


chart the infamous Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. On board is an Arnold chronometer (No. 294). The expedition is a disaster and no one survives. Rediscovered over 150 years later, the chronometer has been disguised as a carriage clock to make it unrecognizable. How it found its way back to the UK remains one of the greatest mysteries of watchmaking.

1857  A rnold & Dents No. 4575 chronometer accompanies Dr David Livingstone on his expedition to South Africa.

Christies Bridgeman Giraudon

John Roger Arnold, mean and sidereal pocket chronometer with bimetallic Z balance, No. 2, London, 17961799

HISTORY 19

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M A N U F A C T U R E
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Manufacture Preserving a proud heritage

Arnold & Son belongs to a select group of watchmaking companies in Switzerland entitled to call themselves a manufacture, a French term reserved exclusively for watch manufacturers who develop and produce their own movements in-house. The brands prowess in the development and production of in-house movements is reected by an impressive collection of Arnold & Son calibres with a complete range of sophisticated complications. Some measure of its achievement can be found in the fact that at least two new movements have been launched each year: an exceptional achievement that puts Arnold & Son on the same level as some of the most dynamic manufactures in the watch industry.

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Every Arnold & Son movement has its own story to tell and reects the brands heritage. They range from the minuscule repeating watch presented to King George III that cemented the founders reputation, to the precise marine chronometers that made travel at sea so much less hazardous and put the British Empire on course to expansion. Unlike other watch manufacturers, who often use the same calibre for different models, Arnold & Son develops a new movement for every single model. Today, the brand maintains a product philosophy established well over 200 years ago, combining traditional, hand-nished crafts manship with state-of-the-art technology.

CNC machinery delivers the microscopic precision needed to guarantee the accuracy and quality that were always one of John Arnolds prime concerns.

MANUFACTURE 23

Arnold & Sons development and production facilities are located in La Chaux-de-Fonds, at the heart of the Swiss watchmaking industry, for the simple reason that this is the ideal place to ensure that Arnolds heritage lives on. It is home to the industrys most talented and experienced watchmakers and engineers, individuals whose pride and raison dtre lie in the production of high-quality precision watches that are among the very best available.

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MANUFACTURE 25

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M T I E R S

D A R T
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Decorative Arts Consummate craftsmanship at its creative best

John Arnold and, later, his son John Roger Arnold established towering reputations for the innovation and stateof-the-art technology that went into their timepieces. But from the start, the intricacy and exquisite workmanship of their movements was mirrored in the purely decorative elements of their timepieces. The foundations of John Arnolds reputation were laid when he presented his elaborately ornamented half-quarter repeater ring to King George III. Among his work were pocket watches with handengraved movements and champlev enamel cases. Even his marine chronometers had hand-engraved balance cocks with the oral motifs typical of the English style.

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True to its founder, Arnold & Son today carefully preserves and cultivates the skilled creative craftsmanship in the form of hand-nished engravings and miniature paintings that have been characteristic of the brand throughout its history. Today, the company has its own qualied hand-engravers, who specialize in a traditional art form involving the use of hardened steel tools called burins in combination with other special tools. These create cuts, lines and texturing that build up entire images, often with a breathtaking richness of detail, and are featured in several watches in the Royal and Instrument collections, either on the dial or as exquisite details on the movement

itself. Examples include the HMS Victory set featuring three scenes of the renowned HMS Victory battleship, the TE8, which has a spectacular entirely hand-engraved movement with unique motif, the HMS Lady, which has also an entirely hand-engraved movement with Englishstyle oral motifs and the UTTE in the Instrument collection with its hand-engraved tourbillon bridge.

MTIERS DART 29

Further evidence of the brands commitment to traditional craftsmanship is furnished by the delicate hand-nished miniature paintings featured on the East India Company set, where the miniatures stand out almost transparently against the mother-of-pearl background.

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MTIERS DART 31

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A R N O L D

&

S O N

C O L L E C T I O N S
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The Royal and Instrument Collections From classical horology for kings to absolute precision

John Arnolds professional life was divided into two distinct sections. But clearly dened as they were, several elements were common to both: a passion for sophistication and perfection in every timepiece he produced. These qualities are epitomized by a half-quarter repeater watch he presented as a gift to King George III in 1764. A mere 16 mm in diameter, with 120 separate parts and weighing no more than 7.6 grams in total, it was set in a ring and was the smallest of its kind ever made. The timepieces Arnold designed and manufactured during this phase of his life helped lay the foundations for the Golden Age of English watchmaking. Arnold established a style and tradition that have remained unique in the history of horology. That heritage is reected in the presentday Arnold & Son Royal Collection. The Royal Collection is a reference to the masterpieces with which Arnold initially made his name. These have evolved into a series of timepieces characterized by their unique English style: regal and sumptuous, boasting a discreet opulence offset by the elegance of a double-step bezel and lugs, gently owing contours and soft curves.

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The movements, often visible, have a multi-level design that adds an intriguing three-dimensional sensation of depth. Components are exquisitely decorated and hand-nished. John Arnolds reputation was such that he could have lived comfortably selling these unique, exceptional timepieces to a well-heeled clientele for the rest of his days. Contemporary events, however, took him down a different path. As the world opened up to exploration, the need for mariners to calculate longitude accurately had become a pressing problem. The British government offered the Longitude Prize to anyone who could provide a means of determining longitude reliably. It was clear that the answer lay in extremely precise and dependable chronometers. The stage was set for Arnold to put his expertise to the test and develop mechanisms that would satisfy this need. After deciding to forgo the lucrative business to be had at court, Arnold devoted his life to chronometry and embarked upon a period that showcased his originality and ingenuity. He nally revolutionized precision timekeeping with breakthrough inventions in the form of several bimetallic, temperature-compensated balances,

the spring detent escapement, the helical spring and the terminal overcoil curve. His products and the technical renements that came with each new model would have been as eagerly awaited by his customers in the 18th century as are those of the more iconic brands of our own day. The results of his labours were chronometers of breathtaking precision that were found on the ships of the Royal Navy and many explorers, and are reected today in the Instrument Collection from Arnold & Son. With their complex movements, rened dials and slim, elegant bezels, they reference the chronometers that helped roll back the boundaries in navigation, science and astronomy. The time display is off-centre and the greater part of the dial given over to a complication, such as a true beat seconds or retrograde date. Future models in this line will spotlight a variety of different complications and appeal to a discerning group of connoisseurs.

COLLECTIONS 35

36

R O Y A L

C O L L E C T I O N
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Royal Collection Classical timepieces in the great English tradition

Given the dominance of Swiss watchmaking in modern times, it is difcult to imagine an age when another horological culture and tradition held sway in Europe. The late 18th century, however, was an age when English watchmaking reigned supreme. The countrys watchmakers developed an aesthetic entirely of their own, dictated partly by contemporary taste but also by their desire to roll back the boundaries of a eld that combined art, tradition and technology like no other. John Arnold and his son played an inuential role in the directions taken by English watchmaking. They combined a nely developed aesthetic sense with an ability to nd solutions to technological problems, crafting magnicent movements and designs with cutting-edge mechanical features that garnered several major patents, which changed the course of horology.

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Historical Inspiration: John chronom eter, signed Arnold

Arnold,

marine

Historical Inspiration: Arnold & Dent, No. 4229, London, 1833, bridges cut straight, in classic English design

Royal Collection: TB88, detail of the manufacture calibre A&S5003, signed Arnold & Son

Royal Collection: TB88, detail of the manufacture calibre A&S5003, bridges design inspired by historical English design

ROYAL COLLECTION 39

Historical Inspiration: Arnold, Charles Frodsham, No. 8623, London, 1855. Classic three-quarter barrel bridge with large wave-shaped cut-out

Historical Inspiration: Arnold & Son, pocketchronometer, detail of the classic pocket watch case design

Royal Collection: TE8 Tourbillon, detail of the manufacture calibre A&S8000 designed with the classic three-quarter barrel bridge with large wave-shaped cut-out

Royal Collection: TB88, detail of the baroque voluptuous case design which characterizes the Royal Collection, inspired from the Arnold & Son pocket watch case design

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Today, Arnold & Son is proud to draw on and maintain that unique heritage. The models in the Royal Collection reect many of the features that made the original companys name. The TB88, for example, demonstrates Arnold & Sons ongoing quest for state-of-the-art technology and clearly reects the inuence of English horological heritage. With its true beat (TB) complication and the symmetrical arrangement of twin barrels, balance wheel and seconds display, it is beautifully balanced and unites many of the technical and aesthetic qualities associated with the brands heritage. The other members of the Royal Collection are just as impressive. The deceptively simple lines of the HMS1, for example, house an ultra-slim hand-wound movement with twin barrels that generate a power reserve of more than 90 hours. HMS Lady retains the same elegant proportions as the larger version because the movement is so precisely scaled down. Another member of the HMS Family, HMS Victory Set, a fabulous special edition set featuring three different beautifully sculpted three-dimensional views of the vessel, showcases the brands ability to replicate John and John Roger Arnolds prowess in the decorative arts.

Other Royal models, like the TE8 another example of trailblazing technology are tted with complications such as a tourbillon escapement (TE), or as in the case of the Hornet World Timer, a wealth of complex indications including equation of time and true solar time, together with big date, month and multiple time zone displays. With one of the biggest moonphase apertures on the market, the sophisticated HM Perpetual Moon is also a superb example of Arnold & Sons technical and artistic excellence. It surprises and delights with its uniquely precise and three-dimensional representation of the moon. Common to them all, however, is traditional craftsmanship, as evidenced by the hand-nished and embellished movements, combined with outstanding technical features and the opulent design of the Royal Collection.

ROYAL COLLECTION 41

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T B 8 8
ROYAL COLLECTION 43

TB88 An English-style ships chronometer designed for the wrist

John Arnold was an exceptional watchmaker who had several major patents to his name and created a minor storm in precision timekeeping with the Arnold No. 36. This was the rst-ever watch referred to as a chronometer, a term used to this day to denote a supremely accurate timepiece. The TB88 is compelling proof that the brand has lost none of its appetite for innovative technology or precision timekeeping, all encompassed in distinctive English design for the Royal Collection. The hand-wound, 32-jewel A&S5003 calibre unites all the technical and aesthetic characteristics of a classical Arnold chronometer. The letters TB stand for true beat, a complication that stands for superlative accuracy and permits the precision timekeeping required for navigation at sea. Unlike a conventional mechanical watch, a movement equipped with a true beat (or dead beat) seconds complication measures out time in complete one-second steps rather than the fractions determined by the balance frequency. This enables a navigator to determine the exact time and, consequently, his longitude.

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The TB88 is also a tribute to John Arnolds earliest known pocket watch, of which the original case bears the number 88. The number is replicated by the design of the movement in this latest model, with its perfectly symmetrical layout featuring the twin barrels at the top, the balance wheel between 4 and 5 oclock and the true beat seconds indicator between 7 and 8 o'clock. The watch movement is partly inverted, which means that most of the intricate, technically interesting features are visible on the dial side of the movement instead of being hidden away on the reverse. This showcases the two barrels, which generate a power reserve of over 100 hours when fully wound, and the Breguet overcoil balance spring. Bending and tting the spring by hand is a delicate and highly skilled operation mastered by a precious few watchmakers. As for the complex true beat seconds mechanism, it is visible on the reverse of the movement, ensuring that both sides of the movement offer a unique technical view. But the feature that unquestionably sets Arnold & Sons TB88 apart is its unique English design, as expressed through features like the straight-cut bridges. Each of the

pivoting elements in the movement is mounted on its own bridge, 16 in total. Further shining examples of watchmaking at its nest are the hand-bevelled and polished edges of all bridges and all steel components. The TB88 from Arnold & Son is housed in either a stainless steel or rose gold case measuring 46 millimetres in diameter, with a hand-stitched alligator strap. Water-resistant to 30 metres, it features a cambered sapphire crystal with anti-reective coatings and a see through sapphire case back. Manufactured entirely in-house, the TB88 is a scintillating combination of classical styling and leadingedge technology.

ROYAL COLLECTION 45

A&S5003
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 32 jewels Diameter: 37.8 mm Thickness: 5.9 mm Power reserve: 100 h, two barrels 18000 vibrations/h Breguet spring Functions: hours, minutes, true beat seconds at 8 oclock Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, black ruthenium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges and brushed surfaces, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

46

REF. 1TBAP.B01A.C113A

TB88
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: black open dial Case diameter: 46 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 47

A&S5003
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 32 jewels Diameter: 37.8 mm Thickness: 5.9 mm Power reserve: 100 h, two barrels 18000 vibrations/h Breguet spring Functions: hours, minutes, true beat seconds at 8 oclock Movement decoration: nickelsilver movement, palladium treated bridges and NAC grey treated main plate with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges and brushed surfaces, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

48

REF. 1TBAP.S01A.C113A

TB88
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: black open dial Case diameter: 46 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 49

A&S5003
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 32 jewels Diameter: 37.8 mm Thickness: 5.9 mm Power reserve: 100 h, two barrels 18000 vibrations/h Breguet spring Functions: hours, minutes, true beat seconds at 8 oclock Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, NAC grey treated bridges and black ruthenium treated main plate with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges and brushed surfaces, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

50

REF. 1TBAS.B01A.C113S

TB88
Case material: stainless steel Dial colour: black open dial Case diameter: 46 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 51

52

T E 8
ROYAL COLLECTION 53

TE8 Tourbillon An inspired masterpiece fit for a king

The invention of the tourbillon in 1801 is attributed to John Arnolds close friend and fellow watchmaker, AbrahamLouis Breguet, but there is evidence to suggest that Arnold played more than a small role in its development. Some indication of the close professional relationship that existed between them and of Arnolds involvement in the mechanism can be found in the fact that Breguets rst-ever tourbillon was mounted in John Arnolds No. 11 movement, a watch which can be seen to this day in Londons British Museum and bears a dedication to Arnold from Breguet. The tourbillon is one of the most elegant and inspired complications in the history of watchmaking. As simple in principle as it is difcult to make, the mechanism was designed to eliminate the errors of rate caused by gravity on a pocket watch carried in a vertical position. Weighing mere fractions of a gram, it consists of a mobile cage that contains all the parts of the escapement, with the balance at the centre. The cage completes one revolution around its own axis every minute, thus ensuring that the balance wheel oscillates at different positions in the course of its 360 journey and that the rate remains as constant as possible.

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The TE8 Tourbillon heralds the Royal Collection that combines classical styling with innovative, state-of-the-art technology. The letters TE stand for tourbillon escapement. Some of its more distinctive features are obvious at rst glance. Compared with other more conventional tourbillons found today, the TE8s movement is said to be inverted: in other words, most of the technical elements and visually interesting features can be seen on the dial side, when they would normally be hidden away on the reverse. The timepiece also boasts a number of typically English technical idiosyncrasies that will interest even the most discerning watch connoisseur. Take the symmetrical layout of the movement, for instance: the barrel spring and the tourbillon cage are centred along the watchs longitudinal axis. The main jewels are hold by screwed gold chatons. They are a reminiscence of the nest Haute Horlogerie mechanical watches of the good old days and contribute to the beauty of the movement. In addition to their esthetical appeal, gold chatons also allow to replace damaged jewels without modifying the boreholes in the plates and bridges. A closer examination of the

winding system and the gear train reveals a traditional construction used in older watches that involves the use of wolf-teeth, an asymmetrical tooth system featuring both long and narrow spokes used primarily to improve the smoothness of the overall movement and to enhance its elegant design. From an aesthetic point of view, however, the feature that sets Arnold & Sons Tourbillon TE8 apart is its singularly English design. Some of the more obvious elements include the meticulously positioned three-quarter barrel bridge with its large wave-shaped cut-out and a lavish decoration unique to Arnold & Son, the triangular tourbillon and motion-work bridges, and the three-spoke design of the wheels, which are shaped with such distinctive air. Needless to say, every detail of this striking piece, such as the black and brushed polishing, bevelling and movement decoration, is painstakingly hand-nished by Arnold & Sons master watchmakers. This unique wristwatch will be available exclusively in limited editions.

ROYAL COLLECTION 55

A&S8000
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical tourbillon movement Hand-wound 19 jewels Diameter: 32.6 mm Thickness: 6.25 mm Power reserve: 80 h 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, tourbillon Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, black ruthenium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and A&S specic waves decoration, screwed gold chatons, mirror-polished tourbillon cage and bridge, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

56

REF. 1SJAP.B01A.C113A

TE8
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: black open dial Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 8 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 57

A&S8000
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical tourbillon movement Hand-wound 19 jewels Diameter: 32.6 mm Thickness: 6.25 mm Power reserve: 80 h 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, tourbillon Movement decoration: nickel silver movement, rose golden treated bridges and rhodium treated main plate with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and A&S specic waves decoration, screwed gold chatons, mirror-polished tourbillon cage and bridge, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

58

REF. 1SJAP.G01A.C21A

TE8
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: silver open dial Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 25 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 59

60

T E 8

M T I E R S

D A R T

ROYAL COLLECTION 61

TE8 Tourbillon Mtiers d'Art I

True to English watchmaking and handcraft heritage, Arnold & Son unveils the TE8 Tourbillon special edition Mtiers dArt I, limited to only 8 exclusive timepieces. Each single TE8 Tourbillon Mtiers dArt I is hand-engraved by Arnold & Sons own master engraver, who went as far as to create a new engraving pattern solely for this special edition. This new pattern is composed of complex geometrical elements arising from the center of the movement. Hand-engraving is a traditional art form that involves the use of hardened steel tools called burins in combination with other special tools. It goes without saying that every nishing touch on this striking piece has been done by hand by Arnold & Sons master watchmakers, thus fullling the highest standards of Haute Horlogerie nish and bringing more brilliance and depth to each element of the movement.

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ROYAL COLLECTION 63

A&S8000
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical tourbillon movement Hand-wound 19 jewels Diameter: 32.6 mm Thickness: 6.25 mm Power reserve: 80 h 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, tourbillon Movement decoration: hand-engraved nickel silver movement, rhodium treated bridges and NAC grey treated main plate with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, hand-engraved, ne circular graining, screwed gold chatons, mirror-polished tourbillon cage and bridge, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

64

REF. 1SJAP.B04A.C113A

TE8 Mtiers d'Art I


Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: black open dial Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: hand-numbered, see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 8 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 65

66

H M

P E R P E T U A L

M O O N

ROYAL COLLECTION 67

HM Perpetual Moon An exceptional perpetual moonphase with 122 years of accuracy

The HM Perpetual Moon, with one of the biggest moonphase apertures on the market, rightfully joins the Arnold & Son Royal Collection and demonstrates the brands prowess in traditional watchmaking and classical decorative arts. The sophisticated HM Perpetual Moon is, indeed, a superb example of Arnold & Sons technical and artistic excellence. From the inside out, this new timepiece with rich guilloch dials and three-dimensional big moon surprises and delights. The 42 mm case is created in either 18-carat red gold or in stainless steel and houses the exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical hand-wound movement A&S1512. The 27 jewel calibre offers one of the most accurate moon phases on the market, with only one days deviation every 122 years at which point a single push on the corrector will keep it in sync for another 122 years. The calibre is also equipped with a double barrel to yield 90 hours of power reserve. The exceptional perpetual moonphase indication of this watch is a marvel in many ways. From the aesthetic side, the 29 mm moonphase disc, which runs from 10 to 2 oclock on the dial, reveals one of the largest moons on the market with a diameter of 11.2 mm for the moon alone.

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Additionally, this large moon is one of the most visually stunning recreations of the moon because it is a threedimensional sculptured moon that was rst hand-engraved and then duplicated for the series. The sculptured moon is then inserted into the disc. From the technical side, in addition to the HM Perpetual Moon being so precise, it is also an intriguing complication in that it is not simply a module added to the movement, but, in fact, is fully integrated into the calibre. The watch also has a unique easy-to-set feature thanks to the ingenious addition of a second moon indication installed at the back of the movement. This second moon display, visible via a sapphire case back, features a graduated dial and a pointer hand that allows for a more exact setting. The multiple technological advancements in the calibre make this timepiece truly outstanding. To further underscore that, the entire rhodium treated nickel-silver movement features hand nishing indicative of the nest Haute Horlogerie timepieces, including manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining with polished edges and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, and blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads.
ROYAL COLLECTION 69

A&S1512
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 27 jewels Diameter: 34 mm Thickness: 5.35 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, big perpetual moon, diameter disc: 29 mm, diameter moon: 11.2 mm Second moonphase indication on the back for setting purposes Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

70

REF. 1GL AR.U01A.C123A

HM Perpetual Moon
Case material: 18-carat red gold Dial colour: translucent blue lacquered guilloch, translucent blue lacquered guilloch moon disc with golden moon and stars Case diameter: 42 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 71

A&S1512
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 27 jewels Diameter: 34 mm Thickness: 5.35 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, big perpetual moon, diameter disc: 29 mm, diameter moon: 11.2 mm Second moonphase indication on the back for setting purposes Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

72

REF. 1GL AR.I01A.C122A

HM Perpetual Moon
Case material: 18-carat red gold Dial colour: cream, translucent blue lacquered guilloch moon disc with golden moon and stars Case diameter: 42 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 73

A&S1512
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 27 jewels Diameter: 34 mm Thickness: 5.35 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, big perpetual moon, diameter disc: 29 mm, diameter moon: 11.2 mm Second moonphase indication on the back for setting purposes Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

74

REF. 1GL AS.B01A.C122S

HM Perpetual Moon
Case material: stainless steel Dial colour: black guilloch, black guilloch moon disc with silvered moon, Case diameter: 42 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 75

76

H M S 1
ROYAL COLLECTION 77

HMS1 A vibrant union of tradition and classicism

With its understated simplicity, the HMS1 line is a modern take on Arnold & Sons traditionally elegant design combined with superior craftsmanship. The watch has a classically styled 40 mm case with see-through back and is water-resistant to 30 metres. The hand-wound A&S1001 calibre is manufactured in-house and decorated with either straight or radiating Ctes de Genve. The ultrathin movement is just 2.7 mm in height. The twin barrels generate a power reserve of over 90 hours and a more constant force, hence greater accuracy the whole time the movement is running. Blued screws in the rhodium-treated movement, mirror-polished ones in the NAC grey version, and specic decorations for each version testify to the attention to detail. The HMS1 collection comes in a range of dial colours and with various nishes depending on the model, as well as a choice of cases in white gold, rose gold or stainless steel. It is also available with an exquisite diamond-set bezel.

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ROYAL COLLECTION 79

A&S1001
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 21 jewels Diameter: 30 mm Thickness: 2.7 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, small seconds at 6 oclock Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

80

REF. 1LCAP.W01A.C110A

REF. 1LCAP.B01A.C111A

HMS1
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: cream Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 250 pieces

HMS1
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: black Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 250 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 81

A&S1001
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 21 jewels Diameter: 30 mm Thickness: 2.7 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, small seconds at 6 oclock Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve

rayonnantes, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

82

REF. 1LCAP.S04A.C110A

REF. 1LCAW.S03A.C111W

HMS1
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: anthracite Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 250 pieces

HMS1
Case material: 18-carat white gold Dial colour: silver Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 100 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 83

A&S1001
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 21 jewels Diameter: 30 mm Thickness: 2.7 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, small seconds at 6 oclock Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, NAC grey treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

84

REF. 1LCAS.S01A.C111S

REF. 1LCAS.S02A.C111S

HMS1
Case material: stainless steel Dial colour: silvery-white Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: seethrough sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 250 pieces

HMS1
Case material: stainless steel Dial colour: anthracite Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 250 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 85

HMS1 Royal Blue

Inspired by an exceptional gold- and enamel-cased halfquarter repeating watch made by John Arnold in 1775, the HMS1 Royal Blue is an eloquent expression of elegance and sophistication in the inimitable English style and demonstrates the brands traditional prowess in the classical decorative arts. The workmanship and ornamentation of this historical timepiece by John Arnold is echoed on the dial of the HMS1 Royal Blue. Finished with intricate guilloch pattern overlaid by sumptuous, translucent deep blue lacquer, it creates a spectacular illusion of depth that contrasts with and is underscored by the ultra-slim case in elegant rose gold. The A&S1001 calibre, with its gorgeous Ctes de Genve rayonnantes decoration is made of rhodium-treated nickel silver with Haute Horlogerie nishing.

The Trustees of the British Museum

John Arnold, half-quarter repeater, gold and enamel cased cylinder pocket watch, No. 253, London, 1775

86

REF. 1LCAP.U02A.C110A

REF. 1LCMP.U02A.C110A

HMS1 ROYAL BLUE


Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: translucent blue lacquered guilloch, Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reflective coating on both sides Case back: seethrough sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

HMS1 ROYAL BLUE


Case material: 18-carat rose gold Diamonds: 80, 0.720 ct, V Vs Dial colour: translucent blue lacquered guilloch, Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

ROYAL COLLECTION 87

HMS1 Dragon A consummate expression of traditional craftsmanship at its finest

Arnold & Son perpetuates the brands long tradition in the eld of Mtiers dArt by launching the special edition HMS1 Dragon, limited to only 50 timepieces. The HMS1 Dragon was designed to mark the Chinese Year of the Dragon. Set off to perfection against the glossy black lacquer dial is the appliqu of an exquisitely sculpted dragon, inspired by one of the gures on a wall in the Forbidden City, in solid 22-carat gold, which is then duplicated for the series. The three-dimensional dragon boasts a breathtaking richness of detail and creates a spectacular illusion of depth that contrasts starkly with the ultra-slim case. Available in rose gold or in rose gold with a diamond-set bezel, the HMS1 Dragon Special Edition is housed in a 40millimetre case with a hand-stitched alligator strap and is water-resistant to 30 metres.

88

REF. 1LCAP.B02A.C111A

HMS1 DRAGON
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: black lacquer, 22-carat solid gold dragon appliqu Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reflective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: one out of 50 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 89

HMS Victory Set A magnificent tribute to the role of the HMS Victory in maritime history

The name HMS Victory is one of the best known in English maritime history and played an important role in Arnold & Sons history by using its chronometers. Her glorious career spanned forty years and she enjoyed her nest hour as Lord Nelsons agship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. The HMS Victory Set from Arnold & Son celebrates this common history by presenting three different views of the vessel: the rst, resplendent in shafts of sunlight breaking through the clouds; the second, with guns ablaze as she rakes the French eet; and the third, an interior of the ship, on one of the cannons deck. Arnold & Sons own master engraver created the exquisite HMS Victory Set dials, which are then duplicated in silver for the series. The threedimensional nature of these dials is further accentuated by the engraver who then individually hand-tarnishes each nal dial. The illusion of depth contrasts starkly with the ultra-slim case. The HMS Victory Set is available in an exclusive limited edition of just 28 sets of 3 timepieces.

90

REF. 1LCAP.S06A.C111A Cannons ablaze, Lord Nelsons flagship takes on the French fleet.

REF. 1LCAP.S05A.C111A HMS Victor y at sea, lit by rays of sunshine piercing the clouds.

REF. 1LCAP.S07A.C111A Where the battle was won: one of the cannons deck on HMS Victor y.

HMS VICTORY SET


Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial : hand-engraved, duplicated silver dials, individually hand-tarnished Case diameter: 40 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 28 sets of 3 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 91

92

H M S

L A D Y

ROYAL COLLECTION 93

HMS Lady Elegance, sophistication and a perfect sense of balance

Simple as it may appear, the HMS Lady is an example of the perfection towards which Arnold & Son strives. At rst glance, it is clearly a scaled-down version of the HMS1 designed for a slender female wrist. On further inspection, however, it turns out that the proportions are also identical because the small seconds display is in precisely the correct position relative to all the other features on the dial. The feminine character of this timepiece is further enhanced by its workmanship and ornamentation. Demonstrating the brands traditional prowess in the classical decorative arts, the movement is entirely hand-engraved with English-style oral motifs. With its double-stepped bezel and lugs, the 34mm 18-carat rose gold case (with or without diamonds) houses an ultra-slim A&S1101 mechanical hand-engraved movement nished to perfection.

94

ROYAL COLLECTION 95

A&S1101
Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 17 jewels Diameter: 23.7 mm Thickness: 2.5 mm Power reserve: 42 h 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, small seconds at 6 oclock Movement decoration: golden treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: hand-engraved bridges with English-style oral motifs, blued screws

96

REF. 1PMAP.W01A.C114A

REF. 1PMMP.W01A.C119A

HMS LADY
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: cream Case diameter: 34 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched honey alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 100 pieces

HMS LADY
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Diamonds: 76, 0.685 ct, V Vs Dial colour: cream Case diameter: 34 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reflective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched red alligator leather Water- resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 100 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 97

98

H O R N E T

W O R L D T I M E R S K E L E T O N
ROYAL COLLECTION 99

Hornet World Timer Skeleton Tracking global time couldnt be easier

The Hornet World Timer Skeleton has no fewer than six central hands. They are driven by wheels with special split teeth, manufactured using LIGA technology, to ensure playfree movement. The watch can display three time zones: the two pointed hands indicate two different time zones on the outer ring, while the golden sun-tipped hand can be set to show any other time zone in the world (even half time zones). It can also be adjusted to display mean solar time at any location according to its longitude. The shortest hand shows the equation of time: the difference between apparent solar and mean solar time. A double-disc big date at 5 oclock and circular month display at the centre complete the dial. The open dial revels the highly complicated skeletonised movement.

100

REF. 1H6AS.B05A.C79F

HORNET WORLD TIMER SKELETON


Case material: stainless steel Dial colour: white, black and grey open dial, skeletonised Case diameter: 47 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: metallic sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 50 m Limited edition: 50 pieces

ROYAL COLLECTION 101

102

I N S T R U M E N T

C O L L E C T I O N
103

Instrument Collection Combining marine precision with aesthetic perfection

The Instrument Collection was inspired by the timepieces produced during the second part of John Arnolds life and later, following his death, by his son, John Roger. This was a period when the Arnolds dedicated themselves exclusively to the quest for absolute precision and to nd a solution to the problem of determining longitude accurately and reliably on the high seas. So successful were they, and of such high quality their products, that within the space of a few years they had established themselves as suppliers of choice to the Royal Navy and to some of the most distinguished mariners and explorers of their day. During this era, timepieces played a crucial role as aids to navigation and were, effectively, technical and scientic instruments. John Arnold and his son decided to make them as rugged and reliable as possible, and in sufcient quantities to equip the Navys extensive eet. Ultimately, they were to prove pivotal to the nations marine dominance and helped ensure that Britannia really did rule the waves.

Arnold, Charles Frodsham, pocket chronometer escapement, split-seconds and winding indicator, No. 8623, London, 1855

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Historical Inspiration: off-centred subdial for the hours and minutes leaving center stage to the split chronograph

Historical Inspiration: dial layout with two subidals, one for sidereal time and one for mean solar time

Instrument Collection: TBR, off-centred subdial for hours and minutes leaving centre stage to the True Beat Seconds indication

Instrument Collection: DBS, same dial layout as historical pieces with two subdials, one for sidereal time and one for mean solar time

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 105

Historical Inspiration: classic triangular balancecock and barrel bridge

Historical Inspiration: marine chronometer with extra-large glass and dial

Instrument Collection: The DBS has a triangular balance-cock and bridge like the historical pieces

Instrument Collection: The TBR has an extra-large glass and dial like the historical marine chronometers

106

The Instrument Collection clearly shows the inuence of the pocket watches, marine chronometers and precision regulators. It draws in particular on several original timepieces made by John Roger Arnold. The rst two of these, manufactured at around the time of his fathers death, were known as No. 1 and No. 2, respectively, and featured a Z balance, mean and sidereal time displays, and an additional small seconds hand at 6 oclock. Another important timepiece, produced in 1855, was a very unusual chronometer with hours and minutes displaying mean time in a subsidiary dial on the right, a symmetrical subdial on the left with a power reserve indication, and a central seconds with an additional chronograph split-seconds. Typical of the Instrument Collections design is the off-centre position of the hours and minutes indication. This dial layout creates space for the display of other complications without one overlapping the others, making the dial much more legible. It also allows on certain models the second hand to take centre stage and dominate the dial, thus perfectly showcasing the down-to-the-second precision needed by marine navigators to determine longitude.

The other stylistic features that dene the new timepieces are pure, timeless lines and a discreet, almost austere case. Viewed from the side, the housing is stepped and tapers from top to bottom, the widest section accommodating the extra-large glass and dial with the lower part narrowing to t snugly on the wrist. Like the Royal Collection, the Instrument Collection from Arnold & Son is a family of elegant, exquisitely handcrafted and nished timepieces: the sublime expression of a long and proud tradition.

Christies Bridgeman Giraudon

John Roger Arnold, mean and sidereal pocket chronometer with bimetallic Z balance, No. 2, London, 1796-1799

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 107

108

D B S
INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 109

DBS Equation Sidereal A watch for stargazers and others

The Instrument DBS Equation Sidereal is a tribute to two watches (Nos. 1 and 2) made by John Roger Arnold that showed mean solar and sidereal time on two separate subdials. The movements of these two watches, made between 1796 and 1799, featured some of the most famous inventions of father and son, including their fabulous thermocompensated Z balance, expansion escapement and gold helical spring. It is no exaggeration to say that they represented the state-of-the-art in the micromechanics of their time. Watches with a sidereal time display were extremely rare at this time. After the Arnolds had paved the way, Breguet followed in their footsteps and produced a few watches with a sidereal time display and a similar dial layout (such as No. 3863, sold in 1824). Creating a precise sidereal time display is a tall order. Simply adding a second gear train to a standard movement showing mean solar time is not a viable solution because a mean sidereal day is about 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.091 seconds, which is not a round fraction of the 24 hours in a mean solar day. This means it is virtually impossible to obtain the correct

The Royal Observatory Greenwich

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rotation speed using gears. To guarantee the kind of precision demanded by Arnold & Son, the only choice was to create a movement with the correct rotation speed from the start: in other words a movement specically for sidereal time. The answer was a totally new movement with a double barrel/ gear train and double balance/escapement running at different speeds that enables the watch to display mean solar time and mean sidereal time simultaneously. This technical solution has the additional advantage that neither of the two indications saps energy from the other. Watches with a double balance and escapement are extremely rare and have almost disappeared, so it is with some pride that Arnold & Son has revived the tradition. Identical in layout to the DBG Equation GMT, the DBS Equation Sidereal has the same perfectly symmetrical arrangement of the bridges, barrels and gear trains. The symmetry is continued on the dial side, where the two adjacent balance-cocks create a harmonious circle. Sidereal time is displayed on the left subdial and mean solar time on the right. In addition, a subdial at 12 oclock indicates the equation of both times on a 24-hour basis, which allows the user to measure the difference between mean solar time and sidereal time and

to ascertain whether the time in both zones is a.m. or p.m. The watch has a long central permanent seconds hand (for mean solar time). The two barrels are wound using the crown on the right, but sidereal time and mean solar time are set separately using the crowns on the left and right, respectively. This ensures that neither of the displays is changed or manipulated by accident.

Sidereal time
Sidereal time is the timekeeping system used by astronomers to track the direction needed to point a telescope at a particular star in the night sky. A mean sidereal day is measured by the rotation of the earth relative to the stars rather than the sun and lasts 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.091 seconds. It is approximately four minutes shorter than a mean solar day because, owing to the movement of the earth round the sun, the time that elapses before a distant star appears at the same point is slightly less than the time it takes for the sun to be directly over the same point.

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 111

A&S1311
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 42 jewels Diameter: 35 mm Thickness 3.9 mm Power reserve: 40 h 21600 (mean solar time) and 21659 (sidereal time) vibrations/h Functions: local hours, minutes and seconds, sidereal hours and minutes, local time 24 h indicator, sidereal time 24 h indicator Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges and polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve, blued screws

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REF. 1DSAP.W01A.C120P

DBS
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: silvery-white and silvery opaline Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 113

114

D B G
INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 115

DBG Equation GMT A watch with two heartbeats

A masterpiece of perfect symmetry, the Instrument DBG Equation GMT features two separate time displays, each driven by its own barrel and gear train with its own escapement and balance. This highly unusual technical specication permits the two displays to be set independently of each other. Although it is a standard feature of watches displaying two or more time zones for the hour hands to be set to different times, being able to set the minute hand as well opens up other possibilities. It means, for instance, that the display can be set to show the precise time in zones that differ from Greenwich Mean Time by a fraction of an hour, such as a quarter or a half. In addition, a subdial at 12 oclock shows the equation of the two time zones on a 24-hour basis. This enables the wearer to see the time difference between the two zones and also to ascertain whether it is day or night in the second zone. Both time zones share a common permanent seconds in the shape of the long slender hand emanating from the centre of the dial, which is a hallmark feature of the Arnold & Sons Instrument Collection.

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Watches with a double barrel and escapement have a tradition going back many years in horology but are rarely found today. The principle is ideally suited to the Arnold & Sons Instrument line because a separate barrel/gear train and balance/escapement enable the watch to be used for a second time zone, as in the DBG Equation GMT, or to accommodate an unusual astronomical complication. The Instrument DBS, for example, not only shows mean solar time but also boasts a separate display for sidereal, or star, time. This is the timekeeping system used by astronomers to track the position of stars in the night sky and differs from mean solar time by just less than four minutes in any given period of 24 hours. Other possible complications include a true beat seconds mechanism or a chronograph. Another practical advantage of having a double barrel/gear train and a double balance/escapement is the fact that neither of the complications or displays inuences the accuracy of the other by draining its energy. In addition, it means it is also possible to house two completely different technical solutions and characteristics in one and the same movement.

No less impressive than the watchs technical features is its aesthetic appeal, and in particular its symmetry, which is largely determined by the positioning of the elements in the dual movement. The view from the back reveals a pleasingly balanced arrangement of bridges, barrels and gear trains. From the front, and highlighted against a backdrop of Ctes de Genve stripes on the lower half of the dial, are two triple-armed balances secured in position by the two balance-cocks, which face one another and fuse together to create a circle. Completing the overall sense of balance are the two crowns, one in the conventional position at 3 oclock, the other at 9. The two mainsprings are both wound using the crown on the right. However, the time in each of the two selected time zones is set using its own crown, which ensures that neither of the zones is moved or changed advertently. The time zone on the left is set using the crown at 9 oclock and the time zone on the right by the crown at 3 oclock.

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 117

A&S1209
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Hand-wound 42 jewels Diameter: 35 mm Thickness 3.9 mm Power reserve: 40 h 21600 vibrations/h Functions: local hours, minutes and seconds, GMT hours and minutes, local time 24 h indicator, GMT 24 h indicator Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges and polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve, blued screws

118

REF. 1DGAP.W01A.C120P

REF. 1DGAS.S01A.C121S

DBG
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: silver y-white and silver y opaline Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reflective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

DBG
C ase mater ial: stainles s steel Dial colour: light- grey and silvery opaline Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reflec tive coating on both sides Case back: seethrough sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 119

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U T T E
INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 121

UTTE An exceptional ultra-thin tourbillon timepiece

The UTTE is a masterful demonstration of elegant design and superb technical prowess. It pays tribute to A.-L. Breguets rst-ever tourbillon escapement mounted in John Arnolds No. 11 movement a watch that can be found today in Londons British Museum. The ultra-thin A&S8200 movement and the ultimate UTTE watch is the result of several years of research and development, and boasts important features and functions. In fact, when the brand embarked on the creation of an additional tourbillon, Arnold & Sons team of watchmakers and engineers determined that the end result should possess unique features that would set it apart in the watch world: It had to be at the same time thin, boast a big and three-dimensional tourbillon cage and have a long power reserve. Utilizing the most cutting-edge technology, Arnold & Son pushed the creative envelope to achieve this goal - thus developing an exceptional timepiece. The UTTE has a movement that is just 2.97 mm thick and a case thickness of only 8.34 mm, making the UTTE one of the thinnest tourbillion watches on the market.

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Additionally, while the movement diameter is 32 mm, the tourbillon cage is a massive 14 mm in diameter thus occupying almost half of the movement space for impressive visual appeal. To add further dramatic beauty to this already impressive watch, Arnold & Son created a totally spherical tourbillon cage one devoid of any at surfaces for a magnicent three-dimensional aesthetic effect. In fact, the ying tourbillon cage is not inset into the calibre, but instead rises out of the movement, through the dial, and achieves the same height as the hour and minute hands. With an eye toward every detail, and the desire for harmonious appeal, the watchmakers removed all visible screws so the spherical tourbillon cage appears beautifully balanced. The only visible screws are on the regulator. Finally, to ensure a long power reserve of at least 90 hours, the brand implemented two barrels to offer more constant force and unprecedented power reserve for an ultra-thin tourbillon. UTTE is created in either 18-carat red gold or palladium (a rare alloy in the watch world). Each movement is nished in a color to complement the case color, and each features

a different Ctes de Genve pattern. The 18-carat red gold case watch houses the movement treated in rhodium and decorated with Ctes de Genve rayonnantes. The tourbillon bridge of the 18-carat red gold UTTE is entirely hand-engraved by Arnold & Sons master engraver. The palladium UTTE version houses a grey NAC treated movement decorated with a straight Ctes de Genve pattern for a bold, contemporary appeal. This unique wristwatch is limited to just 50 timepieces of each of the two models.

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 123

A&S8200
Exclusive Arnold & Son ultra-thin mechanical movement, one-minute ying tourbillon Hand-wound 29 jewels Diameter: 32 mm Thickness: 2.97 mm Tourbillon cage diameter: 14 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hour, minutes, tourbillon Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nish: hand-engraved tourbillon bridge, manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads. Tourbillon cage: satin-nish with chamfered and polished edges

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REF. 1UTAR.S01A.C120A

UTTE
Case material: 18-carat red gold Dial colour: silvery-white Ctes de Genve rayonnantes and silvery opaline Case diameter: 42 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 50 pieces

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 125

A&S8200
Exclusive Arnold & Son ultra-thin mechanical movement, one-minute flying tourbillon Hand-wound 29 jewels Diameter: 32 mm Thickness: 2.97 mm Tourbillon cage diameter: 14 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hour, minutes, tourbillon Movement decoration: nickel-silver movement, NAC grey treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads. Tourbillon cage: satin-nish with chamfered and polished edges.

126

REF. 1UTAG.S03A.C121G

UTTE
Case material: palladium Dial colour: light-grey Ctes de Genve and silvery opaline Case diameter: 42 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 50 pieces

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 127

128

T I M E

P Y R A M I D
INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 129

Time Pyramid

Deftly demonstrating its British heritage, the Time Pyramid hosts a totally new manufacture movement with unique architecture. Inspired by the regulators created by John and John Roger Arnold over two hundred years ago, and by antique British skeleton clocks. The skeletonised calibre A&S1615 is built in a unique format, with balance wheel at 12 oclock, situated directly beneath the palette and the anchor wheel (which is shaped in typical Arnold & Sons majestic X form). At the opposite end of the movement, at 6 oclock, lay two mainspring barrels that supply the hand-wound calibre with an amazing 90 hours of power reserve, and provide a more constant force to the wheel train. The gear train runs vertically in a linear format connecting the two barrels at 6 oclock to the balance wheel at 12 oclock, and endowing the movement with its pyramid structure. The bridges are designed so that all of the wheels, the two mainspring barrels, the escapement and balance wheel are all magnicently visible from the dial side.

British skeleton clock, chain driven fusee, England, 1830-1845

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Additionally, the movement is tted with two power reserve indicators one each on either side of the linear gear train to display the energy level for each barrel separately. The power reserve hands indicate the reserve level via graduated dots (that are printed under the top sapphire crystal) in an arc format, and demonstrate how one barrel transfers energy to the second one when needed. Essentially, as the rst barrel winds the second one, the power reserve indicator of the rst barrel goes down, while the second one goes up making for an accurate and intriguing readout. This Time Pyramid follows the original regulators from the brand with its component positioning and detailed three-dimensional visual appeal. Movement parts and watch indications are built on three levels, with the subsidiary seconds dial on the bottom, the hour indications on a sapphire crystal dial in the middle level, and a silver top ring for the minutes indication. While the movement is extremely thin at just 4.4 mm the multiple levels bring amazing depth and detail to the watch. To further enhance the balance and symmetry of the Time Pyramid, the crown is artfully positioned at 6 oclock.

As with every esteemed Arnold & Son watch, each component in the Time Pyramid is magnicently hand decorated with manually chamfered brides and highpolished edges, all yielding a striking masterpiece of decorative craftsmanship and brilliant execution. Viewed from the side, the case is stepped and tapers from top to bottom, the widest section accommodating the extra-large glass with the lower part narrowing to t snugly on the wrist.

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 131

A&S1615
Exclusive Arnold & Son skeletonised mechanical movement Hand-wound 27 jewels Diameter: 37.6 mm Thickness: 4.40 mm Power reserve: 90 h, two barrels 21600 vibrations/h Functions: hours, minutes, seconds, double power reserve indication Movement decoration: skeletonised nickel-silver movement, rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie finish: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, satin-nished main plate, Ctes de Genve, circular satin-nished wheels, blued screws

132

REF. 1TPAR.S01A.C125A

TIME PYRAMID
Case material: 18-carat red gold Dial : sapphire, circular satin-nished dial frame with chamfered and polished edges Case diameter: 44.6 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 133

134

T B R
INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 135

TBR Double first from a timepiece on course for success

The TBR features the rst automatic movement with an integrated true beat system to be developed, designed and manufactured entirely at the workshops in La Chauxde-Fonds. Its pure, timeless design takes its inspiration from the later instrument-style chronometers produced by John Roger Arnold. These answered the call for timepieces rugged and reliable enough to withstand the hardships of life on the high seas combined with the down-to-thesecond precision needed by marine navigators to determine longitude. With the unmistakable design cues that dene the Instrument Collection, the TBR is a masterpiece of reduced simplicit y. The initials stand for the watchs t wo complications, true beat and retrograde. While the time is displayed in an off-centre subdial at 9 oclock (a hallmark of the entire Instrument Collection) the two complications occupy the middle of the dial and command center stage. Dominating the face of the watch is the central true beat, or dead beat, seconds. The true beat seconds, a hark-back to the precision required by navigators on the high seas, is a rarely found complication these days, and its combination

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with an automatic winding system calls for enormous technical expertise. In the TBR it was made possible by a worldwide patented system comprising a sophisticated double wheel, an oscillating pinion and a pallet mechanism. This complex solution calls for virtually microscopic precision (to tolerances of a micron, or one thousandth of a millimetre) and the key parts are made using state-ofthe-art LIGA fabrication technology. LIGA is a German acronym that stands for Lithographie, Galvanoformung, Abformung (lithography, electroplating and moulding) and describes the sequence of processes used to produce metal parts made of nickel and nickel phosphorus. Longitude is measured in degrees, minutes and seconds. By comparing the time difference between local apparent noon, determined by a sextant, and noon at Greenwich (GMT/UTC) shown on the chronometer, a navigator is able to calculate the ships position east or west of the Greenwich Meridian (0). The R of TBR retrograde is a description of the watchs second complication, the date display. The second most conspicuous element on the dial, the date display shows

the dates 1 to 31 in Arabic numerals with intermediate dots for the even dates. A slim, undulating hand advances a day at a time until it reaches 31. At midnight on the 31st, the hand springs back (hence retrograde) smartly to 1, in other words to the rst of the next month, and the process commences all over again. The TBRs retrograde mechanism is extremely sophisticated and features patented dents sans jeu (literally, teeth without play or gaps), which ensure that the date hand advances cleanly and precisely. These components can only be produced using the complex LIGA fabrication technology described above. Also worth noting is the fact that the retrograde date can be set using the crown, which is considerably more demanding in terms of movement design than having an additional pushpiece.

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 137

A&S6008
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Self-winding Ceramic ball bearing 34 jewels Diameter: 30.4 mm Thickness: 7.79 mm Power reserve: 50 h 28800 vibrations/h Stop seconds Functions: hours, minutes, true beat seconds, retrograde date Movement decoration rose gold model: rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and

Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, brushed and skeletonised rotor, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished head Movement decoration
stainless steel model: NAC grey treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, brushed and skeletonised rotor, screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

138

REF. 1ARAP.W01A.C120P

REF. 1ARAS.S01A.C121S

TBR
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: silvery-white and silvery opaline Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: seethrough sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

TBR
Case material: stainless steel Dial colour: light-grey and silvery opaline Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reflective coating on both sides Case back: seethrough sapphire Strap: hand-stitched black alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 139

140

T B

V I C T O R Y
INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 141

TB Victory A magnificent tribute to the role of the HMS Victory in maritime history

The name HMS Victory is one of the best known in English maritime history and played an important role in Arnold & Sons history by using its chronometers. After a glorious career spanning forty years, she had her nest hour as Lord Nelsons agship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Now, Arnold & Son celebrates this common history by presenting the exquisite TB Victory. Gracing the righthand side of the dial is a 22-carat solid gold appliqu of the famous warship, rst hand-chased with breathtaking richness of detail by Arnold & Sons master engraver and then duplicated in gold for the series. The TB Victory timepiece has a distinctive off-centre subdial for the time of day, one of the unmistakable design cues of the Instrument Collection. Central to the creamcoloured dial is the timepieces complication: a central true beat (TB) seconds. The TB Victory will be available in an exclusive limited edition of just 28 timepieces.

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REF. 1ARAP.I01A.C120P

TB VICTORY
Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial colour: cream, 22-carat solid gold appliqu Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 28 pieces

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 143

National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, UK

East Indiamen in the China seas. Oil on canvas, painting by William John Huggins, 1820-1830

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E A S T

I N D I A

C O M PA N Y

S E T

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 145

East India Company Set A magnificent tribute to the famous East Indiamen

The East India Company Set comprises three timepieces that combine maritime precision with aesthetic perfection. The models celebrate the East Indiamen, the vessels that helped to establish the trading supremacy of the East India Company. The East India Company was the most powerful and famous of the commercial empires that proted from trade expansion between Europe, the Americas, India and China. Underpinning its supremacy were the heavily armed trading ships that were also regularly used by the Royal Navy. Now, with the East India Company Set, Arnold & Son unveils a trio of true beat timepieces. Gracing the dial of each model is an exquisitely hand-nished miniature replicating one of three paintings from the National Maritime Museum in London. The art of painting miniatures by hand calls for innite patience and consummate skill. The tiny brushstrokes and texturing gradually build up entire images with an astonishing richness of detail that is given even greater emphasis by the reection of light in the depth of the mother-of-pearl dials, and underscore Arnold & Sons mastery of the decorative arts.

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The timepieces in the East India Company Set have a distinctive off-centre subdial for the time of day, one of the unmistakable design cues of the Instrument Collection. Our watchmakers and designers took their inspiration from the distinctive instrument-like chronometers produced by John Arnold and his son, John Roger Arnold. These delivered the robustness, reliability and down-to-the-second precision needed to determine longitude by marine navigators. The central feature on the dial is the timepieces complication: a true beat (TB) seconds. A rarely found complication these days, the true beat seconds (or dead beat seconds) stands for superlative accuracy and was an invaluable instrument for marine navigators. The timepieces in the East India Company Set are powered by the rhodium treated A&S6103 calibre, the rst automatic movement with an integrated true beat system to be developed, designed and manufactured entirely at Arnold & Sons workshops in La Chaux-de-Fonds. The exquisite Haute Horlogerie nishing includes manually chamfered bridges and polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, a brushed and skeletonized rotor, and blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads.

The East India Company Set is available in an exclusive limited edition of just 28 sets of 3 timepieces.

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 147

A&S6103
Exclusive Arnold & Son mechanical movement Self-winding Ceramic ball bearing 30 jewels Diameter: 30.4 mm Thickness: 7.79 mm Power reserve: 50 h 28800 vibrations/h Stop seconds Functions: hours, minutes, true beat seconds Movement decoration: rhodium treated with Haute Horlogerie nishing: manually chamfered bridges with polished edges, ne circular graining and Ctes de Genve rayonnantes, brushed and skeletonised rotor, blued screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

148

REF. 1ARAP.M01A.C120P A fleet of East Indiamen

REF. 1ARAP.M03A.C120P East Indiamen in the China Seas

EAST INDIA COMPANY SET

REF. 1ARAP.M02A.C120P The Honourable East India Companys Ship

Case material: 18-carat rose gold Dial: hand-nished miniature painting, mother-of-pearl Case diameter: 44 mm Glass: cambered sapphire with anti-reective coating on both sides Case back: see-through sapphire Strap: hand-stitched brown alligator leather Water-resistant: 30 m Limited edition: 28 sets of 3 pieces

INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 149

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C A L I B R E S

O V E R V I E W
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Arnold & Son Calibres Overview

A&S5003

A&S8000

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A&S1512

A&S1001

A&S1311

CALIBRES OVERVIEW 153

Arnold & Son Calibres Overview

A&S1209

A&S8200

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A&S1615

A&S6008

A&S6103

CALIBRES OVERVIEW 155

CONCEPT AND REALISATION Arnold & Son SA, La Chaux-de-Fonds PHOTOGR APHY Time Photo, La Chaux-de-Fonds Le Labo, Delmont Eveline Perroud, La Chaux-de-Fonds Anita Schlaei, Neuchtel Claudio Stefanutti, Zurich BIBLIOGR APHY The Monthly Review or Literary Journal, vol. 58 (London, 1780) Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) The Visitor or Monthly Instructor (London, 1847) Breguet, Emmanuel, Breguet: Watchmakers since 1775 [English trans. of Breguet: Horloger depuis 1775], ed. Alain de Gourcuff (Paris, 1997) Le Globe, Journal littraire, vol. 3/1 (Paris, 24 December 1825) Mercer, Vaudrey, John Arnold & Son, supplement (London, 1975) Huddart, Joseph, Captain, The Oriental Navigator (London, 1801)

SOURCES Antiquorum Genve SA, Geneva Bridgeman Art Library, Paris Getty Images, Munich iStockphoto, Canada National Maritime Museum, Greenwich Science & Society Picture Library, London The British Museum, London TEXT AND DOCUMENTARY RESEARCH Arnold & Son SA, La Chaux-de-Fonds Dr Jol Pynson Hill Johnson Associates GmbH, Zollikon Roberta Naas, Naas Enterprises

Arnold & Son SA Bd. des Eplatures 38 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds Switzerland www.arnoldandson.com

Arnold & Son SA reserves the rights to change models and prices at any time.

Copyright 2013 Arnold & Son SA, Printed in Switzerland