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Thursday, March 6, 2014 Vol. 48, No. 41 Verona, WI Hometown USA ConnectVerona.

com $1
The
Verona Press
The
Verona Press
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
To learn more about the advantages of an Edward Jones
Individual Retirement Account (IRA), call or visit today.
Retirement May Be Far Of,
Matt Gerlach, AAMS
Financial Advisor
.
1053 N Edge Trail
Verona, WI 53593
608-848-8801
But the April 15 Deadline for IRA Contributions Isnt.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
To learn more about the advantages of an Edward Jones
Individual Retirement Account (IRA), call or visit today.
Retirement May Be Far Of,
Matt Gerlach, AAMS
Financial Advisor
.
1053 N Edge Trail
Verona, WI 53593
608-848-8801
But the April 15 Deadline for IRA Contributions Isnt.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
To learn more about the advantages of an Edward Jones
Individual Retirement Account (IRA), call or visit today.
Retirement May Be Far Of,
Matt Gerlach, AAMS
Financial Advisor
.
1053 N Edge Trail
Verona, WI 53593
608-848-8801
But the April 15 Deadline for IRA Contributions Isnt.
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848-1800
212 E Verona Ave
unwinchiropractic.com
Chiropractic Massage Rehabilitation Nutrition
Dr. Jill Unwin Lee Unwin LMT
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Girls gymnastics
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Elizabeth Paul (center) has inspired her Verona/Madison Edgedwood teammates, as well as the rest of the Big Eight Conference. The
15-year-old was born with Down syndrome.
Leaving Them Floored
Teammate with Down syndrome becomes inspiration to VAHS gymnastics squad
JEREMY JONES
Sports Editor
Fifteen-year-old Eliza-
beth Paul is your typical high
school girl in most regards.
She smiles widely, loves
music and dancing, is highly
active and when it came time
to attend Verona Area High
School she wanted to be
involved in an extracurricu-
lar activity as her parents
would tell you, just about any
extracurricular activity.
Elizabeth is different in one
aspect, however, having been
born with Down syndrome.
The genetic disorder, which
causes mental and physical
developmental delays, hasnt
been a problem as shes pur-
sued her passion for gymnas-
tics.
Not only has her team
embraced her, shes become
an inspiration to them and as
she has practiced with them,
cheered them on and eventu-
ally capped the season with
an emotional performance in
the teams final home meet.
She cheered on her team-
mates at sectionals this past
Saturday, the end of the sea-
son for all but one gymnast.
Its provided Elizabeth with
a whole new group of friends.
What shes learned about
gymnastics pales in compari-
son to the lessons shes taken
home from being part of a
team, her mother says.
As Elizabeths mother and
father, we are both so proud
of our daughter, but even
more proud of a team of that
has shown the true meaning
of friendship and love, Deb-
bie said.
Looking for a club
The Paul family moved
to Verona when Elizabeth
was 4, after they heard great
things about the welcoming
community and the smaller
school district.
She took swimming lessons
from a very young age and
also did some tumbling, so
when she got to high school
and the information sheet
about the Verona/Madison
Edgewood co-op gymnastics
team came home, she was
naturally interested. Elizabeth
asked her parents, Debbie and
Matt, to join just about every
sport or club that was offered,
but this time, she begged.
So the family talked it over
and emailed V/ME co-head
coach Rachael Hauser.
I email Rachael and she
immediately responded and
welcomed us to come see
how Elizabeth would like
it and how the practices are
geared to give each girl her
own time to concentrate on
what they want and need to,
Debbie said.
Elizabeths parents were
also worried that many kids
with Down syndrome have
lower activity levels and that
their daughter would wear out
faster, want to give up and not
stay the course.
The rigors of long practices
and the physical demands of
the sports were not the only
apprehensions for the Paul
family, though.
We were concerned she
would not be accepted and/
or the other team members
would be more concerned
about their progress and prac-
tice than helping Elizabeth,
Debbie said.
Nothing could have been
farther from the truth, as
everyone has benefited and
Elizabeth has had more than
enough energy. Elizabeth fit
in immediately and the girls
all said they were excited to
have her join the team.
The family showed up to
three practices before Debbie
decided to officially let her
daughter become part of the
team.
Making new friends
For Elizabeth, the decision
to ultimately join the gymnas-
tics team was simply because
its really fun.
Seeing how happy being
part of the team has made
their daughter, the experience
may have been even more
beneficial for her parents in
some ways.
El i zabet h coul d not
stop talking about all her
friends, Debbie said. She
immediately knew the fellow
teammates names and talked
about them like they have
been her best friends forever.
Every member of the team
has coached, mentored and
encouraged Elizabeth this
season.
vs.
Inside
State
bound!
Wildcats win
third straight
sectional title
Page 11
Mayoral
debate
7 p.m. March 13
Verona Senior
Center
Page 7
Verona Area School District
Local officials:
Dont dump Core
Bill would change
standards district
has done a ton of
work toward
SCOTT GIRARD
Unied Newspaper Group
The state Legislature
is considering a bill that
would alter performance
standards for schools state-
wide, and Verona Area
School District adminis-
trators are questioning the
legislations necessity.
Senate Bill 619 would
el i mi nat e t he nat i onal
Common Core standards,
which despite becoming
a source of controversy,
have been adopted by 45
states. It would replace
those standards with a
15- member appoi nt ed
board.
VASD d i r e c t o r o f
instruction Donna Behn
said the district has put in
a ton of work getting
ready for Common Core
since it was adopted in
2010.
Just the work that Ive
done with staff is over-
whelming, but then they go
back into their buildings
and work with others,
Behn said. I cannot even
imagine (implementing
new standards).
It boggles my mind
that were going to set all
that aside and just throw it
away.
Reversing Core
The Common Cor e
standards, originally cre-
ated by a national group of
governors and education
Turn to Paul/Page 13
Submitted photo
Paul holds the scorecard given to her by teammates and the bou-
quet of flowers her mother presented her following her exhibition
routine against Madison Memorial last month.
Turn to Core/Page 15
If you go
What: SB619 public
hearing
When: 10 a.m.,
Thursday, March 6
Where: 411 South,
State Capitol building,
Madison
Info: legis.wisconsin.
gov, search 2013 SB619
2
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Learning to plan a city
New Century and Glacier
Edge elementary school
students got a chance to try
their hand at city planning
this year.
Through the Terrace
Town program, which was
first created in 2000, stu-
dents built their own cities
using cardboard boxes and
real-life lessons from city
planners and architects.
At NCS, all students par-
ticipated, with the K/1 and
4/5 classes focusing on
communities and features
that promote sustainability,
while the 2/3 classes used
scaling to learn math and
got in-depth looks at dif-
ferent architecture tools,
2/3 teacher Larry Gundlach
said.
At Gl a c i e r E d g e ,
third-graders and bilingual
second-graders had t he
chance to design their city
and met with Verona city
planners to learn about the
regulations and processes
for planning a city.
Teachers involved in the
project first met in Novem-
ber and students began to
work on the project soon
after.
Friday, students set up
their towns in the Exhibit
Hall at the Monona Terrace
and participated in learning
activities and a ribbon-cut-
ting ceremony.
The towns were open to
the public Saturday, and
families had the opportuni-
ty to design and build with
hands-on activities at the
Terrace.
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Thursday, March 13 6 - 7:30 pm
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Photo submitted by Amy Klubertanz
Glacier Edge Elementary students plan out their citys zoning using 1-inch square blocks. Different
colors represented different zoning locations like on a city map. As part of the project, different groups
compared and discussed the similarities and differences in their maps until they agreed to a compre-
hensive zoning plan.
Photos submitted by Susan Christiansen
Above, New Century School students Leo Becker and Sierra Posey work near their citys water as
they set up at the Monona Terrace Friday, Feb. 28. Below, NCS kindergartner Parker Ferolie helps
complete a building in the citys town Friday at the Terrace.
Photo submitted by Kurt Knueve
Glacier Edge third-graders and bilingual second-graders helped to plan and construct the schools
Terrace Town.
See even more
photos online!
Go to: Ungphotos.smug-
mug.com, go to Verona Press
and look in the Community
section for more submitted
photos from Terrace Town.
Terrace Town
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
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Tickets available at: State Bank of Cross Plains-Verona, Capitol Bank-Verona and www.vapas.org or call (608) 848-2787.
Sponsored by An Anonymous Donor
presents
Theresa Walters
International First lady of Piano
Saturday, March 29, 2014 ~ 7:30pm
VAHS Performing Arts Center (300 Richard St.)
County M
New plan: Underpass,
signals at PD intersection
Revision up for
review next week
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unied Newspaper Group
The latest plan for the
difficult intersection of
Count y Hwys. M and
PD calls for a westbound
underpass that should keep
traffic moving along what
will be an urban highway.
And t he r oundabout
idea appears to have been
scrapped.
Updated plans will be
discussed at a public meet-
ing set for 6 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 12, at t he
Verona Senior Center.
City staff from Verona
and Madison, as well as
Dane County and MSA
Professional Services have
been drafting plans for the
stretch of Hwy. M from
Verona to Mineral Point
Road in Madison since
2011. Parts of the project
are already under construc-
tion.
The intersection at PD
has been especially diffi-
cult for planners as traffic
projections have increased
dr amat i cal l y over t he
years partly because of
the growth of Epic. A plan
for a two-lane roundabout
devised just last year, in
fact, failed in modeling
tests.
The March 12 meeting
will feature a brief presen-
tation by engineering staff
and time for questions and
answers, city administrator
Bill Burns said.
Staff will update attend-
ees on the changes to the
project including a new
preferred option for the
Hwy. PD intersection and
an updated project time-
line. The latest revision
shows a signalized inter-
section with dedicated turn
lanes and a westbound
Hwy. PD underpass. Burns
said the new intersection
would cost slightly more
than the previous two-lane
roundabout but less than a
full diamond interchange.
Const ruct i on for t he
southern end of the proj-
ect is slated for 2016. The
area south of Flagstone
Drive had been scheduled
for construction in 2015
and the area from Flag-
stone Drive north to Valley
View Road was to be done
in 2016, but the bulk of
both areas will be rebuilt in
2016 with some work pos-
sibly starting in late 2015,
Burns said.
The project aims to build
at least a four-lane, divided
urban highway along most
of the corridor. Provisions
for bikes and pedestrians
are also included. The area
north of Flagstone Drive
will typically have three
lanes of vehicle travel,
according to plans previ-
ously presented by engi-
neers.
Downtown Plan
Commission axes Silent
Street connection
Council will review
changes next week
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unied Newspaper Group
Silent Street wont connect
to Main Street in the latest
revision of the citys down-
town mobility and develop-
ment plan.
Despite a smaller crowd
than last month, parishioners
from St. Christopher Catho-
lic Parish were still vocal in
their sentiments that no con-
nection of Silent Street be
made to Main Street.
City staff and planners
from MSA Professional
Services had recommended
a bike and pedestrian path
along the city-owned right-
of-way near the cemetery.
St. Andrew Church mem-
bers and Fr. William Vernon
again argued that extend-
ing the street in any way
would be detrimental to the
neighborhood and com-
munity and would impede
any future expansion plans
for the church or cemetery.
Youth football and lacrosse
programs often use the open
space, but a connection could
alleviate some traffic conges-
tion along Main Street in the
future.
Nearly 100 people turned
out for last months meeting,
with about a dozen speaking
in opposition to the down-
town plan. Many of those
speakers were upset that
planners had not contacted
the church when drafting
proposed changes to the
citys comprehensive plan.
Ald. Dale Yurs (Dist. 2)
apologized to the parishio-
ners for the oversight before
making a recommendation
to pass the plan without the
Silent Street connection.
I do think that that was
something that we missed,
and I think the city does need
to own up to that, Yurs said.
The recommendation was
approved 3-2, with Jack
Linder and Janie Ritter vot-
ing against. Ritter told the
commission she was in favor
of removing the Silent Street
connection but had concerns
about the municipal parking
areas downtown. Commis-
sioners Steve Heinzen and
Patrick Lytle were absent.
The plan now heads to the
Common Council for review
and possible adoption Mon-
day, March 10. The Silent
Street plans could be added
back in at the council level.
Yurs said comments are
still welcome, particularly
since most of the recent dis-
cussion had focused intently
on removing the Silent Street
connection.
You dont always have to
speak out against things we
like to hear when youre for
something, too, Yurs said.
Thats going to help the city
prioritize where we want to
go next with the downtown.
In brief
Planners had
recommended a bike/
pedestrian path along
city-owned right-of-way
extending from the end
of Silent Street to Main
Street, with the potential
for it to become a road
in a few decades.
Commission
members removed
that provision from the
plan, which goes to the
council Monday.
Mayor: Nobody should be forced to sell
While much of the con-
cern last month about the
downtown plan was aimed
at Silent Street, other speak-
ers had concerns that they
had not been contacted by
the city when making plans
for the area.
Some cur r ent bui l d-
ing owners or businesses
thought the plan -- show-
ing possible parking areas
where current buildings are
now meant they would be
forced from their properties
in order to make way for
the proposed changes.
Mayor Jon Hochkammer
said the plan was a guid-
ing document and that he
personally thought the city
would not forced anybody
from their properties in
order to implement any of
the proposed changes.
I will do whatever in my
power to ensure that we are
not relocating of disturbing the
business of any current land-
owner, Hochkammer said.
Hochkammer sai d he
would ask council members
to share their opinions on
that issue at the next coun-
cil meeting.
Mark Ignatowski
Rendering submitted
The latest intersection improvement planned for hwys. M and PD shows a signalized intersection
with a through-traffic westbound underpass planned for Hwy. PD. A meeting discussing the pro-
posed changes will be held Wednesday, March 12, at the Verona Senior Center.
If you go
What: Hwy. M recon-
struction meeting
When: 6 p.m.
Wednesday, March 12
Where: Verona Senior
Center
Info: cityofmadison.
com/engineering/cthm/
City of Verona
Council considers Brewery patio hours
When the weather warms
up this spring and it will
visitors to Wisconsin Brew-
ing Company likely will
have an outdoor patio area to
enjoy their microbrews.
The citys Plan Commis-
sion recommended approval
Monday of a conditional-use
permit that will allow out-
door drinking and live music
in an fenced-in area near the
4-month-old American Way
operation.
The commi ssi on rec-
ommended shortening the
allowable hours of operation
from what was requested
to placate some concerned
neighbors, but the Common
Council will have final say
next week.
WBC had sought to have
the patio open with the poten-
tial for live music until mid-
night on weekends and 11
p.m. on weekdays. CEO Carl
Nolen had said he was ame-
nable to reducing those hours
to 11 p.m. on Friday and Sat-
urday and 10 p.m. other days,
city planner Adam Sayre told
the Commission.
Still, some neighbors were
concerned about the noise
carrying from the brewery
and asked that the hours be
reduced further -- to have
the music stop at 9 p.m., 10
on Friday and Saturday, and
allow another hour for wrap-
ping up.
Commission members vot-
ed 4-1 to forward the permit
to the council with the earlier
hours, with mayor Jon Hoch-
kammer casting the lone no
vote. The approval comes
with a staff-recommended
stipulation that the hours be
reviewed on an annual basis
every fall.
The Common Council is
slated to review the permit
Monday, March 10.
Mark Ignatowski
4
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Verona Press
Thursday, March 6, 2014 Vol. 48, No. 41
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Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
Institution of marriage
could use some updates
R
egardless of your stance
on same-sex marriage, you
have to admit, those seek-
ing a same-sex marriage have a
tough road to travel to get there.
This issue got me thinking
about heterosexual marriage and
how disproportionately easy it is
to get married, especially com-
pared to how difficult it is to get
divorced.
Dont get me wrong. Im a
proponent of
marriage, but
as someone
who has been
on both ends,
it was far more
difficult to get
divorced, and
perhaps mar-
riage shouldnt
have been that
easy to do.
My point is that its time to
modernize marriage laws and our
expectations of marriage in gen-
eral, and same-sex marriage is
only one of many areas where we
need to shift our attitudes.
With the marriage rate of
American women decreasing and
the divorce rate increasing and
with women choosing to marry
at a later age or not at all it
calls into question the tradition
of marriage in the 21st century.
For anyone concerned about
marriage, it seems same-sex mar-
riage should be the least of their
concerns. Focusing on fixing
what is broken with heterosexual
marriage would likely be more
beneficial and productive.
Given the legal implications
and benefits (and burdens, with
assumption of debts) that come
with marital union, shouldnt
there be a check or balance? Our
government bases its legal deci-
sions on checks and balances,
after all. Doing so may prevent
bad marriages and help strength-
en good ones.
In some religions, there is
somewhat of a vetting process,
with marriage classes the couple
must take before the ceremony.
But friends who have gone
through this say the classes were
easy and a formality or dogmatic
tradition.
And even this level of a check
or balance is not required for
marriages outside of religion
(which are on the rise). Perhaps
its time to require couples to
take courses before they are
allowed to marry as an exercise
to find out whether a couple is a
good fit and to put our cultural
biases into context with the real-
ity of a modern marriage.
The practice of marriage
historically was established to
ensure the safe keeping of ones
female children. In ancient and
medieval times, marriage was
less to do with love, compan-
ionship and family and more to
do with future safety, alliances,
status and upward mobility. Mar-
riage was an insurance policy for
both men and women.
An argument could be made
that, while extremely misogy-
nistic, the approval of the family
(read: father) and the need for a
dowry made marriage far more
difficult than it is today.
I hope no one advocates for a
dowry in the 21st century, but
perhaps some form of sliding
financial tax or fee needs to be
established based on the couples
net worth or prior years income
tax statements. This would put
a financial check or balance
on the marriage. It would not
penalize the poor or reward the
wealthy, but it would put a tan-
gible seriousness to the practice
of marriage that may bring an
awareness of financial views,
inequities, goals and life plans
up for discussion that might not
have otherwise.
While women always worked,
be it in the home or in a textile
factory, it wasnt until World
War II they found a new sense
of self as they did mens work
as men went off to war. Women
now make up 50 percent of the
workforce and have built their
own careers and independence
from a need for compulsory mar-
riage.
In fact, undergraduate college
attendance is now 57% women.
Also, women serve as the pri-
mary breadwinner in 40 percent
of American households with
children under 18, according to a
2013 Pew Research Center study.
While there is still work to be
done for equality in the work-
place, women have established
themselves outside of marriage.
Men on the whole, have not
adjusted well to the changes
women have rightfully attained.
On the surface, most men
endorse the erosion of man as
primary earner, and they will-
ingly accept more responsibilities
at home. But there is a learning
curve that impacts marriages.
There is no social modeling
for these changes. Men in the
past 30 years have slowly been
creating a new model for the
next generation to follow. When
breaking new ground, much like
when women broke new ground
into the workplace, difficulties,
misunderstandings and conflicts
will arise.
In their book, Gender and the
Culture of Heterosexual Marriage
in the United States, Karyn
Loscocco and Susan Walzer
explain: Even in the most equal
of marriages, theres an incredi-
ble awareness of gender and how
a wife and a husband should
act. That continues to drive
contemporary heterosexual mar-
riage and its discontents.
While there is general agree-
ment that women working out-
side of the home and men doing
more at home are overall positive
changes, the change of one is a
progressive, empowering change
and the other is a byproduct or
result of that change. At least that
is the common perception, even
if its a subconscious awareness
of winners and losers.
More attention needs to be paid
to mens struggle with these ulti-
mately positive changes because
they have deep impacts on mod-
ern heterosexual marriage.
The concept of marriage in
our psyche, culture, society,
economy and laws has not kept
up, nor have we kept up with
the advances made psychologi-
cally, culturally, sociologically,
economically and legally by both
men and women. Same-sex mar-
riage may be only the tip of the
iceberg when it comes to mar-
riage reform, that is if we as a
society want marriage to remain
an important milestone and insti-
tution that anchors us.
Before we throw the anchor
overboard, perhaps its time we
look for fraying sections and
change the rope attached to it.
Brian Simons is the director of
the Verona Public Library.
Simons
Community Voices
Letters to the editor
Bare deserves Veronas support
I proudly support Mike Bares
campaign to continue his work on
the City Council.
Last week, a l et t er from a
friend of Mikes opponent, Evan
Touchett, unfairly attacked Mike
for receiving campaign contribu-
tions from friends and family who
support him.
After asking Mike about his
contributions, I believe he should
be proud that so many of his fam-
ily members, childhood friends,
and former and current colleagues
believe in him enough to contrib-
ute to his campaign despite lean
incomes, mountains of student
debt or daycare costs. It says a lot
that people who have known Mike
his whole life or have worked
with him donated to his campaign
because they believe he is a good,
bright and hard-working person
deserving of our support. Their
support is not something to attack,
its something to admire.
And who coul d begr udge
Mikes biggest contributors
Mikes parents, his in-laws, his
boss and mentor, and people who
were in his weddingfor wanting
him to succeed?
Mike has been and continues to
be focused on the issues affect-
ing our community, including
Veronas rapid growth, improving
safety and services and protecting
taxpayers.
It seems Mr. Touchett would
rather attack Mike for not living in
Verona for as long as he has. Four
thousand people have moved to
Verona since Mr. Touchett moved
here and half of the current 4th
District didnt even exist then.
Last weeks attack makes it seem
as if new voices dont matter.
Let s st op di scr i mi nat i ng
against new families coming to
our community. Lets instead
embrace them and recognize that
all people, from all places, offer
valuable contributions to our com-
munity.
When Mr. Touchett served on
the council previously, I contacted
him with a simple question. I nev-
er got a response. I was, however,
accidentally included on the for-
warding of my email to his fellow
councilmen when he asked them
what he should do.
Mike responds directly to all
concerns, listens to all sides and
makes his own decisions.
My husband and I are voting
for Mike on April 1 because hes
focused and like-minded on the
issues. I urge all of our neighbors
in the 4th District to vote for him
as well.
Jana Schroeer and
Chris Hannemann
City of Verona
Corrections
Due to an editing error, a letter to the editor in last weeks paper
inadvertently replaced 60 percent with 6 percent when referring to the
amount of donations raised by Mike Bare and Evan Touchett.
The sentence should have read: In reviewing each candidates Cam-
paign Finance Report filed thru January, Mr. Bare has raised 60 percent
more in donations ($4,075 for Mr. Bare vs. $2,552 for Mr. Touchett).
The Press apologizes for the error.
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
5
Deer Creek Sports & Conservation Club
Wild Game Feed
& Sporting Clays
March 8, 2014 3-7 p.m.
Wild Game, potato, vegetable,
dessert, coffee/milk - $10.00 per person
Rafes & Door Prizes Drawing at 7 p.m.
Sporting Clays 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
$15.00 per person
Shoot & Eat $20.00 per person
Contact: Ray Gilden 832-6261
Vern Martin 437-3999
8475 Miller Rd.
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March 7-9
Friday at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday at 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Sunday at 2 p.m.
Promenade Hall at Overture Center
For tickets call 608/258-4141 or
visit www.fourseasonstheatre.com
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Build Your Dream Home on
a Solid Financial Foundation
Capitol Bank has you covered from the ground up. Well draw up a Construction Loan to fit your
building plans with excellent rates, flexible terms and service from a local name you can trust.
1.99%
with an APR of 3.605%
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Call 836-1616 or apply online
in minutes at capitolbank.com.
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monthly interest payments ranging from $249.75 to $257.04 and one balloon payment of $300,248.75. Offer applies to owner-occupied single unit
residential construction, maximum 80% loan-to-value. Property must be located in Dane County. Limited-time offer starting 2/1/2014. Subject to
change without notice. Subject to credit approval. Some restrictions may apply. Consult your tax advisor on interest deductibility. Other fees may apply.
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Press wins six WNA awards
The Verona Press won
six awards from the Wis-
consin Newspaper Asso-
ciations convention last
week, including two for
first place.
The paper s annual
showpiece ode to business
and development, Verona
Progress, was chosen as
the top special section,
and the paper also won
for headlines. It finished
second in four categories,
and in three of those it got
beaten out by one of its
sister papers in Unified
Newspaper Group, t he
Oregon Observer and the
Stoughton Courier Hub.
All three of those pub-
lications, along with the
new Fitchburg Star, which
debuts next week, are col-
laborative efforts among
the entire UNG staff.
The WNA recognizes
winners in six categories
daily and weekly news-
papers of three sizes each
in its statewide competi-
tion. The Press, Observer
and Hub are in the middle
category of weeklies, with
ci r cul at i ons of 2, 000-
3,500.
Verona Progress is a
reflection of the citys
relentless growth, provid-
ing stories that recap the
past years developments
but al so ori gi nal work
highlighting growth and
improvements not other-
wise covered. This years
issue centered on the com-
munitys fascination with
its new brewery.
The winning headlines
were: Pulling together as
a family, about a Mount
Vernon family that trav-
e l s t o i n t e r n a t i o n a l
tug-of-war competitions;
TIF deal keeps beer buzz
goi ng about t he ci t ys
i nvest ment i n Wi scon-
si n Brewi ng Company;
and Superintendent earns
raise, praise, $50K, about
a school district contract
extension.
The al l - ar ound pho-
t ography award recog-
nizes quality photography
throughout the newspa-
per, i ncl udi ng i n com-
munity, news and sports
stories. The Press entry,
whi ch fi ni shed behi nd
its sister publication, the
Hub, included coverage of
Hometown Days.
Former Press reporter
Set h J ovaag s educa-
tion coverage award was
second only to his own
reporting in the Oregon
Observer. Jovaag, who
continues to contribute to
UNG, explored parents
concerns with a middle-
school behavior program
called the Wildcat Way,
the use of technology to
send students home with
lectures, rather than home-
work, and the expensive
securi t y upgrades t hat
followed the Sandy Hook
shootings.
Edi t or Ji m Fer ol i e s
busi ness coverage al so
took second to the Observ-
er, stories on a local death
at an assisted living facili-
ty, the brewerys deal with
the city and two stories
on Epics growth plans
and its use of alternative
energy.
Designer/reporter Vic-
toria Vlisides also took
second in page design.
UNGs four print news
publications earned a total
of 13 awards this year,
including five for first
place, after earning 14 last
year. The Press earned six
awards last year and three
the year before.
Press awards
First place
Special section-edito-
rial: Verona Progress
Headlines: Jim Ferolie,
Anthony Iozzo
Second place
All Around
photography: staff
Overall page design:
Victoria Vlisides
Local education: Seth
Jovaag
Business: Jim Ferolie
Verona Area School District
Union unhappy with change
in recruitment policy
SCOTT GIRARD
Unied Newspaper Group
The Verona Area School
Board approved changes to
the districts recruitment and
hiring policies Monday night
over objections from two
district support staffers.
The changes involve add-
ing six options for district
administrators to use while
recruiting new staff, with
questions specifically sur-
rounding waiving posting
requirements for open posi-
tions and retention and sign-
ing bonuses.
Mariann Kropp, president
of the Verona Educational
Support Professionals Asso-
ciation, which represents
school secretaries, custodi-
ans, teachers aides, food-
service workers and special-
education assistants, told the
board the posting require-
ment changes brought a loss
in transparency.
The possibility of hiring
the best and brightest may be
curtailed when limiting the
search, she said, according
to her prepared statement.
Support staff already have
a challenging time getting
interviewed for positions
they are qualified for, to
which I can personally attest
to.
Kropp also expressed con-
cerns about changes that
allow the district to create
scholarship programs, give
signing and retention bonus-
es, loan forgiveness programs
and partially or fully fund
teacher certification programs
for support staff, because
none had a defined cost.
The purpose of the chang-
es, superintendent Dean Gor-
rell and director of human
resources Jason Olson said,
was to give Olson and site
principals more flexibility
in case they find a candidate
whom they only have a lim-
ited window to discuss a
potential opening with, such
as someone visiting for a
weekend just before a job is
posted.
Previ ousl y, t he rul es
required a seven-day posting
period for openings to notify
current VASD staff.
The changes also aim to
create a more diverse staff,
both in a multicultural sense
and in finding teachers in a
diverse range of subjects,
specifically the STEM (sci-
ence, technology, engineer-
ing and math) fields, which
are often more competitive,
Gorrell said.
Kropp, along with spe-
cial education assistant Deb
Szarka, said while they
strongly supported increas-
ing diversity on staff, they
believed it could be done
within the current rules, and
that signing bonuses would
hurt staff morale and create
unintentional outcome(s).
Olson told the board he
understood the concerns, and
had only come up with the
proposals as an idea of one
way to fix the lack of diver-
sity currently on staff.
I believe if not changed it
will continue to be the detri-
ment that it is (in diversify-
ing the workforce), Gorrell
added.
Board members John
MuCulley and Jeannie Por-
ter voted against the changes,
with both expressing con-
cerns specifically over waiv-
ing posting requirements.
With one board member
absent, however, the changes
passed on a 4-2 vote with
the expectation that Olson
will report any times the new
methods are used to the Per-
sonnel Committee around
June.
Active shooter training
VASD school safety coor-
dinator Todd Endl said the
district will hold an active
shooter training at Savanna
Oaks Middle School Aug.
19.
The drill will include dis-
trict officials, Verona and
Fitchburg police and fire
departments, the sheriffs
office and the public works
department, among other
groups.
He said in future years the
drill will alternate between
a Fitchburg location and a
Verona location so they can
be prepared for both possi-
bilities.
He also updated the board
on some of the security con-
cerns he had identified in
his time at the district and
some of the solutions they
are looking at, which include
more cameras, new strike
locks on doors to speed up
door locking and creating a
check-out system for substi-
tute teachers using keys for
buildings.
BR principal search
The district received 108
applications for the open
Badger Ridge Middle School
Principal position.
Gorrell said a committee
including parents and district
administration is reviewing
the applications and hopes
to have a first round of inter-
views beginning next week.
The or i gi na l t i me -
line called for a hire to be
approved by the board in
April.
BRMS principal David
Jennings is retiring at the end
of the year.
Other business
Gorrell told the board the
district received 58 appli-
cants for the Future Schools
Committee, many more than
the 12-15 the committee
plans to include.
To choose the committee,
Gorrell will disaggregate the
applicants into groups such
as parents, non-parents and
business owners, along with
look at areas of residence.
He will bring that data
back and the group will con-
sider drawing names out of a
hat or other methods to ran-
domize selection.
The board also unani-
mously approved changes
to the districts high school
graduation requirements to
put them in line with state
standards.
Vlisides
Jovaag
Ferolie
Iozzo
Weve recently launched
the option to renew your
newspaper subscription
electronically with our
secure site at:
connectverona.com
Easily
renew your
subscription
online!
6
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Seeking volunteers
The Verona Area School District
is seeking volunteers to serve on a
Future Schools Committee. Interested
people are asked to fill out a brief sur-
vey to be considered for the post. For
information, call 845-4300 or visit
surveymonkey.com/s/Y9KLW92.
Play and Learn at Sugar Creek
Sugar Creek offers a chance for
parents and children to interact with
other families. The event features
story time, songs and arts and crafts
based around a theme.
The event is from 9:30 a.m. to 12
p.m. every Friday in the schools Step
Room. The event is free and open to
all families.
Making Our Marks
Verona studio artists Bea Neal and
her group 3150 Studio Artists, will
have their mixed media and fiber art
works on display from March 1 to
April 11 at the Madison Senior Cen-
ter, 330 W. Mifflin St. This is the
fourth annual exhibit, and this year,
members chose an American female
artist to inspire one or more of their
own creations.
For more information, contact Neal
at 848-9519 or visit 3150studioartists.
com.
Freckleface Strawberry
Based on the book by Julianne
Moore, VAHS Theatre Arts will pres-
ent the musical Freckleface Straw-
berry on March 7-9 in the VAHS
Performing Arts Center.
The March 7 show will run at 7
p.m., the March 8 shows will begin
at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. and the March 9
show will run at 7 p.m.
Candidate forum
The Verona Area Chamber of Com-
merce and the Verona Press will hold
a Mayoral Candidates Forum at 7
p.m. Thursday, March 13 at the Vero-
na Senior Center. Both incumbent Jon
Hochkammer and challenger Chad
Kemp will be on hand to answer ques-
tions from moderator Jim Ferolie. All
interested citizens are encouraged to
attend.
Social Security 101
At 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 18,
the library will host this informational
session. Jesse Grutz, from the Retire-
ment Classroom, will be available to
help you decipher this government
program.
Chamber Lecture Series
The Chamber Evening Lecture
Series will return to the Verona Pub-
lic Library at 7 p.m. Thursday, March
20 in the librarys community room.
The topic will be Everything You
Need To Know Before Buying or
Selling a Home, and featured pre-
senters will be Barb Dawson of First
Weber Realtors and the lending staff
from BMO Harris Bank in Verona.
Email kcurtis@veronawi.com for
information.
Coming up
Community calendar
Call 845-9559
to advertise on the
Verona Press
church page
430 E. Verona Ave.
845-2010
Thursday, March 6
9 a.m. to 3 p.m., AARP tax assistance appointments,
senior center
6-8 p.m., Josh Cataldo, contemporary guitar, Avanti
Italian Restaurant, 848-3315
Friday, March 7
Southwest Eagles Mite Showdown tournament,
Eagles Nest Ice Rink in Verona, southwesteagles.com
9:30-11:30 a.m., Young and Restless open indoor
playtime, library
7 p.m., Freckleface Strawberry, VAHS PAC
Saturday, March 8
Southwest Eagles Mite Showdown tournament,
Eagles Nest Ice Rink in Verona, southwesteagles.com
2 p.m. and 7 p.m., Freckleface Strawberry, VAHS
PAC
Sunday, March 9
Southwest Eagles Mite Showdown tournament,
Eagles Nest Ice Rink in Verona, southwesteagles.com
7 p.m., Freckleface Strawberry, VAHS PAC
Monday, March 10
11:30 a.m., Mr. Penumbras 24-Hour Bookstore
book discussion, VPL
7 p.m., Common Council, City Center
Wednesday, March 12
4-6 p.m., Divergent release party, ages 11-18, library
Thursday, March 13
7p.m., BRMS and CKCS Student and Staff
Showcase of Talent, Badger Ridge Middle School
7:30 p.m., mayoral candidate forum, Verona Senior
Center
Friday, March 14
9-10:30 a.m., meet new senior director Mary Hason
at the Mens Group meeting, 845-7471
12:30-2 p.m., bingo, senior center
Hearts and Minds
A good heart is vastly superior to a powerful intellect, since
a powerful intellect wedded to an evil or callous heart is sure
to cause lots of suffering. It would be best to have a good
heart wedded to a powerful intellect, but what matters in
most cases is the disposition of ones heart, i.e., whether
one is inclined to help ones fellows. What usually inclines
us to help our fellow creatures and to alleviate their suffering
is empathy, and its ability to help us to feel, or at least imag-
ine, what our fellow creatures might be experiencing. But,
there are times when empathy can lead us astray and we
need our intellect to help us in determining what we ought
to do. Most of us are more moved to action by the plight of
some individual we can identify with, the guy on the side of
the road trying to change his tire, or the single mother try-
ing to raise money to pay for her sick childs medical care.
But, when it comes to helping people halfway around the
world, refugees from Syria or starving people in Africa, our
empathy often fails to be engaged, and there we may need
to appeal to reason. God gave us hearts and minds, and we
should use them both.
Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
I will put my law in their minds and write it on their hearts.
Jeremiah 31:33
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Road, Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
allsaints-madison.org
Pastor Rich Johnson
8:30 and 10:45 a.m. worship times
THE CHURCH IN FITCHBURG
2833 Raritan Road, Fitchburg, WI
53711
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 8 and 10:45 a.m.
THE CHURCH IN VERONA
Verona Business Centre
535 Half Mile Rd. #7, Verona.
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 9 a.m.
FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008 memorialucc.org
Phil Haslanger
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
(608) 271-6633
Central: Raymond Road & Whitney
Way
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 & 10:45 a.m. Worship
West: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine
Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Worship
LIVING HOPE CHURCH
At the Verona Senior Center
108 Paoli St. (608) 347-3827
livinghopeverona.com, info@living-
hopeverona.com
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
201 S. Main, Verona
(608) 845-7125
MBCverona.org
Lead pastor: Jeremy Scott
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
REDEEMER BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
102 N. Franklin Ave., Verona
Pastor Dwight R. Wise
(608) 848-1836 www.redeemerbible-
fellowship.org
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Family Worship Service
RESURRECTION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Wisconsin Synod, 6705 Wesner
Road, Verona
(608) 848-4965 rlcverona.org
Pastor Nathan Strutz and Assistant
Pastor: Jacob Haag
THURSDAY
6:30 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship Service
ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC
PARISH
301 N. Main St., Verona
(608) 845-6613
Stchristopherverona.com
Fr. William Vernon, pastor
SATURDAY 5 p.m. Sunday Vigil,
St. Andrew, Verona
SUNDAY 7:30 a.m., St. William,
Paoli
9 and 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
Daily Mass: Tuesday-Saturday at 8
a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
ST. JAMES EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
427 S. Main Street, Verona
(608) 845-6922
www.stjamesverona.org
Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter
Narum
Services 5 p.m., Saturday, 8:30 and
10:45 a.m., Sunday - office hours
8-4 Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday; 8 a.m. to noon Wednesday
SALEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
502 Mark Dr., Verona, WI
Phone: (608) 845-7315
Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor
Laura Kolden, Associate in Ministry
www.salemchurchverona.org
9 a.m. Sunday School - 10:15 a.m.
worship service - Staffed nursery
from 8:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. - 11:30
a.m. Fellowship Hour
SPRINGDALE LUTHERAN
CHURCH-ELCA
2752 Town Hall Road (off County
ID)
(608) 437-3493
springdalelutheran.org
Pastor: Jeff Jacobs
SUNDAY
8:45 a.m. Communion Worship
SUGAR RIVER
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
130 N. Franklin St., Verona
(608) 845-5855
sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org,
sugarriverumc.org
Pastor: Gary Holmes
SUNDAY
9:00 & 10:30
Contemporary worship with chil-
drens Sunday school.
Refreshments and fellowship are
between services.
WEST MADISON BIBLE CHURCH
2920 Hwy. M, Verona, WI 53593
Sunday (nursery provided in a.m.)
9:15 a.m. - Praise and worship
10:45 - Sunday School (all ages)
6 p.m. - Small group Bible study
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST Located at Hwy. 92 & Ct.
Road G, Mount Vernon
(608) 832-6677 for information
Pastor: Brad Brookins
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
At Hwy. 69 and PB, Paoli
(608) 845-5641
Rev. Sara Thiessen
SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship
Wednesday, Mar. 5
5 p.m. Plan Commission from 3-3-14
7 p.m. - Capital City Band
8 p.m. 911 Information at Senior Center
10 p.m. United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. Marci & the Highlights at
Senior Center
Thursday, Mar. 6
7 a.m. United Way 211 at Senior Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Marci & the Highlights at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. Four Winds Presentation at
Senior Center
5 p.m. A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
7 p.m. - Words of Peace
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. White School at Historical
Society
Friday, Mar. 7
7 a.m. Four Winds Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. 911 Information at Senior Center
4 p.m. A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
8:30 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior
Center
10 p.m. - United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. Marci & the Highlights at
Senior Center
Saturday, Mar. 8
8 a.m. Plan Commission from 3-03-14
11 a.m. - 911 Information at Senior
Center
1 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
4:30 p.m. White School at Historical
Society
6 p.m. Plan Commission from 3-3-14
9 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
10 p.m. - White School at Historical
Society
11 p.m. - Marci & the Highlights at Senior
Center
Sunday, Mar. 9
7 a.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
9 a.m. Resurrection Church
10 a.m. - Salem Church Service
Noon - Plan Commission from 3-03-14
3 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
4:30 p.m. - White School at Historical
Society
6 p.m. Plan Commission from 3-03-14
9 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
10 p.m. White School at Historical
Society
11 p.m. - Marci & the Highlights at Senior
Center
Monday, Mar. 10
7 a.m. Four Winds Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
4 p.m. A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
7 p.m. Common Council Live
9 p.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
10 p.m. United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. Marci & the Highlights at
Senior Center
Tuesday, Mar. 11
7 a.m. United Way 211 at Senior Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Marci & the Highlights at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. Four Winds Presentation at
Senior Center
5 p.m. A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Resurrection Church
8 p.m. - Words of Peace
9 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. - White School at Historical Society
Wednesday, Mar. 12
7 a.m. Four Winds Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. 911 Information at Senior
Center
6 p.m. Common Council from 3-10-14
7 p.m. - Capital City Band
8 p.m. 911 Information at Senior Center
10 p.m. - United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. Marci & the Highlights at
Senior Center
Thursday, Mar. 13
7 a.m. United Way 211 at Senior Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. Marci & the Highlights at
Senior Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. Four Winds Presentation at
Senior Center
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. White School at Historical
Society
Whats on VHAT-98
Watch city meetings online: youtube.com/user/VeronaWIMeetings
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
7
Mayoral debate set
The two candidates for
mayor will debate local
issues next week at a forum
at the Verona Senior Cen-
ter, 108 Paoli St.
The Verona Press and
Verona Area Chamber of
Commerce are jointly coor-
dinating the forum, which
will be held at 7 p.m. March
13.
Incumbent Jon Hochkam-
mer faces local attorney
Chad Kemp, his first chal-
lenger since his election in
2006.
Verona Press editor Jim
Ferolie will moderate the
discussion, which will be
based off questions devised
by himself and chamber
execut i ve di rect or Karl
Curtis, who is a former
Verona Press editor.
The publ i c wi l l be
allowed to submit questions
to Curtis and Ferolie after
the initial round of ques-
tions and answers are com-
plete. These questions will
be asked as time allows.
For information, call 845-
5777.
family dental care
608-437-5564
on the trollway in mt. horeb
522 springdale street
www.familydentalcarellc.com
one-visit crowns.
In one visit we can replace a damaged tooth with a pure
ceramic crown milled by computer to t your tooth precisely.
Your new crown is made while you wait, eliminating the need
for a second appointment and a temporary crown.
another convenient reason to choose
family dental care
608-437-5564
on the trollway in mt. horeb
522 springdale street
www.familydentalcarellc.com
one-visit crowns.
In one visit we can replace a damaged tooth with a pure
ceramic crown milled by computer to t your tooth precisely.
Your new crown is made while you wait, eliminating the need
for a second appointment and a temporary crown.
another convenient reason to choose
U
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City of Verona
Fire/EMS station
plan draws few
comments
Only a handful of people
showed up to an open house
meeting last week to ask
questions about the pro-
posed 40,000-square-foot
fire station.
City administrator Bill
Burns said he expected
a little more turnout, but
added that it was a good
opportunity for alders and
fire and EMS personnel to
speak directly to the archi-
t ect s from Fi ve Bugl es
Design.
Burns said the architects
will work on more detailed
designs for the project this
month and will meet toward
the end of March to get
feedback from the citys ad
hoc public safety facilities
committee. Those designs
will be reviewed again by
the citys Plan Commission
and Common Council.
The ad hoc committee
has been working with Five
Bugles to refine the station
with a projected total cost
of nearly $10 million. The
proposed design includes
two EMS vehicle bays and
six fire equipment bays
fronting Verona Avenue
near the current fire station.
Living quarters for both
crews would be housed on
the second floor of the prai-
rie-style building, which
would feature glass-cov-
ered folding doors. There
would be a public meeting
room and kitchen, along
with a museum area near
the corner of Lincoln Street
and Verona Avenue.
The current station, built
in 1974, is about 12,000
square feet with office and
training space. The old sta-
tion would be partially pre-
served while the new one is
built.
The Common Council
reviewed initial plans earli-
er this month and voted 6-1
to move planning forward,
despi t e some concer ns
about some details of the
project. Alders still wanted
more input as designers
worked on details of the
project, including a discus-
sion about what amenities
might be needs versus
wants.
Bur ns s a i d a not he r
open house will likely be
held later this spring once
det ai l ed document s are
available. A date for that
meeting has not been set.
Mark Ignatowski
Hochkammer Kemp
Theatre comes
to the library
The Madison Childrens The-
atre visited the Verona Public
Library Thursday, Feb. 20. A
teacher and a half-dozen student
actors did role playing games
with the kids who attended.
The event is called Curtains
Up with CTM. This series is
meant to introduce young people
and their families to the color-
ful characters and memorable
stories of its productions. Last
Thursdays was centered around
the upcoming show, Alexander
and the Terrible, Horrible, No
Good, Very Bad Day.
Children attending the event
were read the classic text, acted
out parts of the story. They acted
out scenarios like what would
you do if you spilled your milk?
And how would the other actor
comfort them?
At the end, the CTM actors
sang a few songs from an
upcomi ng performance and
answered questions about what
its like to be in CTM.
Photos by Victoria Vlisides
From left: Max Vitale (Philip), Alice Wenzlow (Becky), Sophia Bavishi (Christine), Flynn Marcus (Albert) act in Alexander and the
Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.
Right, Henry Steger, 3, with Sophia
Bavishi, CTM actress.
Below, Thea Leuschen, 6, gets into
the action.
8
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
UN338336
Verona History
December
40 years ago
Verona electors decided
to purchase the Dane County
Special School, located on
South Marietta St., for $60,000
as a place where extra space
could be provided for class-
rooms if it were needed.
The district had sold the
building to the county in 1965
for $25,000, then the county
put $35,000 in improvements
into it, yet it was not consid-
ered appropriate for teaching
handicapped students -- the
purpose of the Special School.
In addition, state statutes
recommended mixing handi-
capped and other children.
The vote followed a school
board recommendation.
Town voters decided not
to allow the board to increase
its size from three to five
members, an option that had
been created by the state a
year earlier. The board is now
five members, however.
The Bank of Verona moved
into a new building on North
Main Street, doubling its size.
The bank stayed there until it
was sold in 2006 to State Bank
of Cross Plains, which now
uses that building.
The Village Board decided
to begin holding regular meet-
ings twice a month. It was
already holding special meet-
ings frequently.
The Mount Vernon
Telephone Co. increased the
number of Verona service
lines into Madison to 42, up
from 10.
A 2-year-old boy was
struck and killed by an out-of-
control car near the road by
his Country View home when
the driver swerved to avoid an
accident with another car on
Timber Lane. That happened
less than 24 hours after a
49-year-old Town of Verona
resident was killed in another
car crash at Cross Country
and Nesbitt roads.
30 years ago
The Railroad Crossing
building more familiarly
known as the Auditorium
began undergoing an exten-
sive interior facelift to restore
its original beauty.
The roughly 100-year-old
building on Railroad Street,
which the new owners called a
grand, old lady had accom-
modated several different
businesses over the year, res-
taurants and hotels, and was
being planned for a new res-
taurant and bar with an early
1900s theme.
The building, which at one
point had several hitching
posts out front, has since
gone through several owners
and now is the site of Cahoots
bar.
Superintendent Wayne
Diekrager recommended
monthly monitoring of what
would have to be a $60,000
cut in the school budget to
match the outgoing tax bills.
The budget still an
increase of $400,000 over the
previous year was so tight
the margin for error is prob-
ably zero, Diekrager said.
Mayor Bill Pechan
announced he would not seek
re-election.
The Friends of the Verona
Library began a campaign for
an eventual expansion of the
library with a $4,000 deposit.
More than 70 people
attended an open house for
Four Winds Lodge, an assist-
ed-living expansion of the
Four Winds Manor facility.
20 years ago
Construction began on the
four-lane, 6-mile U.S. 18-151
bypass around the south side
of Verona. The first phase of
the once controversial plan
included construction of
bridges on Highway M and
Locust Road.
The bypass was set to open
in 1995, drastically changing
traffic patterns in Verona and
eventually changing the types
of businesses that survived on
Verona Avenue.
Senior Luke Sullivan ver-
bally committed to the track
and field program at UCLA.
Sullivan, one of a select group
of scholarship athletes on the
team, had set state and school
records in the discus throw
and was recruited by more
than 50 Divison I schools.
The school district began
planning for a possible fourth
elementary school to accom-
modate growth. It would
instead move Country View
Elementary School into a new
building on the north side and
a few years later open Glacier
Edge Elementary School.
The city approved three
separate annexations all
around the city, all of which
could not begin construction
until the city had completed
its switch to the Madison
Metropolitan Sewerage
District, scheduled for 1995.
The Plan Commission
approved construction of two
19-unit apartment buildings in
the Westridge Estates subdivi-
sion. Both were scheduled to
open the following summer.
Jim Ferolie
10 years ago
The Verona Cemetery
Association continued its
program to replace dilapi-
dated gravestones. Dating
back to 2001, the program
was spearheaded by volun-
teers and restoration work by
Tim Worachek. Worachek,
who had replaced 20 stones
the previous year, worked on
another 30 in 2003.
The land for the Verona
cemetery was bought by H.B
Matts in 1848 for $15. Matts,
who was buried in the cem-
etery, died of typhoid pneu-
monia in 1883.
A general development
plan to build a state-of-the-art
basketball and recreation com-
plex on Prairie Heights Drive
cruised through the Common
Council. Rick Mason, a Verona
resident ad former owner of
Room to Grow Day Care, pro-
posed the plan, and hoped to
start construction by 2004.
The facility, which did end
up being constructed in 2004,
was dubbed the Mac Sport
Center and hosted a variety of
sporting events and camps.
It is now called the Verona
Athletic Center.
The Verona Area School
District hit target numbers set
by state statute to begin a
bilingual program for the fol-
lowing year.
The school board gave
preliminary approval to
accept bids to sell three
lots in Fitchburg and one in
Westridge neighborhood. The
bids, totaling over $300,000,
would go towards the pur-
chase of land on which to con-
struct a new school, Glacier
Edge Elementary School.
The World of Variety was
torn down as part of its expan-
sion plans. The plans called
for a new, more aesthetically
pleasing building design, a
remodel inside and out and
more parking.
A single-vehicle crash on
US Hwy. 18/151 near CTH
G resulted in the death of
a 15-year-old boy. The SUV,
driven by a 19-year-old boy
from Illinois, rolled over after
the driver got distracted and
lost control.
Sixteen windows at Stoner
Prairie Elementary School
were broken, the damage esti-
mated at $15,000. Five juve-
niles, four from Verona and
one from Fitchburg, all age 14,
were charged with the vandal-
ism.
Michael Fiez
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Verona Area School District
Exploration Academy
fills open spots
Exploration Academy
received 36 applications
for 20 open spots in the
2014-15 school year.
The school, Veronas
charter high school, held a
lottery to decide who will
attend the school after the
Feb. 20 deadline for appli-
cations.
There are an additional
eight conditional spots
for seniors expected to
graduate, but those will
not be confirmed until
June, principal Mike Mur-
phy said.
The other eight appli-
cants were put on a wait-
ing list.
Most of the new stu-
dents are freshman, but
some are al so current
Verona Area High School
students who will transfer
to EA, which is in its first
year of operation.
The school focuses on
personal i zed l earni ng,
with students choosing
and designing their own
projects to demonstrate
academic standards that
are the same as students at
VAHS must meet.
St udent s wor k wi t h
advisers to ensure projects
meet certain standards.
Scott Girard
District adds Personalized
Learning link to website
The Verona Area School District added a link to per-
sonalized learning information to its website in recent
weeks.
The information outlines the Verona Area School
Boards April 2013 decision to adopt personalized
learning plans for every student in the district by 2017,
along with the reasons behind it.
The link also includes an explanation of what person-
alized learning is and how it is applied in the classroom
for curious parents.
To see the information, visit verona.k12.wi.us.
Verona residents honored
for 25-year county service
Verona residents Helen Jaggi, Rayanne Pedretti and
Michael Griffin have been awarded for their 25 years of
service to Dane County.
Jaggi, Pedretti and Griffin received a plaque of appre-
ciation and official recognition from County Executive
Joe Parisi and the County Board Chair.
Jaggi and Pedretti work for the Department of Human
Services, and Griffin works for Public Health Madison-
Dane County.
The countys dedicated public servants have my
deepest thanks for the work they do every day for Dane
County, Parisi said in a news release. Their work sup-
ports and strengthens families, protects our residents
from harm, and helps keep our roads and communities
safe every day of the year.
Jaggi, Pedretti and Griffin are among the 41 county
employees that received recognition for their service
this year.
Sutter gets conservation award
For nearly 30 years Dane
County Conservationist Pat
Sutter has helped preserve
and restore an estimated
60 miles of streams in the
county, increasing fish-
ing access to anglers and
building the countys repu-
tation as a world-renown
trout fishing destination.
Last month, he was named
Conservation Professional
of the Year by the Wiscon-
sin State Council of Trout
Unlimited.
According to a Dane
County news release, Sut-
ters work has contributed
to improvement of trout
habitat and fishing access
in the Sugar River, Badger
Mill Creek and Deer Creek
in the Verona area, as well
as Black Earth Creek, Gar-
foot Creek, Vermont Creek,
Fryes Feeder, Mount Ver-
non Creek, Gordon Creek,
German Valley Creek,
Pleasant Valley Creek,
Kittleson Creek, Syfestad
Creek and the East Branch
of Blue Mounds Creek.
Dane County Executive
Joe Parisi said Sutters
commitment to the health
of the countys waterways
and trout streams is second
to none.
His ability to build
part nershi ps wi t h l and
owners, state and fed-
eral officials, and private
groups has been the key
to the countys successful
conservation efforts for
decades, Parisi said.
A lifelong resident of
Dane County, Sutter is
credited with pioneering
the countys stream bank
preservation process. He
was nominated for the
honor by the Southern
Wi sconsi n Chapt er of
Trout Unlimited President
Steve Wald.
No ones boots have
covered more miles than
Pa t s , Wa l d wr ot e .
Thanks to Pat, the Gold-
en Age of trout fishing in
Dane County is now.
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
9
Jon Ballou Rocky Baumer Paul Charles
Timothy Tofte
Stacie Rudy
April Wutke
Stephen Runde
26 Schroeder Court, Madison, WI 53711
Meet the March 31 deadline. Well walk
you through enrollment, for FREE!
Do you have questions?
What is the Exchange?
What is the Marketplace?
What will it cost me and my family?
How do I pay for it?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
How do I get my Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than 3,500
individuals and families act on Health Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help! We make it easy.
Visit ticinsurance.com or call 608-273-3855.
Act NOW on the Affordable Care Act!
Health Insurance Life Insurance Disability Accident Annuities Age 65 Plus Long Term Care
Jon Ballou Rocky Baumer Paul Charles
Timothy Tofte
Stacie Rudy
April Wutke
Stephen Runde
26 Schroeder Court, Madison, WI 53711
Meet the March 31 deadline. Well walk
you through enrollment, for FREE!
Do you have questions?
What is the Exchange?
What is the Marketplace?
What will it cost me and my family?
How do I pay for it?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
How do I get my Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than 3,500
individuals and families act on Health Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help! We make it easy.
Visit ticinsurance.com or call 608-273-3855.
Act NOW on the Affordable Care Act!
Health Insurance Life Insurance Disability Accident Annuities Age 65 Plus Long Term Care
Jon Ballou Rocky Baumer Paul Charles
Timothy Tofte
Stacie Rudy
April Wutke
Stephen Runde
26 Schroeder Court, Madison, WI 53711
Meet the March 31 deadline. Well walk
you through enrollment, for FREE!
Do you have questions?
What is the Exchange?
What is the Marketplace?
What will it cost me and my family?
How do I pay for it?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
How do I get my Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than 3,500
individuals and families act on Health Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help! We make it easy.
Visit ticinsurance.com or call 608-273-3855.
Act NOW on the Affordable Care Act!
Health Insurance Life Insurance Disability Accident Annuities Age 65 Plus Long Term Care
Jon Ballou Rocky Baumer Paul Charles
Timothy Tofte
Stacie Rudy
April Wutke
Stephen Runde
26 Schroeder Court, Madison, WI 53711
Meet the March 31 deadline. Well walk
you through enrollment, for FREE!
Do you have questions?
What is the Exchange?
What is the Marketplace?
What will it cost me and my family?
How do I pay for it?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
How do I get my Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than 3,500
individuals and families act on Health Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help! We make it easy.
Visit ticinsurance.com or call 608-273-3855.
Act NOW on the Affordable Care Act!
Health Insurance Life Insurance Disability Accident Annuities Age 65 Plus Long Term Care
U
N
3
3
5
6
0
8
Jon Ballou Rocky Baumer Paul Charles
Timothy Tofte
Stacie Rudy
April Wutke
Stephen Runde
26 Schroeder Court, Madison, WI 53711
Meet the March 31 deadline. Well walk
you through enrollment, for FREE!
Do you have questions?
What is the Exchange?
What is the Marketplace?
What will it cost me and my family?
How do I pay for it?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
How do I get my Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than 3,500
individuals and families act on Health Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help! We make it easy.
Visit ticinsurance.com or call 608-273-3855.
Act NOW on the Affordable Care Act!
Health Insurance Life Insurance Disability Accident Annuities Age 65 Plus Long Term Care
Jon Ballou Rocky Baumer Paul Charles
Timothy Tofte
Stacie Rudy
April Wutke
Stephen Runde
26 Schroeder Court, Madison, WI 53711
Meet the March 31 deadline. Well walk
you through enrollment, for FREE!
Do you have questions?
What is the Exchange?
What is the Marketplace?
What will it cost me and my family?
How do I pay for it?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
How do I get my Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than 3,500
individuals and families act on Health Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help! We make it easy.
Visit ticinsurance.com or call 608-273-3855.
Act NOW on the Affordable Care Act!
Health Insurance Life Insurance Disability Accident Annuities Age 65 Plus Long Term Care
Do you have questons?
What is the exchange?
What will it cost me and my family?
Am I eligible for a Tax Credit?
The Insurance Center has helped more than
3,500 individuals and families act on Health
Care Reform.
Enroll now with our help!
We make it easy.
Visit tcinsurance.com/actnow
or call 608-273-3855.
Reading
for a cause
Stoner Prairie Elementary School
students had plenty of motivation to
read all the books they could during
Read Across America Week. As
a reward, students were given duct
tape in relation to how much they
read, and they duct taped principal
Mike Pisani to the cafeteria wall
during lunchtime Monday, March 3.
Once the stool under his feet was
removed, Pisani tumbled off the wall.
Above left, Pisani looks toward a
well-themed sign.
Above right, a teacher helps her
class get their tape.
Right, teacher Amy Magnus, dressed
as Cat in the Hat, helps students
get their tape. The students made Dr.
Suess-themed hats in art class.
Left, Caitlin Bruce puts her piece of
tape on Pisani.
Photos by Scott Girard
Photo submitted
Showing off
Stoner Prairie second-graders hosted a collection museum in
February, where students shared their collections with their
classmates.
10
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
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Hang on until tomorrow
Left, Grace Farrell (Anna Marie Leone) reacts as maids at the pala-
tial estate of Daddy Warbucks grant Annies request after the poor
orphan girl (Erin Butler) cant believe her good fortune and says,
pinch me! Sundays performance was one of three of Depression-
era musical Annie Feb. 21-23 by the St. Ambrose Academy at the
Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center.
Below, Miss Hannigan (Karina Polasky, right), brother Rooster (Ben
Galvin) and his girlfriend Lily St. Regis (Ava Balzer) sing and dance
Easy Street, concocting plans to swindle their way to good for-
tune, eventually using Annie as leverage.
Lowest, Grace Farrell (Anna Marie Leone) smugly presents the
news to an unhappy Miss Hannigan (Karina Polasky, doing the hair
of one of the orphans) that not only did Daddy Warbucks enjoy
Annies visit, but hes planning to adopt her.
Photos by Jim Ferolie
Photo by Scott Girard
Amazing artists
The Verona Area School District honored student artists at its board meeting Monday, March 3. The
students were nominated by their art teachers, with two additional honorees chosen by superintendent
Dean Gorrell. (Front from left) Denali Kraemer, third-grade, Glacier Edge; Elizabeth Jensen, fourth-
grade, Verona International School; Kate Grotsky, second-grade, Core Knowledge; Sanika Vishal,
kindergarten, New Century; Jaden Quinn, fifth-grade, Sugar Creek; (back from left) Mari Devereaux,
eighth-grade, Savanna Oaks; Amber Kleijwegt, twelfth-grade, VAHS; Lindsey Yeager, ninth-grade,
VAHS; Elaina Durnen, eighth-grade, Badger Ridge; Abigail Chase, fifth-grade, Stoner Prairie; Ben
Granberg, fourth-grade, Country View. Not pictured: Warren Bailey, twelfth-grade, VAHS.
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectVerona.com
The
Verona Press
11
Boys hockey
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Senior defenseman Philippe Fromberger and junior forward Grant Smith (2) celebrate Veronas third-straight WIAA sectional victory Saturday. The Wildcats prevailed 2-1
over Madison West. Verona faces Superior in the WIAA state quarterfinals Thursday at noon.
A sectional 3-peat
Cats win 2-1 to make state
for the third-straight year
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Junior Liam Schmitt played the
unlikely role of hero for the Vero-
na boys hockey team Saturday in
the WIAA sectional final game.
Schmitt, who had only scored
five goals during the regular sea-
son, net t ed t he game-wi nner
against Madison West to propel the
Wildcats back to a third straight
WIAA state tournament with a 2-1
victory.
Dominating play throughout
the first two periods, Verona held
just a one-goal lead until midway
through the third period inside
Hartmeyer Ice Arena.
That is until senior defenseman
Phillipe Fromberger teed up a blast
from the blueline, which kicked
out to Schmitt.
We had a couple of chances
prior, said Schmitt, who extend-
ed the Wildcats lead to a pair of
goals just over nine-and-a-half
minutes into the third period. Phil
has been getting some good drives
off and I have been picking up
rebounds. It was all him really.
Head coach Joel Mar shal l
couldnt have been happier for
Schmitt.
Liam is not a guy who nor-
mally gets game-winners. Hes
probably had just as many chances
as everyone else this year, he has
just struggled to capitalize on it.
For him to get that goal was really,
truly sweet.
Despite running the table within
the Big Eight Conference for the
second-straight year, including a
5-2 victory over the Regents back
in early January, no one thought
the win would come easily Sat-
urday. The Regents were without
goaltender Henry Cutting and for-
ward Cole Paskus in that game,
along with having a couple players
out serving suspensions.
West is an unbelievable hockey
team this year and they will be for
a couple years to come, Marshall
said. We knew it would be tight
right down to the buzzer.
Still the team was hoping to cap-
italize a bit more on the influx of
shots (25) it had over the first two
periods.
Henry, in net for them, is one
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1 state
tournament
When: March 6-8
Where: The Veterans Memorial
Coliseum at the Alliant Energy
Center in Madison
Cost: $5 per session
Boys basketball
Turn to Sectionals/Page 12
Tackett propels Cats to regional title
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
It took 14 attempts, but the Vero-
na Area High School boys basket-
ball team finally defeated Madison
Memorial for the first time since its
move to the Big Eight Conference.
What makes last Saturdays 53-51
win at No. 1 Madison Memorial
(20-4 overall) more special is that it
happened in the WIAA Division 1
regional finals.
We just emphasized, The longer
you keep this game close, the better
it is for us and our chances because
they are a heavy favorite, head
coach Alan Buss said in a phone
interview. And they were able to do
it.
It wasnt easy, but senior forward
John Tackett was a huge reason for
the win with his play in the final sec-
onds.
After a Verona (14-10) timeout
with seven seconds left, Tackett had
the ball stolen by Memorial senior
forward Darral Willis with the game
tied at 51. But instead of feeling bad
about it, Tackett rushed back down
the floor behind Willis.
Willis went up for a layup and
missed, and Tackett was able to get
the defensive rebound over two oth-
er guys and got fouled on the play
with 2.7 seconds left.
That set up the biggest free throws
in Tacketts career, and he nailed
both of them to give Verona the
53-51 lead.
Even though Willis missed,
Memorial had two guys down there
for the offensive rebound, and if
Tackett didnt hustle back they
would have had time to score on the
Photo by Jim Kalrath
The Verona Area High School boys basketball team celebrates a 53-51 win at
Madison Memorial last Saturday in the WIAA Division 1 boys basketball regional
final. The win was the first over Memorial since the Wildcats moved to the Big 8. Turn to Regionals/Page 13
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1 sec-
tional semifinal: No. 5 Verona vs.
No. 2 Sun Prairie
When: 7 p.m. Thursday
Where: Waunakee High
School
Wrestling
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Junior Eric Schmid struggles
with the 7-2 loss to DC Everests
Joe Ziolkowski in the 145-pound
WIAA Division 1 state individual
wrestling title match Saturday,
March 1, at the Kohl Center in
Madison.
Schmid is
a runner-up
at state for
second year
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Many wrestlers would
love to be runner-up at the
WIAA Di vi si on 1 st at e
wrestling tournament, but
finishing second overall
for the second-straight year
has left junior Eric Schmid
feeling dissatisfied.
Schmid, ranked No. 3
on wiwrestling.com at 145
pounds,
s t a r t e d
s t r o n g
i n h i s
f i n a l s
m a t c h
S a t u r -
d a y a t
the Kohl
Ce n t e r
in Madi-
son, but
he couldnt continue the
momentum in a 7-2 loss
to DC Everest junior Joe
Ziolkowski, ranked No. 2.
I was excited to make
it to the finals and make
it once again, but to be so
close and not reach a goal
Turn to State/Page 13
Check out more
photos online
ungphotos.
smugmug.
com/
VeronaPress/
Sports
12
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Lynx comeback falls short in sectionals
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Madison West forward Ellie Bohm
scored twice as the Middleton girls
hockey co-op fought until the bitter end
Saturday evening inside Madison Ice
Arena.
Though despite having the fifth
ranked and top-seeded Onalaska Hill-
toppers on their home ice, it didnt mat-
ter in the end.
Bohm and Madison Edgewood
freshman Siera Petet each tallied a
third-period goal, but it wasnt quite
enough as the Metro Lynx fell 4-3.
Im really proud of the girls and the
way they came out in the third period
and made a game out of it, Metro
Lynx head coach Peter Brenner said. I
felt for the majority of the third period
the play was down in their end. I kind
of felt if we could get that first goal, we
could get right back in it and we did.
The loss marked the second-straight
year the Middleton co-op allowed three
goals in the second period and went on
to lose to the Hilltoppers in the section-
al finals.
They definitely had the momentum
in the second period, Brenner said.
Things got a bit chaotic on our end
with a couple of girls going down on
the same shift and then a third girl got
hurt, so we were scrambling a bit with
our line changes.
Throughout the majority of the first
period the Lynx were able to keep
Onalaska to the outside. That was a
large part of the reason Middleton held
a 1-0 lead entering the second period
after the goal of Bohm.
That all changed in the second period
thanks to La Crosse Aquinas senior
Theresa Knutson, the states top scorer,
and Holmen junior Jacyn Reeves.
Knutson scored twice and assisted on
another as the Hilltoppers built a 4-1
advantage over a 10-and-a-half min-
ute span in the second period. Reeves
added a goal and assisted on teammate
Jamie Wielandts goal.
Were a very deep team, I feel we
can skate with Onalaska on any given
night, Brenner said. You have to con-
tain Knutson and Reeves and we were
unable to do that in the second period.
Give them credit. They attacked the
middle and used our D as screens.
Middleton senior Hunter Kurbel
stopped 30 of 34 shots in the loss,
while Jeanalyn Schindler turned away
23 of 26 for the Hilltoppers.
Knutson, a University of Connecticut
recruit, graduates this season though
Reeves returns for one more.
I think with the number of players
we have coming back and the depth
we have, weve built a solid founda-
tion and well be able to contend for
the sectional championship for the next
couple years, Brenner said.
Freshmen forward McKenzie Imhoff
Julia Dragoo and Petet all saw signifi-
cant ice time this season.
We lose eight seniors, but were a
pretty balanced team, Brenner said.
Were looking forward to what the
future holds.
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Baker & Launder, S.C.
351 Prairie Heights Dr., Verona, WI 53593
U
N
3
3
1
4
3
0
of the states best goal-
tenders, so we knew we
had to put the heat on and
probably get a greasy goal,
if you will, Marshall said.
We did that, but obvious-
ly they battled back right
at the end.
The Wi l dcat s st ruck
first on a power-play goal
in front by senior Brodie
Roehrig. Not the flashiest
player on the team, Roeh-
rig is always around the
net, beating Cutting 36
seconds after West fresh-
man Edwi n Ji ang was
called for tripping.
St i l l , Ver ona made
things interesting with
just over six minute left as
West junior Cole Paskus
pulled the Regents within
a goal at 2-1.
Then with just under
three minutes on the clock,
Verona senior defenseman
Joe Stevens was called for
hooking.
I thought we learned
our lesson last Tuesday
against MG in the same
exact scenario, Marshall
said. Weve been in situ-
ations like that before this
year, being tested in a cou-
ple of close loses and ties,
our confidence has gotten
a little more confident in
those situations as the year
has gone along.
The Wildcats killed off
that penalty and sopho-
more goal t ender Al ex
Jones faced more shots
(12) in a frantic third peri-
od than in the first two
periods combined, posting
22 saves to help the Wild-
cats preserve the win.
Cutting kept the Regents
in the game with 37 saves.
Verona was once again
wi t hout one of i t s t op
scores in senior forward
Harry Seid, who injured
his knee against Middle-
ton back on Feb. 1 and had
season-ending surgery a
couple weeks ago.
I didnt notice it at first,
but the guys put what
would Harry do? stickers
on their helmets, Mar-
shall said. He just has that
character, that senior lead-
ership. Hes the first one
in the locker room and the
last one to leave most days,
even when hes hurt.
The last few years Seids
also been one of the teams
most clutch players in the
playoffs and state tourna-
ment.
He pi cks up t hose
cl ut ch goal s when we
needed them, Marshall
said. We got into a couple
of battles here in the last
two games where we might
have separated with a guy
like him on the bench.
Br ogan Baker , who
celebrated his birthday
on Saturday, and Parker
have both stepped up even
more in Seids absence to
anchor the Wildcats top
two lines.
Getting back to state
for the third-straight year,
its just sweet for this
senior class, Marshall
said. Getting to state three
times is probably hardest
thing to do.
State preview
Verona (23-2-2), making
its sixth state appearance
inside the Veterans Memo-
rial Coliseum, will face the
most storied program in
state history in the opening
round of the 44th WIAA
boys hockey state champi-
onships. Superior qualifies
for the state tournament
for a membership-leading
36th time, and for the 12th
time in the last 13 seasons.
Faceoff is slated for
noon on Thursday.
Ticket prices for the
tournament are $8 per ses-
sion. Middle school-aged
individuals wearing their
hockey team apparel will
be admitted for $5 each
session.
The wi nner bet ween
the Wildcats and Spar-
tans advances on to Friday
where they will play the
winner between defending
state champion Eau Claire
Memorial (22-4-1) and
top-ranked Notre Dame
(26-1-0).
Notre Dame is making
its fifth overall trip to the
state tournament, all com-
ing consecutively since
2010. Eau Claire Memorial
will appear in the tourna-
ment for the 14th time and
for the seventh time in the
last eight years, only miss-
ing the tournament during
that span in 2009.
Verona defeat ed t he
Notre Dame in the semifi-
nals last year before fall-
ing to the Old Abes in the
championship game.
Were hoping for some-
thing big again, Schmitt
said. Were going to be
ready for difficult games
the whole way through.
Wausau West (20-6-0)
against University School
of Milwaukee (20-4-3) and
Onalaska (21-3-1) and the
first-time state qualifying
Kettle Moraine co-op (15-
8-4) round out the other
state quarterfinal match-
ups.
Wausau West makes the
trek to Madison for the
fifth-consecutive year and
for the 14th time overall.
Un i v e r s i t y Sc h o o l
returns to state for the 10th
time overall and for the
first time since 2010, when
the Wildcats won their
second state title.
Onalaska returns to the
state tournament for the
first time since 2009 and
for the second time over-
all.
Girls hockey
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Metro Lynx senior Jordann Herrling (15), junior Ellie Bohm and sophomore defenseman
Anna Schieldt (8) fight back tears following the teams 4-3 loss against Onalaska in the
WIAA sectional finals Saturday inside Madison Ice Arena.
Sectionals: Verona starts
state push at noon Thursday
Continued from page 11
Gymnastics
Alt reaches state with fifth-place finish on uneven bars
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
It takes a lot of getting sophomore
Lexi Alt overly excited and perhaps even
more to deter the Verona/Madison Edge-
wood gymnasts.
Battling through a season in which a
lingering (ankle) injury has held her out
of all but four meets, Alt still managed
to earn the fifth and final state qualify-
ing spot at Saturdays WIAA Division 1
Madison Memorial sectional meet.
I thought I would be close to the 9s,
but I didnt think Id score as well as I
did, said Alt, who scored a 9.075 on the
uneven bars.
Following the competition, however,
she was nearly as excited about her dis-
mount as the final score.
It had been a while since I was able
to do a dismount, she said. It was prob-
ably about a month-and-a-half. It felt
good.
Alt, a fifth-place all-around competitor
at state last season, finished 10th overall
on bars with a 9.033.
Only being able to compete four times
all season, some may have been surprised
by Alt qualifying for state. Not her or her
coach, though.
Lexi is such an even-keel kid all the
time, co-head coach Rachael Hauser
said. I try to get her excited. I wasnt
expecting it, but I wasnt ruling it out. I
think we both knew it could be done.
Scheduled to return to all-around com-
petition in early January against Madison
West, the sophomore standouts return
lasted one vault.
Stepping to the side to gain her bal-
ance, she rolled up the same ankle yet
again and sat out the rest of the meet and
just about every other Wildcat/Crusader
dual and invite until returning at the end
of the season to compete solely on bars.
Middleton senior Aryn Skibba, who
has battled her own injuries through-
out much of the season, finally put it all
together Saturday to help the Cardinals
beat Madison Memorial for the first time
all season. She won two of four rotations
to finish as the meets top all-around per-
former with a combined score of 38.100,
while helping Middleton to a season-best
143.525 to take home the sectional tro-
phy.
Memorial finished runner-up as a team
with a 142.725, while Madison West
(135.875) finished a distant third.
Skibba vaulted to a sectional title with
a 9.625 in round three and finished her
day with an 9.475 to win on balance
beam.
Sophomore Mandy Michuda was
Verona/Madison Edgewoods top com-
petitor on both rotations, finishing 14th
overall with an 8.40 on beam and 18th on
vault with an 8.475.
Senior Kayley Alioto, who joined the
Spartans team for the first time this sea-
son, turned in a 9.60 on floor exercise to
better Skibba (9.525) and her teammate,
as senior Caroline Smith posted a 9.5.
Smith finally got the better of Skibba
on the uneven bars where she scored a
9.6. Meanwhile, half-a-point separated
Michuda and junior Hannah Semmann,
who finished10th and 11th, respectively.
Michuda posted an 8.45, while Semmann
scored an 8.4. Co-captain Rachel Samz
turned in an 8.325 for 14th place.
Verona junior Sammy Seymour, in her
first year with the team, scored an 8.625
to finish eighth overall. Semmann fin-
ished two spots back in 10th place with
an 8.55.
Besides Skibba, Smith (37.900), Alio-
to (37.700), Sun Prairie junior Abby Mil-
lard (36.275) and Middleton freshman
Madeline Pfalsterer-Jennerjohn (35.800)
advanced on as state all-around competi-
tors.
Michuda finished five spots back in
10th place with a 33.800.
Mandy had a great year, working all
season to add and perfect little things,
Hauser said. We dont have huge skills
in her routine, but she does them really
clean and that makes a big difference.
Verona/Madison Edgewood mean-
while finished fifth overall as a team with
a season-best 133.125.
I was not expecting that based off
our beam and vault score, but bars was
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Sophomore Mandy Michuda finished 10th overall as a varsity all-around Saturday at the
WIAA Division 1 Madison Memorial sectional meet with a combined score of 33.800 points.
Turn to V/ME Page 13
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
13
rebound, Buss said. And
the other thing John, almost
every day after practice, stays
and shoots free throws, and
obviously, in a moment like
that it pays off.
Verona held a five-point
lead earlier in the fourth, but a
traditional three-point play by
Willis tied the game at 48.
Junior forward Jake Toman
came back down the floor and
made a 3-point play of his own
to give Verona the lead again,
but junior guard Shareef Smith
nailed a 3-pointer on the other
end to tie the game at 51 with
45 seconds left.
Buss said that the Wild-
cats did feel good about their
chances in the final four min-
utes, because they were play-
ing good defense. And that is
something that the team was
building on in the final three
weeks of the season with a
stretch of five wins in six
games.
Buss said that the team
decided to focus on man-to-
man defense near the end of
the season to better prepare for
what the Wildcats would face
in the WIAA tournament.
And that defense kept the
game close, as Memorials
biggest lead Saturday was four
points.
We really emphasized
defensive transition and get-
ting five guys back and mak-
ing them have to play against a
set defense, Buss said. They
really bought into that concept,
and that has really been the
difference for us.
And on the offensive end,
which is another huge part of
it, when you take good shots,
you give the other team less
chances to get out and get tran-
sition baskets.
Verona only turned the ball
over three times in the second
half in both the Madison West
regional semifinal Friday and
the regional final Saturday.
Toman and Tackett both
finished with 15 points,
while sophomore guard Cole
Schmitz added 12. Junior
guard Henry Houden led
Memorial with 16 points.
No. 5 Verona now travels
to Waunakee High School at
7 p.m. Thursday to play No.
2 Sun Prairie in the sectional
semifinal. The game was orig-
inally scheduled to be played
in Verona, but a WIAA rule
prevents a sectional game to
be played on a teams home
floor.
The sectional final is at 1
p.m. Saturday at Burlington
High School. The other sec-
tional semifinal is between
No. 1 Mukwonago and No. 2
Beloit Memorial. The Wild-
cats lost both meetings with
Sun Prairie this season.
Verona 62, Mad. West 49
Verona opened the region-
als last Friday at No. 4 Madi-
son West and picked up a
62-49 win.
The Wildcats jumped out to
a 13-4 lead after the first quar-
ter and added a 17-11 advan-
tage in the third to put the
game away.
Tackett led Verona with 20
points, while Schmitz added
17. Junior guard Will Kell-
erman chipped in 15 points.
Senior forward Malik Clem-
ents led West with 16 points.
is extremely disappoint-
ing, Schmid said. It was
a tough match, and I was
fortunate enough to wres-
tle in the finals and grate-
ful for that. There are a lot
of great wrestlers in this
bracket and this tourna-
ment. You know, what are
you going to do?
Schmid picked up a take-
down to start the match,
but he couldnt muster up
any more offense. Schmid
st art ed t he t hi rd peri od
with control and down two
but allowed an escape.
Schmi d t hen t ri ed t o
shoot wi t h a sense of
urgency as t i me wound
down but was caught for
another takedown and nev-
er had control again.
I got that first take-
down and felt good, and
afterward you can say that
I felt a little out of place,
he said. I obviously didnt
wrestle my match after that
first takedown. As unfortu-
nate as it is, I cant do any-
thing about it now.
Ziolkowski picked up a
reversal late in period one
and added a takedown in
period two.
The 145-pound bracket
was one of the tougher
ones at the state tourna-
ment wi t h sever al t op
seeds falling early, includ-
ing No. 1 Stoughton junior
Joe Nelson in the quarterfi-
nals to Ziolkowski.
Schmid battled through,
however, and he survived
several close matches just
to make the finals.
One of those matches
was a 9-8 decision over
Port Washington senior
Quentin Lueck in the quar-
terfinals Thursday. Schmid
trailed 8-6 in the third and
picked up an escape and a
takedown with time wind-
ing down to edge Lueck.
Schmi d t hen bat t l ed
through a cut on his fore-
head in the semifinals Fri-
day, which he would need
stitches for afterward, and
defeated Menomonee Falls
senior Casey Crangle 9-5
to make the finals.
Schmid opened the tour-
nament with a 6-4 decision
over Sauk Prairie sopho-
more Austin Powell.
To just to get to the
state finals two times is
an accomplishment in and
of itself, but it is bitter-
sweet with just the simple
fact that it was a winnable
mat ch for us, co-head
coach Jason Ott said. We
just came up short. It is
nice to be a finalist, but at
the same time, it is not nice
when you dont come out
on top.
But the great thing is
that he is only a junior, so
he has another shot next
year. Hopefully, we can
get back there and take the
next step and get it done.
Schmid finishes the sea-
son with a 47-5 record, and
he said he plans on work-
ing even harder this off-
season to get ready for his
final chance at getting the
state title, which has been
his goal since he started
wrestling for Verona Area
High School.
I have to put a lot more
time in throughout the off-
season maybe go to a few
camps and practice at least
once a week to keep the
rust off.
Crangle ended up finish-
ing third at 145 pounds,
whi l e Waukesha Sout h
junior Jordan Yatchak took
fourth. Nelson was fifth,
and Kenosha Br adf or d
sophomore Oscar Ramos
was sixth.
really good and floor was
good, Hauser said. I did
not expect, without Lexi
competing as an all-around,
to end up with a 133.
The score was an even
bigger surprise coming off
what Hauser called, the
worse practice ever.
Before competing inside
Madison Memorials gym
on Saturday though, Hauser
took a minute to remind the
team where they were.
Weve competed in his
gym four times this season,
she said. Weve had as
many meets here as we had
home meets all season, so
everyone should be comfort-
able with the equipment.
Once competition start-
ed, they relaxed a bit, but
they were nervous.
State preview
The 44th WIAA state
gymnastics championships
takes place Friday and Sat-
urday at Wisconsin Rapids
Lincoln High School.
The team champion-
ships begin Friday at 2 p.m.
The individual competition
begins at 11:10 a.m. Satur-
day.
Continued from page 11
Regionals: Cats play Sun Prairie in sectional semifinal V/ME: State starts Friday
Continued from page 11
State: Schmid finishes season 47-5 after three wins at Division 1 state meet
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1
state meet
When: March 7-8
Where: Wisconsin
Rapids Lincoln High
School
Cost: $6 per session
Continued from page 12
Mites tournament at
Eagles Nest
Th e f o u r t h - a n n u a l
Southwest Eagles Mite
Showdown tournament
will be March 7-9 at the
Eagles Nest Ice Arena.
The t ournament wi l l
host Mi t e Red hockey
t eams f r om Dubuque,
Waukesha, Milwaukee,
Chippewa Falls, Janes-
vi l l e, Reedsbur g and
Wausau, including local
t eams f r om Madi son,
Stoughton, Oregon and
Middleton.
The t ournament wi l l
begin with the Southwest
Eagles taking on Middle-
ton at 6:30 p.m. Friday.
The Eagles will then
play Reedsburg at 3:30
pm on Saturday.
Pool play will deter-
mi ne addi t i onal game
times. The championship
game will be played on
Sunday, March 9, at 3
p.m.
Sport shorts Girls basketball
Wildcats move to 20-2, get ready for regionals
The Verona Area High
School girls basketball team
traveled to Beloit Memorial
last Thursday for the regular
season finale and picked up a
64-47 win.
The Wildcats (20-2 overall,
16-2 Big Eight) jumped out to
a 33-15 lead at halftime and
added a 16-9 advantage in the
third.
Senior guard Jenni La Croix
led Verona with 16 points,
while senior forward Lexy
Richardson added 14. Sopho-
more forward Grace Mueller
chipped in 11, while senior
forward Marley Campbell
scored nine. Sophomore for-
ward Kira Opsal contributed
eight points.
Senior center Daijah Evans
and sophomore forward India
Dorsey each scored 11 points
to lead the Purple Knights.
Verona, which finished
second in the Big Eight and
received a No. 2 seed for the
WIAA Division 1 girls basket-
ball tournament, now shifts its
focus to the regional semifinal
at 7 p.m. Friday against No. 7
Madison West at Verona.
The winner plays the win-
ner of the No. 3 Madison
La Follette/No. 6 Madison
Memorial game at 7 p.m. Sat-
urday in the regional final.
Anthony Iozzo
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1
regional semifinal: No. 2
Verona vs. No. 7 Madison
West
When: 7 p.m. Friday
Where: Verona Area
High School
Paul: Verona gymnast caps emotional performance against Madison Memorial
Elizabeth has a differ-
ent best friend on the team
everyday. She gives you a
nickname and its just real-
ly fun to work with her,
said captain Tatum Teskey
whom Elizabeth calls my
lil Tey Tey.
Though Elizabeth only
got the opportunity to com-
pete once this season, she
still comes to every practice
and invitationals on Satur-
days to cheer on her team-
mates.
In that way, other girls
from other schools have
been able to get to know
her as well.
Shes inspired everyone
in the entire conference and
the whole area, Teskey
said.
Its more than just that,
though.
Its really great in a spot
thats so focused on being
perfect even if you fall
off the beam or do some-
thing that wasnt supposed
to happen, she still says I
want you do get first. You
did so amazing, Teskey
said. Its just great to have
her here.
Elizabeth said her favor-
ite part of gymnastics is
tumbling and the most dif-
ficult thing shes learned so
far has been flips.
Everyone has been very
encouraging with Eliza-
beth when it comes to her
gymnastics, Hauser said.
They help teach her new
things like how to connect
skills to make a tumbling
pass.
Shes not a fan of bars
or beam, but every now and
then the girls can convince
her to give these events a
try.
Inspiring performance
Though she had t he
skills, she had been unable
t o perform compet i t i ve
routines until coaches and
teammates taught Elizabeth
how to put her floor routine
together.
Unfortunately, the event
requirements for routines
are very difficult for begin-
ner gymnast s, Hauser
explained. Elizabeth has
some basic skills down, but
it wouldnt quite be enough
to qualify as a full routine.
She finally got her chance
in the Wildcat/Crusaders
final home meet against
Madison Memorial on Feb.
13.
Though the team hadnt
originally planned on hav-
ing Elizabeth put together
a performance, it became
clear about halfway through
the season that she was
ready to do it. About that
time, she began dancing to
the other girls floor music
(really, any song that was
on the radio).
The girls helped her put
together some tumbling and
a dance series and her mom
helped her learn how to
work a floor pattern by hav-
ing her watch the other girls
perform their routines,
Hauser said.
Elizabeth handed out 15
invitations for her perfor-
mance, as a larger-than-
average crowd of about
70 or 80 people were on
hand to see the routine per-
formed to Let it Go, from
the movie Frozen.
I remember talking it up
to everyone, said Debbie,
who might have been more
nervous than her daughter
was, once she saw all the
invitations. I remember
wondering if she would
stop and give up or if she
would keep going and make
it through the entire routine.
Debbi e t ook phot os,
while Elizabeths Dad took
video.
It was a good thing, I
could not hold back the
tears. Debbie said.
Even Elizabeths father
Matt had a tear afterward.
He certainly wasnt alone.
Wed seen her do the
routine in practice, Tes-
key said. Wed given her
all the passes and she knew
what she was supposed to
do.
But that moment when
she got out there in front of
everyone there was not a
dry eye in the gym, Tes-
key said. Afterward it was
a big group hug. We were
all so proud of her. We
were all crying.
That is, everyone except
Elizabeth.
I dont think Ill ever
forget that moment because
she was so happy, Tes-
key said. I was crying and
Elizabeth came up to me
and asked, Why are you
crying?
It was just like a collec-
tive feeling. Thats what
a team is supposed to feel
like, Teskey said.
After Elizabeths routine,
Debbie handed her daugh-
ter a bouquet of flowers.
Still fighting back tears of
joy, she never saw the smile
on her daughters face as
she took a giant sniff of the
flowers before she raised
them in the air to show her
teammates, only hearing
about the moment later by
other parents.
As we watched, I hoped
she would inspire others to
see how kids with special
needs can do anything with
support and acceptance,
Debbie said.
Elizabeth recalls clearly:
My friends were crying,
she said. They were hap-
py.
Now that practices are
over, Elizabeth doesnt see
all the girls and often ask
her mom when the team
will practice again.
I told her not till next
year, and she was a bit sad,
Debbie said. That is the
hardest part for us having a
child with Down syndrome.
We are lucky to have very
few health issues, but Eliz-
abeth loves people and is
very social. When she loses
contact with new friends,
teammates and/or teachers
she often talks about them
like they have moved away
and asks when she will get
to see them again.
Continued from page 1
14
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
GS1181 02/25/2014
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U
N
3
3
8
5
4
9
Highest Honors 3.8 ~
4.0
Sofia Abreu
Jennifer Alejandro-
Torres
Alexis Alt
Kaela Amundson
Noah Anderson
Brett Andreas
Sherry Arce-Sotelo
Molly Armstrong
Lauren Atkins
Anthony Augello
Anna Bahlman
Josephine Baier
Warren Bailey
Justin Bain
Brogan Baker
Nadia Banks
Leslie Banzhaf
Jason Barr
Conlin Bass
Zoe Beauchamp
Amanda Best
Melissa Biesmann
Alyssa Billings
Haley Bird
Ian Birschbach
Matthew Blessing
Abigail Bohrer
Erin Bormett
Gaebriel Brandon
Kevin Brazee
Sean Breen
Victoria Brisack
Nicholas Buchert
Bailey Buisker
Tess Campbell
Sonia Carrola
Julian Castronovo
Timothy Childers
Peter Christian
Asia Christoffel
Samantha Chylla
Jack Cioci
William Cioci
Alexandra Clark
Nathan Cleghorn
Bailey Click
Kiana Cline
Baylee Close
Kristi Cottrell
Lindsay Craig
Sarah Curtin
Cameron Damgaard
Bailey Danz
Jaryn Danz
Sydney DeMets
Peter Dimond
Samuel Douglass
Ally Dykman
Morgan Dykman
Sara Endres
Alyssa Erdman
Claire Evensen
Marissa Fahey
Katie Fan
Jacob Fauble
Sigal Felber
Alyssa Feller
Marissa Feller
Brooke Felsheim
Margaret Ferguson
Evan Fernandez
Kenneth Fiala
Mallory Filipp
Abigail Filsinger
James Fisher
Alexis Florac
Alison Ford
Emily Ford
Adam Francis
Jacques Frank-Loron
Robert Freitag
Emma Furniss
Oscar Garcia-Romero
Renee Gavigan
Jonah Gerrits
Benjamin Giese
Danielle Gilboy
Jakob Gingrich
Mariah Gingrich
Brenna Gladding
Zachary Godfrey
Katie Goetz
Nicolas Gordillo
Jerrod Gotchy
Elizabeth Granick
Troy Granick
Sydney Gresens
Ashley Griffin
Serafima Grimm
Jonathan Grinde
Aylise Grossenbacher-
McGlamery
Erin Gust
Zoe Hackel
Anna-Maria Hadjiev
Ella Hall
Damitu Hamda
Madeline Hankard
Joshua Hano
Nicholas Hansen
Zoe Hansen
Kye Hanson
Carolyn Hasselkus
Alan Heatley
Joshua Hegge
Cassandra Hei
Elizabeth Heinzen
Gabrielle Henshue
Jack Herkert
Noah Herkert
Joshua Hernandez
Erica Higgins
Cailin Hildebrand
Leah Hollar
Kaitlyn Hopfensperger
Bryce Hoppe
Jackson Hutchcroft
Cole Hyland
Ogiuzo Ifediora
Elliott Imhoff
McKenzie Imhoff
Katelin Jaggi
Clayton Jannusch
Peter Janssen
Alexander Johnson
Gabrielle Johnson
Paul Kalifatidi
Molly Kempfer
Jaclyn Kermicle
Randolph Kessenich
Jonathan Kilen
Robijn Kleijwegt
Rachel Klein
Alivia Kleinfeldt
Kevin Klockziem
David Klongland
Rachel Knoebl
Keaton Knueppel
Anna Kopp
Emily Kroth
Kyle Krueger
Sara Krueger
Mason Kuchenbecker
Bradly Laufenberg
Stephanie Lease
Jade Lee
Sylvia Lewis
Tiffani Lewis
Nicole Libson
Olivia Lilly
Natalie Long
Justice Lorbiecki
Max Luke
Joshua Madalinski
Joseph Maglio
Dana Maxwell
Katie McCormick
Kate Melin
Connor Melzer
Kaeden Meuer
Abbey Meyer
Makena Meyers
Hannah Miller
Brittany Mitchell
Charlie Mrkvicka
Grace Mueller
Sophia Musacchio
Kaitlyn Nagle
Nicole Neitzel
Megan Ngo
Alicia Nickolenko
Joshua Novotny
George Nunn
Hannah Nybroten
Alec Ochowski
Kailey Olson
Mallory Olson
Taylor Olstad
Emily Opsal
Alexandria Ortgiesen
Macy Osborne
Emily Osiecki
Claire Otto
Lillie Pankratz
Leah Parker
Corey Pedersen
Alexandra Perouansky
Jordan Pertzborn
Rebecca Phelps
Alexander Pletta
Karilyn Porter
Olivia Prescott
Sarah Prescott
Daniella Puccio
Jackson Pundt
Kirsten Queoff
Steven Queoff
Jonathan Redfern
Jessica Reinecke
Jeffrey Reinholtz
Jackson Reller
Matthew Reniero
Jenna Riley
Noah Roberts
David Romens
Rachel Romens
Patrick Ross
Bryn Rourke
Ellery Rourke
Heather Rudnicki
Jaime Runde
Marcus Runde
Bethany Russell
Dominic Sabbarese
Deanna Sagapolu
Lauren Samz
Rachel Samz
Morgan Sandler
Morgan Sanftleben
Anthony Santoski
Elizabeth Sarbacker
Natalie Schad
Lilly Schaefer
Kylie Schmaltz
Cole Schmitz
Luke Schoeberle
Grace Schraufnagel
Alaina Schroeder
Rebecca Schultz
Sarah Schultz
Grace Schwantes
Austin Schwartz
Peter Scott
Zeke Sebastian
Maizie Seidl
Derek Sell
Gabriel Selzer
Noa Seward
Samantha Seymour
Alankrit Shatadal
Alec Shiva
Luquant Singh
Zachary Slinger
Brianna Slonim
Arteyshia Smith
Bailey Smith
Caroline Snodgrass
Anna Solowicz
Madelyn Spindler
Angelique Stepanenkov
Bryn Stevens
Kassidy Steyer
Nicholas Stigsell
Kyle Studnicka
Ava Sutter
Laini Taylor
Tatum Teskey
Elizabeth Thompson
Kya Tiggelaar
Ashlynn Timmerman
Jacob Toman
Cheyenne Trilling
Kateri Trilling
Vineeth Uday
Stephanie VanFossen
Julia Ver Voort
Jennifer Wagman
Robert Wagman
Brett Wagner
Rya Wait
John Wang
Taylor Weigel
Jacob Wellnitz
James Wellnitz
Madeline Weston
Shannon Whitmus
Holly Wickstrom
Joshua Widra
Rachel Widra
Laura Williams
Claire Wilson
Carissa Witthuhn
Karen Wong
Allissa Woodman
Sarah Worley
Jaedyn Wozniak
Pablo Xelhua Garcia
Jessica Yan
Jun Yan
Jenine Ybanez
Jillian Ybanez
Lindsey Yeager
Brenden Zarrinnam
Alexandra Zaugg
Ella Zimbrick
Anna Zimmerman
Mark Zobel
William Zunker
High Honors 3.6 ~
3.799
Taylor Amato
Deeba Amiri
Alex Anderson
Jack Anderson
Madeson Anderson
Allison Armstrong
Jacob Auman
Bernice Ayite Atayi
Katherine Bakker
Christian Baltes
Ryan Barr
Brittany Beermann
Sarah Berry
Savanna Biedermann
Jared Bloomfield
Hunter Bourne
Jackson Bryant
Jenna Butler
Julia Butler
Marley Campbell
Patricia Cazares
Jack Childers
Bailey Christensen
Europa Christoffel
Kealy Click
Nokomis Cocilovo-Kozzi
Cassandra Connery
Dakin Coons
Jessica Coyne
Cristian Crespo
Reginald Curtis
Camille Dalma
Jordan Davis
Alejandra Diaz-Caballero
Sean Dobson
Gabrielle Douglas
Alyssa DuCharme
Callie Edwards
Maria Egle
Sara Ellis
Nicholas Federspiel
Benjamin Feller
Emma Fenne Rabiola
Avery Fossum
Luke Frahm
Philippe Fromberger
Sophie Fromberger
Autumn Gaillard
Isabella Genova
Thomas Gerlach
Anastasia Giese
Andrea Gladding
Larissa Gladding
Kolin Goldschmidt
Danielle Goodall
Nicolas Graese
Wyndham Greenlaw Rollins
Colin Griffin
Riley Grittinger
Garrett Grunke
Amanda Guzman
Hannah Haack
Caleb Haag
William Haessig
Lucy Nuan Hagen
Mackenzie Hall
Kayleigh Hannifan
Matthew Happel
Kaitlyn Hart
Egill Hegge
Shane Herkert
Elena Herman
Laura Hoejgaard
Alex Hofstetter
Abbie Homan
Jackson Hopfensperger
Harrison Ireland
Daniel Iszczyszyn
Bretton Jaggi
Michaela Jaggi
Molly Jennerman
Bradley Johnson
Brian Karebu
Beatrice Kealy
Mitchell Kealy
Jacob Kellen
Steven Kellerman
Rachel Kennedy
Kori Keyes
Jackson Kleese
Jennifer Kopp
Clariel Kramer
Kaylee Krantz
Kelli Krueger
Jennifer LaCroix
Bryce Lamers
Kristina Larsen
Emily Larson
Olivia Latimer
Leslie Lazaro-Padilla
Cameron Lewis
Catherine Lewis
Abigail Lindsay
Jordan Longseth
Abigail Ludwig
Theodore Manning
Emily Marckesano
Casey McClure
Tyler McClure
Nicholas Meland
Allison Meyer
Kate Morton
Heidi Mueller
Brennan Mullins
Julia Murzynski
Rachel Nachreiner
Dayna Nagel
Zachary Nechvatal
Quinlan Nelson
Theodore Nicholson
Trevor Nierman
Ana Noel
Nicole Noltemeyer
Erica Norman
Sarah Noyes
Gilberto Osuna-Leon
Karly Pabich
Charles Parker
Rose Parker
Kennedy Pekol
Claire Peterson
Konur Peterson
Madeline Pielage
Victor Pinto
Spencer Polk
Katelin Hope Princl
Katie Procell
Nathan Procell
Daniel Prudisch
Ryan Pynnonen
Sawyer Quade
Bryce Raffel
Lucas Rakel
Lauren Randall
Shelby Reiber
Alexandra Richardson
Jack Roessler
David Rogowski
Benjamin Rortvedt
Connor Rortvedt
Kyla Rozner
Brooke Schappe
Mary Schroeder
Nicole Schulz
Abbigail Semmann
Ria Sengupta
Evan Shaffer-Nachtman
Maxim Shershnev
Annalyse Shipley
Allison Shorter
Kylee Siegl
Richard Siegl
Cassidy Slinger
Amanda Snyder
Alexa Stampfli
John Stevens
Joseph Stevens
Genavieve Sticha
Patrick Stigsell
Mark Strayer
John Tackett
Cheyenne Teigen
Carly Temby
Addison Thomas
Marlowe Thomas
Julie Touchett
Teeghan Tvedt
Delaney Twing
Marianna Upchurch
Claire VanFossen
John VanHandel
Preston Vesely
Kara Waier
Abigail Waller
Timon Wendling
Madison Westfall
Eliza White-Pentony
Douglas Wilson
Marissa Wilson
Rebecca Wilson
Emma Witmer
Tyson Wolfe
John Yang
Bennett Yeo
Ethan Young
Chad Zachman-Brockmeyer
Shahan Zaman
Acadmic Honors
Verona Area High School 2013-14 Semester 1
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
15
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commissioners and adopt-
ed by Wisconsin in 2010,
attempt to improve college
and career readiness among
st udent s i n t he Uni t ed
States in English language
arts and math.
The state Department of
Public Instruction origi-
nally had planned to imple-
ment new assessments to
measure students based on
the standards in the 2014-15
school year. The 2013-15
biennial budget had already
prevented the department
and districts from further
implementing the standards
until a set of qualifications,
i ncl udi ng publ i c hear -
ings on the standards and
a legislative fiscal bureau
review, were met.
The new l egi sl at i on,
introduced by Sens. Leah
Vukmir (R-Wauwatosa),
Paul Farrow (R-Pewau-
kee), Mary Lazich (R-New
Berlin), Joseph Leibham
( R- Sheboygan) , Gl enn
Grothman (R-West Bend)
and Tom Tiffany (R-Hazel-
hurst), would instead cre-
ate a board with members
appointed by Gov. Scott
Walker, legislative lead-
ers and state superinten-
dent Tony Evers, a former
VASD s uper i nt endent
who has come out strongly
against the bill.
Beyond the politics of
t he Common Core, t he
long-term ramifications of
this proposal on our educa-
tion system and the reputa-
tion of Wisconsin schools
nationally are vast, Evers
said in a press release this
month. Regardless of any-
ones political affiliation,
these legislative proposals
are bad for Wisconsin.
The commission would
consist of the state super-
intendent and four of his or
her appointees, along with
six appointees from the
governor, one each from the
minority and majority lead-
ers in the Senate, the speak-
er of the Assembly and the
Assembly minority leader.
The Model Academic
Standards Board, as it
would be called, would
have to come up with stan-
dards for English, reading,
language arts and math-
ematics within one year
of the bills approval and
science and social studies
within three years.
Behn and VASD super-
intendent Dean Gorrell,
doubted how realistic the
timeline was, pointing out
the in-depth research that
takes place to develop any
sort of standards.
Gorrell also said not hav-
ing standards in line with
other states would hurt stu-
dents more than help them.
This isnt about local
economies anymore, Gor-
rell said. This is a global
economy, and thats the
piece that I just dont get.
Whose domain?
Gorrell pointed out that
whi l e some opponent s
of Common Core have
expressed concerns about a
national curriculum, those
criticisms are incorrect, as
Common Core only sets
standards to meet, and does
not tell districts how to meet
them.
We have a great deal of
control over what goes on in
the classroom, Behn said,
specifically citing teaching
strategies and materials used
as still under district control.
Gorrell added that he
wouldnt be surprised to see
a lawsuit from the Depart-
ment of Public Instruction
if the bill goes through,
because it amounts to a
constitutional issue.
Its really a fight over
who has the right to do this,
Gorrell said. Does the state
superintendent, which is a
constitutionally provided
office in the state of Wis-
consin? Does that officer
have the right to adopt state-
wide standards?
The bill was originally
scheduled to go to the Com-
mittee on Education in late
February, but was pulled
at the last minute. A public
hearing was rescheduled for
Thursday, March 6, at 10
a.m.
Behn wont attend the
public hearing shell be
working on social studies
standards with a group of
teachers.
Itd be impossible for
us to quantify the dol -
lar amount of how much
weve spent (getting ready
for Common Core), but it
would be in the tens and
tens and tens and tens and
tens of thousands, just with
sub time and so forth, Gor-
rell said.
Core: Gorrell questions constitutionality of board proposal
Continued from page 1
Proposed Model Academic
Standards Board
State superintendent
Appointed by state
superintendent
High school principal
School board member
Parent of public school
student
Professor
Appointed by governor
Public school teacher
Private school teacher
School district
superintendent
Elementary school
principal
Parent of private
school student
One other appointee
Speaker of the Assembly
appointee
Assembly minority leader
appointee
Senate minority leader
appointee
Senate majority leader
appointee
In brief
The state Department
of Public Instruction
adopted the Common
Core educational
standards in 2010 after
the National Governors
Association and Council
of Chief State School
Officers developed the
standards at a national
level.
The standards
outline math and
English language arts
benchmarks students
must meet at each
grade level. Along
with the standards
came a new test, with
implementation expected
in the 2014-15 school
year.
If Wisconsin Senate
Bill 619 were to become
law, the standards would
be eliminated and a new
board would develop
standards for the state.
Scott Girard
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Sat. 9:30-4 Sun. 12-4 2805 W. Beltline Hwy at Todd Dr.
sergenians.com 608-271-1111
No carpet we remove will
end up in a landfll.
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See website for
information on other
classes and more
www.springdaleyoga.com
437-4082
Free Newcomers Class
Saturday, Apr. 5, 10:30 am
Free Chanting & Meditation
Sunday, Mar. 9 & Mar. 23, 4:30 pm
Monthly Joint Flow
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Saturday, Mar. 8 & Apr. 12
10:30 am-12:30 pm
Beginning, Continuing & Deeper
Yoga Classes & Yoga Therapy
8435 Cty. Rd. PD
Between Verona & Mt. Horeb
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March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Child care center raises money for Heifer International
A classroom at Once
Upon a Time Child Care
Center raised money and
purchased four animals
for families in third world
countries.
The project idea came
after reading Beatrices
Goat, a book about an
i mpoveri shed Ugandan
girl who receivers a goat
from Heifer International
that changes her life.
The students and teach-
ers in the 4K classroom
spent three months asking
family members, cleaning
out couch cushions and
holding a bake sale to raise
money for Heifer Interna-
tional.
The group raised $800,
enough to purchase a heif-
er along with a sheep, pig
and a trio of rabbits.
Heifer International is
a non-profit organization
that donates animals and
attempts to provide sus-
tainable living for families
in third world countries.
Legals
NOTICE OF
ABSENTEE VOTING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
special voting deputies from the Town
of Verona will conduct absentee voting
at the Badger Prairie Health Care Center,
1100 E. Verona Avenue Verona, WI 53593
on Thursday - Mar 13, 2014 at 10:00am
for the Spring Election to be held April
1, 2014.
DONE in the Town of Verona
This 6th day of March 2014
Tammy Dresser
Deputy Clerk/Treasurer
Town of Verona
Published: March 6, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
VOTING BY
ABSENTEE BALLOT
CITY AND TOWN OF VERONA
SPRING ELECTION,
APRIL 1, 2014
Any qualifed elector who is unable
or unwilling to appear at the polling place
on Election Day may request to vote an
absentee ballot. A qualifed elector is any
U.S. citizen, who will be 18 years of age
or older on Election Day, who has resid-
ed in the ward or municipality where he
or she wishes to vote for at least 28 con-
secutive days before the election. The
elector must also be registered in order
to receive an absentee ballot.
TO OBTAIN AN ABSENTEE BALLOT
YOU MUST MAKE A REQUEST IN WRIT-
ING.
Contact your municipal clerk and
request that an application for an absen-
tee ballot be sent to you for the election.
You may also request an absentee ballot
by letter, fax or e-mail. Your request must
list your voting address within the mu-
nicipality where you wish to vote, the ad-
dress where the absentee ballot should
be sent, if different, and your signature.
Special absentee voting applica-
tion provisions apply to electors who are
indefnitely confned to home or a care
facility, in the military, hospitalized, or
serving as a sequestered juror. If this ap-
plies to you, contact the municipal clerk.
You can also personally go to the
clerks offce or other specifed loca-
tion, complete a written application, and
vote an absentee ballot during the hours
specifed for casting an absentee ballot.
Kami Scofeld, Verona City Clerk
111 Lincoln Street, Verona, WI 53593
(608) 845-6495
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. M-F
John Wright, Verona Town Clerk
335 North Nine Mound Road, Verona,
WI 53593
(608) 845-7187
8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. M-F
THE DEADLINE FOR MAKING AP-
PLICATION TO VOTE ABSENTEE BY
MAIL IS 5:00 P.M. ON THE FIFTH DAY
BEFORE THE ELECTION, THURSDAY,
MARCH 27, 2014.
MILITARY ELECTORS SHOULD
CONTACT THE MUNICIPAL CLERK RE-
GARDING THE DEADLINES FOR RE-
QUESTING OR SUBMITTING AN ABSEN-
TEE BALLOT.
THE FIRST DAY TO VOTE AN AB-
SENTEE BALLOT IN THE CLERKS OF-
FICE IS MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014. THE
DEADLINE FOR VOTING AN ABSENTEE
BALLOT IN THE CLERKS OFFICE IS
5:00 P.M. ON THE FRIDAY BEFORE THE
ELECTION, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 2014.
THE MUNICIPAL CLERK WILL DE-
LIVER VOTED BALLOTS RETURNED ON
OR BEFORE ELECTION DAY TO TO THE
PROPER POLLING PLACE OR COUNT-
ING LOCATION BEFORE THE POLLS
CLOSE ON APRIL 1, 2014. ANY BALLOTS
RECEIVED AFTER THE POLLS CLOSE
WILL BE COUNTED BY THE BOARD
OF CANVASSERS IF POSTMARKED
BY ELECTION DAY AND RECEIVED NO
LATER THAN 4:00 P.M. ON THE FRIDAY
FOLLOWING THE ELECTION.
Published: March 6, 2014
WNAXLP
foster parenting can be!
We are urgently recruiting people over age 25 interested in
parenting youth in need. Empty Nesters, retired, and semi-retired
parents looking for a new challenge are encouraged to call.
ompensation reects the needs of the child. ontact us to nd
out how rewarding foster parenting can be!
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
In the bowels of the library
Alex Cataldo, 7, checks out the huge Strollin Colon exhibit last month at the Verona Public Library. The free, interactive walk-through
inflatable reproduction of the human colon, was a conversation starter at the Verona Public Library on Feb. 18. Visitors had a chance to
chat with physicians from the UW Carbone Cancer Center and the UW Health Digestive Health Center and also enjoy free giveaways and
life-saving information.
5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
10'x20' $58 Month
10'x25' $65 Month
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI STORAGE
U
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2
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Nine Springs hearing
set for March 6
Fitchburg residents are asked
to weigh in on alternative plans
for the Nine Spring Golf Course,
should the council decide to
use the 36-acre site as a nine-
hole golf course.
The hearing set for Thursday,
March 6, at the Fitchburg City
Hall is a chance to give feed-
back on what alternatives peo-
ple like for the site.
The alternatives will be part
of the park master plan if the
city decides to no longer oper-
ate the golf course. Alternatives
include a few golf holes, a disc
golf course, playground areas,
soccer fields and basketball
courts, and a natural area.
The council will vote in May
on the fate of the golf course.
Northeast
Neighborhood passes
over objections
Over objections by dozens
of citizens, the city is send-
ing plans to grow to the east
and west to a regional planning
commission.
Fitchburgs Common Council
voted Tuesday, Feb. 25, to send
the Northeast and North Stoner
Prairie neighborhood plans
to the Capital Area Regional
Planning Commission, which
advises the state on extensions
of sewer service, an important
component for most forms of
urban development.
The requests for amending
the citys urban service area
to both sides inspired nearly
three hours of public comment
and council debate. The coun-
cil passed the measure, which
sent both neighborhood plans
to CARPC together, on a 6-2
vote, with Alds. Steve Arnold
(D-4) and Dorothy Krause
(D-1) voting against.
Krause said she would have
voted for sending one of the
plans to CARPC and not the
other, but since they were
motioned and voted on togeth-
er, she voted against. Arnold
had attempted to separate the
items earlier in the meeting, but
that failed on a voice vote.
The proposals would add
924 acres of land between U.S.
Hwy. 14 to Fitchburgs eastern
city limits and 327 acres of land
near Seminole Hwy. and Lacy
Road to the USA.
Whats new on
ConnectFitchburg.com
For more on these stories, visit ConnectFitchburg.com
Photo submitted
A 4K program at Once Upon A Time raised money to purchase animals in a third-world country.
The city is considering whether to turn Nine Springs golf course
into a large community park.
Send it in!
We like to send report-
ers to shoot photos, but
we cant be everywhere.
And we know you all
have cameras.
So if you have a photo
of an event or just a slice
of life you think the com-
munity might be inter-
ested in, send it to us and
well use it if we can.
Please include contact
information, whats hap-
pening in the photo and
the names of people pic-
tured.
You can submi t i t
on our website at Con-
nectVerona.com, email
t o edi t or J i m Fer o-
l i e at ver onapr ess@
wcinet.com or drop off
a CD at our office 133
Enterprise Drive.
Questions? Call Jim at
845-9559.
Were back in print
March 14
March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
17
143 NOTICES
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLACES TO GO
FITCHBURG MARCH 15-16
CANDLEWOOD SUITES
5421 Caddis Bend
Saturday & Sunday, 9am-3pm.
Scrapbooking, Stamping & Craft Supply
Re-Sale!
FONDY VINTAGE Auto Club Annual
Swap Meet. Sunday, March 16. 8am-
2pm. Fond du Lac County Fairgrounds
Expo Center. Adm $5. Info: Greg 920-
579-8450 or
Gary 920-579-0077 (wcan) .
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL builds peace
and understanding through education.
For more info visit www.rotary.org. This
message provided by PaperChain & your
local community paper. (wcan)
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 3/29/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
340 AUTOS
DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT or Motor-
cycle to Rawhide. Donate before Decem-
ber 31st for a tax deduction and help a
life in your local wisconsin community.
888-653-2729 (wcan)
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
tage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vacation.
Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
work taken care of! 800-856-5491 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules.
350 MOTORCYCLES
2007 ROAD King. Black 33K miles,
apes, corbin seat, detachable luggage
rack/back rest, solo luggage rack, bag
;liners, windshield, mufflers, air leaner,
all stock parts. $11,900. Brunkows in
Monroe
608-325-1300
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
DANE COUNTYS MARKETPLAE. The
Verona Press Classifieds. Call 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
AWNING INSTALLER: Must be
handy with tools, comfortable with
ladders. Safe Driving Record Apply in
person at:
Gallagher Tent & Awning Company.
809 Plaenert Dr, Madison 53713
FOUR WINDS Manor is seeking part &
full time CNA's for the PM shift at our 60
bed facility. This position would include
every other weekend and holidays with
shift differentials on PM & weekend
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VERONA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
BOARD OF EDUCATION
MEETING MINUTES
FEBRUARY 3, 2014
The Verona Area Board of Educa-
tion met on Monday, February 3, 2014
in the District Administration Building.
Board President Dennis Beres called
the meeting to order at 7:05 p.m. Clerk
Ken Behnke confrmed the meeting was
properly noticed.
Present: Renee Zook, John McCul-
ley, Dennis Beres, Ken Behnke Joanne
Gauthier
Absent: Amy Almond and Jeannie
Porter
Student Council Presentation
Brooke Felsheim, Karin Wong and
Katie Fan reported on student council
activities. This will be Karins last stu-
dent council presentation as she will
be graduating and moving on. They
reported that student council has been
really active in giving back to charity
and fundraising. Student council had
penny war at the high school in sup-
port of Pennies for Patients, which ben-
efts students with cancer in the Dane
County area. More than $500 was raised
and the junior class won the penny war.
The student council is looking forward
to doing this fundraiser again next year
as it has been one of their most suc-
cessful fundraisers. Another fundraiser
that was done was Stick it to Cancer
where students were able to purchase
pieces of tape for $1 and use it to tape
teachers to the wall. It is unsure at this
time how much money was raised dur-
ing this fundraiser.
They also reported on student
councils continuous volunteer work.
They have gone to the Ronald McDon-
ald house twice and prepared food for
the families that were staying there.
Families that are there have children at
the UW Childrens Hospital. They also
are continuing to volunteer at the High-
land Park Senior Center on their late
start Mondays by eating breakfast and
spending time with the seniors there.
Katie updated the Board on other
extracurricular activities. FFA had the
national offcers visit in January at
Epic. There were 23 different chapters
and 200 attendees from around the area.
They had a really great experience and
were truly inspired. Katie also added
that the Model UN attended a confer-
ence in Chicago two weeks ago and will
be attended another conference this
Thursday in Chicago. Science Olympia
participated in the Badger Invitational,
which had teams from Wisconsin, Min-
nesota, Illinois and St. Louis that went
well. The team had regional this past
weekend and placed in the top 3, which
may qualify them for state.
Brooke and Karin reported on the
new homeroom scheduling changes
that the high school has been trying
over the past few weeks. There have
been mixed reviews about the changing
of homerooms. Karin reported that the
girls basketball team has a team mem-
ber battling cancer, Ebony Nettles-Bey.
Ebony has continued to attend practices
and games in between chemo treat-
ments and has been an inspiration for
her team. This past Thursday was Beat
Cancer Night where the team raised
money for cancer research and Ebony.
The team sold t-shirts and stickers with
Ebonys name to show support for her.
The t-shirts have been a huge success
and have taken off across the region
with many teams using the shirts for
warms up, just as Veronas girls team
does.
Audience Portion Michelle Sar-
backer attended to speak with the Board
about the attachment / detachment peti-
tion that was submitted by her and her
husband John. Michelle would like the
Board to consider granting the petition
to have her land attached to the Verona
Area School District and detached from
Belleville School District so that her
children can continue in VASD. The fam-
ily has 2 daughters who have already
graduated from VASD and currently
has a very active sophomore (Molly) at
the high school, a 7th grader (Montana)
at Savanna Oaks and a kindergartner
(Jake) at Glacier Edge.
Announcements Ken announced
the passing of two former longtime
VASD employees, Monica Bischoff and
Ferris Harrison.
BOARD BUSINESS
Consider approval of minutes
Motion (Zook) second (McCulley) to
approve the minutes from the January
20, 2014 Board Meeting. Motion carried
(5-0).
Report out on WASB Delegate As-
sembly Ken updated the Board on
the Wisconsin Association of School
Boards Delegate (WASB) that was held
Wednesday, January 24th in Milwaukee.
Ken briefy reviewed with the Board the
15 resolutions that were considered by
315 voting districts, 14 of which passed.
Denny added that he also attended
and found it to be very interesting and
he enjoyed the speakers and breakout
sessions offered. Denny, Dean, Betty
and Rita gave a presentation on inno-
vation grants to a group of about 40 on
Friday morning. The feedback from the
presentation has been good.
Report out on new policy on taking
home devices Betty Wottreng attended
to update the Board on policy 363.4 Stu-
dent Use of District Owned Devices is
working thus far. Betty has been in con-
tact with Mike Murphy at the Exploration
Academy regarding the status of the
policy. After the policy went into place,
EA had several parent information meet-
ings where they walked parents through
the policy and discussed the one-to-one
program that they are able to enroll in.
Feedback indicates that program has
been easy, easy to manage and simple
for parents to enroll. 23 families have en-
rolled in the program, with 18 paying the
damage waiver fee of $20 and 5 families
declining to pay the damage waiver fee,
instead opting to assume responsibility
in the event that damage occurs.
Betty added that Mike believes that
the number of participants is low be-
cause of the timing of the policy, which
was around the holiday season. If the
policy was in place at the start of the
school year that could possibly have
made a difference in numbers however
families still can enroll. There will be fu-
ture parent information meetings to pro-
vide that option. Students that did enroll
report that the program report that it is
very helpful and are very pleased with
having the option of taking the device
off campus. Betty also added that there
is a desire to expand the program to
middle school high school and some
special needs programs.
Discussion of charge of Future
Schools Committee Dean updated
the Board on the charge of the commit-
tee that will be forming around future
schools. The Buildings, Ground and
Transportation committee will be re-
sponsible for building location, building
design, architect, construction contrac-
tor, owners representative and refer-
endum questions. The Future Schools
Committee will be in charge of research
/ review and recommend future school
grade confgurations, research / review
and recommend possible changes to
the Districts practice on equalization of
free and reduced lunch students across
neighboring schools, research / review
and recommend charter school space
options.
Dean added that that he is look-
ing for the Boards input and for them
to make a fnal determination on the
charge of these committees. He would
like to rope a few Board members into
these committees and he will put a note
via School Reach and the VASD website
looking for community members who
would be interested in volunteering. He
will also make some phone calls to oth-
ers who may have interest in participat-
ing. The Board is in support of moving
forward with these plans.
Consider action on inclement
weather make up day(s) Dean re-
viewed with Board the state statute for
hours and days of instruction require-
ments. VASD is currently in compliance
with the hours of instruction at all lev-
els except the high school but across
all grade levels are out of compliance
with the days of instruction and need to
make up one day of instruction (at this
time). Dean shared with the Board the
choices and rationale for make-up days
as discussed by the admin team. The 1st
choice as would be to add another day at
the end of the year (June 12th), leaving
June 13th as another option if we have
another inclement weather day. The 2nd
choice is to add on a day on either side
of Easter weekend (April 18-21); how-
ever since this is a four-day weekend,
it is likely that many students and staff
already have plans. The 3rd choice is to
use part of spring break (March 17-21) to
make up days; however the likelihood is
that many already have plans.
The high school is short of hours of
instruction equivalent of a day that they
need to make up. The plan is to add 2
minutes at the end of each day and to
make the last day of school a full day in-
stead of a half day. This will have a mini-
mal impact and will not affect buses.
This will possibly start as early as next
week. Motion (McCulley) second (Zook)
to approve June 12th as the inclement
weather make-up day. Motion carried
(5-0).
Consider action on changing date
for the March 17th Board meeting - The
Board previously discussed changing
the March 17th Board meeting to March
24th as this meeting falls during Spring
Break. Moving the meeting to March
24th makes sense because there are
5 Mondays in March and it keeps two
weeks between the 24th and the next
meeting in April. Motion (Zook) second
(McCulley) to approve the change of the
March 17th meeting to March 24th. Mo-
tion carried (5-0).
Review of attachment / detachment
petition Dean reviewed with Board the
property that is petitioning for attach-
ment / detachment. The landowners are
petitioning to detach their parcel of land
from Belleville School District and at-
tach to Verona Area School District. The
landowners, John and Michelle Sarback-
er previously lived in the district and
recently built a house on this property.
They would like their children to contin-
ue to attend VASD. The process requires
both school districts approval of the
petition. The Belleville school district
will be discussing this petition at their
February 10th Board meeting; however
it is unclear if it will only be discussed
or acted upon. If the Belleville school
district denies the petition, Dean shared
with the Board the appeals process that
goes through DPI. Another option avail-
able would be for both school districts
to agree to a 6606 which would require
Belleville school district to pay VASD
tuition for the students.
Dean recommended to the Board
that they approve this petition as the
family has been in the district for many
years. There was no action taken on this
matter at this time.
SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT
Update on Educator Effectiveness
Donna attended to update the Board on
educator effectiveness. There is a steer-
ing committee that has been formed to
help guide the district through the EE
process which is made up of administra-
tors and teachers from each level. The
group meets once a month. One of the
biggest tasks right now that committee
is dealing with is to change the current
evaluation structure, going for more
collaboration by subject so that each
group can work together versus being
competitive. Donna also reports that we
are continuing to get administrators cer-
tifed with TeachScape. In addition to the
online certifcation, there are many dif-
ferent components of TeachScape that
are being reviewed at admin team meet-
ings to go over expectations and use of
those components.
The fees for licenses for staff
members, approximately $40,000 were
just paid by the district and should be
received within 2-3 weeks. The fees
will be reimbursed. Donna shared with
the Board the behind the scenes work
that will be done once the licenses are
received. Another large component that
is coming will be the four DPI trainings.
For Pupil Services staff, it will be at least
2 years for TeachScape at a minimum
and there will never be EE developed for
central offce and the superintendent.
Donna also shared with the Board
that VASD in collaboration with the Mt.
Horeb School District, VASD received
a grant of more than $23,000 grant for
Educator Effectiveness; they were told
that the most each grant could be was
$5000 because of the number of appli-
cations. Donna will be meeting with the
Director if Instruction from Mt. Horeb on
February 17th to develop time lines and
get others involved with the process.
Update on communications audit
Dean reminded the Board that David
Voss with Voss Communications will
be here next Tuesday, February 11th
conducting a communication audit for
the district. There will be fve one hour
sessions of no more than 10 individuals
made up of staff, parents and/or commu-
nity members. David has been given a
lot of communication material to review
for this audit.
Dean encouraged the Board mem-
bers to sign up for a one on one time to
speak with David as a part of the audit.
Time line for Badger Ridge Princi-
pal Selection Dean provided the Board
a timeline for the Badger Ridge Princi-
pal Selection. The position is currently
posted and will close on February 23rd.
Review of applications and screening
interviews will take place February 24th-
March 7th; frst round of interviews will
occur March 11th-March March 13th
and the second round of interviews will
take place April 1st and April 2nd. The
goal is to have a recommendation to the
Board at the April 21st Board meeting.
Dean is encouraged by the number of
applications; to date there have been 46
applications submitted and its possible
that number could double. Dean will be
establishing a committee between now
and February 24th to be comprised of
10-12 members.
PERSONNEL ITEMS
No personnel items.
FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS / MEET-
ING DATES
Denny reviewed the future meet-
ing dates with the noted change of the
March 17th Board meeting to March
24th.
COMMITTEE REPORTS
Building, Grounds and Transporta-
tion Has not met.
Finance Committee Has not met.
Personnel Committee Ken re-
ported that the committee has not met
but will meet this Friday, February 7th
at 8 a.m.
Adjourn - Motion (Gauthier) second
(Zook) at 8:23 p.m. Motion carried (5-0).
Published: March 6, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
INFORMATIONAL MEETING
FOR: COUNTY HIGHWAY M
RECONSTRUCTION PLANNING
The City of Madison, the City of Ve-
rona, and Dane County are proposing
to reconstruct County Highway M from
Cross Country Road to Prairie Hill Road.
Reconstruction is scheduled to begin in
late 2015 and carry through 2016.
A public informational meeting will
be held on March 12, 2014 from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. at the Verona Senior Center,
108 Paoli Street, Verona, WI. The meet-
ing will be conducted in an open house
format; the public is encouraged to at-
tend. A short presentation will begin at 6
p.m. City of Madison, Verona, and Dane
County staff and project design staff will
be available before and after the pre-
sentation to answer questions, explain
exhibits, and provide additional informa-
tion regarding the project.
This meeting will update the public
on changes to the recommended de-
sign of the intersection of Mckee Road
(County Highway PD) and County High-
way M. A roundabout design was recom-
mended and approved by City of Madi-
son and Verona resolutions in 2012;
however since that time, continued
development of roundabout design and
capacity analysis, along with continued
growth of traffc volume projections in
the area have resulted in the consid-
eration of two new alternatives for the
County M and County PD intersection.
Persons with a concern for or
knowledge about historic buildings and
structures or archaeological sites are
encouraged to attend this meeting or
provide comments to the City of Madi-
son, the City of Verona, Dane County, or
MSA Professional Services, Inc.
Persons with hearing impairments
may request an interpreter at the meet-
ing by contacting Jason DiPiazza with
MSA Professional Services. Citizens
who are unable to attend the meeting, or
would like more information can contact
Jason DiPiazza at 1-800-446-0679. Writ-
ten comments regarding the project can
be mailed to Jason DiPiazza, MSA Pro-
fessional Services, 2901 International
Lane, Suite 300, Madison, WI 53704.
Published: March 6, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
OFFICIAL NOTICE
TO BIDDERS
LINCOLN STREET
RECONSTRUCTION AND
WATER MAIN REPLACEMENT
CITY OF VERONA,
WISCONSIN
OWNER: The City of Verona, Wis-
consin hereby gives notice that sealed
unit price Bids will be received for the
reconstruction of approximately 2,625
lin. feet, (centerline length) of Lincoln
Street, Holiday Court and Oak Court.
The street reconstruction includes ap-
proximately 4,250 cubic yards common
excavation, 2,750 lin. feet of 6-inch and
8-inch diameter ductile iron water main
replacement; 900 lin. feet, 1-inch di-
ameter water service replacement, 21
lin. feet of 12-inch diameter reinforced
concrete pipe storm sewer including
manhole and inlets; 11,100 square yards
asphaltic pavement removal; approxi-
mately 5,230 lin. feet concrete curb and
gutter removal and replacement; 8,800
tons crushed aggregate base course;
2,650 tons asphaltic concrete paving;
street terrace restoration; erosion con-
trol and all appurtenant work.
TIME AND PLACE OF BID OPEN-
ING: Sealed Bids will be received until
2:00 p.m., Local Time on the 20th day
of March, 2014 in the offce of the City
Clerk, 111 Lincoln Street, Verona, Wis-
consin. After the offcial Bid closing
time, the Bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud.
BIDDING DOCUMENTS: The Bid-
ding Documents are on fle for review
at the offce of the City Clerk, City Hall,
Verona, Wisconsin, and the offces of
AECOM, 1350 Deming Way, Suite 100,
Middleton, WI 53562.
Copies of the Bidding Documents
are available at www.questcdn.com.
Bidders may download the digital Plan
Documents for $20.00 non-refundable
payment by inputting Quest Project
#3132653 on the websites project
search page. Please contact QuestCDN.
com at 952-233-1632 or info@questcdn.
com for assistance in free membership
registration, downloading, and working
with the digital project information. No
paper plan documents will be provided.
SUBSURFACE AND PHYSICAL
CONDITIONS: Subsurface and Physical
Condition Reports and Drawings are on
fle for review at the offce of the City of
Clerk, City Hall, 111 Lincoln Street, Vero-
na, Wisconsin and at the AECOM offce
listed for reviewing documents. Copies
are available at no cost and may be ob-
tained when requesting Bidding Docu-
ments from QuestCDN.com.
LEGAL PROVISIONS: The Contract
letting shall be subject to the provisions
of Sections 62.15, 66.0901, 66.0903, and
779.15 of the Wisconsin Statutes.
WAGE RATES: CONTRACTORs
shall be required to pay not less than the
prevailing wage rates on the Project as
established by the State of Wisconsin,
Department of Workforce Development.
Copies of these wage rates are on fle in
the offce of the City Clerk and incorpo-
rated in the Contract Documents.
BID SECURITY: Bid Security in the
amount of not less than 5% or more than
10% of the Bid shall accompany each
Bid in accordance with the Instructions
to Bidders.
CONTRACT SECURITY: The Bid-
der to whom a Contract is awarded shall
furnish a Performance Bond and a Pay-
ment Bond each in an amount equal to
the Contract Price.
BID REJECTION/ACCEPTANCE:
OWNER reserves the right to reject any
and all Bids, waive informalities in bid-
ding or to accept the Bid or Bids, which
best serve the interests of OWNER.
BID WITHDRAWAL: No Bid shall be
withdrawn for a period of 60 days after
the opening of Bids without consent of
OWNER.
Published by authority of the City of
Verona, Wisconsin.
By:
Jon H. Hochkammer, Mayor
Kami Scofeld, Clerk
AECOM
Middleton, Wisconsin
Project No. 60297764
Published: February 27 amd
March 6, 2014
WNAXLP
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ALL ADS SUBMITTED SUBJECT TO
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ELECTRONICS REPAIR
BUNDLE & SAVE! DirecTV, Internet &
Phone from $69.99/mo. Free 3-months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime & Cinemax.
Free Genie 4-room Upgrade. Lock in 2
year savings. Call 800-918-1046 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
888-676-2750 Use Code 48643XMT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
FARM FRESH BROWN PULLET EGGS.
Delivery possible. $2.25/Doz 608-628-
1143
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
652 GARAGE SALES
STOUGHTON- 400 N Morris St. Skaalen
Friendship Room. Rummage Sale, Tues-
day March 11th, 9am-1pm. 608-873-
5651
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no
activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd
waterproof alert button for free and more.
Only $29.95 per month. 877-863-6622
(WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 PETS
MUST FIND New Homes 2-Cats 1
female/spayed 1 male/neutered, both
declawed. Free. 608-719-8145
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
FRUIT TREES As low as $16. Blueberry,
grape, strawberry, asparagus, evergreen
& hardwood plants. Free catalog. Wood-
stock Nursery, N1831 Hwy 95, Neills-
ville, WI 54456 Toll free 888-803-8733
wallace-woodstock.com (wcan)
PROFLOWERS SEND Bouquets for Any
occasion. Birthday, Anniversary or Just
Because! Take 20% off your order over
$29 or more. Flowers from $19.99 plus
s/h. Go to www.Proflowers.com/ActNow
or call 800-315-9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
CLAM CABIN Style Portable Ice Shack
in excellent condition. Comfortably seats
two people and assembles in just min-
utes. Plenty of room for a couple of bag
chairs and is tall enough to stand-up
inside. $180 or best offer. 608-873-8106
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
690 WANTED
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 ELECTRONICS
DIRECTV OVER 2 Year Savings Event!
Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month.
Only DirecTV gives you two years of
savings & a Free Genie upgrade. 800-
320-2429 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
Furniture & Sportswear
Sales Position
We are now accepting applications for part-time and
half-time sales positions in our casual furniture and
winter clothing departments. If you enjoy working
with people and have a air for color, design and
fabric please visit our store and apply in person.
Chalet is a fun and friendly place to work and we
have great appreciation for our employees and
customers. All positions are year round jobs with
exible shifts on weekdays or weekends. We offer
a generous base salary along with commissions,
incentives and other great benets.
Apply in person or send a resum to:
Chalet Ski & Patio
5252 Verona Road
Madison, WI 53711
(608) 273-8263
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NOW HIRING CONSTRUCTION
CREW PERSONNEL
VALID DRIVERS LICENSE REQUIRED
MUST 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
FULL TIME WORK and FULL BENEFITS
TOP WAGES for the RIGHT INDIVIDUALS
APPLY TODAY!!
www.workforclearybuildingcorp.com
Cleary Building Corp.
190 Paoli St.
Verona, WI, 53593
608-845-9700
Mon-Fri 8am- 5pm


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New Construction,
$223,900!
15 minutes from Verona
One story ranch, 3 bedroom, 2 bath
JASON GEIGER
(608) 277-2167
jgeiger@geigerrealtors.com
Fitchburg, WI
UN338231
Specialized Light Assembly, full or part-time
The work requires energetic people that can work on
their feet for periods of 4-6 hours, must have excellent
eye/hand coordination and hand/nger dexterity. Work
requires assembling parts either individually or as part
of a team at the rate of 200 300 per hour. Work shifts
are 4 - 8 hours/day, Monday Friday, between the hours
of 5 a.m. and 9 p.m.
Production Positions, Plastic Molding, full-time
This work requires operating plastic molding machines
in a high tech facility. Prior experience in plastic
manufacturing is required. Should be mechanically
inclined in order to help maintain the equipment as
necessary. Must have shift exibility. EOE
Apply in person M-F, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Minitube of America, 419 Venture Ct., Verona,
845-1502, or email your resum to
hr@minitube.com.
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UN337868
POLICE OFFICER
Oregon, Wisconsin
The Oregon Police Department is currently
accepting applications to fll current vacancies and
establish an eligibility list for future vacancies. The
current starting salary is $44,566 a year.
Qualifcations: Must be 20 years of age, valid
Wisconsin drivers license, no felony convictions,
preference given to certifed law enforcement offcers
and 60 college credits from an accredited college.
Apply: By 5:00 p.m., March 21, 2014 to the Oregon
Police Department, 383 Park Street, Oregon WI
53575-1494. 608-835-3111.
Only Oregon Police Department application
forms will be accepted and processed.
Applications will be mailed upon request.
Applications may also be obtained on the Village
website www.vil.oregon.wi.us.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
Fabricators
Assemblers
Material Handlers
Maintenance Mechanics
Sub-Zero and Wolf Appliance, Inc., the premier
provider of quality appliances is seeking
Assemblers, Fabricators, Material Handlers
and Maintenance Mechanics to join our 2nd
and 3rd shift teams at our Fitchburg facility. We
offer a clean, climate controlled environment.
Sub-Zero/Wolf offers competitive compensation
plus incentive pay and shift differential.
Benefts offered include: medical, dental, and
vision insurance, free life insurance, pension,
401k, holidays, vacation and personal days.
Qualifcation testing may be required. EOE.
Apply online at
www.subzero-wolf.com
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OUTSIDE ADVERTISING
SALES CONSULTANT
Do you have excellent communication skills?
Creative ideas? The ability to develop and maintain
client relationships? An interest in print and web
based media? We have an established account list
with growth potential. If you possess excellent
communication and organizational skills, a pleasant
personality, and the ability to prospect for new
business we would like to speak to you. Previous
sales experience desired. Media experience a plus.
Competitive compensation, employee stock option
ownership, 401(k), paid vacations, holidays,
insurance and continuing education assistance.
For consideration, apply online at
www.wcinet.com/careers
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub, Verona Press,
The Great Dane Shopping News
Unied Newspaper Group is part of Woodward Community Media,
a division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
and an Equal Opportunity Employer.
VERONA, WI
Park Verona Apartments - Rent based on 30% of your
income. Housing for seniors 62 or better, or persons with
a disability of any age. Pet friendly, income restrictions apply.
One and two bedroom apartments available.
Call 1-800-346-8581 for an application.
Wisconsin Management Company
is an equal housing opportunity provider and employer
A Better WayOf Living
1-800-346-8581
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March 6, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
19
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 RENTALS
2 BEDROOM Townhouse apartment w/
full basement on Racetrack Rd-Stough-
ton $775/mo includes utilities. No Pets.
Security deposit and references are
required. Available Now for an approved
applicant. Call 608-241-6609
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
STOUGHTON- 2/bedroom small house,
N. Forrest St. Appliances, basement
washer/dryer. Window A/C, deck, off-
street parking. Suitable for 2 people.
$695/MO+ utilities/ security deposit.
608-225-9033 or 608-873-7655
STOUGHTON AVAILABLE April 1 Con-
venient location, safe neighborhood, 304
King St 2-Bedroom, 1 Bath, approx. 850
sq. ft., very clean and well maintained,
off-street parking and A/C. Laundry
and storage lockers available. No Cats.
Smoke Free Building. $750/mo with dis-
count plus electric heat. 608-293-1599
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON 2-BDRM w/extra room.
Upstairs, off street parking, all utilities
included. No pets. No smoking. 608-
835-5083
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
730 CONDOS &
TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT
EVANSVILLE TOWNHOUSE 2 Bed-
room, Laundry Hook-up Big yard. 1 1/2
baths. $650 + utilities. 608-628-9569
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
770 RESORT
PROPERTY FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Cottage on Shawano
Lake. Sleeps 12, includes pontoon and
paddleboat. 715-853-1560
www.hellebaek.cottage.com (wcan)
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
845 HOUSES FOR SALE
FOR SALE BY VILLAGE:
455 Jefferson Street, Oregon
Details at vil.oregon.wi.us
For more information and appointments
call:
835-6286 or 835-3118
OPEN HOUSE Sunday 3/9/14. 12:30-
2pm. 11043 Arthurs Dr, Edgerton. 5
bedrooms, 2.7 acres. 35x55 heated
shop. $310,000. Margo/Pat's Realty 608-
201-6800
870 RESIDENTIAL LOTS
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Only 8 lots remaining!
Choose your own builder
608-215-5895

THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
OREGON BERGAMONT
Lot 442 with full exposure
By Owner Make offer!
608-212-2283

935 FARM: LAND FOR RENT
40+ ACRES of pasture land. May 10
through November 10. $3500. Located 5
miles North of Albany, WI. 608-862-3531
before 7am.
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
980 MACHINERY & TOOLS
MADISON FOR SALE
Two Scag Commercial Zero-turn
lawnmowers. 1-48 inch machine
($2000) 1-61 inch machine ($3000)
Professionally serviced and in very good
condition. 608-249-6773
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
ALL ADS SUBMITTED SUBJECT TO
APPROVAL BY PUBLISHER OF THIS
PAPER.
Now hiring for a variety of full & part-time shifts at our
beautiful senior living residence on Madisons west side.
Shift & weekend differentials, paid training & an array of
benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
8210 Highview Drive - Madison 608.243.8800
to request an
application:
to download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
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Customer Service Rep
Carnes Company, a leading manufacturer of
commercial HVAC equipment, is seeking a
dependable and detailed oriented individual
with great work ethics. Position requires
thorough knowledge of general ofce practices
with 1-3 years clerical and administrative
experience. Good oral/written communication
and computer skills, including Windows/Excel
spreadsheets and the ability to multi task
in a fast-paced environment. Employer paid
health, life, and disability insurance premiums
and more.
Send resum and salary history to:
CARNES COMPANY/H.R. Dept.
PO Box 930040
Verona, WI 53593 - 0040
Email: HR@CARNES.com
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Excellent Direct Care Position Open!
Direct Care Professionals have a passion for helping others in need
and often build long lasting relationships with those they serve. Join our
Dungarvin team of Direct Care Professionals, serving individuals with
various developmental disabilities. Starting wage of $11.33 an hour.
Applicants Must
Have a personal vehicle Have acceptable driving history
Be at least 18 years of age Have an HSD or GED
Have a state required auto liability insurance
EEO/AA
To apply go to www.dungarvin.com
Use req# 14-0033 in Madison
UN338901
MahlerClean, a commercial cleaning company is hiring in your area!
MahlerClean is looking to fll multiple part-time evening cleaning positions in the areas listed below.
Positions pay $8.75-$10.00 an hour and most have fexible start times after 5 p.m. Positions available are:
Madison
1hr 30mins, M-F (located on Mineral Pt. Rd.)
1hr, M-F, (located on Cottage Grove Rd.)
3hrs, MWF (located on Science Dr.)
4hrs 30mins, M-F (located on Applegate Road)
Monona
12hrs a week, days of week fexible (located on River Place)
1hr 30mins, M-F (located on Verona Rd.)
Fitchburg
1hr 30mins, M-F (located on Fish Hatchery Rd.)
Verona
1hr 30mins, M-F (located on Verona Ave.)
Must have reliable transportation with a valid drivers license, be able to perform general cleaning
tasks and pass pre-employment background screens. Duties include: vacuuming, cleaning restrooms,
emptying trash, mopping foors, dusting areas, etc.
It you are interested in any of these positions, please complete our on-line application at
MahlerClean.com. If you should have any questions, please contact our offce at (414)-347-1350.
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Specific Responsibilities
The Manufacturing Controls Engineer is a key member of the Manufacturing Engineering team. In this role, you will
act as the technical lead in any PLC and HMI programming support of manufacturing processes and equipment. In
addition, you will partner with the Information Technology department to provide MES (Manufacturing Execution
Systems) production support to ensure the efficient assembly of high-end refrigeration and cooking appliances. You
will also provide direction to Manufacturing Controls Technicians to support the above.
Specify hardware requirements and assist in the software
development of systems dedicated to capturing process infor-
mation related to OEE, FPY, Scrap, Rework, productivity,
downtime analysis, and predictive maintenance.
Assist in the development of Asset Management Systems
and Computerized Maintenance Management systems
Develop predictive maintenance models from historical
and real time process information for CMMS
Develop and modify PLC and HMI software to support
Operational changes and improvements on the plant floor
Investigate equipment failures and difficulties to diagnose
faulty operation, and to make recommendations to engineers,
suppliers and customers
Support installation, operation, maintenance, and repair to
ensure that machines and equipment are functioning accord-
ing to specifications
Recognize potential problems with existing equipment and
develop solutions with the ability to adapt to various engi-
neering designs, applications, and process criteria
Assist in safety improvements throughout the plant Define
MES solution architectures and develops detailed design
specifications
Define functional requirements through client interviews,
documentation analysis and Work Flow Process Mapping
(Value Stream Maps)Actively participate on a technical proj-
ect team, ensuring that effective relationships are built and
maintained
Proactively engage with customers in order to define the
overall technical approach for MES solutions
Maintain technical skills and knowledge continuously
updating them
Proactively report on project progress against schedule
Participate in strategic and tactical planning sessions
Other duties as assigned
Bachelors Eng./Comp Science and minimum 5 years
industry experience in software development, programming,
or engineering in a manufacturing environment with a PLC
background
Strong exposure to MES technologies, including automat-
ed data collection, visualization, quality and efficiency in
manufacturing, SCADA, automated decision control, work-
flow, database applications, scheduling, and interface to ERP
systems
Must have thorough understanding of the interrelation-
ships between electrical and mechanical systems
Proficient in Allen-Bradley Logix5000 Software
Experience with OPC Servers and Clients Exceptional
command in programming of PLC including Allen Bradley
and Siemens, Human Machine Interfacing including
RSViewStudio Knowledge of Industrial Networks including
Ethernet, ControlNet and DeviceNet SQL Database
Experience
High level of accountability in decision making and atten-
tion to detail
Excellent communication, time management and problem
solving skills
Must be proficient with Microsoft Office products
Experience with Wonderware a plus
Sub-Zero is the enduring symbol of the possibilities of
what a kitchen can be, Wolf the symbol of all that the kitchen
can do. Founded in 1945 and now in its third generation of
family ownership and management, Sub-Zero forever
changed kitchen design with the exceptional quality, beauty
and innovative technology of its equipment. Two companies
became industry leaders by sharing a single ideal: the stead-
fast unwillingness to compromise.
What do you want your career to be? Sub-Zero Wolf is the definitive industry specialist in preservation and cooking
products. Strive for the same exacting standards for your career. Take your drive and passion and translate that into
a collaborative team environment to attain your professional aspirations
Visit the career page of our website at www.subzero-wolf.com
for additional information on the current opportunities to
join an award winning team!
Experience & Knowledge Requirements
MANUFACTURING CONTROLS ENGINEER
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The Manufacturing Controls Engineer is a key member of the Manufacturing Engineering team. In this role, you will
act as the technical lead in any PLC and HMI programming support of manufacturing processes and equipment. In
addition, you will partner with the Information Technology department to provide MES (Manufacturing Execution
Systems) production support to ensure the efcient assembly of high-end refrigeration and cooking appliances.
You will also provide direction to Manufacturing Controls Technicians to support the above.
What do you want your career to be? Sub-Zero Wolf is the denitive industry specialist in preservation and cooking
products. Strive for the same exacting standards for your career. Take your drive
Specify hardware requirements and assist in the
software development of systems dedicated to
capturing process information related to OEE, FPY, Scrap,
Rework, productivity, downtime analysis, and predictive
maintenance.
Assist in the development of Asset Management Systems
and Computerized Maintenance Management systems
Develop predictive maintenance models from historical
and real time process information for CMMS
Develop and modify PLC and HMI software to support
Operational changes and improvements on the plant
foor
Investigate equipment failures and diffculties to diag-
nose faulty operation, and to make recommendations to
engineers, suppliers and customers
Support installation, operation, maintenance, and repair
to ensure that machines and equipment are functioning
according to specifcations
Recognize potential problems with existing equipment
and develop solutions with the ability to adapt to various
engineering designs, applications, and process criteria
Assist in safety improvements throughout the plant
Defne MES solution architectures and develops detailed
design specifcations
Defne functional requirements through client interviews,
documentation analysis and Work Flow Process Mapping
(Value Stream Maps)Actively participate on a technical
project team, ensuring that effective relationships are
built and maintained
Proactively engage with customers in order to defne the
overall technical approach for MES solutions
Maintain technical skills and knowledge continuously
updating them
Proactively report on project progress against schedule
Participate in strategic and tactical planning sessions
Other duties as assigned
Bachelors Eng./Comp Science and minimum 5 years
industry experience in software development, program-
ming, or engineering in a manufacturing environment
with a PLC background
Strong exposure to MES technologies, including
automated data collection, visualization, quality and
effciency in manufacturing, SCADA, automated decision
control, workfow, database applications, scheduling, and
interface to ERP systems
Must have thorough understanding of the interrelation-
ships between electrical and mechanical systems
Profcient in Allen-Bradley Logix5000 Software
Experience with OPC Servers and Clients Exceptional
command in programming of PLC including Allen Bradley
and Siemens, Human Machine Interfacing including
RSViewStudio Knowledge of Industrial Networks
including Ethernet, ControlNet and DeviceNet SQL
Database Experience
High level of accountability in decision making and
attention to detail
Excellent communication, time management and
problem solving skills
Must be profcient with Microsoft Offce products
Experience with Wonderware a plus
Sub-Zero is the enduring symbol of the possibilities
of what a kitchen can be, Wolf the symbol of all that
the kitchen can do. Founded in 1945 and now in its
third generation of family ownership and management,
Sub-Zero forever changed kitchen design with the
exceptional quality, beauty and innovative technology of
its equipment. Two companies became industry leaders
by sharing a single ideal: the steadfast unwillingness
to compromise.
Visit the career page of our website at www.subzero-wolf.com
for additional information on the current opportunities to
join an award winning team!
LEAD MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN
Primary duty is to provide in-house expertise to troubleshoot and configure systems and/or electrical components
in our facility.
Assist in the implementation of MES Systems from a corporate perspective.
Specify hardware requirements for MES systems implementations.
Assist in the software development of systems dedicated to capturing process information related to OEE, FPY,
Scrap, Rework, productivity, downtime analysis, and predictive maintenance.
Assist in the development of Asset Management Systems and Computerized Maintenance Management sys-
tems.
Develop predictive maintenance models from historical and real time process information for CMMS.
Develop and modify PLC and HMI software to support Operational changes and improvements on the plant floor.
Investigate equipment failures and difficulties to diagnose faulty operation, and to make recommendations to
engineers, suppliers and customers
Support installation, operation, maintenance, and repair to ensure that machines and equipment are functioning
according to specifications
Recognize potential problems with existing equipment and develop solutions with the ability to adapt to various
engineering designs, applications, and process criteria
Recommend design modifications to eliminate machine, program, or system malfunctions
Assist in safety improvements throughout the plant
Other duties as assigned
EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS
Two-year technical degree and/or equivalent experience in a manufacturing environment with a PLC background
Three to five years experience in a manufacturing environment
Must have thorough understanding of the interrelationships between electrical and mechanical systems
Proficient in Allen-Bradley Logix5000 Software
Experience with OPC Serviers and Clients
Exceptional command in programming of PLC including Allen Bradley and Siemens, Human Machine Interfacing
including RSViewStudio
Knowledge of Industrial Networks including Ethernet, ControlNet and DeviceNet
SQL Database Experience
High level of accountability in decision making and attention to detail
Excellent communication and time management skills
Must be proficient with Microsoft Office products
Wolf offers competitive compensation plus incentive pay and shift differential. Benefits offered include: medical, dental, vision and life
insurance, pension, 401k, holidays, vacation and personal time. Qualification testing may be required. EOE.
Apply online at www.subzero-wolf.com
U
N
3
3
8
5
1
9
LEAD MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN
Primary duty is to provide in-house expertise to troubleshoot and congure systems and/or electrical
components in our facility.
Assist in the implementation of MES Systems from a corporate perspective.
Specify hardware requirements for MES systems implementations.
Assist in the software development of systems dedicated to capturing process information related to OEE, FPY, Scrap, Rework,
productivity, downtime analysis, and predictive maintenance.
Assist in the development of Asset Management Systems and Computerized Maintenance Management systems.
Develop predictive maintenance models from historical and real time process information for CMMS.
Develop and modify PLC and HMI software to support Operational changes and improvements on the plant foor.
Investigate equipment failures and diffculties to diagnose faulty operation, and to make recommendations to engineers, suppli-
ers and customers
Support installation, operation, maintenance, and repair to ensure that machines and equipment are functioning according to
specications
Recognize potential problems with existing equipment and develop solutions with the ability to adapt to various engineering
designs, applications, and process criteria
Recommend design modifcations to eliminate machine, program, or system malfunctions
Assist in safety improvements throughout the plant
Other duties as assigned
EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS
Two-year technical degree and/or equivalent experience in a manufacturing environment with a PLC background
Three to fve years experience in a manufacturing environment
Must have thorough understanding of the interrelationships between electrical and mechanical systems
Profcient in Allen-Bradley Logix5000 Software
Experience with OPC Servers and Clients
Exceptional command in programming of PLC including Allen Bradley and Siemens, Human Machine Interfacing
including RSViewStudio
Knowledge of Industrial Networks including Ethernet, ControlNet and DeviceNet
SQL Database Experience
High level of accountability in decision making and attention to detail
Excellent communication and time management skills
Must be profcient with Microsoft Offce products
Wolf offers competitive compensation plus incentive pay and shift differential. Benets offered include: medical, dental, vision and life
insurance, pension, 401k, holidays, vacation and personal time. Qualication testing may be required. EOE.
Apply online at www.subzero-wolf.com
20 - The Verona Press - March 6, 2014
Congratulations!
Verona Boys Hockey... Going to state AGAIN!!!
Team Roster:
Grant Smith
AJ Augello
Braeden Schindler
Josh Novotny
Gavin McCormick
Jake Keyes
Nate Borgerding
Jeff Bishop
Noah Maurer
Brogan Baker
Zach Lanz
Brodie Roehrig
Spencer Polk
Henry Smith
Phillipe Fromberger
Jacob Taylor
Zach Miller
Zack Ritter
Pat Stevens
Garrett Seymour
Trevin Geier
Jack Ludwig
Jack Anderson
Liam Schmitt
Spencer Slavens
Harry Seid
Kaleb Steen
Charlie Parker
Alex Jones
Brett Storm
Joe Stevens
Nathan Cleghorn
Max Hankard
Garrett Swanson
Coaches:
Head Coach: Joel Marshall
Asst Coaches: David
Bartkowiak, Kent Davyduke,
Austin Schmid, Zach Spencer
Managers: Darby Buisker,
Alena Mears, Karly Pabich
Captains: Charlie Parker,
Phillipe Fromberger, Harry Seid
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Congratulations Verona Wildcats!
A nancial services organization like no other
Wide range of products and services
Retirement strategies
Annuities
Life insurance
Mutual funds
Health insurance
And other benefts of membership
20328 R5-13 2013 Thrivent Financial for Lutherans 672630
Appleton, Wisconsin Minneapolis, Minnesota Thrivent.com 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial
for Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Not all products are available in all states.
Securities and investment advisory services are offered through Thrivent
Investment Management Inc.,
625 Fourth Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55415, 800-847-4836, a FINRA and
SIPC member and a wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans. Thrivent Financial representatives are registered representatives of
Thrivent Investment Management Inc. They are also licensed
insurance agents/producers of Thrivent Financial.
For additional important disclosure information,
please visit Thrivent.com/disclosures.
Timothy Pederson, FIC
Financial Consultant
115 N. Main Street
Verona, WI 53593
608-848-5150
Cell: 608-217-9375
Timothy Pederson, FIC
Financial Consultant
115 N. Main Street
Verona, WI 53593
608-848-5110
Cell: 608-217-9375
Youve worked hard...
Way to Go Wildcats!
119 W. Verona Ave., Verona, WI
(608) 845-7920
Your Hometown Hardware Store
430 E. Verona Ave. Verona, WI
608-845-2010
Were Proud of You Verona!
Way to go Verona!
Kathy Hankard, CFP

Financial Planner
608-848-1133
211 E. Verona Avenue
Verona, WI
www.scaltnessmadison.com
H U G H E S F L O O R I N G
C O M M E R C I A L / R E S I D E N T I A L
407 E. Verona Ave. Verona, WI
(608) 845-6403
Go Wildcats Go!
A Big Thumbs Up Verona!
Kathy Bartels
(608) 235-2927
kbverona@charter.net
Nobody knows the Verona Area School District
housing market like Kathy Bartels!
210 S. Main St. Verona, WI
608-845-6478
www.millerandsonssupermarket.com
Lets Go Wildcats!
Way to Go Wildcats!
1021 North Edge Trail
Verona, WI
608-848-7000
Nice Job Going To State!
320 S. Main St.
Verona, WI
(608) 845-5168
www.veronavisioncare.com
This page is sponsored by:
Go Get Em Wildcats!
503 W. Verona Road Verona, WI
(608) 845-8328
www.avenueautoclinic.com
Keep Your Sticks on the Ice!
Verona Area Chamber
of Commerce
205 S. Main St.
Verona, WI
608-845-5777
www.veronawi.com
Were Proud of You Verona!
QUALITY CELLULAR
600 W. Verona Ave., Verona, WI
(608) 848-7600 quality-cellular.com
Go Get Em Verona!
300 S. Main St., Verona 497-1303
Go Wildcats!
The paper to turn to for the best in
Wildcat sports coverage and photos.
133 Enterprise Drive (608) 845-9559
connectverona.com