You are on page 1of 13

The Millennial Compass

Truths about the 30-and-Under Millennial Generation in the Workplace

About This Report


In February 2014, MSLGROUP teamed with Dr. Carina Paine Schofield,
Research Fellow, and Sue Honor, Research Consultant, of Ashridge
Business School* in the UK, to conduct global research on the Millennial
generations attitudes and expectations in the workplace.
The study, called The Millennial Compass, reveals workplace dynamics that
employers must be aware of as they build their teams, especially across
international borders. Some results including what is most important
to todays younger workers, what they want in their relationships with
managers and their expectations of career progression are startling.
Importantly, The Millennial Compass compares responses across
geographies to provide valuable insights to global organizations.

*Established in 1959, Ashridge is a leading business school for working professionals, with an international reputation for
leadership development. It is in the 1% of business schools globally to be accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA), the
European Foundation for Management Development Quality Improvement System (EQUIS) and the Association to Advance
Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) the UK, European and American accreditation bodies. www.ashridge.org.uk

Table of Contents
Foreword

Chapter 1: Millennials

Who Are They and What Matters to Them?

Chapter 2: Five Truths About Millennials and Work

Truth #1: Millennials are Ambitious and Believe Their Work Ethic is Strong

Truth #2: Millennials Are On Their Way Up and Out

10

Truth #3: Millennials Consider International Experience a Low Priority

12

Truth #4: Millennials See the Boss as a Friend

15

Truth #5: Millennials with Younger Bosses Feel More Engaged

18

Chapter 3: Closing Thoughts


The MSLGROUP Perspective
Methodology

20
21

22

Foreword
For nearly a quarter century, the Millennial generation has been written about
and discussed at length in management books, blogs, articles and conferences.
Much of the publicity focused on character traits that, frankly, tend to cast
them in a negative light. Consequently, organizations around the world are
keen to learn more about Millennials and understand their apparent high
expectations of work and low loyalty to their employers.

Although there are widely varying views on who actually belongs to the
Millennial generation (we define them as people born between 1984 and
1996), one thing is clear: Millennials grew up in a world vastly different from
that of previous generations. Theirs is a global village where social media and
the Web erase geographic boundaries, resulting in a group of people who
undoubtedly share perceptions, attitudes and beliefs. Historically, younger
generations have always stirred new ideas into the corporate world, causing
some expected irritation for older generations, says Erica Dhawan, a writer,
speaker and consultant on next generation leadership. Yet this time its
not an attitude problem, its a transition in business where globalization and
technology have radically changed the game.

I think the biggest challenge facing businesses is the need


for older managers to accept new ways of working. Its not
just about technology, its about a hunger to change things.
- JAMES, London, UK

The Millennial Compass also reveals how common these trends are or arent
around the world. Does a 25-year-old working for a company in Beijing feel
the same way about work as his or her counterpart in London, So Paulo or
Atlanta? The article identifies which traits can indeed be considered universal
and which ones vary with geography, politics and economic factors.

Now that Millennials have been working for 10 years or so, its interesting
to see the trends that have emerged. Among other things, The Millennial
Compass shows they are focused on achieving through personal networks
and technology, having a good work-life balance and getting high levels of
support from their managers. They dont want to be tied to an organization,
a timetable or a hierarchy, and theyd rather avoid the stress they see their
senior leaders shouldering. They may lack some of their predecessors
relationship, communication and analysis skills, but theyre confident in their
abilities to run business in a new way.

Brian Burgess
Global Co-Director,
Employee Practice

Jason Frank
Global Co-Director,
Employee Practice

Chapter 1:
Millennials

Who Are They and


What Matters to Them?
As with other generation groups, Millennials are known by many different
names (Gen Y and Generation Next, for example). There is limited consensus
on who actually belongs to this generation, but for our research purposes, we
describe them as people aged 30 years and younger, born between 1984 and
1996.
Its not hard to imagine how the Millennial mindset would be dramatically
different from that of generations who came before them. They grew up amid
globalization, light-speed changes in technology and communication, and
unprecedented shifts in business, political and cultural norms. The Millennial
Compass study found whats important to them in their working lives varies
somewhat by country, but several key findings emerged.

6 Millennials: The Big Picture

Theyre ambitious and not necessarily loyal to an organization. They want


to move on, up and out quickly.
They want managers who respect and trust them, provide coaching and
mentoring and are trusting and trustworthy.
They need lots of support and positive feedback.
They look to a manager who is a friend or a peer. They seek bosses who
share their knowledge and experience, and they respect experience over
job titles or positions.
They dont believe they need a good boss in order to be successful.
They admire managers with higher levels of social self-awareness, selfconfidence, cultural alignment to the organization and feedback-giving
compared to their own personal capabilities.
Work-life balance is important to them, and they believe they have a strong
work ethic.
Millennials in BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) countries see
international assignments and experience as far more important than
Millennials in the Western world.

Whats Important in Millennials Working Lives


% IMPORTANT1

INDIA

CHINA

UK

FRANCE

USA

BRAZIL

Sense of achievement in work 94 94 84 82 88 90


Good work-life balance

93 93 83 85 89 92

Feel valued/treated with


respect

90 94 87 86 90 93

Pleasant physical environment

92 92 82 76 86 92

Job security

95 87 83 87 84 89

Good manager/leaders

88 88 86 79 88 89

Career advancement

94 87 80 78 81 91

Opportunity to be
creative/innovative

91 88 71 54 76 90

Job status

89 81 74 73 77 91

Location

83 77 81 73 84 83

Independence in work

90 84 78 71 81 88

Influence in organization

84 85 63 54 64 85

Have new ideas implemented

87 83 70 65 71 87

Working in a multi-cultural
environment

77 71 52 45 55 70

International experience

70 61 49 40 44 67

Sum of important and very important responses

Chapter 2:
Five Truths
about
Millennials
and Work

Truth #1

Millennials are Ambitious and Believe Their Work Ethic is Strong


The Ambition to Move Up

The Millennial generation is often cited as demanding work-life balance, which


for them means working to live versus living to work, as the previous two
generations were raised to do. Even so, the majority of Millennials surveyed in all
countries describe themselves as more ambitious than not.

Im a classic people pleaser. I want to keep getting raises and


move up and it will likely never be fast enough.
- STEPH, Washington DC, USA

Millennials in India are the most ambitious for promotion, with 37% believing
they should be in a management position within one year of graduating. The
highest proportion of Millennials in Brazil, the USA and the UK also believe
this, at 24%, 23% and 21% respectively. China peaks at two years and France
lags behind with only a cumulative total of 43% expecting to be managers
within three years. Overall, more than 40% of this generation expect to be in a
management position within two years.
Not only do Millennials from India expect rapid promotion soon after
graduating, 25% of them expect to be in a senior management position or
running their own business within two years. Those in other countries also
show leadership ambition, with 28% in Brazil and 22% in the USA expecting
a senior role in two years. In the UK and France, the horizon is closer to five
years.

I think the most important thing I bring to the company is my


work ethic its born of passion. Its not just, youre a work
horse and youll get the job done no matter the hours and
just be miserable. I think its important to have a genuine
passion for what youre doing.

Redefining a Strong Work Ethic

Contrary to what managers may think, Millennials say they have a strong work
ethic rather than a relaxed attitude toward work, especially in the USA (34%).
The reason for the disconnect? A 2009 Ashridge Business School study
showed the two groups see the world of work through very different lenses.
Millennials view themselves as working hard, doing their best to achieve
and, compared to their peers, doing more than their fair share. They also
believe they have the right to a good work-life balance and have no problem
demanding it.

There absolutely has to be a clear-cut line between work


and personal life. If there isnt, it hampers your creativity
full stop.
- RASHI, Mumbai, India

- PETE, Atlanta, USA

Managers, on the other hand, see Millennials expecting a lot of time and
attention, but vanishing when the pressure is on to achieve team goals that
conflict with personal goals. Not surprisingly, managers think Millennials have
a very relaxed attitude about work, which echoes the earlier work-life balance
requirement. Its also no surprise that the Millennial generation admires
managers who have a similar work ethic to their own. Perhaps strong work ethic
is being redefined for todays world.

Millennials Attitudes about Work (%)


INDIA

CHINA

UK

FRANCE

USA

BRAZIL

Have a strong work ethic

21 17 22 11 34 24

Have a relaxed attitude to work

14 12 8 12 10 20

Truth #1 headlines

Implications for organizations

More than 40% of Millennials


expect to be in a management
position within two years of
graduation.

Companies should clearly communicate


steps and requirements for career
advancement. They should provide
career development planning to help
Millennials move along their career paths
at a pace appropriate for them and the
organization.

Millennials view themselves as


working hard, doing their best to
achieve and, compared to their
peers, doing more than their fair
share.

Managers must set expectations early


and give Millennials continual feedback
on performance. They should visibly
encourage and reward Millennials who
champion organizational goals and
culture.

Managers think Millennials have


a very relaxed attitude about
work, often vanishing when the
pressure is on.

Open, honest and frequent communication


between managers and Millennials is key
to building relationships and abolishing
stereotypes. Companies should consider
multigenerational communication
training for work groups where
breakdowns are severe.

Perhaps strong work ethic is


being redefined for todays world.

Work ethic cannot be mandated.


Organizations must create and/or
maintain a rich culture where values,
beliefs and expectations are reflected in
every aspect of the work environment.

Truth #2

Millennials Are On Their Way Up and Out


Goodbye, Loyalty

Loyalty doesnt appear to be a particularly strong work value for the Millennial
generation. On average, 30% of those surveyed worldwide intend to leave their
organizations in the next year. Nearly half say they plan to depart after two
years, leaving only 57% still working for the organizations theyre with today.

10

I expect to be a senior consultant soon and hope to continue to


progress regularly and manage a small team later. But I need
to work on my relationships with colleagues and knowledge
sharing attitude.
- ISOBELLE, Paris, France

Millennials Intention to Stay


with Their Employers over the Next 10 years
100

Millennials Intention TO LEAVE THEIR EMPLOYER (%)

90

80

To Leave Their Employer


in the Next Two Years

CHINA

UK

FRANCE

USA

60

40
30
20

YEARS

0
Now

India

1
& under

2
& under

China

3
& under

UK

4
& under

France

5
& under

5 to 9
& under

USA

10
& under

Brazil

Thirty percent of Millennials


worldwide intend to leave their
organizations in the next year.

Organizations must have robust human


resources strategies to retain key
personnel, develop bench strength and
recruit new talent, especially in businesscritical areas. Managers at all levels must
be prepared to minimize vulnerabilities
created by turnover.

Millennials are anything but


corporate minded and have little
loyalty to employers.

All companies should have a strong


employee brand and ongoing employee
engagement programs highlighting
benefits important to Millennials.

43 28 51 44 40 51

Surprisingly, Millennials are quite conservative in estimating the number of


fields they will work in over their lifetime. An average of 55% worldwide say
they will work in only two or three different fields, and 27% predict four to six.
The numbers are consistent across countries, so this is a global view.

50

Implications for organizations

BRAZIL

70

10

The steepest drop in retention of Millennials is in the UK and Brazil, followed


by France, India and the USA. In fact, 19% of Millennials in France and 20% of
those in Brazil intend to leave their organizations as soon as possible. These
numbers indicate Millennials are anything but corporate minded and have
little loyalty to employers.

INDIA

Truth #2 headlines

An average of 55% of Millennials


say they will work in only two
or three different fields in their
lifetime.

Working in a small number of fields


allows Millennials to develop deep
expertise in specific areas, which can
benefit organizations who tap those
resources.

11

Truth #3

Millennials Consider International Experience a Low Priority


Millennials worldwide say they expect to be in senior management positions
and/or running their own companies within a few years of graduating.
Having grown up in a global economy, they must know the importance of
international business experience and mobility to reach these goals. And
yet, out of 15 work-life factors ranked by The Millennial Compass survey
respondents, international experience was the least important and working in
a multi-cultural environment was second least important.

International and Multi-cultural Experiences Are Least


Important to The Millennial Generation (%)
International experience

IMPORTANT2 UNIMPORTANT3

12

Do I think its increasingly important to have overseas


experience? Yes and no. I think the place I get hung up on is the
actual, physical overseas part of it. In such an interconnected
world, I dont necessarily think you need to literally travel
across the ocean to get overseas experience.
- PETE, Atlanta, USA

INDIA

70

A Closer Look by Country

Although 60% of Chinese Millennials surveyed have lived/worked abroad,


only 34% from India had, and all other countries had even lower international
experience (UK 30%, USA 18%, France 18% and Brazil 10%).

Working in a
multi-cultural environment
IMPORTANT

UNIMPORTANT

77

CHINA

61

13

71

UK

49

20

52

14

FRANCE

40

29

45

17

USA

44

20

55

12

BRAZIL

67

70

Sum of important and very important responses


3
Sum of fairly unimportant and completely unimportant responses
2

Sixty-five percent of Millennials in India, 47% in China and 37% in Brazil plan
to get international work experience in the next five years. Those in the USA
and the UK appear more insular. Only 18% of respondents in the USA have
foreign work in their plans, and 55% of USA and 42% of UK respondents have
no plans to work abroad in the next five years. For Millennials in India, the lure
of foreign work is career progression (33%) and money (28%); in China, it is
personal development (45%). Millennials from other countries who intend
to take foreign assignments say they would do it for cultural experience (USA
41%, UK 37%) or personal development (Brazil 35%, France 28%).

Millennials Intentions to Work Abroad, and Why (%)


Planning to work abroad


in next 5 years (%)

Main reason(s)

INDIA

CHINA

UK

FRANCE

USA

BRAZIL

65 47 29 28 18 37

Career
Money

Personal
development
and Experience
culture

Experience
culture

Personal
development
and Experience
culture

Experience
culture

Personal
development

Where Theyll Work

When questioned about where they would consider working, those from
China, the UK, France and Brazil said North America was their first choice
(Brazil 65%, others 51-55%). Americans (62%) and those from India (55%)
selected the UK as the top destination. Australia and continental Europe also
scored high. The Middle East, India, Africa, China and Central/South America
were universally unpopular, all scoring below 30%. All in all, Millennials are
prepared to move to the Western world for work, but show little interest in
other destinations.

The Impact on International Business

Research clearly shows Millennials have a strong desire for work-life balance,
and they seem to be closer to their immediate families and friends than ever
before. Even though they travel virtually in and out of their comfort zones
all the time, theyre less eager to make a physical move. These trends could
impact the future of international business as well as the Millennial generation
themselves who may miss key career opportunities.

I guess I wouldnt mind working overseas if it didnt last too


long. Three years would be best for me but I guess I could stay
longer.
- JEAN, Paris, France

13

14

Truth #3 headlines

Implications for organizations

Millennials rank international


experience and working in a
multi-cultural environment as the
least important work-life factors.

Organizations should promote


international rotations and long-term
assignments in external recruiting
and career development planning.
They should emphasize personal and
professional rewards and benefits that
appeal to Millennials, such as rapid
advancement and the opportunity to
change the world of work.

Millennials are prepared to move


to the Western world for work,
but show little interest in other
destinations.

Companies with facilities in unpopular


locations should assess how vital it is to
have Millennials on those teams. If they
are essential to the business, barriers
and negative perceptions can be offset
with extra incentives; positive information
about the destination, lifestyle and
work opportunities; and the companys
commitment to help employees deal with
undesirable conditions.

Even though Millennials travel


virtually in and out of their
comfort zones all the time,
theyre less eager to make a
physical move.

To attract Millennials to international


assignments, organizations must
offer support such as home leave, job
assistance for spouses/partners and
cultural assimilation.

Sixty-five percent of Millennials


in India, 47% in China and 37%
in Brazil plan to get international
work experience in the next five
years; those in the USA and the
UK are more insular.

Global companies can prioritize recruiting


efforts in countries where Millennials are
more open to working abroad.

Truth #4

Millennials See the Boss as a Friend


Millennials perceptions of their relationship with the boss are fascinating.
When asked about the role their manager currently plays, most survey
respondents chose, friend. This answer ranked first in the USA, the UK and
Brazil; second in China and third in India. In France, Millennials see their boss
as a peer.

The closeness I have with my boss is not exactly friendship.


Its more like relying on her. She gets me a lot of jobs and she
gets me involved in the job I do.

Millennials Current and Ideal Relationships with Their Boss


EXISTING

IDEAL

INDIA

Coach/mentor
Knowledge source/expert
Friend

Coach/mentor and Friend


Knowledge source/
expert

CHINA

Director/allocator of work
Friend
Coach/Mentor

Friend
Coach/Mentor
Director/allocator of work

UK

Friend
Coach/Mentor
Director/allocator of work

Coach/Mentor
Friend
Knowledge source/expert

FRANCE

Peer
Director/allocator of work
Knowledge source/expert

Coach/Mentor
Knowledge source/expert
Peer

USA

Friend
Knowledge source/expert
Coach/Mentor

Coach/Mentor
Knowledge source/expert
Friend

Friend
Peer
Coach/Mentor

Friend
Coach/Mentor
Knowledge source/expert

- RAIN, Beijing, China

Whether they think of the boss as a friend, peer, coach or mentor, its obvious
Millennials do not want a hierarchical relationship with them. The role
of director/allocator of work appears only in Chinas description of what
Millennials ideally want from their manager, and then in third place.
Overall, less than a third (31%) of Millennials feel the role their manager
currently plays fits their image of an ideal manager. Similar to the mismatch
in definitions of a strong work ethic, there are obvious differences between
Millennials and managers perceptions of the role the manager plays or
should play.

BRAZIL

15

Power Comes from Knowledge, Not Titles

The Millennial generation is not concerned with titles. They strongly admire those
with experience, at any level, over position or power. This generation wants
managers and senior colleagues to be experts willing to share their
knowledge with younger employees.

16

I see in the market there are many bosses and few leaders. We
must have leaders because they make the team come together
and motivate them to reach the goal. It is important for
companies to invest in leaders and empower them to manage
people. That makes the difference between staying with and
leaving a company.

Implications for organizations

When asked about the role their


manager currently plays, most
survey respondents chose,
friend.

Managers must learn to relate to


multigenerational team members.
This doesnt mean yielding to whatever
employees want; it means understanding
their views of the work world and finding
common ground that benefits everyone.
This may require special training.

Millennials do not want a


hierarchical relationship with their
boss.

A command and control management


style isnt necessary if expectations are
clear, feedback is frequent and rewards
are consistent. To optimize Millennials
contributions, older managers may have
to temper their top-down mentality.
Younger managers may have to assume
more of a coach or mentor role to
establish authority and balance the
friend dynamic.

What Millennials Respect (%)

- BRUNO, So Paulo, Brazil


More than half (51%) of Millennials in India, and 40% in the USA, see their
manager as a knowledge expert, in both cases ranking it second in the way
they describe their relationship with them. However, when looking at the ideal
relationship with their manager, all countries see this factor as one of the top
three characteristics they desire.

Truth #4 headlines

INDIA

CHINA

UK

FRANCE

USA

BRAZIL

Title

8 14 3 7 4 7

Experience

25 18 25 26 37 32

Less than a third of Millennials


feel the role their manager
currently plays fits their image of
an ideal manager.

Managers should strive to understand


what motivates Millennial team members
not to accommodate them, but to
strengthen relationships and drive better
results. Since every employee-boss
relationship is different, this should be
done in one-on-one conversations and
performance reviews.

Millennials want managers and


senior colleagues to be experts
willing to share their knowledge
with younger employees.

Managers should share their knowledge


and bring younger colleagues along,
regardless of generational issues.
Companies that want to create a
Millennial-friendly culture should build
internal knowledge sharing programs and
platforms and include participation on
managers performance reviews.

17

Truth #5

Millennials with Younger Bosses Feel More Engaged


Does youth motivate youth? Our research says yes. Millennials with Generation X
and Millennial managers believe their skills are better utilized than those whose
managers are from the Baby Boom generation.

18

Inherently it is easier to relate to someone closer to


your own age. With bigger age disparities, it turns into a
mother/daughter, father/son, father/daughter, mother/son
relationship. Ive found I do not perform well in that scenario.
- STEPH, Washington DC, USA

To demonstrate this point, Millennials in India are way ahead of other


countries in believing their organization harnesses their talents (75% agree).
China is second at 63%. Correspondingly, Millennials in these countries have
the highest percentage of young managers. In China, 78% of managers are
Late Gen X (31-40 years old) or Millennials (under 30), and this figure is 75%
for India. Conversely, Frances managers are 47% Early Gen X (41-50 years
old) or Baby Boomers (over 50). Millennials in France had the lowest score
(42%) when asked if they believe their organization harnesses their talents.

The Story Behind the Statistics

Generational labels aside, whats really important to Millennials is what they


get from their manager. Millennials want a manager who is very supportive,
on their side and has their best interests at heart. They want their ideas
pushed forward to leaders with whom they dont have direct contact or
influence. For the Millennial, its all about me and feeling valued.

I have a good relationship with my manager, but they have to


understand delegation is needed to improve the organization. But
with people over 50 years old, you can feel the cultural gap.

Truth #5 headlines

Implications for organizations

Millennials with Generation X and


Millennial managers believe their
skills are better utilized than
those whose managers are from
the Baby Boom generation.

Companies must recognize the potential


disconnect between older managers and
younger employees, and help each party
appreciate the others value. This can be
accomplished through communication
training, engagement programs and
mentoring programs designed to bridge
the generational divide.

Whats really important to


Millennials is what they get from
their manager. For them, its all
about me and feeling valued.

Companies that want to maximize


Millennials contributions and potentially
gain their longer-term loyalty should
devise employee engagement and other
programs targeting Millennials specific
needs. These can include personal
recognition, flexible work arrangements,
a great work environment and other
amenities Millennials identify as
important in their working life.

- ISOBELLE, Paris, France

There is a twist, however, to the relationship between Millennials and younger


managers. Previous research has detected a bit of a love-hate dynamic
caused by the closeness in age, and this is backed up by our findings. Younger
managers are seen as friends, which Millennials like, but they may feel let
down by the manager as he/she moves up in the organization.

Millennials Believe Their Skills are Better Utilized


by Younger Managers
I have two bosses, one my age, one 15 years older. Although
I have a very friendly relationship with the younger boss, I
think on balance she needs to focus more on developing the
team, rather than developing herself.
- GEMMA, London, UK

Generation of
Manager

Millennial
(Gen Y)

Late Gen X

Early Gen X

Baby Boomers

Age (years) of
Manager

30 & under

31-40

41-50

Over 50

% Agree

57

62

59

44

19

The MSLGROUP

Perspective
Millennials, like every generation, present unique challenges and
opportunities to organizations striving to succeed in a global economy. Many
of their characteristics have been well documented, but the subtleties warrant
further exploration.

20

Chapter 3:
Closing
Thoughts

We at MSLGROUP believe there are many things that can be done to close
the gap between what companies need and what Millennials want. The first
is to better understand how Millennials view the world and work in particular,
which was the purpose of The Millennial Compass study. As we dug deeper
into the results, we discovered new insights, such as the rather complex
dynamics driving the Millennial-manager relationship, the impact of manager
age in motivating Millennial employees and Millennials lack of enthusiasm
for international work experience. Geographical comparisons also proved
enlightening. As the study shows, differences in attitudes and perceptions
from one country or culture to another can be dramatic, reminding us to never
make generalizations, even in a world where the boundaries that define us
become more blurred each day.
At age 30 or younger, Millennials are the future of business the world over.
Companies and Millennials will do well to listen to each others expectations
and find the common ground on which to build mutual success.

21

Methodology
MSLGROUP partnered with Ashridge Business School in the UK to conduct
a quantitative research project to explore Millennials attitudes and beliefs
about work. In February 2014, an email invitation with a link to an anonymous
questionnaire was sent to an online research panel of Millennial employees
aged 18 to 30 years.
The survey used closed-ended questions (multiple choice, rating scale and
ranking scale) to explore topics based on relevant existing literature.
These included:

22

Working life: what is important


Managers behaviors: what is important and expectations
Relationships between Millennials and their managers
Workplace behaviors of Millennials and senior colleagues they admire
Progression in the workplace and working life
Work-life balance
Employment engagement and intention to stay
International work plans
A total of 1,293 Millennial employees from Brazil, China, France, India, the UK
and the USA responded to the survey. The number of respondents was about
equal for each country (215 or 216) and each group was made up of equal
numbers of males and females.

Research Notes:
These findings describe individual attitudes and perceptions of Millennials
invited to complete the survey. Interpretation of results represents the
opinions of those who participated, not the entire Millennial population. Text
or table percentages that do not add up to 100% are due to multiple answers,
computer rounding and/or the exclusion of neutral, dont know or not stated
responses.

Brian Burgess

Jason Frank

Global Co-Director,
Employee Practice

Brian has more than 18 years experience in developing programs and


communications that engage internal audiences with a companys
business strategy, develop internal brand advocates and that build
awareness, understanding and acceptance of change initiatives. Based in
New York, Brian led the operational transformation of AstraZenecas sales
force, the integration of Bayer HealthCare and Berlex, the development
and launch of the employer brand for Ahold USA family of brands
(Stop & Shop and Giant Supermarkets), the worldwide roll out of operating
principles for Marsh, and the internal introduction and socialization of the
Lilly Diabetes global brand narrative.

Carina Paine Schofield

Global Co-Director,
Employee Practice

Based in London, Jason has over 16 years blue chip experience in


branding, marketing and employee communications and engagement.
He is fascinated by the role employees can play in driving business
performance and reputation, and believes brand and business success
start from the inside out. His experience encompasses research, strategy
and implementation much of it on large, complex, international projects.
He has extensive experience in employer branding, EVP development,
employee engagement and recruitment and student marketing. He brings
insight, multi-channel expertise and an understanding of HR, brand,
marketing and internal communications functions.

Sue Honor

Research Fellow, Ashridge Business School

Consultant

Carina joined Ashridge in 2007 as a researcher in the Public Leadership


Centre, and is now a Research Fellow working on a number of applied
research projects. Carina has a first degree in Applied Psychology
and Computing, a post graduate diploma in Psychology and a PhD in
Psychology. Prior to joining Ashridge Carina worked as a research fellow
and a consultant for The Open University. Most recently she worked
as a researcher at Ipsos MORI. She recently authored Culture Shock:
Generation Y and their managers in the work place, a 2013 Ashridge
research report.

Sue is an independent learning consultant and project manager. She has


held international managerial, strategy and consultancy roles in companies
including Peugeot and Intel. Her interest lie in human behaviour and adult
learning. Sues recent research and publications include best practice in
European Management Development, and whilst at Ashridge, on human
interaction in an MBA programme, innovation in executive education and in
2009, on Generation Y.

Designed by MSLGROUP CREATIVE+

About the MSLGROUP Employee Practice


The MSLGROUP Employee Practice helps companies attract the right talent,
engage employees and maximize their performance. Our services span the
employee lifecycle from employer branding and recruitment, to internal
communications and social engagement, to the departure experience and
alumni relations. We engage employees hearts, hands and minds to strengthen
loyalty and drive behaviors that benefit our clients businesses.
To learn more, please contact:

Brian Burgess

Jason Frank

Global Co-Director, Employee Practice


MSLGROUP
+1 646 500 7635
brian.burgess@mslgroup.com

Global Co-Director, Employee Practice


MSLGROUP
+44 (0)20 3219 8700
jfrank@saslondon.com

MSLGROUP.COM