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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Introduction

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

In the homewares market, there has been growth at the value end of the market through a wide range of retailers. These span the excellent value chains like Home Bargains and The Range, strong high street retailers such as Wilkinson, the vast supermarket chains and the iconic and stylish Ikea. This report examines peoples attitudes to what they pay for their homewares and considers some of the factors that differentiate the higher-priced shoppers from the value-driven. Demand was certainly dented by the recession that followed the credit crunch. There was a perfect storm fewer house moves, squeezed incomes and uncertainty about the future. But things have perked up, thanks to more movement within the housing market. And the outlook is looking better still as the key shoppers for homewares, the 25-34s and ABs, grow in numbers. Homewares enjoy broad availability of products through a wide range of different retailers, both online and offline. With such fragmented distribution we take a look at what motivates people, where they go to shop and how much of this shopping is done online these days. Definitions This excludes electrical goods, with the exception of lamps/light fittings. So we do not cover small kitchen appliances, digital photo frames, or home electrical appliances such as vacuum cleaners. The following definitions give examples of the products within each category but are not fully comprehensive. Home accessories Vases/bowls Candles and candle holders Pictures/prints, mirrors, photo frames and clocks Bathroom accessories (eg soap holders).

Tableware Drinkware (eg glasses, jugs and decanters) Crockery and china eg plates, dessert bowls, serving bowls, platters, mugs, cups and saucers) Oven-to-tableware Table accessories eg salt/pepper sets Cutlery (flatware).

Kitchenware and bakeware Pans, frying pans Utensils Baking tins, oven tins etc
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Introduction

Kitchen accessories eg storage jars, chopping boards. Lighting Light fittings Lamp shades (excludes light bulbs).

Household linens and textiles Filled products duvets, pillows, mattress toppers (regardless of filling) Mattress covers Duvet covers (including sets comprising duvet covers and pillowcases) Sheets, valances, pillowcases Blankets, bedspreads, comforters, throws, bed runners Bolsters, neckrolls, cushions positioned for bed accessorising.

Bathroom textiles: Towels (including beach towels) Bathmats.

Other household linen: Tablecloths, napkins, place mats (individually and in sets) Tea towels and kitchen towels. Curtains and blinds Ready-made curtains Other curtains Ready-made blinds Other blinds.

Broader definitions For the broader definitions of homewares we have used that contained in the governments consumer spending data, but added our own estimates for the market spend on lighting as lighting is classed within furniture in the government
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Introduction

definitions.

Household textiles Furnishing fabrics, curtain material, curtains, double curtains, awnings, door curtains and fabric blinds Bedding such as futons, pillows, bolsters and hammocks Bed linen such as sheets, pillowcases, blankets, travelling rugs, plaids, eiderdowns, counterpanes and mosquito nets Table linen and bathroom linen such as tablecloths, table napkins, towels and face cloths Cloth bought by the piece; oilcloth; bathroom mats, rush mats and doormats Other household textiles such as shopping bags, laundry bags, shoe bags, covers for clothes and furniture, flags, sunshades, etc Repair of such articles.

Glassware, tableware and other homewares Glassware, crystal ware, ceramic ware and china ware of the kind used for table, kitchen, bathroom, toilet, office and indoor decoration Cutlery, flatware and silverware Non-electric kitchen utensils of all materials such as saucepans, stewpots, pressure cookers, frying pans, coffee mills, pure makers, mincers, hotplates, household scales and other such mechanical devices Non-electric household articles of all materials such as containers for bread, coffee, spices, etc., waste bins, waste-paper baskets, laundry baskets, portable money boxes and strongboxes, towel rails, bottle racks, irons and ironing boards, letter boxes, feeding bottles, vacuum flasks and iceboxes Repair of such articles.

Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queens Printer for Scotland. Value figures throughout this report are at retail selling prices unless otherwise stated. Market sizes at 2013 prices are calculated using Mintels Household Goods deflator. Abbreviations B&M CML DIY GDP GMI HMSO LED Bargain Madness Council of Mortgage Lenders Do it Yourself Gross Domestic Product Global Market Insite Her Majestys Stationery Office Light emitting diode
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Introduction

ONS PC PDI TV UK VAT WWRD

Office for National Statistics Personal Computer Personal Disposable Income Television United Kingdom Value Added Tax Waterford Wedgwood Royal Doulton

If you want more details about this particular report, please contact the Mintel information team on +1 312-932-0400 in the U.S. or +44 (0)20-7606-6000 in the UK and the rest of the world, or email them to info@mintel.com.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Executive Summary

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

The market for homewares is dominated by high volume, low-priced goods and many of these offer sufficient style and quality for what people want. So for the future we expect value retailers to develop more sophisticated range and pricing tiers to encourage people to move up from the cheapest basics. But there is a thriving market for higher-priced goods and in this part of the market brands, strong retailer own-labels and designer or celebrity endorsement plays a role. More home moves, together with rising consumer confidence, will encourage people to use homewares to create a better ambience with their homes. We predict a bright future for homewares. Jane Westgarth, Senior Market Analyst The market The market for homewares will perform strongly in the next five years helped by growth in the number of homes in the UK, expanding numbers of 25-34s, improving consumer confidence and by more people opting to trade up for better quality. FIGURE 1: Consumer spend on homewares, 2008-18

Source: Mintel

In 2013 consumers spent 11.79 billion on homewares (the broad definition), up 4.5% on the previous year. By 2013 sales were 12.3% higher than in 2008. And, as the economy and housing market improves, we forecast that spending will rise by 19.2% from 2013-18 to reach 14.04 billion. In 2013 demand was helped by growing levels of consumer confidence and an upturn in the housing market, and people were prepared to spend a little more on buying things for their homes. The trend for home baking and cooking created a surge in demand for cookware and bakeware, with people showing willingness to trade up for better brands and quality. FIGURE 2: The market for homewares (broader definition) by main segment, 2013 (est)

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Executive Summary

Source: Mintel

The market is dominated by high volumes of low-priced goods. Even so, there is a range of factors encouraging people to trade up for better quality and style. People want to recreate restaurant experiences at home and innovative gadgets are helping them achieve this. Celebrity tie-ups remain important in homewares. Companies are adding innovative design touches, even to the most mundane of products. Plus retailers are continuing to innovate in areas spanning branding, multi-channel retailing, extra services and format evolution. Market factors Staying in, not eating out People, especially those with tighter finances, are cutting back on eating out and this is helping stimulate sales of cookware and other homewares. The less well-off are core customers for value goods and so this will help to stimulate sales through supermarkets and value mixed goods retailers like Argos, B&M, Home Bargains and Wilkinson.

Cooking and baking from scratch In the UK, 40% of adults cook from scratch most days and 35% claim to bake from scratch at least once a week. This drives demand for cookware. TV cookery is very popular and there is plenty of airtime dedicated to cookery programmes. This is helping to create interest in cooking, baking and entertaining at home and creating additional stimulus to market growth.

A brighter housing market The housing market has picked up. In 2013 we estimate that there were 1.045 million housing transactions, +12.1% compared with 2012. More housing transactions helps to stimulate home refurbishment activity and this in turn will help to create more demand for home accessories and homewares. Some 49% of people have plans for small home improvements in the next year and another 10% plan to carry out major home improvements. People who are buying their homes on a mortgage or own their homes outright are the most likely to be planning home improvements. This is good for all homewares but especially important for sales of window dressings and lighting.

The connected consumer More people than ever have internet access and, because of smartphones and tablets, can access the internet conveniently wherever they are. This has helped fuel a boom in using the internet to browse, find information, search for deals and to buy goods. Mintels Digital Trends UK December 2013 shows that 58% of people said they had accessed the internet from a smartphone in 2013, an increase of 13 percentage points compared with the same month a year earlier. Indeed, 81% of smartphone owners now connect to the internet using their handsets.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Executive Summary

Underlying growth There are plenty of positive indicators that should help to contribute to growing demand for housewares. There will be 1.3 million more households in 2018 than in 2013, +4.9%. Also, by 2018 the ABs will be the largest socio-economic group and these are the highest spenders on homewares. Demand for homewares for first homes will see a boost as the pre-no family lifestage expands by 7.2% over 201318. Plus personal disposable income will rise by 31.8% over the same years helping to generate growth in consumer spending. Companies, brands and innovation Supply of homewares is fragmented, spread across a wide range of manufacturers, most of which specialise in one segment of the market. The Spring and Autumn Shows in the UK are the key UK trade fairs and each has a vast array of exhibitors with products ranging from kitchen and tableware through to ornaments and lighting. FIGURE 3: Channels to market, 2013

Online and offline sales are included within each sector Supermarkets includes Tesco, Asda, Sainsburys, Aldi and others. Department stores includes John Lewis, House of Fraser, Debenhams, Marks & Spencer, Next and BHS General mixed goods includes Argos, Wilkinson, The Range, Dunelm, B&M and other value mixed goods retailers Home shopping includes pureplay online sellers (Amazon, eBay and others) as well as conventional home shopping companies such as
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Home shopping includes pureplay online sellers (Amazon, eBay and others) as well as conventional home shopping companies such as Shop Direct Furniture stores includes Ikea, Laura Ashley, Cargo and others Specialists includes Lakeland, Steamer Trading, Hillarys Blinds and other specialists including independents Other includes market stalls, gift shops and others DIY specialists includes B&Q, Homebase, other DIY stores, hardware shops.
Source: Mintel

Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Executive Summary

Amazon has become a destination for shopping and sells a wide range of merchandise. We include Amazon within home shopping specialists. Department/variety stores (39%) have the highest share by value and within this the largest player is John Lewis. It has been gaining share through a combination of range and brand development, multi-channel selling and the addition of new selling space including new department store space and the John Lewis at Home outlets. General value mixed goods retailers (33%) are dominated by Argos a destination retailer for many shoppers. Wilkinson is a major value chain and there are several strong and growing mixed goods businesses including B&M and The Range. Dunelm stands out as a high growth business (sales up 60% in five years) with particular strengths in textile products including bedding, towels and window furnishings. Specialists are relatively small players, although within the cookshop sector Lakeland is a leading player and Steamer Trading is growing its presence, although from a much smaller base. Hillarys Blinds is a large direct seller of window blinds and Montgomery a leading concession operator for made to measure curtains.

The consumer What they bought FIGURE 4: Homewares purchased in the last 12 months, November 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

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Source: GMI/Mintel

Seven in ten people and 77% of ABs bought homewares in the last 12 months. The people with the widest repertoire of purchases are 1634s. The categories with the highest rate of purchases are household linens (43%), cookware and/or bakeware (37%), lighting (33%) and soft furnishings (33%). Over a quarter of people (26%) bought homewares as a gift.

Where they bought homewares FIGURE 5: Where homewares were purchased, November 2013 Base: 1,421 internet users aged 16+ who purchased any homewares in the last 12 months

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Source: GMI/Mintel

Value retailers such as discount shops (41%), supermarkets (41%) and Argos (34%) top the list of outlets used by people shopping in-store for homewares. All of these players are popular with C2s, reflecting their focus on good value products aimed at the mass market. ABs (38%) favour department stores and variety stores (including John Lewis, Next, Marks & Spencer and Debenhams) and 25-34s (37%) are also important shoppers at this group of retail outlets. We are seeing more innovative own-label development at these retailers, helping them to add value and differentiate themselves. Ikea is doing a remarkable job of attracting the young homemaker. Despite running a chain of just 18 superstores in the UK, one in five 1644s bought homewares from Ikea and the chain is particularly strong in London, where 21% shopped in-store and 12% online.

What they think about buying soft furnishings FIGURE 6: Attitudes towards buying soft furnishings, November 2013 Base: 1,090 internet users aged 16+ who bought soft furnishings/textiles in the last 12 months

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Note: Abbreviated statements


Source: GMI/Mintel

Many shoppers are price-conscious. A third wait for the sales and more people say they generally buy cheap items (30%) than agree they buy high quality (25%). People want to touch and feel soft furnishings and textiles, indicating that they are likely to visit a shop to experience the products first hand. So shops face the challenge of converting browsers into purchasers and discouraging them from looking for a deal online. Co-ordination is very important to people when deciding what to buy and ranks second in the list of factors. So illustrations of the best ways to mix and match colours and patterns will be helpful to shoppers and we see plenty of examples of style guides including instore displays, catalogues and websites.

What they think about buying for kitchen and dining FIGURE 7: Attitudes towards buying kitchen and dining wares, November 2013 Base: 1,070 internet users aged 16+ who have bought any kitchen and dining wares in the last 12 months

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Note: Abbreviated statements


Source: GMI/Mintel

Functionality is very important in the choice of cookware people want good results from their cooking. Many consumers have tableware and dining ware for special occasions (34%), indicating that themes of parties or entertaining will encourage people to trade up.

What qualities they look for in homewares FIGURE 8: Qualities affecting choice of homewares, November 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

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Note: Abbreviated statements


Source: GMI/Mintel

People are highly conscious of stylish appearance when thinking about lighting, ornaments and curtains. However, functional design at the lowest prices dominates decisions about crockery, glasses and cookware but for these goods people also demand a quality finish. Uniqueness affects choice for ornaments. For household linens people want a high quality finish and feel, but also drive a hard bargain, indicating that they will hunt around for the best prices.

What we think This market is coming out of the doldrums. After several years where things for the home took a back seat in terms of spending priorities, we are seeing the green shoots of recovery. Curtains and lighting went through a particularly tough time while people held back on buying for their homes. But, as the economy begins to strengthen and housing sales pick up, there are signs that people will spend a little more freely on home dcor. Smaller ticket items have fared better over the lean years and the trends to spend more leisure time at home, as well as a new enthusiasm for cooking and baking, helps encourage people to buy things for their kitchens and living areas. We feel more positive about the future than at any time over the last five years and those retailers that have invested in style, branding and presentation are well placed to take advantage of this upturn.
If you want more details about this particular report, please contact the Mintel information team on +1 312-932-0400 in the U.S. or +44 (0)20-76066000 in the UK and the rest of the world, or email them to info@mintel.com.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Issues in the Market

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

In a market flooded with low-priced goods, retailers face a steep challenge to encourage people to trade up and spend more. We expect to see more investment in exclusive brands and designs as retailers strive to differentiate themselves from competitors including online discounters. And retailers will continue to make more efforts to inspire customers to assemble a coordinated look, using displays, catalogues and online technology to help improve the design literacy of todays home makers. Jane Westgarth, Senior Market Analyst What is the future for specialist retailers of homewares? It is quite remarkable that, even though homewares are widely available through many generalist retailers, we are seeing specialist retailers thrive and grow. Some goods, like made to measure curtains and blinds, need the attention of specialists which understand how to get the best look for the job in hand. And this is a factor behind the growth of companies like Hillarys Blinds. But look at the success of Lakeland in creating a strong corporate image and a position of expertise that has allowed it to grow and justify higher than average pricing, despite the intense competition. And following in its wake, the excellent Steamer Trading is poised for expansion. In a different sector Dunelm, which has a strong presence in textiles and homewares, has enjoyed growth far outrunning most in the marketplace, thanks to its depth of choice and competitive prices. So there is a bright future for specialists, particularly those that find a true point of differentiation over their competitors. The market is dominated by low-priced mass market retailers, so how can retailers add value? There are a few excellent examples of retailers that are adding value in homewares and the key lies with branding. The research for this report shows that brands come behind lowest prices for most shoppers, but they do respond well to clear signs created by brands that highlight differentiation such as styling, quality or functionality. We see that Homebase (part of Home Retail Group) has outpaced its rival B&Q by creating a sophisticated multi-layered branding strategy for homewares that encompasses some familiar labels, now exclusive to this retailer and Homebase has been growing market share. The latest addition to its brand stable, Habitat, is seeing a rollout of shop-in-shops as well as some Habitat-labelled goods appearing throughout its homewares ranges. Dunelm has bought Dorma, a leading linens brand, to create added value and to encourage trading up, and this company has seen sales growth far outpace the market. And John Lewis has successfully launched House by John Lewis to cement its own identity in this sector and is one of the most successful retailers in Britain today. How influential is online retailing in the market for homewares? Amazon, the leading pureplay retailer, has been a high growth phenomenon and in the survey for this report we found that 34% of people had bought homewares from pureplay online sellers. To put this in perspective this is the same percentage of people who has bought from Argoss stores. Online shopping has arrived and is here to stay. It is also developing fast with retailers making strenuous efforts to make the experience as convenient and pleasurable as possible. Mobile commerce is growing rapidly and we see many retailers making improvements to their multi-channel (click & collect) services including same-day pick-up. Yet, many items of homewares are low-ticket goods, bought on convenience while out shopping and this kind of trade is least likely to be mopped up by online sellers. And some goods are tactile and people want the experience of touching and feeling before they buy them. So for the future people will want the options to buy at a store or online and we believe that online selling is not the death knell of conventional shopping. A lot of celebrities endorse homewares but does it influence consumers? Our research shows that 20% of people say they generally buy the stores own brand. But far fewer agree that they buy branded items (7%). For kitchenware 7% of shoppers agree with the statement, I tend to buy kitchen homewares that are endorsed by a celebrity chef (eg Jamie Oliver, Raymond Blanc, Delia Smith) but actually more than this (12%) agree with being often inspired to buy kitchen homewares that I have seen on television (eg MasterChef, The Great British Bake Off). This shows that they are responding to stimulus from television programmes but this may not lead them on to actually seeking an endorsed product. We believe that, for some, the power of a celebrity endorsement is important in helping to build a brand and that it does add value, helping to give assurances about the
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design and the quality but that a celebrity name alone is not a magic dust. What role does style play in shaping demand for homewares? A lot of homewares products are there to enhance the room, so styling is hugely important. When we spoke to people about how much it influenced them we found that stylish appearance tops the list for three of the homewares groups lighting (52%), decorative accessories (56%) and curtains/blinds (44%). These are all homewares that form a central part of home dcor and can really make a huge difference to the way a room looks. Co-ordination also counts for many shoppers (45% say it influences their soft furnishings choices) so retailers that inspire by presenting interesting ways to create a co-ordinated look will perform well. Examples include Nexts directory pages, the Ideas and Homes Ikea magazine and John Lewiss Top ten picks for Home.
If you want more details about this particular report, please contact the Mintel information team on +1 312-932-0400 in the U.S. or +44 (0)20-7606-6000 in the UK and the rest of the world, or email them to info@mintel.com.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Trend Application

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Mintels approach in this section goes beyond merely identifying trends. We apply trends from Mintels trend tool, Inspire, to understand the wider implications of cultural changes, gaining insight into how companies and brands can translate these into on-the-ground opportunities relevant to the market for homewares. Trend: Many Mes Consumers are diverse individuals, with multiple identities and niche interests. Todays consumer is more like a multiplex than a single screen cinema, with many different films on show. Marketing and advertising used to be about aligning products and messaging strategies to neatly defined targets. Today, consumers have become far more difficult, if not impossible, to pigeonhole. Individuals are being encouraged to explore and express their inner diversity. This trend means that marketers and retailers are speaking not to one consumer, or one target group, but to individuals who feel nuanced, complex, and individually diverse. When we spoke to people about tableware 34% said I have some tableware items (eg plates, bowls, glasses, cutlery) that I use only for special occasions. So they appear to have a special collection which come out for celebrations, entertaining friends or for big events like Christmas. Retailers could engage theme-based marketing, putting together different collections to appeal to these special days. So instead of a smart dinner table ranges could be themed into birthday dining or romantic dining. People could be encouraged to build up their special collections in the future with loyalty offers on subsequent items such as co-ordinating serving plates or celebration drinks coasters. These could be created for key events like Easter and Valentines day as well as family occasions such as birthdays. Trend: Make it Mine People these days see personalisation as a right, not a privilege. One-size-fits-all is dead. In certain categories, the assembly line approach no longer applies for example, its hard to remember when you couldnt customise your car. Indeed, the ability for a consumer to have some sort of input into what they buy has crossed every industry and nearly every part of the globe. And its the very pervasiveness of customisation that makes the trend what it is today: an expectation. And one that consumers simply wont do without. This poses a challenge for brands if they are to give people exactly what they want, when and how they want it. Another emerging expectation is to be able to continuously customise goods. Watch for consumers seeking products that can be modified over time. In this research we find that 42% of people said they want something unique when choosing decorative items for the home. So there is an opportunity to offer them something unique by allowing people to customise a product, embellish things with their own designs or select the exact colour they want. We arent talking about photo-mugs or school tea towels. Imagine a duvet cover with your choice of embroidery, a teapot featuring your choice of pattern or a set of storage jars carrying exactly the words you want to go with the contents. Retailers could offer hands-on creative sessions where people could work with a design leader to take ideas to new heights. And the website could offer the option to upload images. Trend: Generation Next Teens are struggling to rebel and progress and they need and expect more from companies. Many of todays teens are growing up in an era of intense economic hardship and many are deciding to remain living with their parents in a bid to save money as well as nurture their disposable income. This generation may share the homes of their parents and grandparents but that does not mean they necessarily share their values. Todays teens have heightened awareness of sustainable sourcing, gender equality and greater corporate accountability so expect to see more demand for homewares with eco and sustainable claims. The stay-at-home teenager needs a place of their own within the home where they can retreat from the rest of the family and enjoy some personal independence. So they want to create their own identity within the home environment. Expect to see more demand for household textiles designed to enhance a teenage bedroom and bathroom, ornaments aimed at the teenage den and casual-dining crockery all of their own, ideal for when friends come along for a big night in.
If you want more details about this particular report, please contact the Mintel information team on +1 312-932-0400 in the U.S. or +44 (0)20-7606-6000 in the UK and the rest of the world, or email them to info@mintel.com.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Internal Market Environment

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Consumers are changing their eating patterns and 32% agree they are cooking at home more instead of eating out. So demand for kitchen accessories and tablewares will grow. Some 11% say they are trying to recreate restaurant meals at home instead of eating out. So they will want to recreate the restaurant experience with attractively set tables and better home dcor. At the same time there is a general trend towards casual dining at home and this in turn creates a more relaxed feel for crockery and other tablewares. The British are a nation of cooks. Some 40% say they cook from scratch most days and 27% spend more time cooking when they can at weekends. So the homewares that surround the kitchen and eating areas will be important. 2012 (+5.3%) and 2013 (+12.1%) saw an uplift in the number of housing transactions in the UK. The time surrounding a house move, particularly for people with mortgages, is one of higher demand for homewares so this more buoyant housing market will help to boost sales of homewares. Intentions to undertake home improvement projects were high in 2013 as 49% were planning small home improvements and 10% had major projects in mind for the next year. These projects are likely to be finished off with new homewares such as curtains, soft furnishings, linens and ornaments.

Entertaining at home Mintels Eating Out Review UK June 2013 looks how often people are eating out and their attitude towards what they spend. A key finding is that 32% of people who have eaten in a restaurant in the last three months say Im cooking at home more instead of eating out and 11% agree that they are trying to recreate restaurant meals at home instead of eating out. FIGURE 9: Attitudes towards eating out, by age and financial situation, April 2013 Base: 1,575 internet users aged 16+ who have eaten in a restaurant in the last three months

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Source: GMI/Mintel

People who feel that their finances are healthy are least likely to agree that they are cooking more at home instead of eating out, but even these consumers appear to be behaving cautiously. And those whose finances are tight or struggling, who are core customers for the value chains, are very likely to eat out less. Key analysis: People are eating more often at home as a way of being cautious about how much they spend, and this will make them more aware of their homes and homewares, particularly if they are more inclined to invite guests into their homes more often. So marketing themes that compare investing in tablewares to what you might have spent on a restaurant meal or comparing the price of wine glasses to what you might have spent on a bottle of wine while eating out could chime with them. A nation that cooks FIGURE 10: Cooking and eating habits, October 2013 Base: 1,500 internet users aged 16+ % I enjoy spicy food I usually eat with my family/partner
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46 44
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I prefer to cook from scratch so I can control the contents (eg salt, fat, sugar, etc) 41

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I use leftovers to avoid food waste I cook from scratch most days (eg using raw vegetables, meat) I enjoy experimenting with flavours and recipes I stick to familiar dishes I spend more time cooking when I can (eg at weekends) I often cook larger batches of food and freeze them to eat later I often eat dinner on my own I find I am eating more homemade sandwiches than I did a year ago I do very little cooking and prefer to use prepared dishes None of these
Source: GMI/Mintel

41 40 38 30 27 23 19 17 12 3

Some 40% of people cook from scratch most days and a significant 27% say they spend more time cooking when they can at weekends. People who cook from scratch show a bias towards older age bands (55+, 54%) and people who spend more time cooking at weekends shows a bias to those with the highest household incomes (50,000+, 35%). This means spending time in the kitchen is a key driver behind creating demand for a wide range of tablewares and kitchen accessories. Casual dining The snacking phenomenon has led to more casual dining, in and out of the home and this is affecting where people sit to eat their meals and is one of the factors behind lacklustre demand for dining tables and chairs according to Mintels Living and Dining Furniture UK January 2013. This ongoing trend affects tastes for homewares and has been a factor behind the trend away from formally set tables to a more relaxed look for plates and other tablewares. House sales/mortgages FIGURE 11: Residential property transactions, 2008-15

Source: Office for National Statistics/Council of Mortgage Lenders

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Internal Market Environment

In 2007, before the recession, the UK was experiencing a debt-fuelled housing boom. But, as mortgage finance dried up, housing sales fell abruptly. This set the scene for the next four years as restricted lending by the mortgage providers, as well as weak customer confidence, led to flat conditions. There was a small revival in 2012, with 3.6% more transactions compared with the previous year. And 2013 looks to be better still (forecasts based on the year to November). The Council of Mortgage Lenders forecasts a further recovery in 2014 and 2015 although it remains fairly cautious as household finances are stretched and interest rates may rise. An increase in housing transactions is positive news for the furniture and housewares markets including refitting kitchens. Home refurbishment activity also gets a boost when people have bought a house and this in turn will help create more demand for home accessories and homewares. DIY intentions Mintels DIY Retailing UK May 2013 finds that 49% of people have plans for small home improvements in the next year and 10% plan to carry out major home improvements. People who are buying their homes on a mortgage (55%) or own their homes outright (56%) are most likely to be planning small home improvements. And home owners/buyers are very likely to plan major projects (26% of people with a mortgage are planning major projects on their homes in the next year). So, as home ownership grows and more people buy homes, the market for home improvements will grow. And in turn we expect this to generate more interest in home accessories and homewares.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Broader Market Environment

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Some 69% of adults in the UK have a smartphone (September 2013), 23% more than in January 2012. This is a key factor in assisting growth in online shopping and browsing. Ownership of tablet computers has grown from 19% in January 2012 to 42% in September 2013. This makes access to the internet convenient and is also aiding the growth of shopping and researching what to buy online. There will be 3.3% more adults in the UK by 2018 than in 2013 and the number of households is continuing to grow at similar pace. This will help to grow demand for homewares. Total consumer expenditure will grow by 34.2% from 2013-18, helped by a better economy and stronger consumer confidence.

Seven in ten now own a smartphone FIGURE 12: Personal ownership of mobile phones, January 2012 September 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

Source: GMI/Mintel

The smartphone has been a huge phenomenon in the UK and by September 2013, some 69% of adults aged 16+ have a smartphone. This makes internet access very quick and convenient and in turn this has helped to change browsing and shopping habits. Mintels Digital Trends UK December 2013 shows that 58% of people said they
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Broader Market Environment

had accessed the internet from a smartphone in 2013, up 13 percentage points compared with the same month a year earlier. Indeed, 81% of smartphone owners now connect to the internet using their handsets. Mintels Buying for the Home Online - UK, February 2013 forecasts that shopping online for the home will rise by 79% over 2012-17 to reach 7.1 billion. This growth is being driven by demand from consumers, but is also being helped as consumers are becoming more confident shopping online and retailers have sorted out alot of the early problems associated with purchasing via the internet, such as ease of navigation of websites, security and delivery. Key analysis: Todays smartphone owner has more power as a consumer, being able to look for the cheapest deal, to find out more about a product and to look for online reviews. Retailers have already responded rapidly, investing in mobile friendly websites and sophisticated internet communications. They must be good at providing people with the online information they need as well as the services they demand in todays digital environment. There is no doubt that shopping is becoming ever more interactive and we predict that online shopping and multi-channel shopping for homewares will continue to grow. Tablets take off FIGURE 13: Household ownership of portable computers January 2012-September 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

Source: GMI/ Mintel

Laptops have maintained their high level of ownership in the UK and more than eight in ten households have one. But the phenomenal growth of tablet computers illustrates our hunger for staying connected. Tablet computers offer the advantage of a bigger screen than most mobile phones, making it easier to browse through detailed websites. Again, tablets are behind the growth in shopping online. More households, smaller households FIGURE 14: UK households, by size, 2008-18
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Broader Market Environment

2008 m 1-person households 2-people households 3-people households 4-people households 5 or more people Total households 7.48 9.03 4.09 3.43 1.66 % 29.1 35.1 15.9 13.3 6.5 -

2013 m 7.70 9.31 4.36 3.51 1.67 2.34 % 29.0 35.1 16.4 13.2 6.3 -

2018 m 8.01 9.64 4.66 3.60 1.69 2.34 % 29.0 34.9 16.9 13.0 6.1 -

% change % change 2008-13 +2.9 +3.2 +6.5 +2.5 +0.3 +3.3 -0.5 2013-18 +4.1 +3.5 +6.9 +2.4 +1.4 +4.0 -0.2

25.69 100.0 26.55 100.0 27.60 100.0

Average household size 2.35

Source: Office for National Statistics/Council of Mortgage Lenders/Mintel

The number of households in the UK is growing and by 2018 we expect there to be 7.4% more than in 2008. This growth is helping to create more demand for homewares. More homes means an increase in demand for kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and living room furniture, so this will provide growth in demand for homewares. The population will grow FIGURE 15: Forecast adult population trends, by socio-economic group, 2008-18 2008 000s AB C1 C2 D E 2012 000s 2013 000s 2017 2018 (proj) % change % change 000s 000s 13,941 13,672 12,749 8,335 5,210 53,907 2008-13 +2.5 -1.3 +10.1 +2.6 +12.3 +3.8 2013-18 +0.6 -4.9 +9.1 +3.6 +13.3 +2.5

13,526 13,682 13,860 13,981 14,563 14,368 14,377 13,880 10,618 11,456 11,688 12,594 7,846 4,095 8,121 4,551 8,048 4,598 8,338 5,115

Total 50,647 52,178 52,571 53,907


Source: Office for National Statistics/Mintel

ABs will be the largest socio-economic group by 2018 and these people are important consumers of homewares. Their higher than average wealth means that they can afford to buy more goods and often that they are prepared to pay extra to get the style or quality that they seek. This is a key shopper group for department stores and specialist retailers such as John Lewis or Lakeland. The consumer research for this report shows the importance of C2s for discounters, supermarkets and Argos. So growth in this socio-economic group will play into the hands of these mass market retailers. Shifting lifestages FIGURE 16: Forecast adult population trends, by lifestage, 2008-18 2008 2013 (est) 2018 (proj) % change % change 000s Pre-/no family 13,826
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000s 14,529

000s 15,141

2008-18 +5.1

2013-18 +4.2
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Broader Market Environment

Families Third age Retired Total

14,002 12,904 9,916 50,647

13,723 13,179 11,140 52,571

13,305 13,571 12,217 54,233

-2.0 +2.1 +12.3 +3.8

-3.0 +3.0 +9.7 +3.2

Source: Office for National Statistics/Mintel

The population is growing and within this different lifestages are experiencing very different rates of growth or decline. By 2018 we expect 4.2% more adults in the pre-/no family category, fuelling demand for homewares to suit first homes or for the boomerang generation who have returned to the family home after university to create their own style in their corner of the house. Families will see a decline, with numbers dropping by 3% between 2013-18. So this will reduce demand for childrens homewares including linens and textiles for kids bedrooms. The retired consumers are the least active group of shoppers in this marketplace but they do buy things, especially cookware and linens. There are many opportunities to tap into the particular desires of these older shoppers, particularly catering for the needs of people as they lose dexterity or as their eyesight fades. Personal disposable income will grow FIGURE 17: GDP, PDI, consumer expenditure and savings, at current prices, 2008-18 GDP bn 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 (est) 2014 (proj) 2015 (proj) 2016 (proj) 2017 (proj) 2018 (proj) 1,441 1,402 PDI Consumer expenditure Savings Savings ratio bn 921 954 bn 893 877 921 954 991 1,029 1,084 1,150 1,221 1,299 1,381 +15.3 +34.2 bn 29 78 79 73 77 148 154 158 162 166 170 +416.1 +14.7 % 2.2 7.0 7.3 6.7 6.7 7.1 8.0 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.1 +4.9 +3.9

1,467 1,000 1,516 1,027 1,541 1,068 1,581 1,178 1,641 1,237 1,710 1,308 1,786 1,382 1,867 1,382 1,949 1,552

% change 2008-13 +9.7 +27.8 % change 2013-18 +23.3 +31.8 * %-point change
Source: Office for National Statistics/HM Treasury/Mintel

Consumers will spend 34.2% more in 2018 than in 2013 according to Mintels forecasts. This will be helped by improvements in the economy, increased levels of employment and rising consumer confidence.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Broader Market Environment

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Competitive Context

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Between 2009-13 it is clear that spending on glassware, tableware and cookware performed well by comparison to household textiles and lighting, while sales of furniture were very slow over the same period. Demand for carpets was also weak, although 2012 saw a sudden jump in activity, helped by more house moves. Homewares for the kitchen and table have kept pace with growth in spending on food and drink, but all other homewares have lagged behind.

FIGURE 18: Household spend on selected categories, 2009-12 Household Glassware, Lighting Furniture Carpets and textiles tableware and and other floor hardware furnishings coverings m 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 (est) % change 2009-13 5,713 6,308 5,559 5,799 6,043 +5.8 m 4,269 4,155 4,657 4,841 5,083 +19.1 m 615 608 625 638 660 +7.3 m 12,288 11,824 12,453 12,787 13,107 +6.7 m 3,356 3,856 3,808 4,409 4,420 +31.7 Food Electricity, Gas and and other drink domestic fuel m 79,851 82,917 86,599 90,456 93,600 +17.2 m 29,361 30,591 29,068 32,415 35,006 +19.2

Source: Office for National Statistics Consumer Trends / Mintel

People have been holding back on buying big ticket items for their homes. When we take a view of consumer spend over 2009-13 it is clear that spending on glassware, tableware and cookware performed well by comparison to household textiles and lighting, while sales of furniture were very slow over the same period. Demand for carpets was also weak, although 2012 saw a sudden jump in activity, helped by more house moves. Homewares for the kitchen and table have kept pace with growth in spending on food and drink, but all other homewares have lagged behind. And rising pressure to pay inflating domestic energy bills is also squeezing household budgets.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Strengths and Weaknesses in the Market

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Strengths Choice . There is a wide choice of homewares at a wide variety of price points. Distribution. Homewares are broadly distributed and are available across a vast array of retailers as well as online. Fashion. Style and fashion play an increasing role in the market for homewares. There is a wide choice of styling across the retailers. Basics. Shoppers can select from a huge range of basics goods and low prices. So homewares are within reach of a broad range of people. Disposable . Many homewares are at such low prices people can be encouraged to replace them when they feel like a change rather than waiting until things wear out. Treats. Many homewares are bought as gifts for other people and so can also be thought of as a treat for the shopper something that they enjoy buying for their homes. Celebrity branding. Plenty of opportunities to use high profile celebrities from television to endorse products or create their own ranges. Eating habits. Tablewares benefit from growing enthusiasm for eating in.

Weaknesses Deferrable . Some homewares are deferrable purchases and so people may decide to wait, especially if they have other demands on their wallets. Brands. Own-label goods are taking precedence over branded ones. Cheap imports. The proliferation of low priced imports makes it difficult for conventional brands to justify their higher price points. Price sensitivity. Many consumers wait for sales or special deals before they buy . Incomes squeezed. Homewares take low priority compared with essential living costs such as paying utility bills, rent/mortgage payments and buying fuel. So rising prices in other areas of the economy leaves less discretionary income to spend on things for the home.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Whos Innovating?

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points People want to recreate restaurant experiences at home and innovative gadgets such as the Rice Cube from Dexam is an example of this kind of innovation. Celebrity tie-ups remain important in homewares. Designers like Joseph Joseph are taking a fresh look at home goods and even mundane kitchenwares like a washing up bowl are getting a touch of innovation. Retailers are continuing to innovate in areas spanning branding, multi-channel retailing, extra services and format evolution.

Dexam helps make Sushi FIGURE 19: The Rice Cube, Dexam, 2013

Source: Company w ebsite

Dexams rice cube is a piece of equipment that helps make sushi dishes. It can make sushi from plain rice and so helps cut down on calories. The gadget makes bite-sized sushi cubes from a mixture of rice and other sushi ingredients. Key analysis: This is an example of consumers wanting to bring the restaurant experience into the home. People are experiencing more variety of foods in restaurants and supermarkets and want to recreate the dishes for themselves. This is linked to cooking as entertainment and the importance of food as an experience. Celebrity tie-ups There is nothing especially innovative about celebrity tie-ups in the homewares industry. Television exposure has given us a long list of celebrity chefs, many of whom have formed alliances with homewares brands. FIGURE 20: Sophie Conran for Portmeirion, 2013

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Whos Innovating?

Source: Company w ebsite

The Sophie Conran range for Portmeirion won an award for Excellence in design in cookware at the industrys Excellence in Housewares awards in 2013. The range taps into modern design, is hard-wearing and practical, and combines style with practicality. There is a wide range of dishes and many items can be used for a variety of things. The range can be formal enough to look smart and casual enough to appear at a relaxed meal. For Portmeirion, famed for its heavily ornamented Botanical Gardens range, it is also a daring new direction. Key analysis: Mintel Inspire trend Life, An Informal Affair notices how a less formal atmosphere has invaded everything from the office to the restaurant and even the wedding reception. There has been a growing trend for familiar and unfussy dining, even on occasions we used to think of as formal (think barbecues for a wedding reception) and this trend has bubbled through to many things for the home. So in the same way that fancy occasions have had a casual makeover, so too has the posh dinner at home. Things are less formal, and a less formal dinner setting is an obvious extension of this trend. Wow, a new take on doing the dishes FIGURE 21: Wash & Drain washing up bowl, Joseph Joseph, 2013

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Whos Innovating?

Source: Company w ebsite

Washing up bowls need not be basics. Joseph Joseph has given the washing up bowl a makeover which is stylish and practical. It has an integrated plug which means water can be quickly drained away, and so the bowl does not need to be lifted or tipped to be emptied. This has applications for people who are less mobile as well as being more convenient for the mainstream market (see the Mintel Inspire trends Old Gold and Without a Care). The bowl features other thoughtful touches. The plughole can filter out food particles, allowing them to be easily disposed of and helping to prevent sink blockages. Its large carry handles mean it can be easily carried, if required. So as well as being useful around the house, this bowl could be ideal for campers or for carrying into the garden at a barbecue. Key analysis: Mintel Inspire trend Life Hacking sees how there never seem to be enough hours in the day and that things that can shave a few seconds off tasks are popping up all around us. Of course digital products are often tapping into this trend, but we are increasingly seeing things in homewares that can save people precious seconds. We expect to see more and more innovation in homewares that tap into this trend. Iconic designs FIGURE 22: Cooks Measure, Tala, 2013

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Whos Innovating?

Source: Company w ebsite

The Tala Cooks Measure is an example of an iconic piece of kitchen equipment that has survived the decades and continues to be as practical as ever. For cooks who choose not to use scales, or people without space for scales, this measures liquids and dry ingredients like flour, sugar and lentils quickly and accurately, and creates a minimum of mess. Key analysis: The Mintel Inspire trend Never Say Die looks at the fashion for adopting heritage styles and sometimes using the things your granny may have had; If you werent there the first time round, never mind. The past is a place to occupy. Objects are thought iconic because of their age, by people too young to have experienced them when they first appeared. The rise of eBay has popularised the availability of vintage goods. And the internet offers up an entire centurys worth of images. People are falling in love with retro things for their craftsmanship, durability and individuality. The past truly is our oyster and its products, songs, films and fashions variously appeal because of their tangibility, their individuality or simply because, like the Tala Cooks Measure, they were great ideas in the first place.

Retail innovation As well as new products hitting the market, there are innovations among retailers that make it easier for people to browse, get inspiration and to buy the products they want. Retail innovation is a journey, not a destination, but here
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Whos Innovating?

we highlight some of the key themes that are moving the retailing of homewares forwards. Multi-channel retailing is a hugely influential trend. It creates opportunities for people to be able to mix and match the way they wish to browse, choose, pay, take delivery or collect their goods. As more people have mobile internet access, this trend is becoming ever-more influential, changing the way we shop. The retailers at the forefront of this trend include Argos, Next and John Lewis. Argoss same day collection service is hard for others to match, while John Lewis continues to expand its collection points via Waitrose shops to capitalise on this growing trend. Multi-channel experience is the future and homewares retailers need to invest now, or face losing market share. Custom-makes. We are a diverse nation of shoppers. While some people look for something instant (such as ready-made curtains), for others the attraction of having things made for them and made to measure counts for a lot. We have seen Dunelm commit to expanding its home visit service for made-to-measure curtains, while John Lewis and Next offer an interior design service. Even Tesco offers the option to have curtains made to measure within seven days (although it hasnt gone as far as interior designers just yet). Right-sizing. As the internet alters the way we shop, retailers are beginning to alter their attitude to the geographical coverage and the size of shops that they occupy. In other words they think people will travel a little further to get to a shop, especially if those people have clued themselves up about what they might buy before they make their journey. So we are seeing Argos trimming its store numbers and John Lewis opening its first mid-sized department store. Digital evolution. Digital innovation is now becoming commonplace within retailers . Argos is trialling six concept stores with voice-activated computer systems, iPads, free Wi-Fi and digital screens flashing up adverts. The laminated in-store catalogues, paper slips and tiny pencils have given way in the new digital format which aims to be modern and to give faster service. In April 2013, Marks & Spencer followed House of Fraser in opening a small dotcom store: M&Ss e-boutique in Amsterdam is equipped with screens showing virtual clothing rails and online order points. And John Lewis has equipped sales staff with i-Pads that can be used to take payments.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Market Size and Segmentation

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points In 2013 consumers spent 11.79 billion on homewares, +4.5% on the previous year. In 2012 demand had been buoyant, helped by growing levels of consumer confidence and more house moves. In the 5 years from 2013-18 we forecast that consumer spending will grow by 19.2% to reach 14.04 billion. The strong performance will be helped by growth in the number of homes in the UK, expanding numbers of 25-34s, improving consumer confidence and be more people opting to trade up for better quality. There is a massive choice of hard homewares, with huge volumes being sold at budget prices through a range of value retailers as well as Ikea and the supermarkets. Countering this trend we see many initiatives from retailers and brands encouraging some discerning shoppers to opt for higher-priced goods. Similarly there is a vast choice of curtains and linens spanning a wide range of prices. The trend for home baking and cooking has created a surge in demand for cookware and bakeware, with people showing willingness to trade up for better brands and quality.

Forecast FIGURE 23: Consumer spend on homewares, 2008-18

Source: Mintel

Mintel has produced this forecasts based on an advanced statistical technique known as multivariate time series auto-regression using the statistical software package SPSS. The model, based on historical market size data taken from Mintels own market size database and supplemented by macro- and socio-economic data sourced from credible organisations (eg Office for National Statistics, HM Treasury, Bank of England), searches for relationships between actual market sizes and a selection of key economic and demographic determinants (independent variables) in order to identify those predictors having the most influence on the market. For the homewares market the number of 25-34s was identified to have the most influence on the market volume, as these people are usually setting up home and our research shows that they buy more homewares than other age bands. The second factor used was personal
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setting up home and our research shows that they buy more homewares than other age bands. The second factor used was personal disposable income as people who feel better off are freer with their spending on goods for the home. Next to historical market sizes and a current year estimate, the fan chart illustrates the probability of various outcomes for the market value of homewares over the next five years. The future uncertainty within this market is illustrated by the coloured bands around the five year forecast. The widening bands successively show the developments that occur within 95%, 90%, 70% and 50% probability intervals. Statistical processes predict the central forecast to fall within the darker shaded area which illustrates 50% probability ie a 5 in 10 chance. At a 95% confidence interval, we are saying that 95 out of 100 times, the forecast will fall within these outer limits, which we call the best and worst case forecast as these, based on the statistically driven forecast, are the highest (best case) and lowest (worst case) market sizes the market is expected to achieve. The best and worst case forecasts take the value of homewares from an expected 11,786 million in 2013 to 17,191 m best case and 10,897m worst case. Based on our best judgment however, Mintel expects the market to grow to a total of 14,044m in 2018. A positive big picture FIGURE 24: Total retail value sales of home accessories (broader definition), at current and constant prices, 2008-18 Total Index m 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 10,494 10,597 11,071 10,841 11,278 89 90 94 92 96 100 104 107 111 116 119 % na 1.0 4.5 -2.1 4.0 4.5 3.8 3.0 4.3 3.7 3.1 m at 13,183 12,731 12,743 11,802 11,820 11,786 11,729 11,551 11,529 11,439 11,284 -10.6 -4.3 Index 112 108 108 100 100 100 100 98 98 97 96 % annual change na -3.4 0.1 -7.4 0.2 -0.3 -0.5 -1.5 -0.2 -0.8 -1.4

Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Market Size and Segmentation

annual change 2013 prices

2013 (est) 11,786 2014 (fore) 12,238 2015 (fore) 12,603 2016 (fore) 13,140 2017 (fore) 13,626 2018 (fore) 14,044 % change 2008-13 2013-18
Source: ONS Consumer trends/Mintel

+12.3 +19.2

The governments report on consumer spending tracks various categories of spend on the home. Although these include a wider spread of categories than our core definitions it is useful to see an overview of spending patterns. As consumer confidence recovered and the housing market picked up, 2012 and 2013 saw growth in spending on homewares. By 2013 sales were 12.3% higher than in 2008. Market segmentation FIGURE 25: The market for homewares (broader definition) by main segment, 2013 (est)

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Source: Mintel

FIGURE 26: The market for homewares (broader definition) by main segment, 2008-13

Source: Consumer trends /Mintel

Homewares have seen mixed fortunes during the last five years. People have been reluctant or unable to move house and this has affected sales of big ticket goods for the home, including room makeovers. So demand for curtains and window blinds has been weak. But, the influence of more home baking and cooking has created a surge in demand for cookware and bakeware, with people showing willingness to trade up for better brands and quality.
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trade up for better brands and quality. Household textiles

Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Market Size and Segmentation

FIGURE 27: Household textiles by category, 2013

Source: Mintel

Almost a quarter of the textiles category is accounted for by ready-made window furnishings, most usually curtains and blinds. Other textiles, including table linens, bags made of fabric, made-to-measure window furnishings as well as fabrics sold by the meter account for just over half of all spend. Household linens which includes sheets, duvet covers and towels as well as bedding (duvets, pillows etc) accounts for 20% of spending. Glassware and tableware FIGURE 28: Glassware, tableware and other homewares, by category, 2013

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Source: Mintel

Decorative home accessories are the largest category within this part of the market. This includes ornaments, picture frames, bathroom accessories and other decorative goods for the home. Kitchenwares include goods for cooking and baking and account for 11%, while glass and tableware make up 17%. There is a wide range of other hard goods that fall into home accessories. These include kitchen hardware items such as buckets and bins, home storage items as well as miscellaneous feeding bottles, ironing boards, strong boxes, laundry airers and laundry baskets. Household linens and textiles FIGURE 29: Consumer spend on window, linens and other textiles, 2008-18 Window furnishings and accessories (ready-made) m 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 (est) 2014 1,402 1,318 1,376 1,402 1,425 1,461 Household linens m 1,199 1,128 1,129 1,146 1,175 1,176 Other household textiles (including made-to-measure) m 2,898 3,267 3,803 3,011 3,199 3,406 Total household textiles m 5,499 5,713 6,308 5,559 5,799 6,043

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1,223

3,496

6,218

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Market Size and Segmentation

2014 (fore) 2015 (fore) 2016 (fore) 2017 (fore) 2018 (fore)
Source: Mintel

1,499

1,223

3,496

6,218

1,543 1,591 1,643 1,699

1,257 1,306 1,355 1,420

3,618 3,747 3,901 4,023

6,418 6,644 6,899 7,142

The slow housing market has meant fewer house moves as well as a reluctance to undertake room makeovers. And by 2012, as the number of homes being sold in the UK began to recover, sales of curtains and window furnishings followed. Even so, people are not especially confident and disposable incomes are being squeezed because of rising utility bills, food and fuel costs. Consumers have more choice than ever of low-cost options rom a wide range of retailers from discounters to value chains and supermarkets. As a result average spending has been under pressure and more people are placing value and price high on their list of factors to take into account when choosing curtains and blinds. Buying new covers for the bed is a great way to change the look of a room at an affordable price. So we see people willing to jazz up a bedroom with new sheets and duvet covers. Plus the fashion for making a bed more sumptuous with layers of covers and extra cushions is helping to drive demand for other covers and soft furnishings. The uptick in house moves will encourage more bedroom revamps and in turn this will be good for sales of bed linens. Recession makes people cautious and Mintels trackers show that cautious consumers are spending more time at home. Also, we see the trend for young people to remain in the family homes for longer. So people want comfort and warmth in their homes and this is helping to stimulate sales of bedding such as duvets and pillows. Although times have been tough and the scene is competitive, there are signs that demand for household linens is picking up and we believe that people will invest a little more in the future for better quality and comfort.

Domestic lighting FIGURE 30: Consumer spend on Lighting, 2008-18 Lighting m 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 (est) 2014 (fore) 2015 (fore) 2016 (fore) 2017 (fore) 2018 (fore)
Source: Mintel

654 615 605 625 638 660 675 698 719 743 768

Demand for lighting in the home is closely linked to the property market and house moves. The market has been making a weak recovery and the upturn in housing sales in 2012 should be sustained into 2013. Retro trends have encouraged people to spend a little more to get the look they want and there has been a revival in sales of chandelier style light fittings. Meanwhile the trend for creating more in-home nests, where people can feel comfortable is helping create demand for sales of table lamps and other free-standing lights.
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This, like other homewares, is a competitive market place and there is plenty of choice of stylish fittings at cheap prices so that people can

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This, like other homewares, is a competitive market place and there is plenty of choice of stylish fittings at cheap prices so that people can create the kind of look they want without a major investment. In the future we expect to see more LED lighting moving into mainstream home fittings. And more lighting being built in as people refit kitchens and bathrooms.

Cookware and tableware FIGURE 31: Consumer spend on Glassware, tableware and other homewares, 2007-13 Glassware and tableware Kitchenware Decorative homewares Other homewares Total m 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 (est) 2014 (fore) 2015 (fore) 2016 (fore) 2017 (fore) 2018 (fore)
Source: Mintel

m 482 476 482 501 526 558 570 577 582 586 582

m 891 868 898 913 940 1,132 1,113 1,156 1,207 1,253 1,212

m 2,161 2,108 1,949 2,403 2,522 2,526 2,773 2,846 3,053 3,182 3,349

m 4,341 4,269 4,155 4,657 4,841 5,083 5,345 5,849 5,777 5,983 6,135

807 817 826 840 853 867 889 910 935 962 992

As the recession set in, people indulged themselves in cooking and baking at home. Traditional crafts like baking a cake became fashionable, helped by television exposure on the Great British Bak e Off and other television programmes. Mintels Small Kitchen Appliances UK December 2013 notes how this trend stimulated sales of high end food mixers and food preparation appliances. And at the same time demand for bakewares and good quality pans has been growing. This is accompanied by a general uplift in sales of gadgets. But, this, as with most products in homewares, is a market which is polarising. There is a plethora of goods at cheap prices in a range of different outlets from supermarkets to discounters. So people can opt for goods at throwaway prices if they choose to. For the future the challenge for retailers and brands is to add value and justify their higher prices through style, quality and better functionality.

Other home accessories Consumers are adding finishing touches to their homes, using ornaments and accessories such as cushions to add colour, create personality and interest in their homes. The lounge and dining areas are clearly a focus for living and here the emphasis will increasingly be on nesting, making the home comfortable and homely. People spend the bulk of their leisure time at home and so enhancing this environment will give them pleasure. We predict that accessories will be used more and throughout more spaces in the home, so ornaments for the kitchen, bathroom and bedrooms will become more commonplace. And we foresee that people will want to change the look of rooms more regularly, using accessories as a low-cost way to generate a new look for their homes. So people will buy homewares on impulse, keep them for a while and then replace them with something new. People see bathroom accessories as a low cost way of improving the ambience in their rooms. This is a niche market within other home accessories but Mintels Bathrooms and Bathroom Accessories UK August 2013 sees that it has performed strongly. As more bathrooms include fitted or modular furniture in the future we expect to see more demand for ornaments in the bathroom as well as decorative items with functional uses such as toothbrush tidies and holders for soap.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Companies and Products

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Supply of homewares is very fragmented and spread across a wide range of manufacturers, most of which specialise in one segment of the market. The Spring and Autumn Shows in the UK are the key trade fairs and each has a vast array of exhibitors, with products ranging from kitchen and tableware through to ornaments and lighting.

Curtains and blinds Hillarys Blinds is a leading specialist in the market for blinds. The company sells direct and provides a madeto-measure service. Turnover was 98 million in the year to September 2012. Montgomery Tomlinson is a curtain and furnishings business based in North Wales that runs retail concessions including in Debenhams and House of Fraser. The company went into administration in August 2013 but was bought by a Manchester-based venture capitalist, with a view to revitalising the business and continuing to trade. Plumbs is a direct seller of loose covers, made to measure upholstery and curtains. In 2010, the company celebrated its 50th anniversary. Thomas Sanderson sells blinds, conservatory blinds and shutters and sells direct in the UK. The company manufactures its products in the UK and has a turnover in excess of 35 million.

Others include Hunter Douglas Group (Luxaflex and Sunway Blinds), Faber (blinds) and Velux (window specialist that supplies blinds for its sloping roof windows). Household textiles and linens Bedeck supplies its own bed and bath linens as well as making Sanderson, Harlequin, Designer Guild and other brands under licence. Chortex supplies high quality towels under its own as well as the Horrockses and Osman brands. Christy is a leading brand for towels and the company also supplies bed linens and cushions. As well as enjoying wide distribution the company sells through its own website and also has ten factory outlet shops. Dorma is a leading name in bed linens and was bought by Dunelm in 2008. John Cotton is a major maker of pillows, duvets and mattress protectors. The company makes a wide range of products from basics through to luxury products. The company supplies own-label goods for many retailers as well as its own Snuggledown and Norway brands. Sharief Group owns a range of brands including Carlton Luggage. Its flagship linens brand is Fogarty, a maker of high quality pillows and duvets. Other linens brands in the group include Westone (bed linens), Canningvale, Pierre Cardin (linens) and Christian Fischbacher.

Tableware and glass


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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Companies and Products

Arc International is an international glassware company. Brands include Crystal DArques Paris (classic drinking glasses), Luminarc (tableware), Pyrex (glass cookware) and Chef & Sommelier (stylish modern drinking glasses). Arthur Price grew from its foundations as a Sheffield-based maker of cutlery, adding tableware, silver gifts and photo frames. The company has had a successful tie up with TV designer Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen. Churchill China is a supplier of tableware to the hospitality and catering industries as well as selling consumer products through retail channels. It provides many retailers with own-label ranges. The company works with many leading names including Cath Kidston, Jamie Oliver, Alex Clark, Julie Dodsworth and Dee Hardwicke. Dartington makes crystal glassware. The ranges include drinking glasses and gifts. The company claims to be the only maker of crystal manufacturing in the UK. Denby is a British manufacturer of stoneware, with a broad range of dinnerware and other crockery. In addition there is a small selection of glassware and the company launched a range of cookware in 2010. The company has created ranges endorsed by James Martin and has also created a Monsoon range of dinnerware. Emma Bridgewater makes hand decorated pottery. The family-run company is based in Stoke-on-Trent. The merchandise is widely distributed and the company makes the most of its British heritage. Oneida s ranges encompass cutlery (flatware), dinnerware and cookware. Other brands include Viners (cutlery, cookware, kitchenware and dinnerware), George Wilkinson (home baking, kitchenware and cookware), Samuel Groves (Mermaid Bakeware as well as bakeware for the commercial trade) and Anchor Hocking (comprehensive range of kitchen storage and serving dishes). Mermaid products are endorsed by Delia Smith. Portmeirion (Portmeirion, Spode, Royal Worcester and Pimpernel). This Stoke-on-Trent-based company is a market leader in high quality and innovatively designed tableware, cookware, giftware and tabletop accessories. Portmeirions Botanic Garden range launched in 1972 and is an iconic design. The company also has newer award winning collections including Sophie Conran for Portmeirion. The company acquired the classic Spode and Royal Worcester ceramics brands in 2009. The companys Pimpernel brand is a market leader in coasters and placemats. Villeroy & Boch is a Germany-based company that makes and sells products for the home. Its divisions include Bathroom & Wellness, Tableware and Tile, and it has 15 production facilities in Europe, Mexico and Thailand. The company makes tableware and a wide range of ornamental products for the home. Two of its ranges were highly rated in the 2013 Red Dot Design awards. WWRD Holdings is a maker of luxury china and glassware under the Waterford Crystal, Wedgwood, Royal Albert, Royal Doulton and Johnson Brothers brands. Waterford Wedgwood was bought out of receivership in 2009 by a US-based private equity firm, KPS Capital Partners. Parts of the business re-entered receivership in 2011. But today the group is still trading and in 2012 announced plans to invest in its site at Stoke-on-Trent, including an improved visitor centre. There are designer collaborations with Vera Wang, Jasper Conran, Monique Lhuillier, John Rocha, Gordon Ramsay and Donna Hay. The company sells through a wide range of stockists as well as its own outlet shops.

Lighting At the Interiors UK exhibition in January 2014 there are 50 different lighting suppliers showcasing their products and services. These include: dr lighting sells a wide range of lighting for residential and corporate customers. Its ranges include its own David Hunt brand, which focuses on high quality, hand-made lighting items.

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Micromark (owned by Micart LLP) has a comprehensive catalogue of lighting fixtures and fittings and supplies major chains in the UK including B&Q, Argos and Homebase.

Kitchenware and cookware This is a very fragmented sector with a wide range of suppliers and brands. Some brands including George Wilkinson, Mermaid, Viners, Pyrex and Denby, are mentioned as part of other supplier profiles above. Other brands include: Amefa is a Dutch manufacturer and distributor of table cutlery and kitchen knives under the Amefa, Couzon and Richardson Sheffield brands. While the company specialises in cutlery, it also has a presence in the cookware market through a range of branded kitchen knives. Horwood Homewares is a manufacturer and importer of homewares, including cookware, cutlery, knives, bakeware, kitchenware and small electricals. Horwood is owned by Portuguese cookware manufacturer, Silampos SA. The companys products are sold under the Stellar, Judge and Horwood brands, but some also carry the name of celebrity chef James Martin. Joseph Joseph is a manufacturer of stylish modern kitchenware. Most products include an element of innovation, improving their functionality. Le Creuset is a French manufacturer best known for its enamelled cast iron cookware, and also now sells stainless steel and toughened non-stick pans, stoneware and ceramics. It has an iconic orange range, but also sells an assortment of other coloured wares. Metalrax Group was a specialist steel manufacturing company which included a bakeware division. The cookware is sold via retail and commercial markets in the UK and abroad. Metalrax has a number of subsidiaries in its Consumer Durables division, including GW International and Samuel Groves. The company went into administration in April 2013 with the divisions sold to different companies. Metalrax Homewares was acquired by Cable Capital Partners and continues to trade. Meyer Group manufactures and markets gourmet cookware and kitchenware across the globe. The company claims to be the UKs largest supplier of kitchenware. The company has built up a reputation for quality, innovative cookware and is a leading player in hard-anodised non-stick cookware. Its brands include Anolon, Circulon, SilverStone and Prestige. Russell Hobbs is an appliance supplier selling small domestic appliances, large appliances and hair and beauty appliances. In addition the company has cookware range, including one endorsed by celebrity chef Marco Pierre White and others under the Tower and Russell Hobbs brands. Tefal is a global cookware manufacturer and was a pioneer in non-stick pans. Through a mix of organic and inorganic growth over the years Tefal has added pressure cookers, electrical cooking appliances, food and beverage preparation, irons and scales. The company is owned French appliances company Groupe SEB, which also owns the All Cad and Lagostina (pressure cookers) brands in the cookware market, as well as the Rowenta, Moulinex and Krups brands in small electrical. It produces a range endorsed by Jamie Oliver.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Homewares are sold by a wide range of types of retailer, including many general retailers, online sellers and supermarkets. Department stores (39%) have the highest share by value and within this the largest player is John Lewis. It has been gaining share through a combination of range and brand development, multi-channel selling and the addition of new selling space. General mixed goods retailers (33%) are very important within the sector and are dominated by Argos a destination retailer for many shoppers. Wilkinson is a major value chain and there are several strong and growing mixed goods businesses including B&M and The Range. Dunelm stands out as a high growth business, which we have classed as a value mixed goods retailer because of its breadth of range, although its particular strengths lie in textile products including bedding, towels and window furnishings. Lakeland is a leading specialist within the cookshop sector and Steamer Trading is growing its presence, although from a much smaller base.

Fragmented distribution FIGURE 32: Channels to market, 2012

Online and offline sales are included within each sector Supermarkets includes Tesco, Asda, Sainsburys, Aldi and others. Department stores includes John Lewis, House of Fraser, Debenhams, Marks & Spencer, Next and BHS General mixed goods includes Argos, Wilkinson, the Range, Dunelm, B&M and other value mixed goods retailers Home shopping includes pureplay online sellers (Amazon, eBay and others) as well as conventional home shopping companies such as Shop Direct
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Furniture stores includes Ikea, Laura Ashley, Cargo and others Specialists includes Lakeland, Steamer Trading, Hillarys Blinds and other specialists including independents Other includes market stalls, gift shops, garden centres and others DIY specialists includes B&Q, Homebase, other DIY stores, hardware shops
Source: Mintel

Winners and losers FIGURE 33: Channels to market, 2010 and 2012 2010 2012 % point change 2010-12 % Department stores Supermarkets Home shopping DIY specialists Specialists All furniture stores Other Total
Source: Mintel

% 38.6 33.5 5.9 5.7 5.5 4.8 4.3 1.8 +1.7 +1.7 -0.2 +1.0 -0.3 +0.3 +0.1 -4.2

36.9 6.1 4.7 5.8 4.5 4.2 6.0

General value mixed goods 31.8

100.0 100.0

Department stores (39% market share) Mintel examines the department store sector in detail in Department Store Retailing UK May 2013. John Lewis is the key player for homewares within department stores and has grown sales through a combination of excellent multi-channel retailing, the addition of new selling space and strong range development. It has a major commitment to homewares including comprehensive departments for lighting, curtains, bed linens and other household textiles, cookware and tableware. Marks & Spencer has lost ground, although it remains a major player in homewares, with particular strengths in bedding and bed linens. Next (usually profiled as a clothing retailer in Mintel reports but added into department stores for this report because of its strong presence in furniture and homewares) has a growing presence in homewares and its good looking Next Home and Next Home & Garden outlets, together with clear targeting, will help it grow further. Debenhams http://www.debenhams.com Debenhams is a UK-based department store group which is popular among young home makers in their 20s and 30s and attracts shoppers biased towards the AB socio-economic group. There are 156 stores across the UK and Ireland and the company also operates a fully transactional website. In addition the company trades via stores and online overseas. The company has continued to invest in store modernisation including allocating more in-store space for click & collect areas as well as restaurants. There are 16 stores in the pipeline for 2014-17. According to the companys own reports Debenhams generated some 12% of its turnover from home goods in the last full trading year to August 2013, helped by online growth, particularly in furniture. There is a wide home accessories selection, including bath linen & accessories, bed linen, cushions, throws, rugs, curtains and blinds (made to measure and ready-made), mirrors, photo frames, clocks, vases and bowls, candles and candle holders and lighting. The range is comprehensive although smaller than that at John Lewis. It includes own-label products as well as branded products including famous brands, exclusive designer ranges and celebrity-endorsed ranges. Cath Kidston, Christy towels, Kylie at Home and John Rocha table linen are among those it sells in the home accessories sector. Interior designer, stylist and author Abigail Ahern and print designer Vicki Elizabeth joined the department stores Edition homeware collection in Autumn 2013.

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Abigail Ahern and print designer Vicki Elizabeth joined the department stores Edition homeware collection in Autumn 2013. House of Fraser http://www.houseoffraser.co.uk House of Fraser is a premium department store group in the UK and Ireland, targeting the mid to upper market. The group has 61 stores across the UK and Ireland, as well as a rapidly growing online business. Home accessories include cookware and tableware, bath towels & accessories, bed linen, cushions, throws, rugs, curtains & blinds, mirrors, vases & bowls, clocks, photo frames and lighting. House of Fraser supplies a wide range of brands including Cath Kidston, Harlequin and Kylie Minogue, as well as Missoni-branded bathlinen and Innermost-branded lighting. It also carries ownbranded goods including the Linea brand. The company uses buying guides Home Looks to illustrate ways of creating the right effects in a room. John Lewis http://www.johnlewis.com John Lewis has invested for growth and has been a highly successful retailer throughout the last five years. The company has had three main pillars to its growth: new selling space, improved ranges and multi-channel retailing. The company has a strong focus on quality and customer service and emphasises its fair pricing by using the never knowingly undersold promise. There is a large choice of homewares at John Lewis and this has been one of the core strengths of the business for many years. Currently John Lewis operates 40 stores across the UK; 30 department stores and 10 John Lewis at Home stores. Three of the At Home shops opened in 2012 and one, Ashford, opened in 2013. There are several new stores in the pipeline including full-line department stores at the Westfield Shopping Centre in West London, Birmingham, Oxford and York. John Lewis stocks a highly extensive range of homewares and accessories including linens, rugs, curtains, cushions, mirrors, clocks, candles and candle holders, vases, bowls and lighting. The companys own branding is very strong and its House label, launched in 2012, is now the biggest brand within the home ranges. In addition the company carries many branded homewares products. At the end of 2013 John Lewis launched a membership reward programme under the My John Lewis banner. Marks & Spencer http://www.marksandspencer.com Marks & Spencer has over 766 stores across the UK ranging from large out-of-town and town centre flagship stores to smaller format Simply Food stores. Marks & Spencer is fully committed to multi-channel shopping and has developed apps for mobiles and tablets to help the online shopping experience. In its last full financial year, sales of Home merchandise fell by 2.2%. The Home range includes bath linen and accessories, bed linen, curtains & blinds, cushions, throws, rugs, photo frames, mirrors, candles and candle holders, clocks, vases & bowls and lighting. Marks & Spencer focuses on own-label products, including its Autograph brand, and also features exclusive ranges by Sir Terence Conran and Marcel Wanders. There has been an arrangement with Sir Terence Conran since 2011. In August 2012 M&S launched a new generation store at Cheshire Oaks, Ellesmere Port, featuring the biggest home department in the UK at 18,000 sq ft. Home features include a duvet and pillow selector which tailors recommendations based on answers to on-screen questions. The company has also developed a new inspirational roomset layout which includes home accessories, as well as featuring style ideas on its website. The new home concept is now featured in 33 stores. This includes in-store technology so that shoppers can browse a broader online range while shopping in the stores. The technology also helps to inspire customers and provide guidance. Next http://www.next.co.uk Next sells clothing and homewares from 541 stores in the UK and Ireland, Next Directory home shopping and through its international website. This is a mid-market retailer with a core shopper group of 25-45-year-olds. The companys town centre outlets usually allocate some space to a home section, but there is a far wider choice including furniture online. Next has also been opening Home stores on retail park sites and now has four even larger Next Home & Garden stores with planning permission for 11 more. Next opened five home stand-alone shops in the year to January 2013, bringing the total number to 55 (including Next Home & Garden). The companys reports indicate that the Home stores have been performing above expectations. Home products include kitchenware, tableware, bath linen and accessories, bed linen, curtains & blinds, cushions, throws, rugs,3/16 http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen/print/id=693301

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Home products include kitchenware, tableware, bath linen and accessories, bed linen, curtains & blinds, cushions, throws, rugs, table linen, mirrors, photo frames, clocks, candles & candle holders, vases & bowls and lighting. The company aims to develop ranges that reflect current fashion trends. There are examples of roomsets which include home accessories and the company also offers an interior design service. The company released a television advertisement emphasising that it has new home collections to suit the customers personality. General value mixed goods retailers (33% market share) Value retailers on the march Mintels UK Retail Briefing October 2013 looks at the rise of value mixed goods retailers in the UK. FIGURE 34: Selected value mixed goods retailers, turnover, year-end 2009-13

Note: Total turnover, including homewares


Source: Company annual reports and accounts / Mintel

Growth at The Range has been helped by an active programme of new store openings. The chain had 34 outlets in 2009 and 80 by its 2013 financial year-end. Similarly B&M growth has been helped by expanding the chain from 89 to 350 outlets, while Home Bargains has boosted store numbers from 190 to 316. This compares with the more mature Wilkinson, which moved from 321 to 372 outlets over the five-year period. Wilkinson has seen its market share chipped away by more price aggressive competitors which have grown rapidly. The Range, B&M and Home Bargains have improved market share of homewares. These chains are clear about their value proposition and there is plenty of scope to expand the retail chains into new locations.

Argos http://www.argos.co.uk Argos, part of Home Retail Group, is the largest general goods retailer in the UK. The company operates through catalogue showrooms and has also developed a sophisticated multi-channel business. It stocks a large variety of different homewares for all rooms in the home. Habitat was bought by Argoss parent company, Home Retail Group, in 2011 and selected lines from Habitat were introduced into the companys range in October 2013. FIGURE 35: Argos, total turnover, year to June 2009-13

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Source: Company annual reports and accounts /Mintel

Argos has been struggling to maintain share of all retailing in the UK, with intense competition from Amazon, supermarkets and other growing value mixed retailers such as B&M and the Range. Currently Argos sells over 7,300 products under the label of home furnishings and lighting. It has over 730 stores across the UK. The company focuses on value, choice and convenience at very competitive prices. Argos currently offers a Whats hot section on its website at the bottom of each product page. This displays products which are currently in high demand and are well rated on the website. The concept is based upon Twitters Trends feature and is designed to make Argos appear more trendy and in touch with the modern online market. Argos currently offers a number of Price Cuts on its website which provide large discounts on products across the companys range. Argoss click & collect service makes this value retailer hard to beat, although the company has been losing ground, affected by the rapid rise of Amazon.

BHS http://www.bhs.co.uk BHS is a subsidiary of Arcadia and has around 180 stores in the UK. It has a comprehensive range of homewares encompassing kitchen, cookware, household textiles and home accessories. The companys lighting range is a department where BHS has been traditionally strong. The company has a fully transactional website which also offers a range of furniture.

Dunelm http://www.dunelm-mill.com Dunelm formerly Dunelm Mill is a specialist soft furnishings and homewares retailer which operates in out of town retail sites across the UK. The company was founded over 30 years ago and is pitched at the mid-market. There are some 127 stores across the UK with plans for expansion in the future. Sales in the year to June 2013 reached 677 million, up 12% on the previous year.

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the UK with plans for expansion in the future. Sales in the year to June 2013 reached 677 million, up 12% on the previous year. This growth was helped by nine new store openings. There are plans to continue to expand and the companys eventual aim is for 200 outlets throughout the UK and it has committed to open ten new outlets in 2014. In October 2013, Dunelm launched its first TV advert as part of its 3 million marketing overhaul. The campaign also included a rebranding which saw the word Mill dropped from the company name, which has been simplified to Dunelm. In addition to this the company also introduced the tagline theres no place like Dunelm to its marketing materials. Dunelm also announced an investment of 4-5 million to redesign its website. The new website will go live in 2014. Dunelm grows 60% in five years FIGURE 36: Dunelm, turnover, year to June 2009-13

Source: Company annual reports and accounts/Mintel

Dunelm, included within value mixed goods retailers, stands out as a rising star in homewares retailing. Its strengths lie in a strong value proposition, depth of choice and good own-label development. The companys growth has been helped by a storeopening programme that has taken Dunelm from 84 to 126 stores in five years. At 126 outlets there is still significant potential for growth and more emphasis on services including in-home measuring and estimates will help secure the future of this excellent retailer. Dunelm sells a strong range of bedding, bed linens, ready-made curtains, curtain fabrics and other household textiles. In addition the company sells home accessories, kitchenwares, tableware, lighting and other utility homewares such as ironing boards and laundry baskets. There is also a range of furniture spanning lounge and bedroom. Its own brands are Dunelm, Dorma, Spectrum and Hotel. The company has ambitious expansion plans. It intends to develop its specialist services such as made-to-measure curtains and http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen/print/id=693301 6/16

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The company has ambitious expansion plans. It intends to develop its specialist services such as made-to-measure curtains and blinds and its in-home consultation service. It will also continue to open new stores and further develop its multi-channel proposition. The company is also engaged in a store refurbishment programme. The website already offers multi-channel options so that customers can browse at home and reserve and collect merchandise at the store on the same day. Other recent developments include a version of the website optimised for tablets and accepting payments via PayPal. Online sales have reached 4% of the companys turnover and grow by about 80% in 2013.

HomeSense http://www.homesense.com HomeSense is a chain of off-price home furnishing stores, owned and operated by TJX Companies, the owners of TK Maxx, which has outlets in the UK (TK Maxx) and US (TK Maxx). The HomeSense chain was launched In the UK in 2008 and the business currently operates 28 outlets across the country which carry a similar range of homewares to that found in TK Maxx stores. HomeSense sells a variety of low-end to brand name products in its stores. The pricing of the products is competitive, kept low through sourcing discontinued lines, prototype models or seconds. The range is extensive and includes cookware, tableware, household textiles, ornaments, small furniture items and garden accessories. Because of sourcing policies, each store may have slightly different stocks. HomeSense does not trade online.

Matalan http://www.matalan.co.uk Matalan is a UK clothing and homeware retailer with over 200 stores which are based in out of town retail sites. Typically Matalan stores trade from 30,000 sq ft and stock a large selection of homewares alongside the clothing ranges. Matalan positions itself towards the lower end of the market and maintains that its goods represent quality at affordable prices. Matalan sells online and services include click & collect. The company also offers free standard delivery on all orders over 50 as well as next day home delivery on items purchased before 5pm. Matalan offers a variety of products for the home tailored for each room in the house. Products are categorised into living, kitchen, bathroom, dining and bedroom with design ideas and modern trends displayed on the website.

The Range http://www.therange.co.uk/ The Range is a homewares and furnishings retailer which carries some 65,000 products spanning 16 departments. Products include DIY, Homewares, Furniture, Lighting, Arts & Crafts and Garden. The positioning is stylish and affordable. This retailer has been expanding rapidly and has grown from 37 stores in 2009 to around 80 today. Some 45 more outlets are planned over the next three years. These are out-of-town superstores. Sales in the last full trading year reached 382 million, an increase of 29% in the year. Product positioning and strategy The Range offers a substantial variety of products for the home included a long list of branded homewares. There is a range of pricing from low entry prices through to mid-market merchandise. The stores carry all of the categories of merchandise featured in this report including ready-made curtains and blinds, towels and bed linens, soft furnishings, lighting, kitchenwares and tablewares.

Wilkinson http://www.wilko.com/ Wilkinson specialises in the sale of DIY products and homeware goods. The company was founded in 1930 and currently operates over 373 high street stores across the UK. It offers a variety of homewares for the different rooms around the house in addition to garden furnishings.

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addition to garden furnishings.

Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Wilkinson positions itself as a budget retailer, offering quality products at low process. Much of the companys offering is based around its own-brand Wilko and Wilko Value portfolios. The products available from Wilkinson are categorised by rooms in the home, with additional products sold under the categories of home dcor, lighting, cushions and soft furnishings, rugs and mats and curtains. Wilkinson has a transactional website and offers free home delivery on online orders totalling over 80 with free store delivery available for all orders. The company also operates a blog page named Wilko Life in which it provides useful money saving tips, how to guides and trending design ideas for rooms in the home. Supermarkets (6% market share) Mintels report Supermark ets: More Than Just Food Retailing UK November 2013 looks at the growth of non-foods and online shopping through the grocery sector. Grocery multiples are a convenient place for consumers to pick up homewares and Tesco, Asda and Sainsburys are at the forefront of online developments and all the supermarket companies have ranges of homewares in-store. Morrisons is expanding its online presence. Meanwhile the discounters, Aldi and Lidl operate a when its gone its gone policy, with special buys coming into the stores on a regular basis. Homewares represent a fairly small amount of space within supermarkets. Our research shows that the largest of the formats allocate a higher percentage of their selling space to homewares. These stores carry the widest assortments of home goods. FIGURE 37: Leading supermarkets, share of selling space allocated to homewares, November 2013 Home Non foods Food and grocery Total % Asda supercentre Asda supermarket Asda superstore Tesco extra Tesco superstore Waitrose Sainsbury's superstore Sainsbury's v large Morrisons Aldi Lidl Co-op
Source: Mintel

% 51.7 19.3 48.7 44.6 26.2 14.8 30.7 51.6 25.4 22.5 15.1 17.1

% 48.3 80.7 51.3 55.4 73.8 85.2 69.3 48.4 74.6 77.5 84.9 82.9

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

3.8 0.6 3.1 3.3 1.1 0.8 1.9 5.2 1.6 1.1 0.6 1.4

Tesco Tesco sells homewares instore and online (Tesco Direct). In its superstores Tesco dedicates several aisles to homewares. Products include a selection of own branded and branded goods ranging across kitchenware, tableware, linens, soft furnishings and ornamental accessories. The Florence + Fred brand has been introduced for selected homewares products. For most lines there is a choice of price points and brands. The company makes extensive use of its Clubcard in the marketing mix and customers are encouraged to use Clubcard Boost, which can double the value of a Clubcard voucher when redeemed against homeware items. Tescos online services include made to measure curtains, which promises curtains made to measure and delivered in seven days. The company also offers a click & collect option for online shoppers. Tesco has launched an online marketplace and now has many sellers included in its website. For example, under the Ornaments and Figurines section of the Tesco Direct website, there are seven third party sellers.

Asda
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Asda

Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Asda has a wide range of homewares in its shops and also sells online (Asda Direct). It dedicates several aisles of space to its homewares in-store and carries a larger selection online. Much of the merchandise is Asda branded, although other brands are also available including Denby tableware and Tefal cookware.

Sainsburys Sainsburys also has a wide choice of homewares online. Many of its items are own branded (by Sainsburys, Tu and Home Collection) although there is also a sprinkling of branded goods including Denby dinnerware, Tefal cookware, Jamie Oliver cookware and Silentnight bedding. DIY stores (5% market share) Mintels Report DIY Retailing UK May 2013 looks at the DIY retailers in detail. DIY retailing in the UK is dominated by three major companies B&Q, Homebase (part of Home Retail Group) and Wickes. Homebase has the greatest commitment to homewares. FIGURE 38: Selected DIY retailers, estimated homewares turnover, year-end 2008-2012

Source: Company annual reports and accounts / Mintel

Within the DIY sector B&Q is the largest player, but Homebase is gaining share because of its focus on home dcor and accessories. This company has built market share through engaging a strong and clear multi-layered approach to brands. Its latest addition is the Habitat brand and this is now seeing a rollout of new products for the home via the stores and online. This joins other exclusives within Homebase including some products from Laura Ashley.

B&Q
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

B&Q is the largest of the DIY specialists and carries a small range of homewares including lighting, curtains & blinds, cushions, throws, picture frames and mirrors. Products are available at the stores and online and the company continues to invest for online growth. There are small ranges of bed linens and bedding. Prices are low to middle, reflecting B&Qs positioning. The companys lighting ranges are divided into indoor and outdoor lights and it also sells bulbs. Styles are contemporary and the prices are reasonable. FIGURE 39: B&Q, lighting examples, December 2013

Source: Company w ebsite

The companys Unloved Rooms campaign shows how a revamp can transform the look of a room and the website features examples from every room in the house, showing a before and after photograph.

Homebase Homebases strategy is to be a softer DIY store with a slant towards home dcor including furniture and homewares. It has stronger appeal to women than either B&Q or Wickes do and has several in-store departments which cater purely for homewares such as cookware, tableware and bedding. Homewares are available in the stores and online and the company has a strong multichannel offering. As well as the Homebase website, customers may visit the dedicated Habitat website. Homebase has been building a sophisticated portfolio of brands, mainly via acquisition and one of the latest additions was Habitat, acquired when this chain failed in 2011. Homebase is now injecting Habitat ranges into all its stores, including Habitat shop-in-shops in 17 stores. Homebase also carries some Laura Ashley-branded products, many of which are exclusive to Homebase. FIGURE 40: Habitat, selected products, December 2013

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Source: Company w ebsite

Tiger www.tigerstores.co.uk Tiger is a growing chain that sells mixed goods, including homewares. Everything is at low prices and there is nothing in the stores priced above 30. The chain has 18 stores in the London area and has expanded into southern England with a further nine outlets outside London. This Danish-owned retailer now trades by forming partnerships (similar to regional franchises) with retail companies in 20 countries and has a total of 283 stores. FIGURE 41: Tiger, example of store interior, January 2014

Source: Company w ebsite

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Specialist retailers (5% market share) The market for homewares has been absorbed into the hands of many general retailers. Even so, there are a handful of successful specialists.

Specialist cookshop chains on the up FIGURE 42: Turnover for Steamer Trading and Lakeland, 2008-12

Source: Company annual reports and accounts/Mintel

Lakeland and its smaller rival Steamer Trading are kitchen and cookware specialists, generating the majority of sales from homewares and small electrical goods. Lakeland is differentiated by its selection and testing procedures and Steamer Trading though excellent ranges and attentive service. Lakeland has a mature home shopping service and sells online as well as through catalogues.

Lakeland http://www.lakeland.co.uk Lakeland is a homewares specialist with a strong focus on kitchenwares and carries over 4,000 kitchen and homeware products. There is extensive range of kitchen products alongside a wide range of innovative and practical products for the home. The company describes itself as providing long-lasting and value for money products backed up by a no fuss guarantee on everything it sells. There are 67 stores nationwide. In the year to December 2012 Lakeland generated sales of 157 million, up 4.0%. Lakeland published several catalogues which showcase its products and these are available in-store and online. There is a catalogue app, which makes the catalogue more easily readable on iPads. There is also a comprehensive home shopping website and order can be delivered to the customers home or collected from a store for free. Product positioning and strategy Lakeland has built its reputation based on quality and trust. This is one of its claims: Our buyers search for innovative products that make life easier, before putting them through a rigorous selection and testing process to ensure they meet our exacting standards. This emphasis on its rigorous selection regime is a key pillar of its brand and helps to differentiate Lakeland from competitors. The products offered by Lakeland cover a variety of categories and product types. There is a strong range of kitchenwares including crockery and cooking equipment. The company also sells a number of products designed for use around the home with designs centred around usability and innovation. The range includes towels and mats.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

In October 2013, Lakeland announced plans to launch outlets in India and the Far East. The expansion plans will see the company add to the nine existing stores that it operates in the Middle East through a franchise partner. Lakeland also launched its first European website in Germany in 2013 as part of its continuing online expansion plans.

Steamer Trading http://www.steamer.co.uk/ Steamer Trading is a cookware specialist which also provides a selection of cookwares and other, mainly kitchen-based homewares. The company was formed in 1985 and has since expanded to a chain of 29 stores. In 2012 the company relaunched its website, enhancing options such as Click & Collect. Steamer has won numerous awards including an Excellence in Specialist Retailing award in 2013. Homewares available from Steamer include cookware, food storage, cleaning utensils, bins, textiles, organisation and assorted small household products. The stores are positioned as expert and they aim to give high quality customer service.

Ponden (Ponden Home and Ponden Mill) http://www.ewm-store.co.uk/_SM_pub/PH/ Ponden is part of Edinburgh Woollen Mills Group (EWM). EWM bought Ponden Mill in 2011 and merged it with 80 outlets from the failed Rosebys chain. It is a retail soft furnishings group with a mix of high street and edge-of-town outlets. There are 126 stores in all and the company has been expanding in the UK. Merchandise is centred around value-for-money bed linens and towels and the stores also carry a range of ready-made curtains. The company appointed PR consultants in 2013 to raise its profile in home interest media as well as to promote its new store openings.

Hillarys Blinds http://www.hillarys.co.uk Hillarys Blinds is a direct selling specialist which has a position of leadership in the window furnishings market. Home shopping (6% market share) Mintels report, Buying for the Home Online UK February 2013 looks in detail at the way online shopping is developing. FIGURE 43: Shopping for the home online, UK, 2007-13

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Source: Mintel

Altogether we estimate that people spent 4,417 million shopping for the home online in 2013. This is almost double the amount spent in 2007. This covers any online sales, including those through multi-channel retailers. And it also covers a broader spectrum of products that we are looking at in this report. Even so, the scale of the growth is clear. People are in love with online shopping these days, enjoying the convenience, looking for lower prices and finding things that might be out of stock on the high street. Amazon and eBay have become destination shops among pureplay sellers online. They were used by 34% of people in our survey for homewares in the last 12 months, FIGURE 44: Amazon UK, total turnover, 2008 -2012

Source: Company annual reports and accounts/Mintel

The rise of Amazon has been a retail phenomenon in the UK. Originally a seller of books but now a massive multi-product retailer, Amazon is popular with consumers for its price leadership, convenience and broad ranges. Amazon has been through a period of impressive growth and has become a destination of choice for many online shoppers. Amazon is investing now to improve its digital and multi-channel services and will remain a key player in this sector for some time to come. Furniture retailers Ikea http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/ Ikea offers a wide variety of home furnishings. The company focuses on modern designs, functionality and affordability. Many of its homewares are at very low price points. Its main customer base is centred around pre/no family couples looking to improve their home on a budget, as well as first-time homemakers. Ikea has 18 stores in the UK and one in the Republic of Ireland. The company also maintains a transactional website, which has been in operation since 2007. There is also a free catalogue which showcases its products.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

The homeware products offered by Ikea are extensive and the ranges cover all categories. Although Ikea is undoubtedly a destination for homewares, we believe that many sales are impulse purchases made by customers who notice things as they browse the store as accessories are used extensively throughout the roomsets. Ikeas price points are typically very low. Examples include a quilt cover and two pillowcases from 9, a 16 piece cutlery set for 1.50 and mugs from 35p. Ikea space allocation FIGURE 45: Ikea, space allocation by product group, 2013

Other includes self-service furniture, luggage, home storage, toys and other childrens goods.
Source: Mintel

The layout of the stores splits selling space into two principal areas. The furniture displays are mainly arranged in roomsets and shoppers are encouraged to walk round the whole display area on a walkway. People wanting to buy large furniture items then go to the self-service warehouse area to collect their goods before paying. The stores have a large separate self-service marketplace for homewares. We estimate that homewares occupy 26% of the showroom space within Ikea stores as well as being featured as accessories to roomsets throughout the outlets. In 2013, Ikea launched the new Stockholm range of homewares. The range included a number of products including crockery, furniture, soft furnishings, lighting and sofas. The range is based around rustic dark wood colours and the products are designed to age well with continued use. Ikea also introduced the Smart Craftsmanship concept to its ranges, which uses skilled workers and intelligent design to generate the best quality products. The 2014 Ikea catalogue features an augmented reality feature which allows customers to see how products will look in their homes with the use of virtual reality. The service utilises a downloadable application which makes use of tablet and smartphone cameras to judge the approximate scale of furnishings in relation to an Argos catalogue. The application then produces an image of the product overlaid on the view of the room through the camera.

Laura Ashley http://www.lauraashley.com/


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Laura Ashley is a UK-based retailer which sells a range of furnishing and homewares which are described as quintessentially

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Channels to Market

Laura Ashley is a UK-based retailer which sells a range of furnishing and homewares which are described as quintessentially English in their design. The company produces a range of home furnishings plus an established womens clothing collection. In the latest year to January 2013, Laura Ashley grew sales in the UK by 3.1% to 263 million. There are 212 UK outlets (one more than in 2012). Of these 135 are mixed product stores that carry a full range, 50 are home outlets and 23 are home concessions. The company generated 16% of its UK retail sales online in 2013 and this channel grew sales by 16.4%. Meanwhile the companys mail order channel is seeing declining sales. A mobile-enabled website was added during the year, reflecting the companys efforts to grow online shopping. Laura Ashley derives 28% of its sales from home accessories (including tableware, clocks and pictures) and 23% from home decorating (including curtains, paint, wallcoverings and decorative accessories). Sales of home decorating grew by 0.7% in the year (up 1.6% like-for-like) while sales of home accessories performed well, up 7.6% (and 8.5% on a like-for-like basis). The Laura Ashley range of homewares covers a variety of products including soft and hard furnishings including lighting, curtains, blinds, mirrors, gifts and tableware. The products are designed with a heavy focus on floral prints, with a range of pastel colours used. The designs are described as having a 19th Century rural feel to them. The companys distinctive designs differentiate it from other home furnishings companies. July 2013 saw the launch of the first Laura Ashley-owned hotel. The site was purchased by the company and was filled with the companys homewares products, all of which are available for purchase from the Laura Ashley website. The brand positions itself at the mid to high end of the market with a number of high value items for sale.

Cargo http://www.cargohomeshop.com/ Cargo was bought by the international furniture company Steinhoff in May 2004. Steinhoff runs the Harveys, Bensons and Sleepmaster furniture chains in the UK. Cargo sells a small range of furniture for different rooms in the home as well as seasonal gift ideas and homewares. The company caries stylish, modern merchandise and encourages its customers to Express yourself for less. There are 44 UK high street stores, each with a slightly different mix of merchandise. The company positions itself as eclectic and says that the variations from store to store are part of its charm. Cargo covers a wide range of homewares as well as a small range of furniture. There are soft furnishings including rugs, cushions, linens, towels and throws and the home textiles range covers bed linens as well as table linens and other kitchen textiles. There is a strong range of kitchen and tablewares from cookware to crockery. Decorative accessories feature strongly in the stores and include pictures, frames, mirrors and candles. Many of the products sold on the company website are discounted, with Cargo currently offering up to 60% off on selected furniture online. Festive products are also discounted in time for the Christmas period. Cargo has embraced e-commerce and there is a transactional website which carries an edited range of the companys products. The website is organised by room, with homewares are included under each of the rooms.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Brand Communication and Promotion

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Advertisers spent 43 million on homewares in 2012, + 7.5% on the previous year. Direct sellers top the list of advertisers including Plumbs (24%) and Hillarys Blinds (8%). Lakeland (7%) is the largest spender among the multi-channel retailers. Press (41%) is the largest advertising medium, followed by direct mail (28%).

43 million spent on above the line advertising FIGURE 46: Topline adspend homewares, 2009-12

Source: Nielsen/Mintel

Homewares is a sector in which there is a low level of advertising spend. In 2012, companies spent some 43 million on advertising, up 7.5% compared with 2011. FIGURE 47: Adspend on homewares, by advertiser, 2012

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Brand Communication and Promotion

Source: Nielsen/Mintel

The leading advertisers are direct sellers which rely on their advertising to drive customers to make enquiries. Plumbs, which is engaged in soft furnishings as well as curtains and blinds, is the largest advertiser and is followed by Hillarys, a direct selling specialist in window blinds. Thomas Sanderson is also a direct seller and ranks fourth in terms of adspend. The largest retail advertiser in the sector is Lakeland (7%) and others are relatively minor advertisers of homewares. Some of these large companies also advertise their corporate offers or other products and this activity makes a contribution to brand awareness. Lakelands television advertising campaign highlights how people can create those special moments with a little help from Lakeland. The adverts are brand- and image-builders aiming to raise awareness of the companys identity and focus. Lakeland also signed a sponsorship deal in 2012 with ITV1s Countrywise Kitchen show, using the tagline Celebrating Great British cooking, Countrywise Kitchen is sponsored by Lakeland, the home of creative kitchenware. Hillarys Blinds unveiled a new logo and identity in 2012. The creative concept focused on the creative potential of a window and how it can transform a room, encapsulated in the strapline Make a window. Make a room. TV commercials were run using the new identity to raise brand awareness throughout the Christmas period of 2012. John Lewis has made headlines two years running with its Christmas Campaigns. However, apart from this the company has used a variety of other advertising including Shop Spring this April in 2013. The campaign featured daily exclusives to inspire our customers with a range of different daily exclusives on the products we know our customers love. These included homewares. FIGURE 48: Adspend on homewares, by media type, 2009-13

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - Brand Communication and Promotion

Source: Nielsen/Mintel

Press dominates the advertising media, accounting for 41% of spend. This is influenced by the direct sellers, all of which use press extensively to generate interest and enquiries. They are also heavy users of direct mail and door drops. Television advertising accounts for a relatively small 18% of spending. Kilner, famous for its preserving jars, embarked on its first ever advertising campaign in 2013. The advert features a family using Kilner jars for a wide range of things from storing foods through to craft materials for the children. The advertisements were aired on Really, More 4, TLC, Food Network and The Good Food Channel.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Purchasing Patterns

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Seven in ten people bought homewares in the last 12 months and the people with the widest repertoire of purchases are 16-34s. Multi-buy or loyalty schemes targeting these frequent shoppers would be appropriate. The categories with the highest rate of purchases are household linens (43%), cookware and/or bakeware (37%), lighting (33%) and soft furnishings (33%). ABs (77%) are most likely to have bought homewares, indicating that affordability plays a role in shaping demand. Over a quarter of people (26%) bought homewares as a gift across a wide range of categories. The most popular gift is decorative home accessories (9%). This highlights opportunities for creating specific gift ranges and of gift services.

Purchasing patterns for homewares FIGURE 49: Homewares purchased in the last 12 months, November 2013 Which, if any, of the following homewares have you bought for your home or for someone else (eg gift) in the last 12 months? Please select all that apply. Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

Source: GMI/Mintel
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Purchasing Patterns

Frequency of purchase is linked to two main influences. People setting up home for the first time are more likely to buy homewares and the rate at which things wear out or get damaged affects the replacement cycle. Above this there are other less tangible reasons why people might buy such as just fancying a change, trading up to get a new model or simply buying on impulse. This research shows that durable items such as cutlery and glassware and high ticket items like window furnishings are much less likely to be purchased than goods which get worn out by regular use such as household linens or cookware. The demographic data in the Appendix of the report shows the following highlights: 45-64s (44%) are most inclined to buy household linens 65+ (38%) are more likely than average to have bought cookware and/or bakeware 25-34s (35%) are the key shopper group for lighting (35%), soft furnishings (34%) and glassware (29%) 16-24 (24%) and 25-34 (22%) are very likely to have bought cutlery 25-44s (30%) are most likely to have bought decorative accessories Crockery is bought by a wide spread of ages but is less likely to have been bought by those aged 65+ (20%) 16-24s (65%) are very likely to have bought at least one kind of homeware People who rent from a private landlord are generally more inclined to buy homewares than others.

Key analysis: Everyones home is different and there is a wide range of different shoppers in this market place. So segmenting the ranges and targeting different products to different consumer groups is highly important in this vast arena. Role of women as homemaker? FIGURE 50: Homewares purchased in the last 12 months, November 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Purchasing Patterns

Source: GMI/Mintel

Men and women display different shopping patterns. We see that women are particularly likely to have bought decorative homewares such as tableware (crockery and cutlery), bathroom accessories and soft furnishings. Even so, men play a big role in decisions about what to buy for the home and so retailers should make every effort to aim to appeal to both men and women. Homewares as gifts Over a quarter of people (26%) had bought some kind of homewares as a gift in 2013. These purchases span a wide range of homewares and the most popular category is decorative accessories, which includes picture frames and ornaments (9%). These are popular with 16-24s (14%), so gifts that have appeal to a youth audience will perform well. People in the highest household income groups earning 50,000 + are most inclined to buy homewares to give as gifts (30%). Key analysis: Retailers should cater for the gift market in a variety of ways. There are opportunities to create gift areas within the store and gift ideas sections on websites. Gift wrapping services help the shopper to make the gift even more special and gifts that are sold boxed with special packaging can also be of greater appeal. Multi-packed gifts are a feature of many Christmas ranges (for example a bottle of drink with a set of glasses, coffee with a mug) and this helps to make the gift a little more special. Gift services such as wedding lists or wish lists are also a way of encouraging gift shoppers.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Purchasing Patterns

People are shopping for a wide range of homewares FIGURE 51: Repertoire of homewares purchased in the last 12 months, November 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

Source: GMI/Mintel

Some seven in ten people have bought from at least one category of homewares and shoppers span a wide range of socio-economic groups and ages.

FIGURE 52: Repertoire of homewares purchased in the last 12 months, by age, November 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Purchasing Patterns

Source: GMI/Mintel

As people age they buy from fewer categories of homewares they probably already have most of the things they need and appear unlikely to replace them frequently. Those aged 65+ are the least active group of shoppers in this marketplace. Even so, they have not dropped out of the market entirely and over half in this age band have bought something. Key analysis: The number of older people in the UK is growing rapidly and there are opportunities to tap into this market as they go through lifestage changes. Most notably, when people retire, some downsize into smaller, more manageable properties and this is a time for rethinking what is essential in the home, buying new items to decorate the rooms and planning for smaller kitchen storage space. Lump sums from retirement are often pumped into sprucing up the home and so there are opportunities for marketing to this group via pension providers or financial planners. As the elderly become less mobile and less dextrous, there are opportunities to appeal to them with things that are designed to be used one-handed or that are lighter weight for ease of moving about. And as eyesight fades this can create more demand for better lighting in the home including reading lamps. More than three in ten 16-34s bought from at least five categories of homewares, indicating that these active shoppers are establishing a suite of possessions for their homes. They may be moving out of the family home to get married, or to go away to university. Key analysis: The younger homemaker has plenty of demands on their cash. But they are likely to buy from a wide range of product categories for the home and will be buying many items for the first time. So retailers can appeal to them with multibuy offers or loyalty schemes. Co-ordinated ranges of goods are likely to encourage people to buy a wider repertoire from that retailer, but retailers should avoid being too prescriptive about style and co-ordination as people may not wish to become too constrained by buying colours that are tricky to match. FIGURE 53: Repertoire of homewares purchased in the last 12 months, by socio-economic group, November 2013
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Purchasing Patterns

Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+

Source: GMI/Mintel

The likelihood of buying homewares is higher for ABs but for the lower socio-economic groups there is a decrease. Unsurprisingly those who describe their finances as struggling are least inclined to have bought homewares, indicating that affordability plays a key role in influencing demand for homewares. Key analysis: Retailers should be careful to design their ranges to cater for a spread of prices and affordability. By constructing the right price architecture, they will be able to encourage more volume of purchases. But it is important to create justification for the higher-priced lines, by highlighting better styling quality or product features. One way of doing this is to inject designer or celebrity names into the branding (eg Jamie Oliver tableware, or Orla Kiely linens).
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Where Homewares Were Purchased

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points Homewares are available at a wide range of retailers and this research shows that people use a huge range of outlets and websites when shopping for homewares. Discount shops (41%), supermarkets (41%), Argos (34%) and department stores (31%) top the list used for in-store shopping for homewares. Online shopping for homewares accounts for a high proportion of shopping. Internet-only sellers (such as Amazon and eBay) are by far the most used internet outlets (34%). There is also a significant amount of online purchasing at Argos (9%), department stores (9%) and supermarkets (8%).

Where homewares were purchased FIGURE 54: Where homewares were purchased, November 2013 Which of the following retailers have you bought homeware items from, either in-store or online, in the last 12 months? Please select all that apply. Base: 1,421 internet users aged 16+ who purchased any homewares in the last 12 months Bought instore % Argos Department/variety store (eg John Lewis, Marks & Spencer, Next, Debenhams) Discount shops (eg Wilkinson, The Range, TK Maxx, Home Bargains) DIY store (eg Homebase, B&Q) Garden centre/gift shop (eg Dobbies, National Trust, independent gift shop) Ikea Internet-only seller (eg Amazon/eBay) Specialist cookshop or china shop (eg Lakeland, Steamer Cookware) Specialist home shopping company (eg Very, Betterware) Specialist curtain/linens retailer (eg Dunelm, Ponden, Hillarys Blinds) Supermarket (eg Tesco, Sainsburys) Other (eg furniture shops, market stalls, factory outlet shops)
Source: GMI/Mintel

Bought online % 9 9 4 6 3 6 34 5 4 5 8 16

34 31 41 28 12 16 NA 10 6 15 41 13

The online shopping phenomenon


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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Where Homewares Were Purchased

Online shopping has grown in stature in recent years and this report shows that every category of retailer has online shopping options these days. From the very excellent Next Directory to the superb multi-channel options at Argos, John Lewis and specialists, consumers are voting with their clicks and buying homewares online. Mintels report Buying for the Home Online UK February 2013 sees how much the boundaries between stores and online has blurred and that click & collect allows customers to mix and match the way they shop and avoid the problems associated with having to wait in for deliveries. In this report the online winners include Argos (9%), department stores (9%) and supermarkets (8%), but discount shops (4%) and garden/gift retailers (3%) are lagging behind. This applies both to the share of shoppers they have captured in this survey and the ratio of their in-store and online shoppers. So these outlets have an opportunity to do more to attract people to buy online from them. In Mintels Buying for the Home Online UK February 2013 report we find that shoppers tend to associate pureplay online sellers and particularly eBay with being cheaper than store-based sellers. And in this survey we see that internet-only sellers including Amazon and eBay are by far the most-used online channel and that more than a third of people who had bought homewares in the last year had opted for a pureplay seller. They are used by a broad range of consumers and even the older 65+ age band (28%) are inclined to buy online these days from pureplay retailers. Key analysis: There is no doubt that online shopping is part of the fabric of the way we shop these days and that retailers need to be excellent online sellers if they are to compete for a share of consumer spending. We believe that the rapid rise of smartphones is key for the future and that people will increasingly use their mobiles to shop. So retailers will develop more user-friendly ways to browse and shop online from a mobile. As Amazon continues to go from strength to strength retailers must look carefully at new ways to compete. Amazon is making strides to make it even more convenient to buy online and to take delivery (with more secure collection points around the country) but the main thing other retailers can do that Amazon cant is offer multi-channel services. Multi-channel, coupled with great flexibility and service, is key to being able to compete.

C2s favour discount shops, supermarkets and Argos Discount shops (41%), supermarkets (41%) and Argos (34%) top the list of outlets used by people shopping in-store for homewares. All of these players are popular with C2s, reflecting their focus on good value products aimed at the mass market. Discounters and Argos are both used by a wide spread of age groups although both have a young bias. 46% of 16-24s used discount shops and 41% of 16-34s bought homewares from Argos. The supermarkets also attract a wide spread of customers for homewares but are particularly popular with 45-54s (46%). Mintels report Savvy Shoppers UK December 2013 notes how the more affluent households are often better placed to take advantage of good deals as they are not restricted by budgets and can be opportunistic buyers. Ownership of mobile devices also plays a crucial role. For example, adults with annual household incomes of 50,000+ are more likely to have taken advantage of a discount (67%), have used a promotional code found online (45%) and used a local/daily deals site (27%) in the 12 months to October 2013, compared with the average. Ownership of smartphones (87%) and tablet computers (59%) peaks amongst the most affluent adults, making it much easier and more convenient for them to find the best price and locate discounts. However, as technology prices continue to decline, mobile shopping will become more and more accessible to adults of lower means, whose online activity currently lags behind the more affluent adults. Key analysis: There is a growing availability of homewares in discount shops and ranges are up-to-date and stylish, as well as representing great value for money. This has been one of the key factors behind the rise of Wilkinson and The Range, as well as others including TK Maxx. Clearly these shops appeal to people with restricted spending power but there is a new breed of savvy shoppers who also appreciate a bargain.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Where Homewares Were Purchased

Department/variety stores favoured by ABs ABs (38%) are the biggest shopper group at department stores and variety stores (including John Lewis, Next, Marks & Spencer and Debenhams). The 25-34s (37%) are important shoppers at this group of retail outlets. People who feel that their financial situation is healthy (37%) are also inclined to use department/variety stores. Key analysis: We are seeing more innovative ideas being injected into department and variety store ranges as these retailers aim to differentiate and as they face stiffer competition from discounters, supermarkets and Argos. Own-label development is highly important to these retailers as it is a way of creating exclusivity (ranges that cant be found elsewhere) and we expect to see even more investment in creating ranges that stand apart from competitors.

Plenty of shopping for homewares at Ikea Ikea is a homewares and furniture specialist with a huge following among consumers. So it is not surprising that this research shows that 16% bought things from Ikea stores and 6% bought something online from Ikea. FIGURE 55: Where homewares were purchased, November 2013 Base: 1,421 internet users aged 16+ who purchased any homewares in the last 12 months

Source: GMI/Mintel

The age profile of Ikea shoppers is heavily biased towards 16-44s and some one in five in this age band have made an in-store purchase of homewares. The online shopper profile for Ikea is slightly younger than for in-store shoppers and centres around 16-34s. Ikea is particularly strong in London (21% shopped in-store and 12% online), reflecting its store positioning (there are four Ikea outlets in the Greater London area) and Londons demographics (plenty of young renters and people living in flats). Key analysis: Ikea is doing a remarkable job of attracting the young homemaker and it has a huge following among the under-45s. For the future, is there scope for Ikea to expand its appeal to target the over-45s for homewares, reflecting their more established lifestyles and tastes? And, as other retailers combine digital with
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actual stores, could we see Ikea follow suit and opening smaller footprint shops which encourage people to click & collect from more points around the UK? Plenty of shopping around People use a wide range of retail outlets for their homewares shopping. This is partly because not every retailer sells everything for the home. And it is also linked to the broad availability of homewares many items can be picked up conveniently wherever people happen to be shopping. FIGURE 56: Repertoire of where homewares were purchased, November 2013 Base: 1,421 internet users aged 16+ who purchased any homewares in the last 12 months % 1 type 2 types 3-4 types 20 28 29

5 and above 23
Source: GMI/Mintel

People with children (30%) are particularly likely to use a broad range (5+) of outlets for their homewares and when the children are young (0-4, 36%), people are highly inclined to use five or more outlets.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Attitudes towards Buying Soft Furnishings/Textiles

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points People want to touch and feel soft furnishings and textiles before they buy (46%) indicating that they are likely to visit a shop to experience the products first-hand. So the challenge for retailers is to convert browsers into purchasers. Co-ordination is very important to people when deciding what to buy and ranks second in the list of factors. So illustrations of the best ways to mix and match colours and patterns will be helpful to shoppers. Many shoppers are price-conscious. A third wait for the sales and more people say they generally buy cheap items (30%) than agree they buy high quality (25%).

Attitudes towards buying soft furnishings and textiles FIGURE 57: Attitudes towards buying soft furnishings, November 2013 Think ing about shopping for these home furnishings (eg cushions, throws, bedding, rugs, table linen, curtains) which, if any, of the following apply to you? Please select all that apply. Base: 1,090 internet users aged 16+ who bought soft furnishings/textiles in the last 12 months

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Attitudes towards Buying Soft Furnishings/Textiles

Note: Abbreviated statements


Source: GMI/Mintel

Tactile sensations Just over half of people in our survey had bought soft furnishings or household textiles in the last year. It is important to people when buying textiles or soft furnishings to be able to touch and feel before they buy. This is a key reason why people will visit a shop when they are thinking of choosing because thats a place where they will have an opportunity to squash the cushions or finger the fabrics. Older shoppers, aged 55+ (54%) are more likely to agree that touching matters to them, but the 16-24s (42%). The 25-34s (38%) and 35-44s (45%) show less inclination to touch before they buy. So are they simply less fussy or are they more likely to trust a description on a packet or online?

Women like co-ordination More than half of women (52%) agree that they buy soft furnishings/textiles to co-ordinate or match other things in their homes. Co-ordination is particularly important to the 45-64 age band (45-54, 52%; 55-64, 56%). Todays fashions are less constrained than those of 20 or 30 years ago. In the 1970s we had trends from Laura Ashley and in the 1980s we saw wallpaper borders co-ordinating closely with floral patterns. But todays decorator is encouraged to mix patterns and colours in a wider variety of ways.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Attitudes towards Buying Soft Furnishings/Textiles

Younger people opt for inexpensive homewares The youngest shoppers are most likely to say they go for inexpensive linens or textiles (16-24, 37%) and this is also linked to their budgets as the households with lower incomes (less than 20,000, 36%) are also inclined to agree. But the wealthier households (those with incomes of 50,000+, 35%) are much more inclined than average to say they tend to buy higher quality items that will last a long time. This result is hardly surprising. But the challenge for retailers is to tempt younger shoppers to spend more. This could include introducing offers for volume purchases such as two for the price of one, or use layered prices and branding to encourage people to shift up to more desirable goods.

Impulse shapes habits There are plenty of opportunities for people to buy homewares on impulse when they are shopping for other things, as homewares are widely available. Supermarkets often place homewares in the body of the store so that people walk past them when doing their grocery shopping. So its an easy matter to simply pop things into the trolley. And there are plenty of other temptations around in shops from discounters to department stores. So it is unsurprising that one in five people say that they pick up textiles or linens on impulse and this applies to a wide spread of demographics. This highlights the importance for retailers to place homewares in a position of high customer traffic and create desire by making the products more highly visible. For online sellers, these impulse moments can be created by showing browsers a range of alternative choices, or items that go with the ones being looked at. Inspiration from displays Women (21%) are more likely than men (15%) to agree that displays inspire them. And people who live in London are most inclined to agree that they are often inspired by in-store displays these people may be being influenced by a wide range of retailers as there are many department stores in London as well as a high profile presence for Ikea and other shed retailers.

Brand or own-label? FIGURE 58: Attitudes towards buying soft furnishings/textiles, branded or own-label, by age and socio-economic group, November 2013 Base: 1,090 internet users aged 16+ who bought soft furnishings/textiles in the last 12 months

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Source: GMI/Mintel

Far more people say they tend to buy own-label (20%) than branded (7%) household textiles or soft furnishings, illustrating the power of own-label in todays retail environment. And, with players such as Next, John Lewis, Marks & Spencer and Ikea creating own-label products, there is plenty of choice around at a variety of price points. There are no age groups or socio-economic groups where people have a higher preference for brands, they all say that they generally buy own-label. The biggest shopper group for branded items is aged under 35, showing the importance for brands to create fashionable lines that appeal to younger shoppers. They could be influenced by players such as Orla Kiely or Cath Kidston, which are aimed at the style-aware householder. For retailers the big advantage of creating own label ranges is the opportunity to differentiate. If people like your stuff and cant get it elsewhere they will buy from you. And good own-label sales are built on the back of trust in the brand and all that it stands for. So for example people shopping at Ikea should expect style and value; shoppers wanting John Lewis brands will expect quality at a fair price and shoppers buying a Wilkinsons own brand will get low prices and great value.

Fashion The 25-34s (13%) are most inclined to agree that they like to buy new home furnishings regularly to keep up with the
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latest styles. This is also linked to the higher response rates for people with young children (0-4, 17%; 5-9 16%). So for them retailers should keep refreshing their ranges and bringing in new styles to encourage people to buy new things.

Shopping on price Some 35% of people who bought textiles or soft furnishings in the last year said that they usually wait for special offers or sales. This matters least to people living in Greater London (24%), probably linked to the high percentage of people in London who shop at Ikea. Ikeas every-day-low-price policy makes it affordable to shop there even when there isnt a special offer or a sale. For example, at the time of writing, Ikea is selling a duvet cover with two matching pillow cases for 4. Special deals are less important to the wealthier ABs (29%) or those who feel their finances are healthy (28%). But the differences are fairly insignificant and generally people love a deal. This echoes the theme discussed in Mintels report The Savvy Shopper UK December 2013, which explores how much use people make of vouchers, offers, discount codes and all kinds of other special deals when they shop. Key analysis: No retailer can afford to overlook the relevance of offers. People love promotions and there is little doubt that looking for a better deal is made easier these days with mobile phones and widespread internet access.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Attitudes towards Buying Kitchen and Dining Wares

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points The top factor influencing choice of kitchen and dining wares are good quality for cooking and baking (45%). People feel that how well it works is more important than how it looks (39%) indicating the importance of functionality for cooking. Many consumers have tableware and dining ware for special occasions (34%) indicating that themes of parties, entertaining and family celebrations surrounding big events such as Christmas will encourage people to trade up.

Attitudes towards buying kitchen and dining wares FIGURE 59: Attitudes towards buying kitchen and dining wares, November 2013 Now think ing specifically about k itchen and dining homewares (eg cutlery, pans, bak ing tins etc), Which, if any, of the following statements apply to you? Please note by these we mean non-electrical goods for cook ing, dining, drink s etc. Please select all that apply. Base: 1,070 internet users aged 16+ who have bought any kitchen and dining wares in the last 12 months % I like to use good quality homewares for cooking and baking How well a kitchen homeware product works is more important than how good it looks I have some tableware items (eg plates, bowls, glasses, cutlery) that I use only for special occasions Its important that kitchen homewares can go in the dishwasher The way the kitchen/dining table is presented matters to me (eg place mats, table linens, cutlery, accessories) It is not important for kitchen homewares to match (eg plates and mugs with the same design) I like to buy homewares for the kitchen that coordinate with my dcor I like to have decorative homewares on show in my kitchen (eg storage jars, ornaments) If a recipe needs a special pan/tin I will buy that specific one 45 39 34 27 25 24 23 21 20

I am often inspired to buy kitchen homewares that I have seen on television (eg MasterChef, The 12 Great British Bake Off) I tend to buy kitchen homewares that are endorsed by a celebrity chef (eg Jamie Oliver, Raymond Blanc, Delia Smith) None of these
Source: GMI/Mintel

7 6

Function matters in the kitchen


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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Attitudes towards Buying Kitchen and Dining Wares

The most influential factors for kitchen and dining wares are good quality and functionality (how It works). Although demand for quality varies little with demographics we see that functionality becomes more important to people as they age. People aged 55-64 (53%) are particularly inclined to agree that how well it works is more important than how it looks.

Easy to clean up Practicality also comes into play in shaping decisions 27% say its important that kitchen and dining wares can go in the dishwasher and this is particularly important to ABs (33%). This bias reflects the likelihood that they own a dishwasher. (Mintels Dishwashing Products UK April 2013 shows that 52.7% of ABs buy dishwasher detergents compared with 36% of C1s and fewer for other socio-economic groups, reflecting the different ownership patterns.) It is also linked to convenience, as people want their things to be easy to look after and simple to clear up after being used.

Special things for occasions Women (40%) are particularly like to have some tableware items they reserve for special occasions but this notion may be becoming rather old fashioned as the 55-64s (53%) and 65+ (46%) age groups are much more likely to agree than younger people. The ABs (42%) are most inclined to have some items they keep for special occasions, indicating that affordability plays a part in this. Also, the ABs may have more storage space for keeping a special set of dinnerware or serving plates in reserve.

Arranging the dinner table A quarter of people say that the way the table is arranged matters to them, indicating that they would be interested to buy table mats, linens and table accessories. Women (29%) are most inclined to agree. And women (24%) are more inclined than men (17%) to say they like to have decorative accessories on show in their kitchens, reflecting their interest in the way the room looks and possibly linked to the likelihood that they spend more time in the kitchen. Decorative accessories are of most importance to the higher earners, indicating that for them the presentation of the room is important and also implying that affordability comes into play when thinking about buying ornaments to enhance their rooms.

Keeping things co-ordinated Almost a quarter of people say its not important for tableware to match, such as plates and mugs having the same design. People who rent from a local authority are particularly likely to agree that it is unimportant that their things match (35%).

Ideas from the television Younger people are most inclined to agree that they are often inspired by homewares they have seen on television. There is also a younger profile for people who agree that they tend to buy kitchenwares endorsed by a celebrity chef (16-34, 12%) reflecting the influential role of television programmes on peoples choices.

Getting the right tin Young people are likely to agree that if a recipe demands a specific pan or tin they will buy one. Their tendency to do this is probably linked to the fact that they do not own the right sized tin or pan already more likely to affect younger cooks than older ones as the older cook will have built up a collection of different sized cookware over the years. The ABs (25%) are also inclined to agree that they will buy a specific pan/tin if the recipe demands it and this is linked to
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Attitudes towards Buying Kitchen and Dining Wares

affordability as they are wealthier and can afford to buy new things even if they are just trying out a new recipe.
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Qualities Affecting Choice of Homewares

Homewares - UK - January 2014


This report is supplied in accordance with Mintel's terms and conditions. Mintel Group Ltd.

Key points People are highly conscious of stylish appearance when thinking about lighting, ornaments and curtains. So retailers should present these products in way which helps people envisage how they will look in their homes. Functional design at the lowest prices dominates decisions about crockery, glasses and cookware but also demand a quality finish. So retailers should focus on affordable basics then inject more style at higher price points to encourage trading up. Uniqueness comes into play when people look for ornaments. So retailers should build ranges with breadth of choice to create the impression that a shopper might discover something unusual within the display. For household linens, people want a high quality finish and feel, but also drive a hard bargain indicating that they will hunt around for the best prices. Swatches that allow people to touch the linens without disturbing the packaging could allow them to experience the feel before they buy.

Qualities affecting choice of homewares FIGURE 60: Qualities affecting choice of homewares, November 2013 Still think ing about homewares, which of the following qualities do you think you would specifically look for when shopping for the following products? Please select all that apply. Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+
Lighting (eg lamps, Decorative accessories Household linens lamp shades, light (eg mirrors, (eg sheets, f ittings but excluding ornaments, vases, towels, duvets, bulbs) pictures) pillows) % H igh quality finis h/feel Something unique L owes t pric e Stylis h appearanc e Func tional des ign A brand I like M ade in the lates t s tyle P roduc ed in an environmentally friendly way 34 26 33 52 38 21 19 21 % 40 42 32 56 25 24 21 20 % 56 16 42 35 31 32 17 29 Kitchen homewares (eg crockery, glassware, cutlery, cookware) % 42 19 44 34 59 32 19 25 Window f urnishings None (eg curtains/ blinds of including net curtains) these % 37 13 33 44 31 21 19 22 % 17 34 31 17 16 47 55 56

Source: GMI/Mintel

People have a range of criteria when thinking about buying homewares and there are significant variations when they think about different product groups.

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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Qualities Affecting Choice of Homewares

FIGURE 61: Qualities affecting choice of homewares, top three by homewares category, November 2013 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+ First Lighting Household linens Kitchenware Window furnishings
Source: GMI / Mintel

Second Functional design Something unique Lowest price

Third High quality finish/feel High quality finish/feel Stylish appearance High quality finish/feel

Stylish appearance

Decorative accessories Stylish appearance Functional design Stylish appearance

High quality finish/feel Lowest price

High quality finish/feel Lowest price

Where style really matters Stylish appearance tops the list for three of the homewares groups lighting, decorative accessories and curtains/blinds. These are all homewares that form a central part of the dcor and can really make a huge difference to the way a room looks. So retailers should make every effort to display these items in a way that allows people to visualise them in their own homes. Key analysis: Computer-based apps could be used for items like this so that people could superimpose the new items into pictures of their existing rooms and visualise the final results. In-store interior design specialists could advise people on the best way to create the atmosphere they want by using good lighting schemes.

Touch and feel the textiles For linens such as towels and sheets people are conscious of the finish and feel. A higher quality might mean easier care, but also promises greater comfort. Yet, this does not automatically lead people to pay extra as they demand this quality at the lowest price. People are probably price-sensitive about the linens they buy because they are replaced more regularly than some other household items. And also they may begrudge spending too much on something that may be out of sight of guests or of the family for most of the day. Images on packets should allude to the softness and comfort of the linens, while displays should include fabric swatches so that people can touch and feel without disturbing the packaging.

Basics for the kitchen Kitchenwares need to be functional, come at a low price and also be good quality. So this is a price sensitive area and this could explain why so many in our survey opted to buy at discount shops or supermarkets. Retailers should encourage people to trade up by offering a good, better, best pricing structure which introduces more styling and branding to justify the higher price points. The Appendix to this report shows variations by age and other demographics for these statements. In summary the key findings are: Women are most influenced by style, something unique and high quality finish/feel 25-34s are more likely than average to be sways by the latest style
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Homewares - UK - January 2014 - The Consumer Qualities Affecting Choice of Homewares

ABs are most motivated by brand and also veer towards high quality.

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