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GRAHAM HAMILTON.

Bare innocence

is

no support,

When you are


Stand
liigh in All others

tried in Scaniial's court.

honour, wealth, or wit;


interior sit,

who

Conceive themselves in conscience bound To join and drag you to the ground.

Your

altitude offends the eyes


rise.

Of those, who want the power to The World, a willing stander-by.


!

Inclines to aid a specious lie; Alas they would not do you wrong; But all appearances are strong
!

SWIFI ON

KNSURE.

VOL.

II.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR HENRY COLBURN AND CO.
CONDUIT-STREET, HANOVER-SQUARE.

1822.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

CHAP.
I

I.

COULD not

rest.

The scene of
was before

the preceding night

my

eyes; and then


to

home

my thoughts
:

recurred

to

Gertrude

and the mornI fell

ino-

was

far

advanced when
uncle sent for

asleep.

to

My

me

at ten
I tried

found him in his study.

apply myself to business, but he must have perceived, though he did


not remark upon
it,

the distraction of

VOL.

II.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
thoughts, and the constraint of

my my

manner.
I
I

As soon
to

as I

was

re-

leased,

hurried

Lady
it

Orville's
;

door.

approached
seeing

twice

but

each time
carriage,
I

Lady Denmont's

did not venture even to

leave

my

name.

It M^as nearly a

week
;

before 1 again

saw Lady
told

Orville

when we met,

she

me

of Moncriefs generosity, but

she also told me, that he had treated her with some harshness and severity.

She confided
ville

to

me

that

Lord Or;

was on the brink of ruin

that

he accused her extravagance as the

cause of his distress, and had declared to her his serious intention of

separating himself entirely from her.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
She concluded
closure,
to
**

d
dis-

this

melancholy

by enjoining me to leave her her fate, and see her no more.


I

Oh! wherefore,"
presence?

cried,

"banish
have you
hear

me your
permitted

Why

me

to

see

to

to

adore you, and then say coldly, cruelly,

Never approach me again' ?" Lady Orville again bade me fly her;
'

and yet her countenance seemed to beseechexpress a different wish, and


ingly to say,

"

Remain and comfort me


only friend."
I I

you
not
looks,

are

my
to

knew

how

obeyed her I saw rather than her words.

actbut

her again and again, and every time


1

saw

her,

became

more
I

and
re-

more entangled.
B 2

At length

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

solved, cost
I

me what
off

it

might, that
intercourse,

would break

an

which every day engrossed me more and which, novice as I entirely;


then was,
I

felt

could lead only to

error and misfortune.

Exhorted by
all

her

summoned up
I

my

resolu-

tion;

recalled

to

my mind

the

form the

features of Gertrude; I read

over her innocent her simple letters:

but

all

these exertions and resolutions

were

insufficient to enable

with the force and


passion.

cope vehemence of my

me

to

As

last

desperate resource

plunged into folly, vice, and dissipation.


I

thought nothing wrong which could

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
be the means of estranging
her. I sought other society

me
I

from

courted

new

friends,
I

and followed other pur-

suits.

indulged in profusion and


;

extravagance

but
I

by some unacalways met her,

countable means

and sometimes

in situations of great

interest and difficulty.


ney-affairs I
I

With her mo-

became connected; what

could to soften
I

my uncle

in her fa-

vour

did; and whilst


fly

we were both

determining to

from each other,

chance threw us continually together.

Though she was


sufficient

grieved, she did not

express offence, nor had she firmness


to break
to
off

friendship

which she knew

be so sincere

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

SO devoted

and

which had,

in

mo-

ments of great embarrassment, rendered her such material assistance.

Notwithstanding

my

excesses,

my
be-

uncle's munificence towards

me

came unbounded
his pride in

his attachment
I

and

me

increased.

was no

onger called a Scottish adventurer,


or a poor

student a

friend

whom

Mr.

Brandon had picked up at Edinburgh but I was talked of every where

Sir Malcolm the rich merchant's heir and a young man of surphew,
prising genius.
I

as the brave Captain Hamilton's ne-

was generally courtCards on cards

ed and sought

after.

crowded

my

table with invitations to

dinners, concerts, parties, and balls.

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
But what was
the
first
all this

7
after

to

me,

few weeks, when

my
I

success
?

was evident, and

^when
care,

my
for

vanity gratified

women,

whom
I

did not

made advances
and talked

wished not

to

return,

to

me
I it

during

operas and plays, which


ing to hear
?

was dyto

dance
to sit

the eternal length of dinners

to dine

What was

me

to

to drink

to

game

to

be mixed

in the senseless

crowding of

assemblies

to witness the vulgar ser-

vility of those

who were pushing

their

way

into the

world of fashion, and the

of those equally vulgar arrogance

who
?

considered themselves

its

leaders

What was it to me

to hear, one

by one,

the names aspersed, and the characters

.'.TIT'

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
down
into the mire, of
to

trodden

women
good,

who appeared

me

all

that

is

I was not hapinnocent, and pure ? py. I look not back upon those days, however brilliant, as days of enjoy-

ment.

My

vanity was gratified,


still it

and

time passed swiftly by; but


not happiness

was
felt,

not such

as I

had

when

first

Gertrude had told

me

was

dear to her,

when my

heart pictured

no other delight than spending th"e remainder of my life in her society.

My
caused

attachment to Lady

Orville
T
I

me

bitter

sorrow;

heard
could

her spoken of in terms which

not endure;
])led

heard her name cou-

with

my
me

own,

in

manner
Oa.'i..'\;

which made

miserable,

Moncrief

GRAHAM HAMILTON,
taxed

me me

with

my
Lady

conduct.

As a

mend, older than myself, he admonished


for
for

Orville's

sake

my

father's

for

Gertrude's

at
re-

least to

be more circumspect.
"

assured him.

Can you

really say,"

he asked, " that

my fears are
it,

unfound-

ed

"1

assure you oi
**

upon

my

honour."
^^
is,

All I ask of you," he said,


''

not to deceive me."


f

Is

nothing

going on in secret
her in private,"
I

"
:

never see

replied

honour
gave

v^e

do not

Upon my even meet." He


said,

"

me his hand

and

"I

believe

you, and you are a noble fellow."

But very shortly


tain Colonel L., a

after this a cer-

forward profligate
his

coxcomb, who, judging from

own

b5

10

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
in hO"

want of both, believed neither


nesty nor virtue, affirmed in
sence, that'.

my

pre-

No,

dare not

cannot even

now

repeat the terms in


her.

which he characterised

The blood
rashly
for his
I

boiled in

my

veins

too

called

upon him

to account

shameless aspersion.

He

smiled,

and would have withdrawn from the


danger of supporting
Forgetting
that
I

his

own words.
certainly
as well
aj^

should

make Lady

Orville's
I

name

my own

public,

listened only to

my

resentment,

and expressions passed before others, which made it impossi-

ble that Colonel L. should not


satisfaction.

demand

We

met

Mr. Brandon

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
was

11

my
fire
;

second.

The Colonel received


pistol in

my

discharged his own


and
I

the air
clare
its

was compelled to demyself satisfied. The affair with


effect of still far-

cause became generally known,

and had the natural


ther injuring
tion.

Lady

Orville's reputa-

It

were

difficult

to

believe

how

many unfounded
lated

stories

were circuIt

by malice

against her.

was

aot indeed to be expected, that a cen-

ever greedy of scandal,


hasty to condemn

sorious, officious, intermeddling

world

ever ready

to adopt the worst construction,

and

should

shew unto

wonted mercy and compassion

one

12

GRAHAM

HAMILTON'.

whose superior endowments had so


deeply mortified
cited
its

its

vanity

and ex-

envy.

Moncrief was confident that these


reports were unfounded but he proved
;

to

me

too clearly that

my
;

was

the

cause of them

imprudence and he urged


for

me

to find

any pretext
for

quitting
time.
:

London immediately
pleaded
a

some

thousand excuses

and

when
ments,

at last yielded to his arguI still

urged a thousand reaoff"

sons for putting

a step, which

could not deny to be absolutely necessary.


I

In ten days

in
I

a fortnight,

promised to depart.

undertook

during that time not to approach Lady


Orville's doors
;

and though

for

some

GRAHAM
days
I

HAMILTON".

13
in this

kept

my

engagement

respect, I

still

delayed breaking to

my

uncle

my

intention, or asking his


I

permission that

should leave him.

Lady

Orville

had of course heard,

and she had been much affected on


hearing of the risk
accdnnt.
of
I

had run on her

The

gallantry and devotion


in her eyes, as in those
it

my

conduct w^as

would have been

of

most
for

women, more than an atonement


its

rashness and imprudence.


to ask

She

had twice written


to her
;

me

to

come

mise
I

would not break the prohad made Moncrief. At length


but
I
ill,

heard that she was

and

could

resist

no longer.
a loser of

Sick of scenes of
I

vice,

more than

cared to

14

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

confess at the gaming-table, and under


the consciousness that half the

town

me the favoured lover of a person for whom my admiration was such as not to permit me to lower her
believed
for a

moment even by an unworthy

thought,

with such feelings


my

entered

her apartment, and at once communi-

cated to her

intention of leaving

London.

She seemed
said there

aifected,

and instantly

was now no necessity for my malice departure it was too late

had done
i;5

its

worst.
I

'*

Oh

yes, there
I

necessity,"

no command
self,

no

replied,

"for

have

control

over

my-

must leave you. commanded me to do so


I

and

You once
it

had been

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
better for

15

me had

then

obeyed
in

you."

"

You obeyed me
Lady
Orville

every

thing," said

"
:

it is

now

unnecessary London." "

you
May
I

must not leave


ask you where''

fore ?" I replied hastily. fore

Ah! wheretears,

such

confusion

Your

your embarrassment,

all tell

me

that I

am

a source of misery and disquiet to

you.

Why

do you

start

from

me

as

replied,

from something hateful?" " Oh, if I were to tell you," she " that I returned
that interest,
that friendship,

your looks and words


prove that you
to
feel for

and actions

all

me

if

were

friendship,

of me ?"

promise you my what would you then think


I

''

know not, but in

that case

16
I

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
fly

would

you

still

more,

still

far-

ther," I replied, as firmly as I could.

''Alas!" she said, in tears, "every


friend I have thus forsakes
either

me they
as I

leave

me
T 1

as

Moncrief does,

or I force

them from me,

do
if

you

yet

am

not your protectress,


society?
Is

your friend
house at
say
it is

in

not
?

my
If I

all

times open to you

shut, if
?"

b'^'\vimdrawn
ni^)^^ I

"

my

protection should
It

were better

for

variety

answered, struggling with a " far better for of


feelings,

me

than any
disgrace."

success

accompanied by " Could you bear to live,'

and never see

me

again

?"

"I know
;

not, I answered, hesitatingly


I

but this
live.

know,

could never bear to

GKAHAM HAMILTOX.
1

17
becaip.e

,'f

if

you were I^pj^^worthy

if I

so.

Lady

Orville coloured deeply,


to the heart

and

appeared struck
words.

They seemed
exclaimed,
that

to
!

by these overwhelm

her with confusion.


ton," she

"Oh
'*

Mr. Hamil-

where have

you
such

lived

you should cherish


?

noble sentiments
I

or

rather,

where have
forgotten

lived that I should have


?

them

Lord Orville

is

cold,

severe, and unfaithful.' y./'^ Have

done nothing

to render

him so

you " 1

have never dishonoured him." "

Good

Heavens

can you talk so coldly of " " Mr. such a crime ? Hamilton,
!

hear
ture

me

why in your own mind


superior to
all

pic-

me a being

others,

18
in

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
order to

wound me

the

more

deeply to use me the more unkindly ?

How
been
:

inconsistent your conduct has

why

even risk your


reputation
"
?

life

in de-

fence of

my
?

if in fact
!

you
I

are indifferent

" Indifferent
at

do

appear so

Look

me and

see

if in

these eyes, this countenance, you can


trace indifference to your welfare
;

but

do not imagine

am

base enough to

mistake your friendship, your condescension, or to forget the principles

of honour and religion

do not

tell

me

of Lord

Orville's coldness,
1

and
the

your

own

unhappiness.

am

last in the

world to
"

whom

you should
"
:

name them."
heart," replied

You have wrung my


Orville
I

Lady

am

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
alone

19
not

upon earth
it

you
so.
I

know
pass

what

is

to

be

my

days in a struggle

to

appear gay,

my

nights in tears."

" Your mother," I said faintly, in" your mother could terrupting her,
be a friend."
thise

with

my

She cannot sympawoes it would break

*'

her heart were she to hear them.

Ah

have you never done any thing wrong,


that
to

you can speak with such severity


I
felt

me ?"

my

strength

fail

saw Lady
continued,

Orville's tears,
*'

and

I faintly

Moncrief

is

and
Her

your friend,"
his

as I

pronounced

name,

tried to penetrate into her


fair

very soul.
;

arm, supported her head

her dark

brown

hair, carelessly dishe-

20
.veiled,

GUAHAM HAMILTON.
fell

over her pale cheek, yet


;

,wet with tears

her eyes were lowly

bent

she
!"

raised

them

softly

she
of

looked beseechingly on me.

" Gra-

ham

she called

me

thus:

the tenme
firmness.

derness of that soimd


hearing such a
:

the emotion
thus call

woman

overcame
I

my
it

assumed

bent forward to take her hand,-^


to

ing back,

perhaps to press " Oh


misunderstand

my
'tis

lips.

Start-

no," she cried, **you


:

me

a friend^

kind, an ardent, an unspoiled friend,


I

wish

for

one

to soothe

my

harassed
the road

soul,

to lead

me back from

of ruin, iVom the brink of that gulf of


.crime into whicJi
.look
I
**

was

truth

assure you"
I

her

never yet have

GRAHAM
fallen.

HAJIILTON.

21

It is for this
I will

alone I sought
I cried,
**

you.'*-^^*^

be that friend,"

throwing myself before her.


serve you with zeal
;

I will

weep with you,

ifit^cannot comfort you; pray for you,


if

nothing else

is

left

me

pray with
the

you,
fii&

Lady

Orville,

and teach you to

your affections higher than

transient

dream of

this world.

As

was thus speaking, the door


''^

opened, and Moncrief entered.'


If

"""'

Never was confusion greater than

mine; never was terror more strongly

impressed on any countenance than

upon her s what then was my surprise, what my relief, when Moncrief,
perfectly

composed,

and appearing

not even to observe me, seated him-

22

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
Lady
Orville,

self near

and

in

somewhat anxious tone inquired of


her,

whether she had heard from her

husband.

With

hesitation,

with em-

barrassment, not knowing what she


said,

Lady

Orville

first

answered that

she had

then that she had not.


may speak
:

"

conclude," continued Moncrief,


I

" that

you openly before Mr. Hamilton he seems," and

to

he smiled with bitterness,

'*

he seems
that
is

perfectly acquainted with

all

going on."
said eagerly.

" Not in the least,"

Moncrief cast

his

eyes

upon me with

a glance of superiority
I

and proud contempt


dure.

could not en-

then continued, addressing " You know Lady Orville my wishes.

He

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

23>

my
is

proposal
;

the

offer

have made

sincere

decide in whatever
think
:

way
to

you may

most conducive

your happiness

mine, you are well

aware, depends on yours."

He was
spoke.

strongly

agitated as

he

Lady

Orville wept, but


I

made

no answer.
leave the

felt

that

ought to

room

but
I

my

embarrassit.

ment was such

that

could not do

At length Moncrief rose


solemn voice
I

to depart, in a

and as he passed me, said


:

low
:

" meet

me
at

to-night

am engaged

until twelve, after that

hour you will


house."

find

me

my own
the room,

As soon
Lady

as he

had

left

Orville

beckoned

to

me, and

24

GRAHAM

HAMlLTOSr.

seated myself by her side.

She took

my

hand, and said,

*'

What must

yon think of me

of me to whom you
and
to

have been accustomed to look up as

something

elevated

superior.

Hear me,
real

and learn

worth

learn

appreciate
the dis-

to

know

tinction

between the appearance and

the reality of generosity of sentiment

and ma^nanimitv of soul.

her voice faltered,


to

Moncrief," " Moncrief was


:

have been

my

husband

he had

loved

me

from infancy
I left

our parents
for the prO'

were

friends.

him

ferred

hand of one of the richest and


in

handsomest men
Orville

England.

Lord

rewarded

me

as I deserved

but enough of him.

After

my

mar-

GRAHAM
nage,
I

HAMILTON'.

25

saw Moncrief.

Lord
scious

Orville's

Piqued at indifference, and constill

that Moncrief
I

loved

me
him

with ardour,
tortured
his

sought

his

society,

heart,

and
as

led

about in
I felt

triumph

my

victim

the proudest pride in humbling

of men.

My
a

vain heart exulted in

shewing

man
to
I

of
the

integrity

and
at-

honour a prey
tachment;
in

maddest

but

unworthy firmer than I had expected: and, whatever pain


I

my

was disappointed wish. Moncrief was

may have

given him

however

may have

deserved other-

wisehe has never treated me but


with the respect and attachment of
a friend.

VOL.

II.

26

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
"

He sought to save me when he found me involved in debts and many


difficulties
:

and

now

now that Lord


magnitude of
offers to

Orville,

enraged

at the

my

offences, has

determined to part
go to

from me, Moncrief


him., to

attempt an arrangement of

my

affairs,

and a reconciliation be-

tween me and
have been
so

my

husband.

But

deeply

injured

by

Lord
him.

Orville,

that I cannot

forgive

My

affections are entirely alieI


all

nated; and
rated with

had rather be sepathe obloquy that at-

tends upon

such

measure,

than

consent to return with him into the


country, and see

my

friends no more.
:

Think, Mr. Hamilton, of his proposal

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
see

27
*'

read

it

in his

own

letter,

That
ser-

Lady

Orville should give

up her

vants, her

equipages,

her house in

London;

that she should consent to

reside, for the

next three years in the

country
tions

and that upon these condian arrangement may be made


;

for discharging

her immense debts

contracted

by

boundless

extrava-

and gance, undiscriminating charity,


the most inconsiderate negligence."
*'

And have you


"

consented

said
*'

eagerly Have 11" she replied: Oh, Mr. Hamilton, that I had your

simple habits
real
spirit

your

integrity

your
Look
splen-

of independence.

at this
ceilings,

house
the

the
c2

gilding of the

pictures,

the

28
'

GRAHAM

HAMILTOlsr.

^b'tff -df tlie'

furnitliVi^?''!^

" What are


if

these things,"

I said,
?

**

one single
as

debt be

left

unpaid

Such scenes

that of the evening of the ball

must

deprive you of
luxuries.

all

enjoyment of these
all,

And
and

after

magnificent
servants

mansions

numberless

do not promote the happiness of those


to

whom

they belong.

The mirth of
the mind,

the heart, the

amusement of
social

gaiety of

spirit,

intercourse,

and pleasant conversation, cheer and


delight humbler dw^ellings.
for these
I

care not

pomps and ceremonies

you

cannot in your heart regard them,


either:
later

and remember, that sooner or


to re-

you must be called upon

sign them."

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
*'

23
consider

But the

friends

who now

me
to

as their first

be invited

object my parties, to which there is so

much
which

emulation
politics

my

suppers,

at

are debated, and

where

statesmen settle their measures all


these will be lost for ever, and the

world will seek some other general


place of union,
if I

give up

my

pre-

sent place in

society, and

retire into

the country for three years/'

"It

will not

replied.
tirely, if

be for three years," I " How!" " It will be enretire

you once

resolve

upon an you

interval

you once of reason and


:

if

reflection,

will

no longer care

for

these things, as you do now.

With

your mind

^withyour resources you

30

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.

will soon discover the superior enjoy-

ment of a more
cial

rational

and more so!

course of

life.

And oh Lady Orat the

ville,

can one like you hesitate be-

tween the empty pride of being


head of a
train of persons,

who would
and

not refrain from going to the next


ball,

were you

to die to-morrow,

the solid merit of living the ornament,


the
delight,

and comfort

of

your

family ?"
*'

wish," said
**

smiling,

Lady Orville, half you were permitted to


;

preach publicly to ladies in general

you certainly would make many converts

but my case
to adorn,

is different,
it.

your
have

reasoning does not apply to

no home

no husband

who

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
i-equires

31

my attention, no child to inof an struct, my babes are not yet care and besides, age to demand my not pass my if they were, I could
;

time in hearing them their lessons.


I hate to

torment children

they are

my

only comforts now, yet

my
'

heart

I feel too ardently to requires more,

bear existence without

She hesitated: I did not venture


interrupt her.
''

to

am

not yet twenty-

four years of age/' she continued;


*'

and what does

life

present to

me ?"
all," I

''

What

it
''

ever must present to

replied,
evil.

a varied field of good and

Much

happiness

is

yours some
;

sorrows have fallen to your lot


I

but

am

convinced that of

all

the latter

32
the

GRAHAM HAMILTOX,
most
difficult to

endure

is

self-

reproach."

Ladv

Orville

seemed
I

affected with

my conversation
may
tire

fear these details


let
it

others

but

be remem-

bered by the lovers of a more laconic


style,

by those who

suffer

under an

irritable

impatience of monotony, and


all

nourish by

incentives a passion for


I

continual novelty, that

spoke to a

woman,
^that
age
I

of herself and her

own

affairs

and that something of the ardour

was not yet twenty years of

of an enthusiastic lover broke in ui)on

and relieved the tediousness of admonition.

"

Had

once heard you speak thus,


at

Mr. Hamilton,"

length

she said^

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
looking at
ness,

33
r.ir-

me

with irresistible sweetfelt

"

might, perhaps, have


to

amended, but now

me

perpfetual

change of scene, variety of conversation,

and multiplicity of acquain-

tance are

become necessary.

You
it

nce told

me

that existence was, as

were, dead without active pursuits,

and
I

that action

was

cannot labour
I

write

the light of
I I

life.

do

but
I

were

to

publish

what

write,

should only
censure.

make

enemies, or incur
I

In the country

dread the

tediousness of neighbours, the wrangfihg

of companions
!

and

then

the

ridicule

As

all

other fears in society


;

lose their power, this fear increases

and no one who


'

is

not aware of the


'

''^'

''

c 5

34

GRAHAM HAMILTON,
in

manner

which others
can at

talk,
all

laugh,

and misrepresent,

imagine

how

unpleasant
fools."

it

even of
complete
'

is to be the jest " Where there is

heartlessness,"
total

replied,

there

must be a
for those

want of sym-

pathy

who

act from right


scoffers

feeling;
fear

but,

be assured, the
ridicule,

what they

and
who,

only

affect to

despise those

they

know,

must deeply despise them.


the

Act upon higher motives than


dread of
this

ridicule.

Oh,

if

you

knew how they already aspersed your name how little they really love you

how

day is forgotten by those who pay the most


abject adoration

soon the

idol of the

and how every fault

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
is

3o

noted in those who, from whatever


!"

cause> are thrust into public notice


j^.

It

was thus

went

on,

till

Lady Orand
I

ville

discovered that she had listened


for

to

me

nearly three hours

felt

that attachment alone could have


:

induced her to do so

this led to a

more dangerous explanation.


appeared
gination
to interrupt us.

No

one

was
far,

overheated,

My
I

ima-

forgot

myself so

as to forget

what was

due

to her.

owned

that I felt for

her with ardour

Lady Orville blushI

ed

never had

seen her look so


passion gave
I

beautiful.

Hope and
in

me

a confidence
fore.
I

myself

had not be-

uttered the rhapsodies of en-

thusiasm, the promises which some

36r>

GRAHAM

HAMILTON'.
in order

think are only

made
I

to bej

broken, but which


sidered as sacred.

at that

hour conI

At length

recol-

lected the necessity of departing, ^nd,>


tore myself

away

my heart
my mind

beating

with agitation, and


disorder.

in strange

" Mr. Moncrief requested

me

to

remind Mr. Hamilton that he expected

him

this

evening at twelve," said the


as
I

servant
**

descended the
I
is

stairs.
it;

Good heavens!

had forgotten
it?"
*'

and what hour

It is

half;

past two," said the

man with

a smile

and

immediately hastened whither

Moncrief had appointed me.

As

went

out,

heard

the

porter
that

say,

" Did you

tell

my

lady

Lady

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
Denmont and
Miss
Clairville
I

37

had
re-

twice called this evening, but


fused

them on your orders?"-"'^!


you were quite her ladyship was too much
"

did," said the laquais aloud, that I

might hear him,


right
;

indisposed to see any one."

itt.--n'T('v^

hnrf T

sfTftTROff

.booO

-'

lix

38

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

CHAP.

II.

That Moncrief
ceived him,
1

thought

had de;

was convinced

that he

would demand of

me

satisfaction, I
:

considered as inevitable

with a mind

possessed by these expectations, with


passions excited, and an imagination
inflamed,
I

arrived at the place which

he

had

appointed.

He had been
hours

w^aiting for

me two

yet

his

manner was calm.

" It was kind of

you, Graham," he said, extending his " thus to hand, comply with my re-

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
quest
:

39

and

to

disarm at once your

brow of that haughtiness, which I and to check a perceive upon it,

young enthusiast who may be delighted with the


bullet friend
into
in

idea of sending a

the

bosom

of

the only

London w^ho wishes him

well, let

me
may

inform you, that whatsay,

ever you

provoke me,

aoainst vour's never, never will

my

however you may arm is defenceless


I

do

any thing
merit
I

harm a person whose appreciate, and whose inexto


I

perience

would guide."

Softened

and somewhat calmed by


*'

this address,

came not

hither," I said,

" in the

idea that you would act unkindly

by

me.

shall

never

forg^et

the

ser-

40
vices

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
you have done me, and
I

ask
sin-

yon, Moncrief, to speak to


cerely

me

to
;

give

me your

full

confiit,

dence

think I shall not abuse

or be deficient in that generosity and

noble virtue, the example of which

have ever found in


"

'

you."'

'

Graham," said Moncrief,


silence,

after a

few moments'
ceived me
it

"

you have de-

was, however, natural,


;

perhaps right
the truth
to

for

had you spoken


betrayed
loves

me you had
Lady
in
I

Lady

Orville.

Orville a

^OU,"' he
tone.

continued

hurried

" Loves

me

!"

exclaimed.

"

No

childish denials

if

you are too

innocent to perceive

it,

others are notV


it,

She loves you

see

know
tnrlt

it;'
I

hhn

GRAHAM

IIAMILTOX.
it
;

41

nay, you are aware of

and, wj.th-

out returning- her attachment,

your
are

head

is

turned,

your

passions
is

excited, and your vanity

flattered."

"

My
:

vanity
all I

!"

" Cease,
to

and hear

me

ask

is,

be quietly heard,
of surprise

Avithout aff"ectation

and

without interruption.
ville I

To Lady Orfor
I

have been attached

many
loved
of

years
her

before her marriage


the

with

romantic
that

ardour
I

youth; since
disinterested

period,

have

omitted no one act that fidelity and


affection

suggested for

the protection of her innocence and the


security of

her happiness.

It

may not sound


I

pleasing in your ears, if


felt

add that

have

for

her

all

the

42

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
I

attachment that

could ever

feel in

honour

to a

married woman.

That

could have
I

made

her forget her duty,


I

do not believe; and had


I,

done so

had

in the

common acceptation of the


I

world, succeeded with her,

had

felt
it

humbled, and not triumphant:


is in

for

her virtue, her excellence, her

superiority over every other


that I
tion.

woman,

place

my

pride and satisfac-

"

have even been careful, by


to

my

attention

propriety,

to

keep the
1

busy tongue of scandal


it is

silent.

know

but what of that


even hint that

said I love her absurdly, madly;


?

no one can ever


for-

my

devotion has

gotten the respect due to her, or ever

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
attempted
to

43

influence her
I

mind

to

what
to

is

base.

have exerted myself

keep

my own bosom
it

sound and

pure, that
nication,

might

not,

contaminate
is, I

by commuSuch hers.
beheve,rare;
it

conduct

am sorry to
it

perhaps few would understand


ficiently to

sufit

admire

neither

was

for the praise of others, that I acted

thus.

The

virtues

which

really apply

to the great leading relations

and

cir-

cumstances of
undervalued

life

are neglected and


false refine-

enthusiasm,
I

ment, exaggerated sensibility are more


interesting.

wish not
I

to interest

but,

Graham,

did hope the reward

of so

many

years of devotion to one


dif-

individual

would have met with a

44

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
Lady Orville has what was due to
to her only real

ferent recompense.
at length forgotten
herself,

and

may add,

friend.

It is ever thus,

when

constan:

cy and virtue possess the heart of man

when, departing from the ordinary


track, he exercises a generous self-

denial

when

he struggles to over-

come

his passions,

and

to treat the
if

wo-

man whom he

loves as

she were a ra-

tional being, she is sure to disappoint his expectations, to

undervalue his

at-

tachment, and to throw herself away

upon the

whom
I

young enthusiast with she meets. That flattery which


first

have denied her, your ardent and

admiring eyes have bestowed.


the
first
I

From
capti-

saw

it

she was

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

45

vated by your frankness, beauty of


person, and youth
;

she has not even


there
is

paused to ask

if

one

ster-

ling virtue beneath.

After years of
after

long-tried

acquaintance,
her,
I

a de-

votion
leled,

to

believe

unparal-

she calls
I

you by the

name

to

which

alone have a right to as-

pire

by

the sacred
!

name

of friend.

Oh woman
art thou;

how
"
!

worthless a thing
in thy perfection

and even

how contemptible
I felt

offended at his severity.

To

maintain the propriety of Lady Orville's

conduct would have been inde-

licate

and ungracious

but

took ad-

last vantage of the generality of his

remark, and undertook the defence of

46
the sex.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
"

Women were the comfort,


life,"

the delight of

I said.

"

were

less

selfish

they

They

had more

kindness,
tion,

love than men; who were cold,

feeling,

generosity, devo-

arrogant, tyrannical."

"
said

What

then are your intentions ?"


earnestly.

Moncrief,

" Leave
I

London

remember the delicacy, the danger of her situation act nobly, though
scarce expect
not, follow the
it

see no more of Lady Orville


of you.
If

you canSee

her

be

customary track.

her ruin; go on in the old

hackneyed course, under the name of


Friendship
;

and there

so

say you will pause here,


far,

and no

farther

dream away hours in

ecstatic bliss, as

it

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
is

47

when you have depraved your own heart, and tainted


called
her's, rejoice, if you

and

can

and
to

for

me,

shall henceforth leave

you

your own
intrude
feel asit

reflections.

shall

never

again.

Of one
if I

thing,

however,

sured

do take

this step,

shall

be

decisive.

Will you, therefore, take

to upon yourself to replace me watch over, to defend, to save from


error,

woman

M'ho

might have
in

been heaven's masterpiece


character, as she
is

mind, in

in beauty,

but

for
I

these fatal weaknesses, which will,


fear,

corrupt

all

her virtues, and renlife

der her talents useless, her

dis-

honourable, and her death without


consolation."

48

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
"

Depend upon

it,"

said/

" with

all

your kindness and

all

your genecruel-

rosity,

you do Lady Orville the

est injustice in supposing her guilty

of ingratitude towards you


the

and as

to

wrong feelings and the attachment which you condemn, though I


cannot declare your suspicions entirely

unfounded, yet be assured that

they are greatly exaggerated."

Moncrief was incredulous.


sisted.

per-

Our

discussion was long

each

of us kept his temper, nor used one

harsh or unbecoming expression


it

but

ended, like most discussions, in the


of

conviction

neither

party.

The

hour of the morning to which

we had

prolonged our conversation, compelled

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
US to separate.
I

49

returned fatigued
still

and

harassed,

but

vain

and

elated, to

my

uncle's.

Moncrief, hurt and

wounded both

by Lady
hopeless

Orville's

conduct and mine,

of rendering her

any

far-

ther service, fully convinced that she

would not break


with

off her intercourse

me

in that dignified

and decisive

manner which alone could save her


reputation,

determined upon giving

up

his vain endeavours,

and departed

into the country, without seeking an-

other interview with her, and without


offering

any farther admonition or and

remonstrance.

Lady
culties

Orville's

distress

diffi-

now became so great and pressII.

VOL.

50
ing, that

G R A II A M
it

H A :sr I LTO X

would have been cruelty


'

in

me
it

'

to'

nave 'abandoned

her'.

Mbii-

crief's

absence caused her disquiet,

but

was too evident


'

that 'mine

would, at
her
still

this

mome'ht, 'hav^' given

greater pain.

She praised
;

him

in the highest

terms

she

owned

he was the only

man she'had'ev^Y'^fe^n,

"who
"

entirely realized every idea she

had ever formed of matchless integrity


and^perfect
ft6i\Bi\?';

^she believe'd 'him

capable of making the most generous


efforts,

and of submitting
"bilt,^

to the se-

^'>^re^r {)rivatim^;

^^h Sai&;'%e
nature.

required to6
'

much

of

human

-^His expectations were even more absurd than "'ftf;^ 'j)V?J"^e^'^,'' tlvfe' liitter

were mereflattcry, exaggerations quite

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
.

51

*^ i J.

-out of nature
tainly rational
b^it
,3r}vho

the former were cer-

and right in themselves,

wholly impracticable for those


lived in the world.

fjgyjThe fact

was she was

relieved,

by
his

l^l^m departure,
|.

from the justice of

reproofs

and she was so

fully con-

j>-^inced
3, she.

of her

power over him,

that

thought the not appearing to heed

V his absence, would secure his speedy


, ,

return.

She

felt

secure that his attachto permit


;

,^^nent to her

was too strong

him
,

to

abandon her

in her distress

and

in the

mean time

the society of

^Praham Hamilton ,jfji qf one wholly


,

pew

to

life,

too

young

to

admonish,

and too ardent

to repress her hopes,

d2

52
&C-

HAMILTOX. GRAHAM /OTJIMAH KAHAH^

prudence

made

up

for

his

tempo,

rarv absence and displeasure.


I said all I

could to warn her; but


at

unfortunately,

the
I
*'

same

time,

shewed how, much

admired her.
had
a

"A

friend,"

said,

sacred

character^

and should be more con-

sidered than, a host of lovers.

^Mon-

crief possessed a firm character, not to

be

trifled

with.

The conviction

that she had forsaken such a^.lojigtried friend for one

who had no
;

claim

upon

her,

had

stun^^ his heart

he was
It

more resolved than she imagined.


would be a painful
struo-srle,
fail

no doubt;
it

many

man would

under
^

should>but not Moncrief."

All these considerations I

urged

TOT IM AH GRAHAM HAMILTOX.


I

IfAHy

CJxJ

jiamsl ^ift vani. but

'i(Jl

qw sbfim , fionabrria She continued ner own


;

peculiar course

and as a strange exfault

ample of the ruling

and ruling

virtue of her character, even at this

time, I

saw her

relieve the

wants of a

half of the starving family with the one


ft

last small

sum which

she possessed,

and buy a useless bauble which a her yispection jeweller had left for
Willi the remainder.

"With

she prorespect to the future,

fessed her intention of confining herself to the

most moderate allowance

her

husband might be inclined to to grant her, if she were permitted


reside alone, and be the mistress of I'^tToaoM.ton -Irj^t-btuof-l', her own time and actions. She would.
.

ff

consent to give up her house, her car-

54

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
;

;PT2ni Offt donoin'^f n.-t hrtp. rrfrrf nv/n but riage, her suppers, and her balls
it

must be done with

effect

the whole
sacri-

world must bear witness to the


fice;

her vanity must be completely


could bring her-

gratified, before she

self to

endure the humiliating change.


solely intent

She became

upon the
;

preparation of this concluding scene

and at a moment when Lord Orville's


affairs

were the most seriously embar-

rassedwhen her own character was


at stake

when her health required the


care, she

employed herself in devising ^fcfe which was to exceed every other in splendour and
magnificence.
like
It

most prudential

Timon's

last

was not designed, banquet, of smoke


to declare her

and luke-warm water,

GRAHAM HAMILTON. /lOTJIMAH MAHAHO


.

55

own

ruin and to reproach the ingra-

titude of her friendsbut to shew to 'i; -.'7/ o\ ;io3rt3 fijiw 3X100 od 1^um j< the world she had loved so well, that

the idol they had worshipped had been

worthy of itheir adoration.


-I9ri

gfiiid

biucj ulg 9ioi3cJ

^L

.9]OflJ3ffo snftn'frfrrrrrf ^)di

ninhnn ot Ha?
t^iiiiiv^t

sd:
J

f.O':jL"

:;iic>jm

'{itiiuf.

9II938 ^aibii ^

io
jrf\v

iioi:tij'i

? '^[[rviO

Jn3fr;ofn- p tr

eBw
?i
.

nwo

19x1

nadw^J^stasm
tai^

Tff-t[s9d'i9rinf>

lifobfTsfqy ni rgdio ^i^'^^


'^

b903X3

Jjda'^Lz

3*^nDoSifl^m
'

sioms
f.od
;

to ^jeuyLiiii

oraiT
'9iljjf

bxiii

56

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
amiJBio
bflfi

>j)

allid

am

iaw9ria

woa
sAl
^^^

^'bnrfofT hViBgiJodi 99iiil lo


f'

iauomB

aidiiv/

banuDni
'

>

III

CHAP.
.qml

>.dinom
III. .biB3 ':
fMfr

.T?

ylblim ad
,goq

[,,,..-,>

..JjJ;JU;ji

aiTt 10

Such were the floiJiuui


ill.

scenes in which I
uncle wasg

was engaged,
taken

when my
for

He had

some days

complained of uneasy

feelinos.
felt it

had neglected him

and

resolved in future to be more attentive.


,

kpewjilsOjtha^t large

demands
beeUit

upon

my
I

account

had

lately

pressing upon him from


ters.

many
I

quar-j

expected

lijs

^^ge^-j^^^^had

prepared myself
idea that

for it;

but

had no

my

debts amounted to so

GRAHAM
large a

HAMILTO^f.

57

sum.

To my
bills

confusion he

now shewed me
the
all

and claims

to

amount of three thousand pounds, incurred within the last few

months.

these right, Graham?" " he mildly said. Impossible all im-

"Are

position and

fraud

1"

exclaimed

but, as usual, u]30n


articles, I

exammation

oi the

found

little

reason to ques-

tion their correctness.

He th^-r^ad

the following items,


^'

pausing at each with an


t.

hei/ /"

of en-

quiry as to what they could possibly'


.-

mean. ""Jeweller's
fifty

bin Gold
fifty

^
.

chain/

guineas!

Ring,
''

guineas!
^

Broaeli"
!'.

"*"' '""J" S'l'^^'^H

'"^^

All presents, Sfr^^^^^q^^^

Milliners bill-Shawr;>S'''""

D O

58
**
'

GRAHAM
Still

HAMILTOJC.

a present.
8iri

*'

Blue fox muff, one hundred gui^aiwon^i bflB


j

neas

:0D^ io 9voi
!

vJl

" "

Still

a present.
said

Pay them,"

my uncle gravely,

with no other
slight

observation than his

customary gesture of shutting

his eyes close

when he wished
-

not to

perceive any thing

that displeased

him.

He

then drew a draft for the

sum, and desired

me

to

leave the

room.
Until again admitted into Sir Mal-

colm's presence I suffered inexpressible

any assistance

had he uttered the severest reproaches should have been


I
:

anxieiy.

"Had

he denied

me

able to endure triom

was

not,

how-

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
-VTOlJiMAii
ever,

MAHAHid
but that
I.

5Q CV
I
felt

so hardened,

deeply the fault of which


guilty;

had. been

and knowing

his love of money


life,

and the habits of his

could not
in-

but apprehend some decisive and.


exorable determination respecting

me

from the immoveable calmness of his

manner.
relief to

It was, nevertheless a great

my

mind

to

have these

bills

discharged; and

I firmly

resolved to

be more circumspect

in fyture.

Towards eight
sent for

in the

evening he

me

he put his hand to his

head and again complained of being "It may be the fancy of an old ill,
man," he
into
ii7->u

said,

" but

have taken
3

it

.-"ill

my

die.','

9/od ion

-T-

head that I am about to i"u n'lqjl a " For Heave^'s sake, if VQu V/
i
i

ijf.jiij

'jrHi'Dns

oi

moB

GO
feel
ill,

GRAHAM HAMILTON*
see

some one."

" See
"

some
hey!
se-^

one!" he said incredulously,

boy,

it

is

not for an old

man

of

venty to see any one that can work


miracles.

would perhaps be better for you were I to live a few years longer, but to what must be we must
It

submit

am

satisfied."

*'

Sir,

you

make me miserable this lowness, and


your exceeding and most undeserved
generosity."
*'

;.jji>jiu

was never gay


*'

in

my

youth,"'

said Sir Malcolm,

as

you

are,

Gra-

ham never owre


ladies,

given to admire the

and waste

my

time and
I
it

money
do not
is

upon the puir fools; but like you the worse for it
and becoming.

'well

You

are handsome;

GIIAHAM HAMILTON'*
and young

61

your passions are strong.


is

Where

there

much

of violence in
is

the character, the heart

not apt to
forgotten

be owre
your own

soft.

You have

friends

sometimes think,

nevertheless,

upon poor Gertrude. She was a good modest girl, Gra;

ham

lartd

she

is

sick at heart, as

understand,
I

from
to

your unkindness.
leave her a
little!
do's'tiP

had thought
I

matter.

shall not
i

be able

to

now."
f*'

fii

\ii^.l^l^ii

tii,V;

Not

able, uncle ^ftfooIfiM 118 bifi^

.."Why
I shall

no, for every sixpence I have


to leave to you."
'q

be compelled
Sir ?"
to

hf^
*'

To me.
Yes,

s^J "^^.^
"iil^

you require Her wants are few your's, unhappily''


you

62
for you,

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
numerous.
I

have been the

means of spoiling your nature some


little

I fear.

'Tis well I

should pro-

vide

even for the

faults

my

indulr

gence has generated.

I failed to think,

Graham, when
to live

sent for

you

to

town

with me, and take care of me,

that youth and age could nae be well

matched

that the glittering

gewgaws

which could not tempt an old miser, might prove the bait and ruin of a

young
sorry,

spendthrift.

But don't look


for saying

young one; I am not a harsh word to you."


"If,"
1

replied, greatly agitated,"you

do not wish to make


rable,

me

truly mise-

do say every thing you can most

harsh,

most cruel do, dearest uncle,

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
for' F"'aeseii6-

63

all only,

if

me, talk not of leaving to

you love me what


and dear,

my

father, uncle Richard,

dear Gertrude alone deserve.


will live a long while, I trust in

You
Godl

a very long while


riches
lo""

you have to bequeath, leave them


!

and

if

such as know
to me.''

how

to use them, not

^^^^'^Why,

Graham," said Sir Malfool

colm,

"

you are playing the


know, with
all

with

meyou
I

their

WfMs;

never loved any thing on

earth but

you Hey

boy, what pleaall

sure you'll take in spending

those

g^ms

have passed
I

my

life in

gather^

ihg together!

have 'n6 child but you.

-iiYou have become

my

child.

My

64
life

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
T JIM AH

MAHi
;

has never been blessed

for the

sweet noise of prattling children nevef *^


enlivened

my

fireside.
i^

1 thought the^^^

would have

bee'h'

ce^e ^o

me

&'d'r

never could bring myself to marry^^^


for fear of

parting with
lonely

my

mone^^'*
2i'^

None know how


I

it is

to life'

have done,

till

they

fall

into years.

If there is

something

to look cheerful

on'iis; 'Something, when''"^^6 gb' iriliht!'""

out of our houses, that attends

li^/'

expects us, watches for us, be

it

eVetf^
^

a faithful dog, '4fe''dW^ndFc'5m{)rH^f

miserable; but

had nothing
I

to love''^

me, Graham,
to

till

knew you;

an(i

ei^^fecH6b^%iV'.^(^h^^fer"sB^^i^8li\i^'''S"^

ladi-*had

been unkinder than evef'^

your old uncle will be


He
T^d hatn'^'ft/j

; so
ajsw
1

don't'^'

doum

oo:t

^><tnom

,>IOTJIMAH
jriJ

KAHAHO
--

Kl

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
loi
,i.^r^. .

65
sli!

./an bbA

fret, iljQy.r Itake

your money;
if I

stay
t

with

me

to-night; and

don

die,

(whic^l I

won t,

if

can help

I it,)

be-

lieye I will

buy myself a new house,


gentleman the
<

and

live like a

rest of

my

days.",

-rrr-rf -FJ'nrr^ -^rtry^

Some

tones in the voice of

my

un-

cle during this conversation

touched

me
for

deeply

some

feelings

were moved

within me, which had lain dormant


a length of

time;

these were
^
.

rendered more powerful by his apparently

weak

state of health during


;

the whole of the evening

and though

Lady

Orville wrote

me

seyei'al notes,

express^gjthp,^9J^g,iji^h^9|:je5^^mind,^I

and the magnitude of hgg^p^grafg^.Y


ments,
I

was

too

much

affected

by

all

66

GRAHAM HAMILTO%.
uncle had said to think of leaving
I

my

him.

read therefore to him, and

he knowing that the only book which


considered amusing was, "Gros^^.ODj,
the Stock Exchange,"' I began

and

went on with

it till

he dropped asleep.
its wit, its

He

could smile at

sigh at its
It,

truths,

and rely upon

morality.

served him, as the

Whole Duty

of

Man

serves

many
and
it

people, for every


position,
it al-

possible

state
;

of humour,
as he

and sensation

knew

most by

rote,

ended generally,

upon the present occasion, by soothing

\\m
-iJi

into a

deep slumber.

.rrf-r^muooaH

looked on him with anxiety; and,


;

listened to hear his breathing

until,,

observing a letter

in

Capt. Hamilton's

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

G7

the tahanir-writTngri/alf open ij^ori


ble, I

snatched
'

it

up, and read to

my
con-

astoriishmeit;
'

two

pages
of

of

well-

deserved' censufe
cluding: with these

myself,
:

words

9^" Struck

with

such unexpected

conduct in Graham, and well aware of


Gertrude's extreme sensibility, I have

done
lieart

all

a father can do to

wean her

from a young m,an, who, I am of her, sure, by his present neglect a closer union, render her would,

upon

I have even completely miserable. endeavoured, by gone farther I have of our very encouraging the addresses
;

worthy neighbour's
riot,

son,
to

to

engage her

young Margive her hand


is

in

marriage to him, as he

virtuous,

68

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
'^teem'ea'bj^'^tj/ 'one, arid

ri^h, well

likely in every respect to

make her

happy.

Do

not conceive, dear bro-

ther, I rt?6flt"6 S^|:fer%6'

Graham, or
in

to

attempt to injure him


;

your opiSfeJ
>

nion

but having witnessed the


I

cret agitation of

my
I

sWeet

girl,

aM
I-

her anxiety to receive even a single


letter

from him,
able' to

have not always

been
tion.

'command

my
is

indigTitt-

His neglect of her


but
I

not per-whilst

haps unnatural;
Yve

wish,

^j^^^'^'the 'pleyiir'e^ of his new'

condition, to save

my

Gertrude from

undeserved pain, and place her in^"

slWaMJfVfi^e^^-'^l^^
find the
trust,

lii*^^^

at

le^st
I'

quiet and

peace which,

belong to her more humble

lot^'

m^.^tti^JKfy^^^^ must ultimately be


tfi^r r^3Y?(?<i
t

of

.te

piety; ,.^nd

many

virtues.^pj
,

Thus

it

^"fl ,9vbonoo ion oO was that a few periods, read

by.^tealtb, informed
I

me

at

once that

was on the brink


that already
that,

of losing Gertrude,
it

ajiid

was not impro-

1^,

alienated

by

my

neglect,

she might have listened to the addresses of another.


folly,
felt
I

cursed ray

own

offended

^yi,t^i

both Gerr,

trude
as

and her

father,

and as soon

my

uncle awakened, pretended to


pJ:9iPf^,fi4^

b indisposed myself, and


retiring to
-fl-

my own

apartmentj^3gg|)j.^y

then wrote several long

vehement

letters to the

Captain and Gertru^^^^j


sooner ended

which were no

tha^

70

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

recollecting that they could not go at

that hour, I put


tried
to

them

into the

fire,

and

compose myself to sleep. This was impossible and with the


;

first

dawn
I
I

of light

I arose,

and wrote

again.

acknowledged

my

errors

but said
to

loved Gertrude too well

bear the thought of losing her.


I

This also

did not send

for before

my

uncle had

summoned me

to his
.frpjn

apartment, the following letter

Gertrude herself was

put into

my
-,5

hands
'*

3-rr-'

It

is

a long time,
I

my

dearest Gra-

ham, since

have ventured to trouble


I

you, for the last three letters


still

sent are
in

unanswered.

We

have lived

hopes of hearing of your return. Your

tjRAHAM HAMILTON.
dear
'

71
if

mother has
write
to

been
it

ill

you
give
in-

\voiild

her

would

her pleasure.

Should any thing

duce you

to return,

you

will

find

that vour flower- srarden has not been

neglected, and that your dog

is

ever

with me.
"f^ou

have read

all

the books
I

desired; and in every thing,

think,

you

will find

we have

attend-

'%d

to

your wishes.
for

The time goes


dear uncle and

^^ther heavily
aunt,
secret

my
;

without you
it is

and there

is

my
I

wish to communicate

^*f&tiV"if
dearest
^^till

might
earliest

and

hope that my friend would

permit

me

to
I

open

my

heart to

him
"to

as before.
it,

know

not well

how

write

yet, without

more words.

72
it is

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
best at once to state the truth.
is

My father
I
1

desirous of marrying

me

to our neighbour, a

Mr. Marriot's
;

son.

cannot obey him


should never

often told

you
I

marry yet
it

have

ever considered

as a duty to

obey

my
I

dear father's commands.

Could

see

my

dear cousin Graham, to


it

advise

with him,
I I

would

much
up

console me.
spirits,

try to keep
ill.

my
line

but

have been
I

One

from you would,

think, be of

much

service to your dear parents, as well


as
to

your
"

affectionate

friend

and

cousin,

Gertrude Hamilton."
is

*'

My

father

obliged very sud-

denly to go to London

ah,

would

GUAHAM HAMILTON'.
you write
"
i

73
I

to

request that

might
" what

accompany him !"


No, no,"
I

said hastily
?

iftis
f

the

use of her coming

Marriot
so.
I

may marry
have
long

her

Young
is

it

best

indeed

weaned

my heart from her artless charms. Why should 1 keep the flower withering on
to
its

stem

for

me

shall return

my

fathers house no
its

more.

Its

simple pleasures,
life,

even course of
suit

will never

again

my

per-

verted taste.
says,

As my uncle Malcolm
has
learned wants
will

my mind
desires,

and

which

prevent

its

finding any satisfaction

or contentlife.

ment

in

a rural and
it

domestic

Why

then does
11.

give

me

pain that

VOL.

74

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
who would
?

Gertrude,

'not^

how
is

suit
it

me, should marry

What

to

me, that another should


in the possession of

feel

happy

so

inestimable

a treasure?

Fate,

which divides
not
alienated

me
rayii

from

her,

has
let

affections

me

rather rejoice that

she has already forgotten me. she done so


?"
'

Has
i'3ii//

^I again read her letter: "

Yourf

flower-garden has not been neglect-^,

ed
as
is

your
it

dog

.'

This seems
Alas
1

though she loved me.


to

what3

me ?

she loves
it

me

only beK)

cause she thinks

necessary to doat
I

upon

all

her family; and yet

doubt^s

whether the warm affections which


arise

from the relations of private and

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
retired
life

75

be not

stronger

and

deeper, than

the turbulent passions


in the

which are born and nourished

commerce
Sir

of the world."

Malcolm's voice aroused


these
to
reflections.

me
his

from

From

room

ten steps

when
here's

was walking up them went out to meet him. " So

he

my

apartment there

were

a fine affair," he said, holding

out

his

brothers

letter;

"there's

brother Richard trying to marry Gertrude to young Harriot.


of'-it

had a hint

before

but see what he says


girl \von"t

to-day.

The

give her confirst.


?

sent without seeing you

Graham,

what does
what

this look like

It

looks like
it

I've always thought;

looks as

E 2

76
if

C.RAHAM HAMILTON'.

she loved you dearly, and wished to

see you once

more before she was


Sir

se-

parated from you for ever."

Mal-

colm then contemplated me.


poor girl, when she
all

"
it

sees you,

wdll

Hey, be
she

over with Mr. Marriot.

Why,

will

be here immediately. Read bro;

ther Richard's letter


to

and come dow^i

my room;
to

to settle,

many accounts and books to make up, and


for there's

business

do

this

week,

that

we

may

afford to be idle

when the Captain


I

arrives."
..

^'.'

And

is

he coming?"
!

said, in

an irritated tone
ter

for

Gertrude's let-

now appeared
I

to

me
the

a mere ar-

tificerr-ai>4,Al)e;5e^>va$,,spii?etUJRg,,9f-

ward

thought

in

father

and

cliTriA^r HA^nLTo>:.

77
in this

daughter both following


manner,'^ 'perhaps
t'o6',

me

colm's direction

by

Sir

Malit

stratagem,

ap-

peared, to

recover

my

affections

but'if MTOuld not

avail.

"

Read, and

good which confirmed humour, my sus" won't be marthe


picions
ried
;

see," said Sir Malcolm, in great

M'hy

girl

without
a

seeing

you.
Avill,

I'll

buy

me

new

coat, that I

on the

occasion.
trice.
*

They

will

be

here in a

We

shan't have time to

make

ourselves look handsome.

Hey, read
is

the letter, and see

how
it

the old boy


1

preparing to coast not smile at

here."

could

my

uncle's mirth.

He

saw
left

that I

was melancholy, and he

me.

'*7S

GRAHAM
I

IIAMILTOX.

read the

letter,

and gathered from


crossed

five pages, closely written, and

over at each end, that the Captahi,


Gertrude,

and perhaps

the

suitor

might very possibly


immediately
their journey
for

set out almost


;

England

but that

was not

as yet

comthis

pletely determined upon.

Was

necessary

Ought Gertrude thus

to
if

force herself into

my

presence? yet

attachment to
I

me

actuated her, ousfht

not to forgive it? no, there was


in bringing

an indelicacy

Mr. Marriot

t>iE!fore"me' ei'tiier

as tier

acknowledged
suitor.
deli-

bridegroom or her discarded


It is

true I did" not merit


little

much
in

dSfc^ r^ad shewn


duct
to

my

con-

her.

My

hand,

I felt,

was

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
\][nwQrthy of hers
i^js-^jthat
I
;

79
neces-

but was
,

it

should witness a scene

which
feelings

assuredly

must wound
1

my
I

? and,
I

should

imagine,

hers

for

could not but feel that


in

was improved

mind and person,


;

since I had seen her

and that

if I

had attractions when Wf^.Md parted


from each other,
those
attractions

must now be much increased.

Her

was a wealthy farmer, present suitor and, for thing I knew, a man of an
any
ordinary mind.
i|i;:pmised
little.

When

boy he had

Why

should he,

now
more
then

that he was man, have realized

than the expectations he had


held out?
trude;?^i

^Was

he

to

possess Ger.y^i^iit^d

Fa&nfee 4o,>e

to

80
girl
I

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
unmatched,
?

after all,

by any that

had yet seen

Vain were these reflections; vain


the ill-humour such reflections occasioned.

Gertrude's letter must be an;

swered

or

should see her arrive, and

with her that insufferable Mr. Marriot.

What

matter to relate the vari-

ous resolutions that came and went

through

my mind

all

ended

in

my

resolving not to answer Gertrude's


letter

not to accelerate or retard her


my
T

journey to London, but to await


fate

with the indifference


still

hoped

should

be able to command.
I

In the

mean time
;

could not see

Lady Orville

could not answer the

notes she sent me.

My mmd was

per-

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
plexed, and
I

81

was

still

indulging a

hope that they might not come from


Scotland,

when
from

Sir

Malcolm received
father,

letter

my

saying,

" that Capt. Hamilton being compelled


to

go to

England

to

settle

some

money-affairs,

Gertrude
to

had

intreated

permission

him

that

young
;

Harriot

accompany would

attend
Sir

them

and that they wished


to

Malcolm
for

take

lodgings

for

them

a week."
recall,
I

This then was past

and

in

an agitation of mind
define 1 awaited their

cannot well
arrival.

The

very evening before they came,

when

they were expected every moment,


having walked
out for the

sake of

E 5

82

GRAHAM

HAMILTON^^
off

avoiding

and putting

the

first

meeting, Lady Orville's carriage pass-

ed

me

in the street.

She observed

me, stopped, and insisted on

my

ac-

companying her home.


I
vv^as

As

soon as
she

seated in

her carriage,
for

loaded

me

with reproaches

my

apparent neglect and ingratitude: but

when, upon reaching her home she


perceived
ful,

me

cold, absent,

thought-

embarrassed, she re-assumed the


kindness of her heart, and

natural

gently inquired the cause of


usual

my

un-

melancholy.

My

voice

and

manner declared too plainly the nature of my sorrow, and as I perceived


that
'at

Lady

Orville

was not displeased

believing herself the real cause of

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

83

my agitation,
belief.

did not undeceive her.


in her

Indeed she was hardly wrong

-ojShe conversed with


^4ic smiles

me long tears
varied

alternately
w^hilst

her

countenance,

she
all

earnestly

communicated

to

me

her sorrows,
difficulties.

intentions, interests,

and

She displayed
exerted
all

all

her fascinations,

her power, and seemed to


to hear

be anxious again

from

my

lips

another declaration of admiration and


of love.

She
I

half

opened a drawer,

and shewed me a miniature of herself,

which

had long implored her

to give me.
i;qtvaqted

She had promised, then


I

now pressed

her for

it

with more eagerness. She complied;^,!

84
seized

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
it
;

and taking the chain from


it

her neck, she fastened


I

around mine.
ne-

called her

my Augusta I vowed
leave her. "
all I

ver, never to

"

Rememmore

ber," she said,

have done for


I

you
for

it

is

strange,
I

but
felt

feel

you, than

ever

for

any one."
;

The door opened


re-entered
to

rather suddenly

the servant withdrew confused, then


;

and

in

hasty voice,

my
I

astonishment, announced din-

ner.

had certainly forgotten both


I

the hour and where


ville

was.

Lady Orbe

said,

" That
is

man

will

my
me.

ruin.

He
I

Lord

Orville's servant,

and

fear his

spy.

He

hates

Oh

Graham, do not leave me again

so long, I

am

so miserable."

made

GRAHAM
a thousand

H A:\riLTOX.

85

excuses,

promised next

day

to call

without

fail,

and upon the


a point of
to

night of the ball to

make

being there early.

She asked
1

have

her portrait again, but


confidence, for
1 felt

refused with

secure she wish-

ed not what she asked.

The man
I

the gentleman in waiting,

believe

he was called who had interrupted


us so inopportunely,

looked at

me

very earnestly and with rather a con-

temptuous expression,
he accompanied
let

thought, as
stairs

me down
I

and

me

out of the house.

cared not

for his looks, for

but

had more cause

anxiety on that score than at that


I

time

was aware

of.

86
iiTt,.ff->7-

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
-ifirfTt-T'^iD

tpfR vf+nnt^

CHAP. ly/.

Upon my return home, Sir Malcolm informed me in a querulous tone of


and disappointment, that the Captain
Gertrude were not arrived.
greatly relieved at this
I

felt

intelligence,

but the next day, about eleven o'clock


1

was somewhat abruptly


I

told that

they were come.

hastened out from

the back of the house, and ran along


the street, in order to postpone the
first
I

interview

but a few hours

after,

accompanied

my

uncle to the lodgfor

ings he

had taken

them, to meet

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

87

very reluctantly that Gertrude whom Alas how I had once loved so well.
!

was

changed since then, and how


to find

hoped

her a stiffness or
that might
dis-

vulgarity of

manner

gust

me

north-country accent

an unbecoming freedom, or awkward

ing to one of my refinement


events, a

simplicity

a vacant laugh,
want of that
air

displeas'Or,

at all

of fashion,

that high-bred
soft address,

courtly manner,
I

and
to
if

which

had learned
But, as

consider so indispensable.
to plague me.

Miss

Clairville herself

had never appeared half so captivating, so seductive in air and manso


lovely,
ner,

as

my

Gertrude.

Yes,

it

was

my

Gertrude

for

with the joy she

88
felt

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
at
I

seeing

me,

tears mingled,
to'

and as
in

clasped her
first

my
of

bosom,
meeting

the

transport

again,

the

blush

of eonfusiori'; 'tHe

smile of surprise,
told

me how
to

told t'thoiignt'it
I

much

was

still

preit

ferred

every other.

For was

not deep attachment that had tempt-

ed her so

far

from her native home in

search of one
grateful

who had appeared unand inconstant? What'Biu


could

attachment
pride

have

offended pride deeply


by

conquered
humi-*'

liated

my

cold,

my

cruel neglect t^*

What

too had refined her manners,

her form, and rendered those cheeks

which rosy health had once adorned? Did she not tremble, did
pale,
l)nu
I

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
sh,e

89

p9t

lips

weep on my bosom, as her met mine? and did she not


the words,

breathe out

"

Graham,

you have not then forgotten me," with


an accent that awoke corresponding
tenderness in

my

heart

My
this

uncle Malcolm,

who witnessed
in

scene, and

was better read


I

human

nature than

had sometimes

thought, gently withdrew her from

my
his

bosom, but only own.


I

to place her
after

upon

asked

mother

my

my

father
;

and

heart was
y^jt^

full

wept
1/

with Gertrude,

smiled

when

looked upon her countenance.

Capt.
coldly,

Hamilton

at first received

me

but, seeing

me

thus affected, he took


it

my

hand and wrung

with tender-

90
ness:
rents

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

he

told

me

that

were

well

that
me

my

dear pa-

they

would
this to

have been glad long before

have seen

me
he

that

my

father

had
;

desired him to give

his blessing

and

then

sighed

deeply /^'^tiiSk

paused, and looked upon Gertruae.


I

understood him, and

felt

the re-

proach.
to

Former scenes of home came

my
all

remembrance

attachment

her

my promises of
love

innocent

-^
;

and

the vain-glorious joys of the

world

in a

moment were

forgotten.

Gertrude,

who had

at first so

openly
ap-

discovered her real feelings,

now

peared embarrassed:
turned towards

som heaved

she

her '^yeS'wfere the ground her bolooked


mournful.

GRAHAM
pale,j

IIAMILTOX.

91
al-

dejected she was greatly

tered, I thought; but every alteration

had only rendered her more


ing,

interestI

more

lovely.

Whilst

gazed
d

w.^th tenderness upon her, that d

fellow

young Marriot was announced. He entered, and I was at once convinced by his manner, his approach,

that he

considered himself sure of

.Gertrude's hand.

He

did not seem

even to entertain a doubt

he was
:

he

not the timid, the anxious lover

no

was the happy,


I

the

acknow-

ledged bridegroom.

looked upon

Gertrude, and assuring myself from


her coldness to him, and her timid,

embarrassed glance at me, that she


LS

(Unchanged, that

alone

was be-

92
loved,
it

GR/liAM
I

IIAAr'TfltON^!

resolved,

cost

it

what
Vi^bula)

might, frown or die ivWo

to

make known my sentiments on the very moment to my uncle, and


to regain the

woman

adored

the

precious prize, which

had so nearly

thrown away.

What
?

to

me was Mr.

Marriot's happiness
!

Presumptuous
!

young man he to possess Gertrude Never and I could not but feel dis!

gust and indignation at his calm and

easy assurance.

With
T

me

to

think

was
for

to

act.

wrote no

letter

wailed

no op-

portunity

concealed no part of my but as soon as Mr. Marriot feelings


left

the room, poured out


to

soul

Gertrude

declared

my

whole
that
I

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
lived but in the

93
call-

ing her

mine

that

hope of one day


I

would die

sooner than see her hand bestowed

upon another;
violence,

that they
me
all

knew my

and mi^ht dread the conseto acts of

quence of driving
ration.
I

despe-

spoke with
all

the ardour of

a lover, with

the eagerness of inI

temperate and overbearing youth.

menaced

the destruction of

my rival
the
that I
to hea-

knelt before one

uncle grasped

hand of the other


had been a
ven
I

confessed
vowed
1

truant, but

would die were

not heard, or

yvere nxy suit rejected.^^J cpi^sidered


Eio

one's feelings

for whose

could be

^o deeply interested as mine? .Sir Malcolm absolutelv laughed


:

94

GRAHAM

HAMILTON".

with delight when he heard me.

The

Captain began twenty haran^n'^^, aiM"^

was always interrupted.

Gertrude
t<9*

changing from pale to red, and red


pale, turned

alternately her eyes to

them and
alone

to

me; and Mr. Marriot, who


scene,

was absent from the

was
to'''

now

perceived the sole obstacle


:

our happiness
that Gertrude
to

for

who

could not see

was ready, nay anxious,


all I

consent to

proposed?
?

" And^'^

should he be an obstacle

away with
I

him!
"
let

will

speak with him,"

cried;

me

settle

with himlet

me"

The Captain at once interrupted me: There was no need he would manaire
every
thing;,

he

said.

He would

leave^^'

town I should

follow afterwards.

No

GRAHAM

HAMILTON'.

95

word should be breathed


tl^e,

at present of

change

his intentions.

There

was much
the
fair
;

delicacy,

much

nicety in
this
af-

manner of conductinobut Gertrude,

who never had


had
yet
ap-

yet,

consented

never

proved the marriage, should

finally

inform Mr. Harriot that she could

ngt agree to it. I have done I*


said

so

before

this,"

" Gertrude; Oh,

though Gra-

ham had

forgotten me, think not I

ever had consented to marry another.

Mr. Marriot knows

did
his
I

not

he
half

knows
ment.

cannot

return

attach-

My

hand was,

fear,

promised
heart,

by

my

father but

my
they

who can bestow?

Had

06

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
me
to
it, it

over-persuaded
killed

must have

to his

The Captain strained her bosom. The whole party were


me/'

now

in ecstacies,

when

Harriot's re-

entrance into the apartment in which


this

scene had been discussed ao-ain o

threw us into consternation.


Gertrude's manner was cold.

The

Captain entered upon his most weaH-

some stories well


again. Sir

remeriiberecl'them
as

Malcolm shut his eyes, so


I

to perceive nothing.

looked embar-

ral^d, and

felt

furious.

Mr. Marriot

was

as calm, as satisfied, as easy as

ever: his loud and not disagreeable


voice discussed public matters carelessly.

He

talked of the dearness of

provisionssaid he should have no

i-lV*

GRAUAM HAMILTON.
objection to live a
in

97

London

and

month every year


then,

simpering,

asked Gertrude what her ideas were

on that head.

She

turned

away.

My
ful

uncle,

alarmed, desired
;

me

to

return

home with him

and so

fear-

was he during

the whole of that

day, least a quarrel should take place

between me and the young farmer,


that he never suffered
his sight.

me

to

be out of

As soon
ment,

as

entered

my own

apart-

in the evening, the portrait of

my eye as it lay half concealed in my unlocked desk. I coloured, and turned my eyes A feeling of deep away from it.
Lady
shame and regret oppressed me
VOL.
II.
;

Orville caught

but

98
I

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

blessed
oh,

my

lot that I
I
I

was

still

free

for,

had

deeply

had
?

involved myself more


forgotten Moncrief's

advice,

what now would have been


I

my

feelings

resolved immediately

to restore

so

dangerous a

gift;

to

write a frank avowal of

my

attach-

ment

to

Gertrude
;

to

return with
to

her to Scotland
for the rest of

and

renounce,

my

life,

every folly

and every

error.

This resolution having been made,


1

took up

my
1

pen

to

execute

my

in-

tention,

when my

uncle broke in upto con-

on me, and

had only time

ceal the portrait, and follow


his little parlour.

him

to

There

found the

Captain; and a grave discussion took

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
place as to
all

99

that

was

to

be done.

This conversation did not terminate


until a late hour,
it

but

I retired

from
satis-

with a

spirit

more calm and

fied than of late.

Tired out with two


I

wakeful nights,

slept deeply,

and

dreamed

of

home and former

times.
in
I

The ensuing day a note written fair Italian hand awakened me.
it,

read
in

and placed
It
I

it

with

its

fellows

my desk.

no longer gave

me any
style

emotion.

now thought

the

affected, and, as soon as I could, has-

tened to Gertrude.

Every hour of
I

my

time was engrossed by her.

saw and watched her with

solicitude,

with jealousy; and Harriot's presence

rendered

me

miserable, lor

could

f2

100

GRAIiAM HAMILTON".

not Dring:

my self

to

oeheve that a

man

in love
if

could look so happy as

he did,
It

he were quite without hope.

was lyiiUciw-v^^is' tLvfeffli


Captain's
short
all

the

stay,

he

and
curi-

Gertrude should see

that

was

ous and interesting in London.


course
I

Of

was eager to accompany her but what was provokevery where ing, Mr. Harriot still followed, as
;
..
. .

.1

,..,.

calm, as happy, and friendly with


as before.

me
ar-

The

Captain's affairs were

now

ranged,' and the

day drew near on which they were to leave London and

reiurn into Scotland.


fore her aeparture
1

The evening befull

had a

and un-

t'eserved conversation

with Gertrude.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
I

101

threw myself upon her generosity,

gicknowledged

my

<e):rprs, bj^t
:

did not

name Lady
hint that
other,^ and
1

Orville

I did

not even

had ever thought of anGertrude knew not

how

to

su^.pectjealousy harboute|j^^riot^m
her pure heart.

My
;

presence had
she trusted im-

removed her doubts


plicitly

to

my
I

professions.

How

can

have the heart to dwell


her inno-

upon these moments to paint

cent happiness, her thousand chgr^BS?


-.TO

With

what tenderness, with what

modest expressions of affection she and oh, when she said heard me
|

she.,lov^4
gentle,

me - loved
^

yet

how

b^t ^me^^^ chastely pure each


.

look, each

word appeared

How deep

102

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
when
I

the blush

called her mine,

and

pressed her to

my bosom how
which no
!

calm
pas-

that heavenly brow,

ill

sions ever had defaced


It

was

finally

arranged

that

should not accompany them, but

fol-

low them

in a

few days

and that an

opportunity should be taken, during


their journey

upon their arrival, of explaining the whole affair to Marriot in such a manner as might least
offend his pride, or
ings.
*'

or

wound

his feel-

Harriot

will

never
said

break

his

heart as

you would,"

my

uncle,

chuckling as soon as they were gone,


''

that

is

one comfort he will never


;

break his heart

and the

girl

has

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

103

never broken her promise, since she


never gave one.
fellow
self;

you brought
however, you
I

But you are a sad


it all

will

upon your be wise in


thus a proagain

future,

know."

And

spect

of

happiness

opened

before me.

104

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
;Ia 1

i3ni5

^ioa
f[ft

qh

f,om
o'l^qd'i

fi'/Kfl

rftn'^l

'<(iy

/3

oDiJ'iJ'iOU

CHAP
tmY
'

v^^"^*^^^
fi^'it

mloolijl/
hnlfil

rf"tfT/

No
than
all
I

sooner was

Gertrude
uncle

gone,
for;

thanked

my
me
"

warmly

his kindness;
to
it

and urging him

to
a

add

" Let

follow her instantlet

ly," I exclaimed,

me be

in Scot-

land, at

my

father's, before

her arrival.
i

will travel slow, will tell .W;ii-. ,Y/OT(Ofnhis long stories. Sir, and, after all the
,
.

The Captain
/.OfiJ

anxiety
serves
Yf

have given her, she de,flom7/


t

Be-, ./on ^nr/rv sides, I see Harriot is a good-natured

some proof of devotion.


sn

mass of

flesh

and blood, who


ill ;.

will

not take any thing

therefore, fear
1

GRAHAM
me
not,

HAMILTO>r. 105 ,v:0TJlMAH MA-HAHv and I shall fret myself to


:

death

till

have made

my

beloved
Sir

Gertrude

every

reparation."
aside; his eyes

Malcolm turned
filled

were
is

with tears.
right

" Your heart

in

the

place,

my
I

boy," he said,

" after all; yes, you shall go

and
?

who knows but


I

may

go with you

have some
^,f
r^
-t

little
Ar/^ol

matters to settle

:,..,_ -t.^rl

the

day

is

too far advanced to set

out

now
it's

let

us sleep upon the plan;

and

my

idea, that if

you do not

change your washes to-morrow, they


shall not

be thwarted because your old


approaching to his 71st year,
,^ '

uncle
-,f|

is

hey,
ral of

,1)

to

lad

saying wnich,

too'iq o/iK*'^

advibf
re-

he

turned to his papers, givmg

me

seve-

them

to finish, and, at the

same

TO

106
time,

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
permission to

go and secure

places

by the mail, charging me to take care to make a good bargain, and

not pay a penny more than the regular fare.

With
full

spirits elated,
I

with
too

my

heart
to

of Gertrude,

was

happy

give pain to any one, and

Lady

Orville

having

written

to

me

repeatedly

during the
events to
I

week

to intreat

me

at all

see her for one


call

moment,

upon her during the few remaining hours I had left,


resolved to
to

restore

the

portrait,

to

explain
to

my

situation,

and

immediately

follow

my
I

Gertrude, and

make her

mine.
land

called,

therefore, in Port-

Place.

Lady

Orville

was

at

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
home
;

107

but the servant hesitated, and " Are said she could not see me. you
sure of it?" I replied, secure that she

would be glad

to

do

so, if

she

knew of

my

being- there.
;

" Take up

my name

at all events

will wait Ibr her an-

" swer."
'*

dare not interrupt her."

Interrupt her!

How
"

is

Lady Or-

ville

engaged?"
is

My

Lord's

man

of business

with her Ladyship."


into

The anti-room,
vanced, was
tors,
full

which

had ad-

of clamorous credi-

surly

servants,

and workmen

who were
lamps the

decorating with roses and


the hall. pilasters of
I

re-

solved to wait the departure of the

lawyer, but as

was never remarkI

able for patience,

was

just walking

108

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
I

away, when

perceived Lady Deii-

mont's carriage driving to the door.


I

hastened towards

it,

but Lady Den-

mont would not look upon me.


This coldness provoked me, and the

whole scene revived


feelings of interest

in

me the

keenest
I

and

solicitude.

hurried to the next coffee-house, from

thence addressed to Lady Orville a


note couched in the most vehement

language,

and remained hour

after

hour, awaiting her reply in the ut-

most impatience and

agitation.

It

came

late,

and contained but these


i^^y
I'^-^ii^

iW^A^

I have plete

-MDifii'^li^"^'

i^

comI

undone myself, and,

fear, involved you.


l}ft9

Come

to-night to
it

WliT^p^k^'^'^ you forgotten

Mith

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
all

109
?

else I

bade you remember


as possible

Speak
take

to

me

as little

I will

some opportunity of explaining myself."


'^^

iioqij jiijoi

Jua

i>i{

She has heard, then, of my intended


^marriage, I thought

and

still,

gene-

rous

woman
is this

she wishes to see me.

And

the ball,

upon which she

had so

set her heart, her final adieu

to the world, her last scene of splen-

dour and magnificence, surpassing


that

all

had preceded
after.

it

all

that should

come

had

faithfully

promised
I fail ? if I
I

her to be there,

why

should
;

had much to say


'^see

to her

and

could

her''d' WofA'fe'fit before

theldofe-

pany
tion
:

arrived,

it

would

be' a satisfac-

to

leave her in suspense, and

110

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
she
is

when

unhappy, would be unto a stranger,

grateful.

Her kindness

to a person

wholly unknown, should

not be returned in such a manner.

The bearer waited


wrote
"
in haste

for the

answer.

1
:

nearly these words

My

dearest

Lady

Orville

wish

for a

moment's interview

to explain to

you the cause of my apparent


tion to your

inatten-

commands
in

will wait

upon you early

the

evening, in

hopes of seeing you before the com-

pany

arrive, as 1

must leave town


I

for

a short time to-morrow."

delivered

the note to the servant, and returned

home

to dress.

When

Sir

Malcolm met me, and

heard that, instead of having taken

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
a place in the mail,
ball,
I

Ill
to a

was going

the pen dropped from his hand,

his

paper

fell

from

the table,

and

he went

off into

such exclamations

and declamations, upon


sistency,

my
I
;

incon-

that

thought
to get

should

never

be able

away

how;

ever his usual good-nature prevailed

and before

went he

said,

" GraI
I

ham, your union with Gertrude


have fixed
trust
ball,

my

heart upon,
:

but

you entirely

go therefore to the

but return as soon as you can."


detained

He had

me

so long with his

lecture, that I

was

in the

utmost ap:

prehension of being too late

dressed

myself as speedily as

could, placed

Lady

Orville's

portrait

and

chain.

112

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
I

which

had before taken

off,

around

my

neck, and set out, swearing the


at the

whole way
for not

hackney coachman,
anp^iji^y

breaking his

own

neck,

till! arrived in

Portland Place.

fi

io1

,bfjBf^ <ifid

narn

ijsl

ot

jjjd
^,i.
nni-.lcji'u

9-

9/nit
l-jj

A
;IJ

i>iiJ

'iifiqaob

idcjo'i

1b90
ifh

rT0rtin1?f"tn;2 hrrr? v^'^tfrn

ofdoa

9fli

lo obi guoisna^
.0'rfj:tf,'n

silJ rnoii

r:-cit?'iid^

offT

nnrrnjfflto

^sgn

)fH'OTR

GRAHAM HAMILTON. 9d bh 3o n9>f^

113

r iii'irr^

CHAP.

VI.

There
men may be
to laugh

is

a time, as the wisest of


all

has said, for


a time to
;

things.

There

weep, and a time

a time to be merry, and a


;

time to be wise

but
is

is

there a time,

when

the heart

breaking, to

mask

the features with levity

and

to con-

ceal the throbbings of despair under

the smile of courtesy and satisfaction

The

stoic has

mastered

his passions,

from the generous idea of the nobleness of

human

nature.

The

Christian

has met death, and smiled; but the

114

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

cause for which he suffered was to

him of far more worth than


existence.
his country
:

his mortal

The
but

patriot has bled for


it

was

left for

woman
mere

alone, without a cause, in the

excess of vanity, to have appeared in


all

the excess of extravagance, and

all

the frivolity of fashion, on the very eve of the ruin in which she

knew

herself

about to be

lost for ever to the defor


1

lights of that world,

which she
could have

had sacrificed so much.


sympathized
in

her feelings, had love

impelled her; had disappointment, or

resentment ])rompted
had
it

the

display

been
;

to

win a new, or regain

an old lover

to avert misfortune, or
;

to conciliate popularity

but the most

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
frivolous of her

115

own

sex surrounded

her

and of mine,

for the
all

most part
is

men, who, forgetting


and useful
tion,

that

noble

in their lot
all

and destinaday,

consumed

their

not
vice,

even amidst the seductions of

nor in the indulgence of passion, but


in the fopperies of dress
ries

and the
it

foolefor

of affectation.

And

was

such as these, (no wonder they are


vain) that a

woman

like

a woman of superior
feeling,
taste,

Lady

Orville

intellect, heart,
effort

was making an

from a hardly to have been expected

devoted patriot or a Christian martyr!

Never was my astonishment greater than when, with my heart full, and

my

interest

I arstrongly excited,

116
rived at

G R A II A M H A.;m UTQN,
.

this

well-known mansion,
with a
Tbi^

for the,Jast,,titne ^9\^^ glittering

brief and temporary splendour.


brilliancy of the lidits withont

and

within, the pilasters ot^t,lp^e,l^l ^co-

rated

with wreaths of flowers,


in

th^

servants

splendid

liveries,

two

hussars stationed at the door, had attracted an


tors,,

immense crowd

of spect^j;

constables, linkboys, and piclf-

Vi?^i^if 'nm-jk^'^^^^^ equipage,

v^^

however, made
i^yself, as

way

for;

and

fpmid

was

my

intention, the fir^t

PSf:?" Avho^^ri^)^^^^^^^ n^jljtarj.band but the v^as pla^ying as I entered


;

npisc of Bow-street officers and foot-

|]^endrowgg^^9^(Jjnarred,.tl^^^W9SSft(^
spunds.^^g^jpaf;t^jr^,of,,desperate-lookiT

^^A^iiXW Sa^iiltox.
ing' ttien

17

were standing sullenly with-

out' 'tKe^'flb^ol-' of the hall.


their

Some
knew

of
:

countenances
I

remembered
I

where
-^Th'ie

had seen them,

not.
in',

savants,

who ushered me
active.

were busy and

The whole

scene was gay beyond description.


'*^Splendid
all

times.

was Lady Orville's taste at There was in her something


which the

of that ostentatious display,

new-made
exhibiting
baronial
;

sons of trade are fond of

but

still

more
is

of the old

pomp, which

thought due

to illustrious

ancestry

and ancient
libs-

clikom:

She WksJfi ^DOuWdl^^^

pitality, of a munificence,

inconsiderstill

km;'Wteiil 'and ill-bestowed, but


'

tri^^'feaB'^'IFry

Vhich

these

feft^fs

118

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
is

sprung was noble, and


rare.

now

too
to

She was not only unwilling

give pain, but to refuse any pleasure

she had

it

in her

power

to impart.

Nor did she seek


racters of those

for flaws in the cha-

who surrounded

her,

in order to enjoy the petty triumph

of excluding

them from those

enter-

tainments, they would otherwise have

enjoyed.

No, Lady

Orville's

whole

soul was benevolent.

Oh, how then could they bear


defame her
?

to

never heard her breathe

an unkind word of another.

The

knowledge that a human being was


unhappy,
at

once erased from her

miud the

recollection either of enmity

or of error.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
It is unfortunately too true,

119

and

it

has been already exemplified in the

course of

my

narration, that a crea-

ture such as

Lady

Orville

all

kind

and
one,

feeling,

wishing well to every

sympathizing deeply with mis-

fortune,

and anxious
led to

to relieve

it,

may be
and
to
selfish

commit more wrong, cause more misery, than the


Before
I

and the depraved.

finish the

sad history, upon which

my
me

imagination loves to dwell, of a being


as fair as nature ever created

let

at least have the melancholy consolation of holding

up

to

others those

great and generous qualities,


it

which

would be well
whilst

if

they would imi-

tate,

they avoid her weak-

120

GRAHAM

HAMILTON".
Let

nesses and faults.

me

tell

them

that neither loveliness of person, nor


taste in attire, nor grace of

manner,
can

nor even
give

cultivation

of mind,

them

that inexpressible
to

charm

which belon2:ed
all

Ladv

Orville above

others,

and which sprang from the

heart of kindness that beat within her

bosom.

Thence

that impression

of

sincere good-will,

which

at

once she

spread around

thence that pleasing


itself,

address which, easy in


others at their ease
;

put

all

thence that freefeelings

dom from

all

mean and petty


all

that

superiority to

vulgar consolicitude for

tentions.

Here was no

pre-eminence

here

was no appreby
the so-

hension of being degraded

GKAHAM
ciety of others

HAMILTON'.

121

here

was uo assumed

contempt

here

was the calm and

unassuming confidence which ought


ever to be the characteristic of rank
ja^^^.

fashion,^

j,).y

hen

this is

wanting,

and when, on the other

liand, there is

found every where an uneasy anxiety


fo^;

distinction,

a pining after petty

"advantages, a dislike of mixing with


the public for fear of being confounded

with the vulgar

when

these feelings
prevail,

and notions generally

they

are a sure sign also of the prevalence

of conscious mediocrity,

and of the

absence of

all

natural superiority.

Many
the

there were

who moved
her,

in

same

sphere with
the

many

who committed
VOL.
II.

same

errors^_^^n4

122

GRAHAM HAMILTON.^

were guilty of the same forg-etfulness of serious duties;' but' where was the
benevolence which could not bear to
humiliate
or mortify
?

which
all

ibund

every where, and upon


a pride

occasions;-

and a pleasure

in soothingy
?

conciliating,

and
then

in
?

making happy

Where
1

Avas

it

Where

is it

now ?
and
such

fear that in this narrow, timid,

little-minded age,
spirit left;
t

we have no
^..

luliiuBsd
1

^^'i ,.8w

iiiAs

soon as

entered the apartmerits^

she

came forward towards me, and,

without one reproach, welcomed


to her last fete.

me

The musicians were

tuning their instruments, the servants


yy^Qxe lighting

the lustres

but no one

Was expected, not even

the old ladies.

GRAHAM

IIAMILIOX,

123

and card-playing gentlemen, for an hcMri-"'^ Lady Orville was dressed,


and never

never had

seen her so

handsome as upon

that evening.

She

always looked best when her beautiful

long hair was braided, and without

other ornaments than diamonds.


^'^'Now
let

my

situation

at

this

moment be imagined let it be remembered how very young I then was,how very beautiful thie person

who addressed me
hope

and then
if,

let

me
it

for forgiveness,

feeling that

would give her pain, I broke all my resolutions and did not dare inform
her that
I

was immediately" '^otAgf' to


I

be married.

faltered out something

about having been very particularly

G 2

124

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

engaged the whole of fee^^fefi^^^^fo but smiling, she bade me say nothing
farther, and, looking
<*

see the chain

is

upon me, said on and as itwa&


;

given,

Graham, by one you

will possiit;

bly see no more, promise to wear


it

may save you when you are


forget

temp^ted
also
re-

to

yourself;

it

may

mind you of one whose short


quaintance has not,
ductive of
ill

ac-

hope, been pro-

to you.
in

Keep

it

it is

me, but I wish " Can I, can you to remember me."

perhaps imprudent

ev;ejci

^eed any token

for that pur-

pose?

Do you

believe

shall forget,

9XiqT?.?,o'^

s ni biiB

^bsofi^^'^'f^'
;

o^

In>K^as'

going to Bay, change


full

but

recollected Gertrude, and

of em-

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
barrassment turned away.
villie'

125

appeared also
little

Lady Orconfused. The


relief
;

entrance of her
tS^'l^oth.

son was a

The

child

knew me

ctasp^i^' KiiiT^'to'my' heaft;

and the

tears

streamed from

my

eyes.

She

sa^'liow deeply I was affected, and " It is sio-hed well, Mr. Hamilton,

we
so-''

should part

never behaved half

you have she enmany other admirers:" and deavoured to smile, and make light
absurdly
of
'

however,

what she had

said, ''cnsn

We

were

still

conyersing

when an
^dtes-

antiquated
ed,

Ladfj^^V^ry

firi'^y

was introduced, and

in a gossiping

tone began to apologize for being so


of being extremely early, from the fear

126
iH^

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
crowd,
to

which she added a


:

long story about her coachman

she

looked

much
it

at

me, and

could see,

thought
already.

strange that

was there
^

mn
numbers

^jh^^c

The company now began


in great
;

to arrive

and those whose

over-delicacy had induced


refrain

them
house

to

from
(for

visiting

the

of

mourning,

such Lady Orville's had


days)

been

for the last ten

now

gladly

crowded

into this palace of pleasure

and delight.

Lady Denmont and Miss Clairville came amongst the first but I could
;

not help ^^zing upon one alone


the iihoughi; that
Orvillc no more,
t

for

should see Lady


felt

and that she

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

127

and strong interest for me, engrossed


oppressed me.
^^^j^

Whether

it

was

that

was

feeble

from my. recent iUness, and out of I know not, but every thing on spirits
that evening offended and displeased

me.

The men seemed more extrava-

gant than ever, their manners affected, their necks tied up till they had constrained
nature.,
,

all

the ease and flexibility of


wpnie^n were
like,

The

exotic

flowers cultured in hot-house^^ delicate,

weak, pretty-faced, and unnastill Lady Orville alone was and unfaded, full of health and

_^tural.
..fresh

beauty and exuberant


the:

life,

with

all

charms that belong

to

human
ima-

,'nature,,^a9^^{^|uc|i o|,^^lia^|j

we

128

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

gine of celestial excellence.


fearful of fatiguing

But

am

you with these eter-

nal descriptions; for the actual events,

however they break up and destroy


every illusion of the fancy, whether
111

life

or in romance, are

all

you look
this
last

for.

For me, a witness of

scene, the pidture of


fore

it still rises-

be-

me,

still

dwells in

my rememb'i^utnoa
let it pass.

brance, and
^
,

cannot withdraw myself


;.!

from contemplating

V.

'^tl,).

r^nLiiK

it.

Yet

J>>iu1 bar, xl{> ^i't 't\fnhiv^\<i^. aijt drrf; It terminated, as all soon of late must
,

terminate; and the ensuing hour pre-1


,^
^ .

'lii

unexpected as theevenmgs entertainment had been brilliant.""^" <-'^'^'-"


1

sented a scene as mournful and as -X') to }'('/)] bsiBonqB 0((^. ,i%{\

nO

ybi.J

I-

i.;;jr;

he

company

retired
^''^p.

late I watch^
f^''~'^

ed the hats, feathers, diamonds, flow-

"iif'lV u-'fi"'^i^^x^^^

3f?v/ ^--r^d

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
ers faces, fans, floating

129

from the crowd-

ed staircase into the

streets,

the sun

had already risen all looked tarnish-

ed^ faded,

false.,"

The
at

light of the

morning vindicated
riority
i8S\

once the supe-

of nature, and like the touch

of the spear of Ithuriel


gtflr
;

shewed the
.

reality of things, distniguishmg

youth

from age, and health from langour, which had been somewhat mixed and
confused amidst the glare of torches

and the splendour of


if'.i'ii'iZ'-

silk

and

tinsel.
first

I also
I

prepared to

retire;
Ors'ille,

but

approached Lady
of
her.

^tc^^take

leave

She appeared exShe seemed irtremely agitated.


resolute^

S^||r^f>ed
G 5

my h^jf^
:

her

was cold and tremblmg

every

130
one

GRAHAM
was gone.

HAHULTON".

The

servants

en-

tered to extinguish the lights.

She

groaned

inwardly,
;"

saying,

...'^.See,

they come
I

and broke from


a

me
but,

followed

her

few steps,

turning round, upon hearing a noise

behind me,
of

perceived
:

the

occasion

her

terror

middle-aged

man

was remonstrating, sometimes civilly, sometimes angrily, with a number of


others,

who had
I

forced their
too

way

into

the

house.

soon perceived
officers.

they were the Sheriff's

They

were preparing

to seize beds, funii-

ture, solas, pictures, plate,

and every
odi od lUv/ Orville at

thing,

'f'

'

om

o3

amca

ml could not
such a

leave

moment

Lady

followed her to

GRAHAM HAMILTON
her

131

own apartment
within.

the
is

door was

fastened
thotight,

Just

heavens!

she

perhaps

meditadreadful
itself to
!

ting self-destruction.

What

meaning might not attach

And some passages in her letter what was the import oi farewell^ pronounced as she had pronounced it, when she parted from me. I now also
remembered, that
as she took leave,

she looked upon each guest with a

mournful eye

and when her mother


Bat-. r

had

asked

her

what hour she

answer had been


will

should see her on the morrow, her " All hours


singular,
to

be the same
I

me."

Full of the

dreadful idea,

hastened to force the


in

door; those

who were employed

132

GRAHAM HAMILTON;
assisted
in

taking dQj^jn.jlthgiittrniture

me

in

my

efforts.
;

We broke

upon

her last asylum

when, oh heavens

how

were.jv^^ (Struck upon.i^gpjog hftr

kneeling to heaven, and praying font


that
fortitude

and that
!,j,ii

resignation,
^.uj

she so

much needed

^-jcnuvx^
full^j

Though
upon
her,

the light of day shone

though the ornaments


still

oio

the night were

upon her neck,

she did not look the less fresh and


beautiful.

]Vor

was she offended

at,

my

entrance, but, turning upon


it

me

a
i

look so benignant that


cheerful,
,

was almost
myself,

she bade

me calm
their

an^

sppkftiwj^tjJA.^^MJlityi.ty

tl^Q^iiwho.
ungraciotiai

were employed'
^^"^y-

in

jftu8

oJ f^m lol

wiisd

ar

il

GRAHAM
^i interrupted

HAMILTON";

133
task^'^

them
I

in

their
'!<

and stated who

was/-'^

am
I

Sir

Malcolm Hamilton's
*'"'ttfyfortime
ifi

heii^,"

said;^""
^^^'

will

be considerable

you

will

forbear to pursue these


will trust to

claims, if

you

my

solemn
pledge
pay-

promise, this morning


all I

I will

possess, for your speedy


I

ment my uncle will,


sisJti''

am

sure, asto talk


affect-'

"

It is in vain,

Graham,
Orville,

stf^

wildly," said
1**

Lady

eft;

Lord

Orville's ruin is complete^^

Lam
ill

a lodger only

now, and a stranger

this

house
is

but sigVii<bt thus, for

my
ted

mind
^

made up

have spent

many

years already^^ifl^'all the


life.

folly

and excess' of 'thiS'M^lty of


better for

It

is

me

to

suffer.

Pro-

134

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

sperity and flattery harden the heart.

These gentlemen are not mhumaii<i


they are only performing a hard but
just

duty.

See, at least,

that

if

have
gance,
well.

out-done
I

others

in

extrava-

know how
is

to bear a reverse

There
all

me
**

in
I

this

only
are

nothing that affects

Moncrief:
I

!"

could

but see Moncrief before

go

And whither
going to

you

going??.

.)**il

am

my mother,
And
see

to

mont
you

assuredly.
shall

then

and then
for

Lady Den-

me only
;

every
it
is,

reason leave

me now
I

for,

as

your name,
breathed
period

fear,

has already been

with

mine,

and

at

this

your presence might do


'^'f

me

irreparable harm."-'j

fliv/

^.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
jiAs

135
little

she was

speaking,

her

boyp Avhom the noise had awakened in terror, was brought in to see her
the nurse

was

in violent

hysterics

the

boy only

called out "Dear, dear


Orville

Mamma."
bore
her

Lady
frame

no longer

her

upher

voice choaked within

trembled she
I

fell

into her attendant's arms.

the child up he pressed her that that kiss from her kiss revived
lips
:

caught

her^

child.

"

My
!"'

little

sweet
bless

boy
you

God
She

darling
bless

my
no

fine

you! God
more,,

said

but sobbed, unrestrained, the hearts " Oh Mariette !" she convulsive sob.
said to her maid, "

what

a desert oufj
little

dwelling will be without this

136

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

cherub!"
asked.

"Must he

leave you?" I

" Lord Orville sent for him


!
'

Oh Mr. Hamilton, some days ago. " m'r//^. vod^sfli biBa ,iyilJom iBoCi bv not comins; to me lor these ten
days past what scenes of anguish you have escaped? Your absence has done

me

a real service

have learned tp

depend upon myself for support, and no longer to cling to others I was too
;

much
all its

attached
vanities.
fit

to to
The
.

this

world and
-','

'<)

justice of

heaven
"-'

has seen
signed.
her.

to punish

me

am

re-

Tne

child again
!

embraced

"Oh! good God


falling
I'^Jm
o.t,

she exclaim-

ed,

on her knees, and clasp>nfi\ Jqfn')Jii:: toi: " how ^ 1 overing him to her heart,

rated

my

strength

And

did

think

r could part with thee, darling and loob tJllJ hlfui) ^llfi91^ 8BW Blifi.

J/OTJIMAH UAH AS],} GRAHAM HAMILTON.


i,
*

081 137

did a mother think she could bear iTiffi lol ine^ 9II1V1O biod to lose her own, her only treasure ?" " sweet " Dear mother," said the boy,

mamma,
jjov
rigiLi

I will

be so good always."
9n9-)^
Jjbiiv/ i^iiTj

evin

Lady
herself
despair.

Orville

-yvas

unable to support
to

any longer, but gave way

The gentleman who had spoken before,

believe Lord Orville's agent,

now
=9T

entered into conversation with


I
a\
'fo:

the Sheriff's officers.


the tone of his

Jtftai.fq

or 1(1 n33? ami voice, which was loud

perceived bv

and angry, that he was unsuccessful. " Oh, Milman," said Lady Qcyille, nllBf ^b;^ -gafib bflfi " do not to interfere,
"

,?.

faintly,
it

//Oil

"

attempt
. ,
,

is

aH

in vain."
^

She begged them

to leave her with


ba.<

ciosed

the

me a moment. They, ssat dhw haq muoo l She was greatly door.

138

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
Beautiful as she was, she
at
:

agitated.

threw herself

my
*'

feet,

and claimed
are involved,
**

my

compassion

You
said.

Mr. Hamilton," she

You
to

are

the cause of the severity

shewn

me.

she hesitated " In


lignant,
fall,

My

mother has been informed that"


short, the

ma-

who

are not satisfied with

my

are eager to blast

my

fame, by

attributing to

me

a guilty sentiment
exist.

which
is it

trust does not


?

Yet
to

not strange

wish you not

leave me.'\ ^*/,,My uncle, in one

mo-

ment,"

" could said, pay the debts

your

generosity,

your

thoughtless
;

good-nature alone have incurred

it is

but as a drop of water in the ocean


of his riches
;

his unparalleled kindness

GRAHAM
to

HAMILTON".

139

me

gives

me

every reason to hope."'

'Lady

Oi-ville

looked eagerly at

me

one

moment, then shook her head, and


said she feared nothing could be done.
**

It Avas

to prevent this embarrass-

ment," she continued,

"

wrote so

to see frequently to implore you

my
;
to

mother and explain


that I might in
friend

yourself to her

my
for

distress have a

who

felt

me

sent

^^du so repeatedly:
'in

for if

my

part

this

atfair

Lord Orville
dren; %'tid
all

were only cleared up. would leave me my chil-

would yet be
I

well.

care not what sacrifices

make

can

live

on the coarsest fare

could
I

'w6rk for

my

children's bread, but

cannot endure disgrace.

Oh,

Gta-

140

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
this entertain-

ham, how different was

ment from the one


myself.
I

had proposed

to

had, in the vanity of

my

heart, resolved to exhibit a scene of


folly it is true,

but one gratifying to


of

my

pride;

instead

which

have
I

received nothing but humiliation.

am supposed
not go on
:

to

be

I
I

dare not, can-

in short,

appeared

this

night in public to

silence the

most

cruel and false reports.

You, Graham,

you

though heaven

knows how un-

justly accused, are one causfe of Lofd' Orville's severity. ""^^^ Ji"^ ^a8^*^' "i'^

As she

said this she looked


*'

upon
save

me with
ybii,^

streaming eyes.

I will
1

or die,"* I' ^Scried, as

strained

her to

my

bosom.

Scarce were the

GRAHAM

HAMILTON'.

141

words pronounced, when I perceived that Lord Orville's agent had entered

had seen me embrace


:

her.

Lady

Orville sprang from

me m
and she

vain;

terror

overcame

her,

exclaimed, almost fainting, "All


is

now
once

over with

me !"

was

at

imprudence of which I had been guilty, and the steward said


ay\^j^e iofth^,

ironically, that her


^^J^U,,

Ladyship might as

accompany the gentleman who seemed so deeply interested for her.


1 seized

him by the

throat,

and thrust

him staggering from the room^

then,
ta^

recollecting the danger of remaining

longer with her, I made,

my way

the door of the apartment, amidst th^ sneers aad scoffs of the impertinent!
.

142

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
the ante-

footmen, and returned to

chamber
There

to witness the cruel scene.


I

again more calmly ofFeri^d

to secure the immediate the

amount the

officers

payment of were authot.j


consideT

rized to levy.
ration,

After a

little

having ascertained that

really

was Sir Malcolm Hamilton's nephew,-' that if I would give' they replied

them a warrant of attortmi, they would


immediately
imagined.
1

desist.

My

joy

maybe
fel*

ahnost embraced the

low who spoke the words, though he


looked,, Jike the arrantest

knave of the
re-

pack.

executed the instrument

quired, which an attorney,

sent for

by the
Jilt

officers,

prepared without the


'iJ>'5q

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
loss of a

143

moment, and

then flew to

Sir Malcolra?3 sdi ^^'^n^iv/ c1 1-

Hope
Lady
and say
all

pictured to

me
I

the joy of

Orville,
to her,

when
**

should return
relieved, at

you are

events, from every pecuniary disI

tress."

paused not to

reflect

how my
I

interference

would strengthen every


afloat.

base suspicion already


not even to remember

paused

how strong were how

the prejudices of Sir Malcolm, and

much

cause he had, at this particular


to

moment,

be displeased with me.

^'His servant

was

still

awaiting my-

return home.

He

said, that his

master
;

must on no account be disturbed

he

had passed a very unquiet night, ex-' pecting me. I would not hear the

144

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

suggestions of prudence

entered
in

my
that

uncle's apartment

and

a few
all

words explained, without


had taken place.

reserve,
I

What man

said

sufficiently

awakened
a

Sir

Malcolm.
could

All that
urge,
I

distracted
all

urged
Lady

that

romance and
I

passion
I

menaced knelt and implored


;

could suggest,

suggested.

as

spoke.

Orville's portrait, dis-

engaged by the violence of


tures, appeared as
it

my
it

ges-

hung around

my
too

neck.

Sir

Malcolm snatched

from

me with

indignation.

He was

angry to find utterance, and when


he recovered himself, his resolution

appeared so firmly taken, that every


shade of

hope

vanished

from

my

GKAHAM HAMILTON.
mind.
I

145

ventured
to

to

remonstrate
that I

warmly, even

menace

would

never see Gertrude more.

Sir Mal-

colm's head dropped upon his pillow

my

ingratitude

had struck him,

and he remained exhausted and almost


insensible.

His

servant interfered,

and desired
his

me

to desist

master farther.

from urging " Never but once,


I,

he whispered, never but once, did


the forty years
see Sir
1

in

have been with him,


so

Malcolm

moved, so offended

as now;"' and saying this, he tried to

draw me from

the

apartment

but,

remembering Lady
1 still persisted.

Orville's situation,

My uncle would
upon me
;

not

speak
ed

to or look

he beckonto

me
VOL.

to leave
II.

him

was obliged

146

Gil A H

AM

J^

AMI hTON

obey. His servant assured

me

should
thus

be

his

old master's death


:

jif id

thwarted him

went, and scarce

remember

the scene that followedv'


I

Like a maniac
streets.

rushed through the


in the city

The crowd

was

great:

every one was hastening on-

ward, each engrossed with his


cares, but all their cares together
light in

own
were
I

comparison with mine.

reall

turned to Lady Orville's house

was

still

there.

dared not to inquire


sufficient caI

^I

had already brought

lamity upon that mansion.


a coffee-house

entered
neAvs^.

took up the
to

paper of the morning, and


the horrors of
full

add

to
it

my

situation,

found

of paragraphs,

founded upon the

GRAHAM

HAmKfd'l^.

147
the

events of the preceding night,

most injurious both


OrvillepJi^

to

me and

to

Lady
ifiwiij

Whilst

stared,

stupified'^By' the
I

consciousness of the ruin of which

had been the author,

was aroused by

the arrival of the Sheriff's officer to

whom
He

had given security, and who

had found

me

after a

informed

me

that

weary he had

search.
visited'

Sir Malcolm, and that he


to interfere: that
fore

had refused

judgment had therebeen entered and execution is-

sued against
attorney
either
I

me

on the warrant of
I

had given, so that

must
his

pay the money or become


then" I

prisoner.

"

To

prison,

cried,

" or to

H 2

148
death
1

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
if

possible

!"

But

first I said,

must write
to

to Gertrude,

and

to

Lady Orville then checking myself. Why should I ? My disgrace will be heard by them soon
and the less they hear of me, enough, -^ '-^
'

iather

my

'

or from

me

-\'^

in future, the better.

b:,fi>^

therefore declared myself ready to ac-

company

the officer upon the mstant,

and, being desired to enter a hackneycoach,

was conducted

to prison.

a
jo/f B be
-iijjjii
',

T
ui

0^ is^ stK noY

tSRAHAM HAMILTON.

149

iD-^rl

CHAP. VIL

iiooa
**
i

HAVE
Mr.

often been
,

in

prison,'

.said

M
*',so

interrupting

Mr.

Hamilton,

that

you may spare

of the scene yourself the description


that followed
:

can fully sympathise

with

your present dilemma. Your other adventures have, I acknowledge, been


in a

sphere of which

know

nothing.

Love has never given


and
until I

me any

pain

came
I

here,

and wanted a housewife,


to avoid

took care

the chains

of

matrimony.

You

are yet young, Sir,

and the me-

'

bo
'-(^f

tfmtMli

'A

M H A U LTO X.
'

^tory

all

these griefs will,

trust,

before long pass aWay.


liyou

As soon
let

as

have composed yourself,


to

me

request you once more

resume
is

your narrative."
In the prison
ship,
I

suffered no hard-

nor

much

inconvenience;

but

the blow
heart.

was struck deep

into the

imprudence had blasted the character of an admired and


M}?^
i^ti

jyirtuous

woman

the stain

was

in-

delible;

every inquisitive eye

had

already, no doubt, noticed the paragraph, and every circumstance


so strong that there

was
hope

was

little

any

justification

would

avail.

By

few words the young, the beautiful

Lady

Orville's reputation

was

for ever

X:iRAHAM HAMILTON.
destroyed
;

151

no inquiry would be made

bv

the multitude whether the report


true

were

or false

no
The

trial

would

ensue in which the guiltless might


find
justification.

conscious-

ness of being innocent might console

and support her for me, and for the misery I had caused her, there was
no consolation. Gertrude too and
father

my

my
ra-

poor old father, whose


strict,

opinions were so
ther have seen

who had

me dead

than dis-

graced
of

who had just heard, no doubt,


intended marriage with GerI

my

trude

who,

knew from my

uncle,

ardently desired
think

it what would he
the cruel

when he should hear

intelligence?

152
}.,h^fr
.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
.;d

i^tn9V9
,

St^dw

.^^biIi

How

sli9,uld I
;

prove Lady Orville's


to,

innocence
I

how

,|;hgj

world should

attempt to prove

it?

Who

would

The ready ear is open to every boaster who betrays the woman who confides in his honour:
believe

me?

but were
ny,

I to

deny the hateful calum-

my words would be treated M^ith scorn, my protestations with laughter.


There
is

nothino-

so

terrible

as

gjijciety,

without the

possibility

of

arriving- at

any conclusion;
,^

nothing

worse than
*'^
.

-.

being: calumniated without

the

possibility

of justification
as

no

situation so cruel
solitude,

that of entire

when

feverish

hopes,

fears^

and eager

irritation torture the

mind.
vicissi-

From scenes

of such

rapid

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
TTP.TTn/r ATT

153

tudes,

where events

had

crowded
rapidity,

upon each other with such

HM

'

'

thatigfe'^to' loiiteHhess ancl


;

silence
too,

was insupportable

Sir

Malcolm

%hat had he

not done for

me ?

How

'l^id ^I'^'retiirn'ed' his

kindneFsT' what,

what would he think of

my

shameful,

my

inexplicable conduct?
for

Happily

me, to spare

me

the

agonies of such reflections,

a fever

came upon me. The delirium was violent, and it was several days bef(6re
youth and the natural strength of
constitution
prevailing,
I
.

my

recovered

my

reason and recollection

At length

as the

memory

of

what had taken


mind,
I

place recurred to

my

faintly

asked the person

who

attended me,

H 5

154

G R A II AM

II

JI I

LTO N"

if any one had' inquiiped forme.


.(Jjtjey.qf

Not
had
and

my

former associates
flattered

done

so.

Of all who had


was

professed, not one individual had even

inquired whether
It is

alive or dead.

seldom, in the course of years,

that a

man who
is

is

not in want of

money,

in the situation of
It is,

needing

common kindness.

indeed, very

seldom that any one, circumstanced as


I

was, can be exposed to such danger,

or subjected to such disgrace, that he

should consider the

visit

of

an

ac-

quaintance a favour and an obligation;

but

this

was now mv

case,

and no-

thing could exceed

my

disappoint-

ment and
all

mortification at finding that

who had

followed, flattered, and

G R A II A JM
caressed,

II

A M I LTO N
at

n65
apfol-

had

fled

the

first

pearance of difficulty
lies

that

my

were exaggerated that falsehoods were industriously


faults

and

spread against
error which
ilwhich
fore,
I

every had committed, and

me

and

that

had been readily pardoned be-

was now remembered and brought


for

forward

the

purpose of injuring

and oppressing me.


.1'

Full of bitterness and melancholy,

perceiving at once the littleness of the


great,

and the heartlessness of the


I

sentimental,

had thrown myself upon


still

my

bed

was

feeble

and

suf-

fering my thoughts had returned


from the delusions of
this vain life to

the contemplation of the

many

ad-

Vantages

had abused; when sud-

and Sir Malcolm, accompanied by


the generous Moncrief, enteredif^^''^-

The

latter '^^aH 'heard 'of ^nSy mis:

fortunes

he had returned hastily from

Scotland, upon reading the paragraphs

concerning Lady Orville and mVself,

which

he

fearfully,

yet
true.

hoped might not be


tracecf mi^^to'

He

fervently,

had

th^

^:)]ace ihS*vhlCh'T

%as
I

confined

he had been informed that


ill
;

'was "dangerously

and without

loss

of time he had souofht

my

iiricle,

and

informed him of

my

situation.

My

weakness was such that


pre^^fence
T

their

sudden

overcame and confor-

fused me.

looked about me,

getting

where

J. jv\^as,

and had some


them.

jgljffic^iUy

in recognizing

"Where

vi$

my

dear Graham?" said Sir Malshort,

coIm,|.i.a

sharp,

querulous

Moncrief. tone, addressing himself to

^^Y Here
^^g
tone,

Sir,"

rephed, in

a^f^ltev-

for I

durst not look upon

him.

.mk^n
.

said Sir Mal''Forgive me," " ^h' "^y ^^^^ uncle," I said,

|^,and offered

him

my hand.
nc^w^

Sir

Malcolm

rpressed

me

to his

bosom and wept.


conspjed
;

M<iu\d

not.

They

me

kindness ^exhorted =swith the utmost to agitate hme to be tranquil and not

continued myself by inquiries. They for several their visits and attentions could perceive from I days; but

Moncriefs^^imnper

that

there

was

158

GRAHAM HAMILT0N\

something- which pressed heavily upon


his

mind,

something which he wish>)

ed, yet dreaded to impart^ii''^

At length one morning, when my health was somewhat re-established,


"

We

must

lose

no farther time," said


;

Moncrief, firmly

" it

is

not for Mr. Ha^

milton at a

moment

like this to yield to

the violence of feeling

an

imperious

duty

calls for the

character.
self

Graham,
I I

whole energy of his


prepare your-

"** What,
?"

good Heavens! has


"
is

occurred
Orville"
self,

cried eagerly,
I

Lady
uncle

stopped,

checked my-

upon perceiving that


his eyes

my
I

had shut

up

at that name,*

and recollecting myself,


foi'

inquired

Gertrude

Sir

Malcolm opened

GRAHAM HAMILTOX.
his

159
to shed

eyes,

but

it

was only

more

tears,

and he again pressed


is ill

my

hand. " She


''

and

feeble," he said.

111 !" 1

cried, starting

up*' Oh, now


a fever again,"

AVe shall have


said Sir

him
;

in

Malcolm
tone,

but, in

com-

manding

Moncrief

implored

me

to

be calm.
will

e^otJil^qSaa-.J Malcolm

leave the

room," he

said, in a firm
'*

but rather

severe manner,

will inform

Mr.
has

Hamilton

of every

thing

that

passed since he was taken ill." My uncle said there was no need for his
going,

he

vv^ould

never

leave

dear

Graham's bed.
me,
that

Moncrief then told


read,

having

and

heard

from strangers, the report circulated

160
frir

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
Lady
-rnTTnrt.TT lAAHAfi'i Orville and me, he had

against

without loss of time hastened to town,


'^ith'aii intent either to

meet

mFas^
my con-

fofei'Or

a friend, according to

duct; that, when arrived, he had heard,


'

first,

that

Lady

Orville atfd'"Siyself
;

had eloped together


in

then, that I

was

prison

and, lastly, that I

was

dead.

He had

seen

Lady Orville*^

her mother's: he was fully convinced


of her innocence and mine.
fortunes

My mishim,

had deeply

affected

and the more, as they were irremediable


;

the

world
guilty

had pronounced

Lady

Orville

her
this

natn'e

waF

blasted
this

for ever in

upon

my

account.

world, and " Worse than


coiil^f-'

thi^; still

worse! aw^ks^'^^Bu,*''

Odi >rOTJIMAH M 161 GRAHAM HAMILTON, Dfifi 3d ,9m DUB 9111 " What *' niied Moncrief Gertrude"
1

(^fJ^&cV
"

interrupted.

Moncrief's
;,

voice failed.

My uncle
girl

sobbed aloud

The poor

could not bear

it,"^

^ajjl,^ir JVI^alcplm;

''she loved you,

Graham,
-^T^not

as I do, with her

whole

heart;

as fine

London

ladies love

she
they
friend

^^ijpst expecting you, your mither


too,

and poor brither Jamie,


a'

were

expecting us when a
aye a friend comes
in

rfor
what's

it's

to

a unpleasant

say

friend
to
tell

from

Edinburgh dropped

them

what had happened, and said more, th^t you had shot yourself upon the
discovery taking place

Graham,
it." irf^

the

poor
is

girl

could not bear


?

She

not dead"

shrieked out.

162
" She
crief,

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
is

not yet dead," said


'*

Monin

sternly,

but

it is

difficult,

such an
long she
ger
*'

illness as

hers, to say

how

on."

may

yet be permitted " To linger on," I

to lin-

cried,

what

is

her

illness? for Heaven^^

sake speak.

Has

my conduct oh,
all,

do not torture me, say

all,

for

il

can bear any thing now."

" She

felt

with violence," said Moncrief

" and
;

she bore up under your cruelty without an expression even of bitterness

but your disgrace she had not strength


of

mind

to endure,

and the rumour of


;

your death oveq^owered her


breaking of a blood vessel
I

the
"

heard no more.

Let those

who

have caused the death of the friend

OR>AHAM HAMILTOy.
they adored,
or
ill

163
rashness
I
felt

from

their

conduct, judge what


it

to paint
.Yfgs. tall
,

to

others were useless


to

it

that
I

can be conceived of

agony.

aroused myself only

have

my

heart torn by

who wept

over

my poor uncle, me by my bed, restmy

ing his head upon his hands, calling are heir out to me "

Graham, you
I

bf^every thing
child, take all
less

have

is

yours

my

my

than

money, there's nae and its a' million,

yours

if you'll

look up and be yoursel

again."
I

did recover

did get well

the

mind, under particular circumstances


can do any thing.

The

paralytic has

been known

to rise

from his bed, the

164

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
/^OTJIMAH MAHAflO
has spoken
:

dumb

and the

fear of

losing, my Gertrude, of not once ^vs 'jrorrt tort j?P7/ tj ,riO .<,ta'"^i8f| again seeing her of not once again

having

it

in

my power
ijj
^i,'

to

tell

her
I

how

dear she was to me, and that

was not so

guilty as she imagined-^-

aroused me, restored me.


discharged
son
;

My

uncle

my
to

debt;

left

the pri-

and we set out


i^i.^ij

for Scotland.

The way
.

my native home
when
I

seemed
Edin-

endless; and

I arrived at

Durgh,

when

gazed again upon


there

my
for

beloved
thusiasm
it

country,
within

was no enno
love

me,

left.

We
son

hastened
;

onward
like

to

my

father's

house

came

the
his
felt

prodigal

who had wasted


and
like
* /
*"

substance in

riot,

him
*
I r

kj liist

I should be received

GRAHAM HAMILTOX. i3fiG ;r'9i^oq^ md isrf^


by my
Oh,
;

V:OTJIWATT

I)

^dl 165
uuujf>

too kind

parents.
fity
I

it

was not

their sevetheir

feared

feared alone

tenderness, and the altered looks of

Gertrude.
fears
life

Alas

what matter
?

my
in

or

my

reflections

We

meet

the good and evil prepared for


it

us 'as

comes;
less,

some with more,


submission.

and some with


-fv

We
how

task our reason in order to determine hMv DfiG ^gaslbfl'a ,

beforehand
look,

how we
;

shall

act,

what say
its

but the heart knows

not

power,

and

nature

bursts

every bond and fetter


of
trial arrives.

when

the hour

arrived at

mv

father's srate Sir

Malcolm's feeble arm supported

my

more unsteady

"
step.

Do

not ask

166

GRAHAM
I

HAMILTO^f.^
said,

fqj:,

^Gertrude,"
**

almost suffo;.

cated,

cannot bear to see her yet

I will first

kneel before Captain Ha^j{

milton, and ask his forgivenes$^i"/

The maid opened


in

the door to us4i

answer

to Moncrief's inquiry
is

"

Our
i^hft)*^

young- lady
said.

little

better,"

The words were


heart.

a great relief,
father

to

my

In a
to

moment my
meet us
;

came forward
I

kneeling

received his blessing, and whilst

weeping on his bosom, he repeated " Thank the words God, my son is re^,;
stored to me."

My mother

came

too,

but turned away again, she seemed


unable then to look ui)on

me

My

brothers and sisters surrounded and

supported me.

*'

Father,",

."^ji}!

might.,

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
"
I'^^ay,
I

167
hfe^vdfi

have sinned against

and

in thy sight,
to

and

am

no more-

worthy

be called thy son."


I

In vain should
rest.

attempt tapaitit the


it

None
is

other can feel

for

who

there that has been loved as


I

fondly, '^'faithfully as

was.

Who
Is

can tax himself with such ingratitude?

"Gertrude

where
I

is

she?

she

better?" had been faintly pronounced"^

by

Sir

Malcolm.

durst not

name
they

h^pf'

they had prepared her,

said, to see
I

me

they led

me

to her.

found her seated by

my

uncle

Richard.
pale,

She looked very ill and and so changed, oh who could


it ?

bear to see

Not

I^

not hardened

she

my heart was

smiled, and held

168

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
if I

her dear hand to me, as not been a


villain
;

had

and her eyes,


tears,

though streaming with

turned
heart.

away
those

for fear of lacerating

my

Heavens, what reproaches were in


acts
I

of

generous
I

kindness

How when
ed
her,

trembled as

approachcontrition,

speechless from

shame, despair how did she kindly


bid

me

sit

near her, and in a hollow


if

tone of voice, and faintly, as

draw-

ing her breath with difficulty, speak

of her garden.

cannot continue."

Here Mr. Hamilton paused,

and
stern

wept without controul. companion was moved.


" Heaven
is

His

just," continued

Mr.

Hamilton, "and

my punishment, great

GRAHAM
as it
Is,

HAMILTON.'
I

169
giveni

was merited.

was

again to behold Gertrude's superio-?


rity.
asfain,
I

was permitted

again, once

to

witness her charms,

her

kindness, her disinterested sweetness,

even when tortured by a cruel and


dfedly malady.
I

was condemned

to

see every beauty increase and soften

under the influence of approaching


death.

Alas!

had not thought how


this
girl

much, how

faithfully,

was
;

attachment. capable of feeling


Sir

Malcolm, whose thoughts

no

sorrows could entirely draw away from


his

to

money, continued to enumerate my father and uncle the stores he

was resolved to settle possessed, and " Give them,' Gertrude and me.
upon
VOL.
II.

170
said

GRAHAM HAMItTOX.

my

father,

gravely,

"'to 'the

wretched

woman whose
;

ruin

Graham

has caused
the wealth

let

Lady

Orville possess
it

Gertrude needs

not.*'

He

spoke too truly, Gertrude needed


here
;

little

and her patience,

her

fortitude,
rise
in

her

calmness, seemed to
as

proportion

her

strength

decreased.
'

She rhiisfdie:
1

saw

it

plainly.

knew

it

from the
here
to

first.

There was

no'(i'ecepl:ion

no

flattery to be-

guile irorh
relations

day

by

false

day her surrounding hopes and delusive

promises

phrases and circumlocution


All in the
little

were here useless


mansion of

my

father

bespoke truth

and simplicity.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
It

171

was a mournful, but a

striking exI

ample of Christian
I

fortitude.

would
all

could bring

it

before others in

the dignity and sublimity of truth.


^,r

The few

first

days after

my

return

^he permitted me to support her into the garden, and place her upon the
bench
for a

few moments during the

heat of the day.


able to leave her
a consolatory

She was soon un-

bed she
to her

often spoke

word
;

she was happy

frien4|jaid but when she looked


in

upon me, and read


the agony of
stole

my

countenance

my

soul, tears

sometimes
still

down

her cheeks. Gertrude

lived: on that remaining


that faint flush-that
still

breath on
beating, ra-

pid pulse,

hung
1

in breathless anx-

172
iety.
I

GRAHAM HAMILTOX,
watched
there
life's

decay,

and
for

hoped,
hope.

when

was no room

The night before she died she desired to take the sacrament. Her
whole family assembled
with her.
I

to

take
I

it

durst not

yet

kneltj
it

though Scottish
not.
I

custom requires

knelt in token of humility of

despair,
ther's

and

prayed even as

my

fa-

broken accents ascended

in fer-

vent prayer to heaven.

How

sweetly

calm

was

Gertrude's

countenance,

when

thus she heard him.


in

Her hands
I

were folded
too, that

each other.

thought

when he prayed

for

mercy

on the
I

sinner, her eyes

sought for me.

was kneeUng by her bed she could

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
not see me.
throb my eyes
act of worship

173

My heart had
to

ceased to

weep.
;

The awful

was over

every one
and
apfather

but

my uncle

Richard,

my father,

myself,

withdrew.

My

proached Gertrude, and thinking, perhaps, he should see her alive no more,

he kissed her forehead saying, "


bless thee!

God
and

dear sweet child,

pardon him who caused thy


ings."

suffer-

The Captain took


said this,
to

my

hand

when my father trude made sign


her

and Gerapproach

me

to

she said,

happy The heat was oppressive. The physician opened the window. The moon

" Grieve not, cousin Graham," " I am T'.

shone upon the garden

looked for a

174

GRAHAM
oii^ fc'

HAMILTON".
hide

moment
mild

my

tears

^the

light, the fresh air

vive poor Gertrude.

seetued to re" AVhere is GraI

ham?"' sW^ said distinctly.


gled with

strug-'

my
I

feelings,

and approach-

ed her.
pillow.
us,

supported her again on her


father,

Her

and Dr. G.

left
I

and went towards the window.

pressed her lips to

mine she return**

ed the kiss with fervour.

be
was

comforted," she said.


short.

Be good Her breath

"Be
word

a son to

father fear God,

my

poor

cousin."
after.
I

She never

spoke

one

slight

struggle followed.

called Dr. G.

He

"

took her hand to feel her pulse.


It is
all

over now," he said.

Moncrief remained with

me throu2:h

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
the trying scene
;

175
the

he tore
its

me from

contemplation of

final close,

and

when

I foro-ot myself,, aiid the duties

of a man, his generous and firm friend-,


ship saved
...'^

me from my own
I

despair.

should have

felt certain, 'before-

hand, that such grief as

endured
I

would have
vounff,

killed

me;
the
;

but

was
of
^a

and
I

with

elasticity

youth

have recovered
to feel as I
in.

but^s j|
?

recovery

do

alone, un-

lav^d, unloving,

this cold
!

world.

My poor uncle Richard


v.ain.
.

he appeared
;

calm, and professed fortitude

but in

Human

nature

is

but weak at

best,

and he had no pretensions to

character

much
is

out of the

common

wav.

" It

the will of

God

his

176
will

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
be done,"

No
all

long stories

was he ever no complaints now


all
:

said.
;

was

at

an end

he was cut to the

heart at once.

Others pitied him,


left

but
I

had no pity

for

any thing.

obeyed, however,

Gertrude's last

words, and exerted myself to soothe


the sufferings of her father.

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

177

'trri/^krrf'oo

on
VIII.

CHAP.

Years have now

intervened since
I

these scenes of misery.

have buried

my

father.

have outlived

my
Sir

moMal-

ther and both

my

uncles.

colm's

death
It

shortly

followed

my

Gertrude's.

took place somewhat


I

suddenly

but

had the comfort of

London time enough to see him and shew him every care.
arriving in

He made some

alterations in his will,

erased poor Gertrude's name, and then


fixed his dying eyes on

me.
said,

"

Nephy Graham," he
I

" do

178

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

not leave

me while there is life in me; and when I am buried, have a care of


those
undertakers,
to
is

they

are

owre

given

surcharge

and

expend.

There
well

nae need Sir Malcolm, sae


iil^'^'

known on 'Change, and


mither earth
in

places, for a thrifty


to his

man, should go

muckle

finer

claiths than these

he has warn lang

syne.
said,

Take ye a' I possess :'* he "sorrow has taught you now a


lesson
:

wholesome
you are was before
for

can

feel for

you

as lone in the
I

world as
-

knew you."

The poor

old

man soon
I

after expired in

my arms.

Before
told

quitted London Moncrief

me that

he had seen Lady Orvilld;

she had lost something, he said, of

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
her beauty, but was cheerful
;

179
for

her

kind heart was alone engrossed by relieving


others.

and soothing the sorrows of


True religion enlightened her
felt
to,

mind, and she


but not hostile

independent

of,

a world she had

once loved too well.

Miss Brandon

expressed much interest in


but married a young
lord,

my

fate,

who had

been nearly ruined by his own extravagance, and was completely so by


his union

with an heiress.

To

divert

my

thoughts,

by novelty

and change, from dwelling upon the scenes I had witnessed, and the sufferings I
I

had endured,

I quitted

Europe.

pronounced upon myself that sen-

tence of banishment so often passed

180

GRAHAM

HAMlLTOJsr.
less

on criminals, who have done


than
I

wrong

have.

hoped that the hurry

of embarkation, the hopes, the fears,


the anxieties of
give peace
to

new

countries,

would

my

heart;
I

but the

moment
in a

of impulse over,

find

myself

new

world, with
Life,
its

all

my
is

old griefs

around me.

after all that has

been said of

brevity,

very, very

long, and more persons find reason to

complain of the slowness, than of the

Every event which happens, and every hour which passes, reconciles the mind more and
swiftness of
its

course.

more
man's

to the prospect of death.


efforts

If a

and exertions are sucwith having he pro-

cessful,

he

feels satisfied

attained

the

objects which

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
posed to himself.
he
fails in his
If,

181

on the contrary,
he
is

favourite views,

no ways

afflicted at

withdrawing from

a world, which has nothing to offer

him but disappointment and

regret.

In the one case he retires contented

with

his

own

glory

in the other

he

is

the scene of his glad to escape from


humiliation.
**

Pshaw!"
the

interrupted
reflections

Mr. M.,
of

these are

weak-

ness and despondency.

Do

not give

way

to them.

Life

is

well enough to

those

who

will rouse
it.

themselves to use

and enjoy
is
all

Recollect

how easy

it

to

argue as you are arguing.


all

At

periods and under


in

circumstan-

ces, in youth,

in age, in health,,

182

GRAHAM HAMILTON.^
in wealth, in

sickness,

poverty,

we

may

readily find

reasons

why we

should be content and even rejoiced


to die. to

There

is

always some trouble


to
,

be released from, some danger


it."

be avoided by

^q

"Ay," continued Mr. H. ''but


condition
it
;

my

is

such as

have described

and such, as
are

far as I

am

sure of
I

myself,

my
for

sentiments.
the

have

no prospects no
tie

future I have
it

on

earth

on

there
like

can
I

be no sympathy with one


can no longer worship
deceits as I have done
;

me.

life's

splendid

and

my

heart

has exhausted
of sentiment

all

the visionary hopes


love.

and

In

woman,
I

even lovely woman, how can

seek

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
for consolation?

183

have destroyed

the best and fairest of

them

all.

Even

the mournful resource of assuaging

my own
others

sorrows by imparting them to

is

denied me.

You,

Sir,

perceive, look

tempt.
it,

upon me with conYou would say, and I feel

that I have

drawn

all

my

miseries

upon myself, by the weakness of


character; that I have
trifled

my

away
errors

my

hour of

life

in vanity;

and the

deserved punishment

of

my

prrm has fallen upon me. " I am not so severe as you imagine,
Sir,"
*'

said Mr.

M.

offering his hand;


al-

and your story has touched me,


I

though

never

felt

any thing of the


are

kind myself.

Yet,

remember you

184

GRAHAM HAMILTON.
all

but young, and that


visions will pass
plaint
it is

these romantic

away.

Leave com-

and vain repining

it is

idle-

useless.

Cast your eyes forward,

infuse into

your character some ener-

gy, and be at length a man.

Look

around you on the scene that Nature


presents upon this vast continent.-U-

The
tall

plaintain

and palm shoot

their

straight stems
lift

on high, the moun-

tains

to the

heavens their summits

of everlasting

snow

the rivers

roll

down

to the

ocean their measureless

multitude of waters; brighter shine


the constellations in the clear skies
;

the condor, mounting from the highest point of the highest rock,
soai^^^

above the storms

all

things in these

GRAHAM HAMILTON.

185

the stamp magnificent regions bear

of greatness

let not

man

alone creep
familiar

with the

worm

in his

own

path, to be trodden

upon and

perish.
for the

You
first

are,

you acknowledge,
;

time independent
pride,
if

enjoy at least
pleasure,

the^

not

the

of

dearly-purchased freedom, that you

may
)

boast you have lived one modie."

ment before you


:^,*

All that

you have

said

is

true,"

replied

" and
mind

Graham Hamilton, mournfully


I

thank you

for

your advice.

I will exert myself,

I will

bend

to

my
me

circumstances

but
I

my
I

carry with

the heavy load of

self-

reproach, and in this

world

can

never

make

reparation for the suffer-

186

GRAHAM

AXmi'lTON.

ings I have inflicted.

Happy, most
it is

happy
to

are they to
so and

whom

granted

do

who,

if

they have

deeply injured one they loved,


yet,

may

by years of labour

or of penanceii

be permitted to expiate their errors

and their crimes."

THE, ^Np.

LONDON
.PRINTED BY
'I

It

S.

AND

U.
:

''"1

BENTLEY, DORSET-'JTnKK'rlJ
iijiij

uyA) 3iU

biiii

'(.'