Sie sind auf Seite 1von 48
IntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroduction totototo CommercialCommercialCommercialCommercial
IntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroduction totototo CommercialCommercialCommercialCommercial
LavenderLavenderLavenderLavender ProductionProductionProductionProduction
Propagation, Planting, Soils, Weeds & Much More!
By Dr. Curtis Beus, WSU Extension, Clallam County
Lavender Propagation The Art of Cloning
Lavender Propagation
The Art of Cloning
Propagation •Lavender should always be propagated from cuttings to maintain the true characteristics of a
Propagation
•Lavender should always be propagated from cuttings to
maintain the true characteristics of a particular cultivar.
Lavender grown from seed will not be consistent.
•Lavandins (Lavandula x intermedia) such as “Grosso” are
sterile and cannot be propagated from seed
•Some lavender cultivars are easy to root and others are not.
•Semi-hardwood cuttings can be taken in Spring or Fall (and,
if source
p
lant is
p
ro erl
p
y
mana ed can be taken nearl
g
y
year-round). Softwood cuttings may be taken in Spring.
Lavender tissue
culture is relatively
easy, but beyond the
means & needs of
most growers
Semi-hardwood cuttings
Propagation Cuttings Semi-hardwood cuttings Mix 50% potting soil and 50% fine perlite for new cuttings
Propagation
Cuttings
Semi-hardwood cuttings
Mix 50% potting soil and
50% fine perlite for new
cuttings to promote good
drainage.
Propagation Dip into rooting hormone Scrape one side of the cutting Bottom heat misting cool
Propagation
Dip into rooting hormone
Scrape one side of the cutting
Bottom heat misting cool ambient
temps, will speed rooting
,
,
Cuttings ready to grow
Depending on cultivar & condition, rooting
will usually take between 3 and 6 weeks
It is Critical to Keep New Plants Properly Watered
It is Critical to Keep New Plants Properly Watered
But, over-watering cuttings and young plants causes plant stress and can lead to various disease
But, over-watering cuttings and young plants causes plant
stress and can lead to various disease problems.
You
must also be sure to use a very “light”, porous planting mix.
In some cases of you could lose your entire crop.
Therefore, you must be careful not to over-water. Plants
should be kept moist, but not saturated.
Healthy Plants
Sick Plants
Humidity and air circulation are very important when young plants are being grown out in
Humidity and air circulation are very important when
young plants are being grown out in the greenhouse
Poor air circulation and/or high humidity leads to fungal diseases
Soils & Soil Fertility for Lavender
Soils & Soil Fertility for Lavender
Soil Textural Triangle Size of Soil Particles Sand Silt Clay .05 - 2 mm .002
Soil Textural Triangle
Size of Soil Particles
Sand
Silt
Clay
.05 - 2 mm
.002 - .05 mm
Less than .002 mm
Lavender does best
in well-drained, low-
clay soils
There’s More to Soil than Topsoil Topsoil A Horizon B Horizon Subsoil C Horizon Substratum
There’s More to Soil than Topsoil
Topsoil
A Horizon
B Horizon
Subsoil
C Horizon
Substratum
Nielton Very Gravelly Sandy Loam
Schnorbush Loam
Soils & Soil Fertility for Lavender Production “Light” Sandy, Sandy Loam, Gravelly and Even Rocky
Soils & Soil Fertility for Lavender Production
“Light” Sandy, Sandy Loam, Gravelly and Even
Rocky Soils are best
Soils MUST be well-drained
“Heavy” soils with high clay content are typically poor
for lavender production
Check the subsoil -- not just the topsoil – hardpans can
lead to poor drainage
If soils are not well-drained, plant lavender in mounds
or berms, and/or install a drainage system
It is often best to plant on slopes and high places in the
landscape -- avoid low spots, especially on more
poorly drained soils
If drainage is very poor, installing drainage systems
might be necessary
Soil pH should be between 6.0 and 8.0 -- 6.5 - 7.5 is ideal
SoilsSoilsSoilsSoils &&&& SoilSoilSoilSoil FertilityFertilityFertilityFertility forforforfor
SoilsSoilsSoilsSoils &&&& SoilSoilSoilSoil FertilityFertilityFertilityFertility forforforfor LavenderLavenderLavenderLavender ProductionProductionProductionProduction
Check pH before planting -- if pH is below 6.5, apply
enough lime to raise pH – periodically check pH
and add lime if pH falls below 6.5
Amending large areas of soil is very expensive and
often ineffective
If subsoil is compacted, fracturing it with a deep
chisel can significantly improve drainage
Conduct soil test before planting -- correct major
deficiencies
Nitrogen applied at 90 pounds per acre (split between
spring and post-flowering) can increase canopy
development in first 3 years
If used at all on mature plants, nitrogen should be
applied at no more than 40-50 pounds per acre
Over-fertilization may actually reduce oil yield and
quality and make mature plants less healthy,
hardy and drought tolerant
SoilsSoilsSoilsSoils &&&& SoilSoilSoilSoil FertilityFertilityFertilityFertility forforforfor
SoilsSoilsSoilsSoils &&&& SoilSoilSoilSoil FertilityFertilityFertilityFertility forforforfor LavenderLavenderLavenderLavender ProductionProductionProductionProduction
Over long periods of time lavender can deplete soil
nutrients and necessitate rotation to other crops to
renew soils
Keep organic mulches away from base of lavender
plants
Light colored soils, or mulches of white sand,
oyster shells or other light colored materials may
increase oil yields and improve plant health,
especially in more humid climates
NZ studies have found that the longest-lived lavender
is found on locations that have:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
north-facing mid-slopes (that would be south facing for us)
light, well-drained soils with low organic matter
high stone/gravel content
low active calcium
stable soil structure without compaction
low available phosphorus
medium available magnesium
low to medium available potassium
In “Heavy” or Poorly Drained Soils it is a Good Idea to Plant Lavender into
In “Heavy” or Poorly Drained Soils it is a Good
Idea to Plant Lavender into Berms/Raised Beds
You may even need to install drainage
You may even need to install drainage
Soil Preparation Sequence at My Farm
Soil Preparation Sequence at My Farm
Soil Preparation Sequence at My Farm
Soil Preparation Sequence at My Farm
Planting Lavender Mix 50% bone-meal and 50% composted chicken manure – add 1-2 cups Mix
Planting Lavender
Mix 50% bone-meal and
50% composted chicken
manure – add 1-2 cups
Mix bone-meal and chicken
manure with the soil
Cut the bottom roots,
especially if root-bound
Press soil firmly around new
plant & water immediately
Planting Sequence at My Farm
Planting Sequence at My Farm
Plant Spacing • - 7 ft. between rows – 4 5 - 6 feet most
Plant Spacing
• - 7 ft. between rows –
4
5
- 6 feet most common
• - 4 ft. between plants –
2
36” - 42” most common
• 2,000 - 4,000 plants per
acre -- 2,500 is the
average (3’ x 6’ spacing will
yield 2,400 to 2,500 plants per
acre)
• Adequate spacing is
necessary so plants get
needed sunlight, air
movement, and for ease
of weeding, harvest, etc.
Establishing Plants • “Harden” plants before planting in field • Fall planting best in mild
Establishing Plants
• “Harden” plants before
planting in field
• Fall planting best in mild
climates*—with bigger
plants (not plugs)
• Spring planting is OK,
and is often the best
option in areas with
harsh winters**
• Clip flower buds for first
2 years to get plants well
established
*Fall establishment is often better because it is often the “slower” season, and
because roots can get established and give plants a “headstart” for the next Spring
**Better quality plants are often more available in Spring, with a bigger selection available
Unless you know what you’re doing and have the time to carefully monitor and care for
them, it is best not to plant plugs directly to the field
Clip Flower Buds for the First Year,, and Possibly even Two Years!
Clip Flower Buds for the First Year,,
and Possibly even Two Years!
Clip Flower Buds for the First Year,, and Possibly even Two Years!
Clip Flower Buds for the First Year,,
and Possibly even Two Years!
Buying Lavender Plants • Plugs -- 72 plug tray $.60 to $.75 wholesale – about
Buying Lavender Plants
• Plugs -- 72 plug tray $.60
to $.75 wholesale – about
$45 to $55 per flat
• 2 ½” pots -- $3.00-$4.50
retail, $1.10-$1.50
wholesale
• 3 ½” pots -- $4.00-$6.00
retail, $1.50-$2.50
wholesale
• 1 gallon -- $7.00-9.00 retail,
$3.50-$4.50 wholesale
• Make sure to buy healthy
plants
• Know what type of
lavender you want before
you buy
• MAKE SURE YOU ARE
BUYING WHAT YOU THINK
YOU’RE BUYING – a lot of
confusion & mis-
identification of lavender
varieties
Cost of plants can run from $2,000
to $12,000 per acre, depending on
size of plants
72727272 CountCountCountCount “Plugs”“Plugs”“Plugs”“Plugs” 3333 ½”½”½”½” PotPotPotPot 2222
72727272 CountCountCountCount “Plugs”“Plugs”“Plugs”“Plugs”
3333 ½”½”½”½” PotPotPotPot
2222 ½”½”½”½” PotPotPotPot
2222 ½”½”½”½” PotPotPotPot PlugPlugPlugPlug
2222 ½”½”½”½” PotPotPotPot
PlugPlugPlugPlug
Irrigation • Drip irrigation is recommended • Irrigation is Critical in the 1 st year,
Irrigation
• Drip irrigation is
recommended
• Irrigation is Critical in the
1 st year, and often
essential in the 2 nd year
• Irrigation may
increase production
in mature plantings
• In dry climates, and/or with fast draining soils, irrigation will be
necessary, even for mature plants
• Overhead sprinklers are suitable for plants early in the season, but
once stems have elongated and flower heads are becoming developed,
sprinklers may cause plant and/or flower damage. There is also the risk
of bacterial and fungal diseases, particularly in more humid conditions.
• Although lavender is a drought tolerant plant, it often benefits from
irrigation, especially in light soils and during dry years – but, be careful
not to over water!
• Irrigation after harvest can stimulate added shoots for next year’s crop
• The amount you will need to irrigate will depend greatly on your soil
type, and on your local climate. I.e., hot, dry areas with sandy soil will
irrigate FAR more than cooler, rainier areas with heavier soils.

ERROR: stackunderflow

OFFENDING

STACK:

COMMAND: ~