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Foreword

The Air National Guard is an operational force providing vital combat capability to todays warfighter and a strategic hedge to an uncertain future. In addition, in its role as the air component of the militia, it provides essential capabilities to the state governors. The FY09 Air National Guard Weapons Systems Modernization Requirements book articulates the Air Guards modernization and recapitalization requirements to meet the capability needs of both constituents. This document is truly Warrior Derived, as the inputs were developed and vetted by the men and women on the front line at home and abroad. For fiscal year 2009, the Air National Guard has identified a modernization and recapitalization shortfall of over $8 billion dollars. Meeting the identified shortfalls improves our combat capability and domestic operations responsiveness in Precision Strike, Network Operations, 24-Hour Operations, and Enhanced Survivability. The National Guard works with the Air Force, other Services, the Department of Defense, allied nations, defense industry experts, and state leadership to find common modernization and sustainment solutions ideally suited to todays resource constrained environment. A recent highlight is our successful A-10 transformation, which resulted in the A-10A+ and culminated in the ANG being the first A-10C Precision Engagement unit deployed to Operation IRAQI FREEDOM and employed in combat immediately upon arrival. Our unique aviation heritage was born of pioneering individuals from the National Guard Signal Corps in 1908. In the early years, the National Guard was an avenue for aviation enthusiasts to apply innovation and creativity to explore military uses of a new invention. This spirit of innovation continues at the Air National Guard/Air Force Reserve Test Center to guide us as we seek to maintain the combat edge of our force. Today, the courage, commitment, and sacrifice of our Airmen continue to be a force multiplier and critical enabler as our nation prosecutes the Global War on Terrorism. I am truly grateful for the continued support you give us and our nation. Thank you.

CRAIG R. MCKINLEY Lieutenant General, USAF Director, Air National Guard

Table of Contents

Table of Contents ANG FY09 Weapon Systems Modernization Requirements Weapon Systems Reference Table by State Contacts TAB A -- A-10 Thunderbolt II Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Day/Night Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) Missile Warning System Digital Receiver, Threat Geo-Location and System Improvement/Replacement for ALR-69 RWR Improved Radio Communications Lightweight Airborne Radio System (LARS) Upgrade Engine Upgrade Advanced Targeting Pods and Video Downlink TAB B -- C-5 Galaxy Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Aircraft Defensive Systems (ADS) Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) Self-Protective Suite Surface-To-Air Fire (SAFIRE) Lookout Capability Check 6 TAB C -- C-17 Globemaster III Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Surface-To-Air Fire (SAFIRE) Lookout Capability Check 6 AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) Self-Protective Suite Individual Crew Position Flare Dispense Switches Stick-Mounted Expendable Dispense Switch TAB D -- C-130 Hercules Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List C-130 Executive Summary HC/MC-130 Executive Summary EC-130 Executive Summary LC-130 Executive Summary C-130 Surface-To-Air Fire Observer Rear Lookout Capability C-130 Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) Self-Protective Suite C-130J Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) Self-Protective Suite C-130 Tactical Data Link (TDL) C-130 Situational Awareness Cockpit Display Unit (CDU) C-130 Loadmaster Crashworthy Seat C-130 Digital Receiver, Threat Geo-Location & Sys. Improvement/Replacement for ALR-69 RWR C-130 Missile Approach Warning System Upgrade C-130 Integrated Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) Cockpit Lighting C-130Yoke Mounted Dispense Switches (YMDS)

i v xii xi

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

11 12 13 14 15

17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

HC/MC-130 Tactical Data Link (TDL) HC/MC-130 Enhanced Airborne Mission Commander (AMC) HC/MC Lightweight Airborne Radio System (LARS) AN/ARS-6 V12 HC/MC-130 Dual SATCOM HC/MC/LC-130 Electronic Propeller Control System (EPCS) HC/MC/LC-130 Eight Bladed Propeller Upgrade HC/MC Dual Rail Cargo Handling System HC-130 AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) Self-Protective Suite EC-130J Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) Self-Protective Suite EC-130J Real Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC) EC-130J SATCOM Installation EC-130J Wideband Satellite Connectivity LC-130 Crevasse Detection Radar LC-130 Jet Assisted Take-Off Program TAB E -- E-8C JOINT STARS Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Aircraft Viability Re-Engining Aircraft Viability - 8.33 KHz VHF Radio Aircraft Viability - Control/Display Unit (CDU) 7000 Prime Mission Equipment (PME) Replacement Communications & Networking Upgrade (CNU) Phase I Link 16& IBS Target ID Capability Enhanced Land/Maritime Mode (ELMM) Aided Target Recognition (ATR) Infrared Missile Defense/Self-Protect Capability Near Real-Time Combat ID Capability NCCT & UAV Integration TAB F -- F-15 Eagle Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Active Electronically Scanned Array Radar (AESA) Very High Speed Integrated Circuitry Central Computer (VHSIC CC) Plus: VCC+ Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems (JHMCS) Advanced Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) Eagle Passive Active Warning Survivability System Embedded GPS/INS (EGI) -220E Engine Upgrade Program TAB G -- F-16 Fighting Falcon Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Commercial Fire Control Computer (CFCC) and Ethernet Day/Night Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) Advanced Targeting Pod (ATP) and Video Downlink (VDL) ALR-69 Digital Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) System Upgrade Improved Voice/Data Communications Center Pedestal Color Display Advanced Identification Friend/Foe (AIFF) Block 42 F-100-PW-229 Re-Engine TAB H -- HH-60G Pave Hawk Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Multi Function Color Display (MFCD) Tactical Data Link Global Personnel Recovery System (GPRS)

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61

63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

81 82 83 84 85

ii

Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) Board Defensive Armament Upgrade TAB I -- KC-135 Stratotanker Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) Self Protective Suite Tactical Data Link Night Vision Goggle (NVG) Compatible Lighting Situational Awareness Cockpit Display Unit (CDU) Fuel Tank Fire Explosion Protection TAB J -- Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Integrated Predator/Reaper Operations Center (POC/ROC) Advanced Cockpit Sense/Detect & Avoid Other Aircraft Capability TAB K -- Operational Support Aircraft Overview Executive Summary C-38 Replacement Aircraft Program C-40C Procurement C-21 Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) Modifications C-21 Enhanced Mode-S C-12 Dual Flight Management Systems (FMS) TAB L -- Command and Control (C2) Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Handheld Full Spectrum Video and Ground Mobile Gateway (GMG) SADL Enabling for Joint Terminal Attack Controllers Tactical Air control Party M-1145 Up-Armored High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle TAB M -- Distributed Mission Operations and Simulation Systems 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary F-16 Full Combat Mission Trainer (FCMT) A-10 Full Mission Trainer (FMT) KC-135 Boom Operator Simulation System (BOSS) E-8C Mission System Trainer (MST) RC-26B Mission Crew Trainer (MCT) C-130 Multi Mission Crew Trainer (MMCT) Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC) Mission Training Engineering Center (MTEC) MQ-1/MQ-9 Desktop Training System (DTS) C-130/KC-135 Visual Threat Recognition and Avoidance Trainer (VTRAT) HH-60G Full Mission Trainer (FMT) Prototype ACS Control and Reporting Center (CRC) Simulation Package (CSP) DMO Connectivity Air Control Squadron Digicomp Air Surveillance and Air Control (ASAC) Rangeless Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation (ACMI) RC/C-26 Joint Weapon System Trainer (JWST) Joint Threat Emitter (JTE) Air and Space Operations Center (AOC) Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) Capability I-FACT Distributed Mission Operations Head-Mounted Display

86 87

89 90 91 92 93 94 95

97 98 99 100 101

103 104 105 106 107 108

109 110 111 112 113

115 116 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135

iii

TAB N -- Space and Information Operations (IO) Overview 2007 Space Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Space Executive Summary Combat SkySat Payloads Mobile Ground System Evolution Mobile Ground System, High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) Certification 2007 IO Weapons and Tactics Requirements List IO Executive Summary Network Warfare Training and Integration (NWTI) Range Mission Essential Equipment TAB O -- Airborne Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) Systems 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Senior Scout COMSEC Obsolescence Avoidance RC-26B Block 20 Software/Hardware Spiral Development RC-26B Beyond Line-of-Sight (BLOS) Data Link RC-26B Communication Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) Compliance Senior Scout Situational Awareness TAB P -- Pararescue, Special Tactics, Security Forces (PJ-ST-SF) Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Pararescue/Special Tactics Situational Awareness Modernization Suite Pararescue/Special Tactics Enhanced Survivability Suite Pararescue/Special Tactics Tactical Ground Vehicle Pararescue/Special Tactics High Altitude Equipment Modernization Special Tactics Mounted (Heavy) Capability Suite Enhanced Survivability for Special Tactics Combat Controllers TAB Q -- SENTINEL AN/GSQ-272 AF Distributed Common Ground Station (DCGS) Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Distributed Common Ground Systems (DCGS) Multi-Intelligence Distributed Ground Station (DGS) AN/GSQ-272 Sentinel (Air Force Distributed Common Ground Station) Homeland Security Enclave ANG Communications Management and Landing Site for the AN/GSQ-272 Sentinel AN/GSQ-272 Sentinel (Air Force Distributed Common Ground Station) Block 10.2 NV ANG Site AN/GSQ-272 Sentinel (Air Force Distributed Common Ground Station) Collateral Enclave TAB R -- Security Forces Overview 2007 Weapons and Tactics Requirements List Executive Summary Personal Protective Equipment M4 Rifle Upgrades M240/M249 Weapons Upgrade Mobility Bag Upgrades

137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144

145 146 147 148 149 150 151

153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160

161 162 163 164 165 166 167

169 170 171 172 173 174

iv

ANG FY 09 WEAPONS SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION REQUIREMENTS


PRECISION STRIKE
F-16 Avionics Improvements (Commercial Fire Control Computer and Ethernet) *Improved processing and bandwidth capability for future growth Ethernet Ethernet kits CFCC

Type Funds
3600 3010 3010 3600 3010

Units Required
1 358 358 1 102

Unit Cost
$7,250,000 $20,000 $70,000 $3,400,000 $83,000

Program Cost
$7,250,000 $7,160,000 $25,060,000 $3,400,000 $8,466,000

A-10 Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) *Provides a quantum leap in air and ground weapons employment and full sensor-to-pilot fusion. F-15 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Radar *Next generation precision capability to detect, track, and eliminate asymmetric threats F-15 Very High Speed Integrated Circuitry Central Computer (VCC+) *Increased processing and memory growth to support future F-15 requirements EC-130J Wideband Satellite Connectivity *Provide POTUS with the capability to broadcast to a target audience throughout the globe.

3010 3010

34 138

$8,720,000 $150,000

$296,480,000 $20,700,000

Integration Kits

3010 3010 3010

1 5 24

$2,000,000 $1,600,000 $570,000

$2,000,000 $8,000,000 $13,680,000

F-15 Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) *Provides a quantum leap in air-to-air weapons employment and full sensor-to-pilot fusion. F-16 Day/Night Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) *Provides a increased situational awareness and lethality while preventing fratricide. NRE HMCS Air kits HMCS Helmet NVU F-16 A-10 F-16 A-10 F-16 A-10 NRE Displays

3600 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3600 3010

1 283 514 415 23 7 49 16 124 31 1 358

$5,000,000 $270,000 $70,000 $100,000 $1,600,000 $1,600,000 $140,000 $140,000 $700,000 $700,000 $3,500,000 $100,000

$5,000,000 $76,410,000 $35,980,000 $41,500,000 $36,800,000 $11,200,000 $6,860,000 $2,240,000 $86,800,000 $21,700,000 $3,500,000 $35,800,000

F-16 & A-10 Advanced Targeting Pod *Provides precision guided munitions employment capability and target identification F-16 & A-10 Targeting Pod Video Downlink *Real time imagery transmission to JTAC/TACP F-16 & A-10 Targeting Pod Modifications *Provides 4th generation targeting/identification/recognition capability F-16 Center Pedestal Display *Replaces center pedestal with a color display.

TOTAL

$755,986,000 Program Cost


$9,180,000 $75,120,000 $8,400,000 $1,600,000 $2,400,000 $2,000,000 $1,980,000 $1,200,000 $2,340,000

DATA LINK/COMBAT ID
A-10/F-16 Improved Line-of-Sight (LOS) and Beyond LOS (BLOS) Radio *Enhances time sensitive targeting and coordination with ground forces A-10 (BLOS) F-16 (BLOS) F-16 (BLOS Conversion Kits) NRE MFCD NRE SADL NRE Group B

Type Funds
3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3600 3010

Units Required
102 313 70 1 40 1 18 1 13

Unit Cost
$90,000 $240,000 $120,000 $1,600,000 $60,000 $2,000,000 $110,000 $1,200,000 $180,000

HH-60 Multi-Function Color Display *Increases pilot situational awareness and aircraft data processing capability HH-60 Tactical Data Link (TDL) *Low cost data link designed give real time threat and friendly information. HC/MC-130 Tactical Data Link (TDL) *Low cost data link designed give real time threat and friendly information. C-130 Tactical Data Link (TDL) *Low cost data link designed give real time threat and friendly information. RC-26 Block 20 Software/Hardware Spiral Development *Allows mission equipment to fully utilized and accurate position information RC-26 BLOS Data Link *Adds the capability to pass real time data to ground based terminals. KC-135 Tactical Data Link *Low cost data link designed give real time threat and friendly information. C2/TACP: Handheld Full Spectrum Video and Ground Mobile Gateway (GMG) *Ensures effective communications across the battlefield C2/TACP: SADL Enabling for JTAC *Enhances transmission of targeting data from the ground controller to the attacking aircraft EPLRs Radios EPLRs Dual Power Adapter AC Power Cable/Data Cable

3010 NRE Kits NRE Kites Group A TDL Radios 3600 3010 3600 3010 3010 3010 3080

197 1 11 1 11 190 190 16

$200,000 $4,500,000 $2,100,000 $2,250,000 $1,200,000 $75,000 $60,000 $2,500,000

$39,400,000 $4,500,000 $23,100,000 $2,250,000 $13,200,000 $14,250,000 $11,400,000 $40,000,000

EPLRS Radio EPLRS Adapt Cables Misc

3080 3080 3080 3080 3010 3010 3010

48 48 48 48 1 8 4

$36,000 $1,400 $600 $6,400 $2,000,000 $300,000 $500,000

$1,728,000 $67,200 $28,800 $307,200 $2,000,000 $2,400,000 $2,000,000

EC-130J Real Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC) Integration *Provides RTIC/RTOC; critical to threat analysis/avoidance while limiting voice transmissions. Group B EC-130J SATCOM Installation *Provides SATCOM to remaining four EC-130Js for compatibility/interoperability. Group B

DATA LINK/COMBAT ID
HC/MC-130 Dual SATCOM *Provides two SATCOM terminals for GWOT. C-130 Cockpit Display Unit *Increases pilot situational awareness and aircraft data processing capability KC-135 Situational Awareness CDU *Provides increased situational awareness in cockpit JSTARS Aircraft Control/Display Unit 7000 *Provides increased situational awareness in cockpit NRE Kitproof/Instll Kits Integration Total 3080 Integration Group B

Type Funds
3600 3010 3010

Units Required
1 13 393

Unit Cost
$500,000 $130,000 $35,000

Program Cost
$500,000 $1,690,000 $13,755,000

3010

380

$35,000

$13,300,000

3600 3010 3010 3600 3080 3010

1 1 90 1

$12,500,000 $3,500,000 $55,000 $750,000

$12,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,950,000 $750,000 $5,060,000 $1,890,000

PJ/ST Situational Awareness Suite *Provides improved situational awareness during Combat Search and Rescue operations HH-60 GPRS *Provides improved OTH communications during Combat Search and Rescue operations JSTARS Prime Mission Equipment Replacement *Ensures connectivity with the future battlefield JSTARS Communications & Networking upgrade (CNU) Phase 1 Link 16 & IBS *Allows entry into the network centric concept of joint force operations Link 16 and Broadcast Intelligence Senior Scout Situational Awareness Capability *Provides advanced Blue Force Tracking capability for more effective force protection DCGS - Medium Multi-Intelligence DGS *Allows ANG to fully participate in distributed operations on a daily basis

35

$54,000

NRE Kits NRE Kits

3600 3010 3600 3010

1 18 1 18

$162,700,000 $8,260,000 $73,900,000 $2,800,000

$162,700,000 $148,680,000 $73,900,000 $50,400,000

NRE Kits

3600 3010

1 3

$500,000 $350,000

$500,000 $1,050,000

Total 3080 Sustainment

3080 3840 3010

1 120

$12,600,000 $180,000

$33,060,000 $12,600,000 $21,600,000

F-15 Embedded GPS/INS (EGI) *Provides global positioning for F-15 aircraft per Congressional Direction. DCGS - HLD/DSCA Enclave GUARDNET Integration *Allows ANG to fully participate in distributed operations on a daily basis DCGS 10.2 GFE Tech Refresh APX-113 Mode 5-60

3080 3080 3080 3010 3010

6 6 1 272 110

$2,820,000 $1,120,000 $7,000,000 $340,000 $60,000

$16,920,000 $6,720,000 $7,000,000 $92,480,000 $6,600,000

F-16 AIFF Kits/Mode 5 Upgrade *Upgrades ANG F-16 in DCA tasking. DCGS - ANG Alternate Landing Site *Provides a stand-by system with network managers to ensure continuous operations MQ-1/MQ-9 Integrated Predator/Reaper Operations Cell *Fully integrated system supporting GWOT and homeland defense mission

Total 3080 System Test Bed

3080 3080 3080 2 1 $2,400,000 $2,200,000

$24,070,000 $4,800,000 $2,200,000

JSTARS Enhanced Land/Maritime Mode (ELMM) *Provides enhanced target ID through several upgrades and an EO/IR sensor JSTARS Near Real Time Combat ID Capability (NCCT & UAV) *Reduces fratricide and increases commanders situation awareness NCCT NRE UAV NRE Kits

3600 3010 3600 3601 3010 3600 3010 3010

1 18 1 1 18 1 18 16

$71,500,000 $2,388,000 $27,200,000 $22,800,000 $940,000 $18,900,000 $322,000 $200,000

$71,500,000 $42,984,000 $27,200,000 $22,800,000 $16,920,000 $18,900,000 $5,796,000 $3,200,000

JSTARS Aided Target Recognition (ATR) *Enhanced target detection capability (ATR) C-21A RVSM Upgrade *Allows for flight at higher altitudes increasing fuel efficiency and weather avoidance C-21A Enhance Mode-S Upgrade *Allows for flight in European airspace after FY09. MQ-1/MQ-9 Advanced Cockpit *Increases situational awareness through advanced visualization with full system integration SPACE Mobile Ground System (MGS) Evolution *Permits the MGS to maintain its operational status. DCGS Nevada Block 10.2 Suite *Upgrades NVANG's DCGS to 10.2. DCGS Collateral Enclave *Provides collection, management, processing and reporting of Signals Intelligence DCGS 10.2 GFE Crew comm Tech Refresh Integration CMDL EO/IR Sensor SMFD NRE Cockpits

3010

21

$550,000

$11,550,000

3600 3010 3010

1 12 1

$38,260,000 $1,730,000 $5,000,000

$38,260,000 $20,760,000 $5,000,000

3080

$7,720,000

$7,720,000

3080 3080 3080 3080 3600 3010 3010 3010

4 4 2 1 1 13 13 13

$2,820,000 $1,120,000 $710,000 $3,500,000 $1,250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000

$11,280,000 $4,480,000 $1,420,000 $3,500,000 $1,250,000 $3,250,000 $3,250,000 $3,250,000

HC/MC-130 Enhanced Airborne Mission Commander (AMC) *Increases situational awareness during CSAR

TOTAL

$1,307,546,200

vi

24-HOUR OPERATIONS
C-130 Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) Cockpit Lighting *Provides panoramic NVGs for increased capability and safety. SENIOR SCOUT Communications Security Upgrades *Provides installation and test for various COMSEC upgrades. MQ-1 Sense/Detect & Avoid other Aircraft Capability *Provides capability to detect other aircraft in-flight KC-135 Night Vision Compatible/Covert Lighting *Will allow aircrews to perform missions while wearing NVGs, to include air refueling. RC-26B CNS/ATM Compliance *Updates the RC-26 avionics suite to address CNS/ATM Compliance requirements JSTARS 8.33kHz VHF Radio *Fulfills CNS/ATM requirement NRE Mod Kits NRE Kit Proof Group B

Type Funds
3010

Units Required
109

Unit Cost
$3,500,000

Program Cost
$381,500,000

Total 3080 SAA System Int

3010 3010 3010 3010 20 16 190 $750,000 $300,000 $250,000

$6,560,000 $15,000,000 $4,800,000 $47,500,000

3600 3010 3600 3010 3010 3080

1 11 1 1 36 75

$4,500,000 $1,800,000 $3,330,000 $25,300,000 $233,000 $11,000

$4,500,000 $19,800,000 $3,330,000 $25,300,000 $8,388,000 $825,000

SPACE: Combat SkySat Payloads *Builds payloads for short notice employment. SPACE: Mobile Ground System HEMP Certification *Permits the MGS to maintain HEMP certification C2/TACP: M-1145 HMMWV *Up-armored HMMWV for TACPs. C-21A Dual FMS Upgrade *Replaces single FMS for DMS with a dual FMS. LC-130 Jet Assisted Take-Off (JATO) Program *JATO enables ski equipped LC-130 operations in deep field locations. Motors

3010

$500,000

$2,500,000

3080

26

$190,000

$4,940,000

3010

21

$290,000

$6,090,000

3010

1628

$18,000

$29,304,000

TOTAL

$560,337,000 Program Cost

ENHANCED SURVIVABILITY
Security Forces Personnel Protective Equipment *Provides essential protection against improvised explosive devices (IEDs) C-5 Aircraft Defensive System (ADS) *Provides the C-5 with AAR-47 MWS and ALE-47 CMDS PJ/ST Enhanced Survivability Suite *Provides PJ/ST improved weapons capability and personal protection PJ/ST Special Tactics Mounted (Heavy) Suite *Provides PJ/ST's combat vehicles A-10 Missile Warning System *Provides warning against man-portable IR threats and increases survivability. C-130 SAFIRE *Allows for wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft C-17 SAFIRE Lookout Capability *Allows for wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft HC-130 - AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM). *Allows HC-130 aircraft to fly in an increasing threat environment C-130 - Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM). *Allows C-130 aircraft to fly in an increasing threat environment Group B Support Equip Group A Group B Support Equip Group A Group B Support Equip Group A Group B Support Equip Group A Group B Group A Group B Support Equip RDT&E Systems Total 3080

Type Funds
3080 3010

Units Required

Unit Cost

$13,827,500 24 $1,300,000 $31,200,000

Total 3080

3080

$1,831,480

Total 3080

3080 3010 102 $160,000

$4,702,000 $16,320,000

3010

189

$650,000

$122,850,000

3010

24

$750,000

$18,000,000

3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3600 3010

5 1 115 56 15 24 12 3 7 7 1 16 16 30 30 3 1 143

$2,530,000 $10,900,000 $1,120,000 $2,640,000 $13,030,000 $1,310,000 $2,390,000 $19,450,000 $1,310,000 $2,390,000 $19,450,000 $1,700,000 $6,600,000 $3,440,000 $2,320,000 $29,390,000 $123,000,000 $1,700,000

$12,650,000 $10,900,000 $128,800,000 $147,840,000 $195,450,000 $31,440,000 $28,680,000 $58,350,000 $9,170,000 $16,730,000 $19,450,000 $27,200,000 $105,600,000 $103,200,000 $69,600,000 $88,170,000 $123,000,000 $243,100,000

C-130J Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) *Allows C-130J aircraft to fly in an increasing threat environment

EC-130J - Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM). *Allows EC-130J aircraft to fly in an increasing threat environment

C-17 AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) *Allows C-17 aircraft to fly in an increasing threat environment C-5 Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM). *Allows C-5 aircraft to fly in an increasing threat environment

F-15 EPAWSS Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) *Replaces outdated RWR; increasing situational awareness, survivability, and maintainability

vii

ENHANCED SURVIVABILITY
A-10 Digital Radar Warning Receiver with Threat Geo-location *Enhanced threat detection and azimuth accuracy A-10 LARS V-12 Upgrade *Increases situational awareness during Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) missions. F-16 Digital Radar Warning Receiver with Threat Geo-location *Enhanced threat detection and azimuth accuracy HH-60 CSAR Board *Allows for simultaneous medical care on two recovered personnel HH-60 Defensive Armament Upgrade *Provides .50 caliber machine gun capability. NRE RWRs NRE CSAR Boards M134D M240 M3M

Type Funds
3600 3010 3600 3010 3600 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010

Units Required
1 102 1 22 1 362 1 21 36 36 36

Unit Cost
10,000,000 $150,000 $750,000 $56,000 $10,000,000 $150,000 $350,000 $20,000 $55,000 $1,500 $135,000

Program Cost
$10,000,000 $15,300,000 $750,000 $1,232,000 $10,000,000 $54,300,000 $350,000 $420,000 $1,980,000 $54,000 $4,860,000

Security Forces M4 Rifle Upgrades *Provides SF upgraded rifles. PJ/ST Enhanced Survivability For Special Tactics Combat Controllers *Provides PJ/ST's special tactics equipment PJ/ST Tactical Ground Vehicle *Provides roll-over protection, 3-man carrying capability, multiple position for litters as well as mounting stations for weapons, navigation equipment, comm equipment, and additional fuel PJ/ST High Altitude Equipment Modernization *Provides miscellaneous high altitude equipment. KC-135 - Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM). *Allows KC-135 aircraft to fly in an environment of increasing threat complexity and lethality.

Total 3080

3080

$29,765,018

Total 3080 D&T TGV

3080 3600 3080 1 15 $200,000 $50,000

$7,470,000 $200,000 $750,000

Total 3080 NRE Group A Group B NRE Kits

3080 3010 3010 3010 3600 3010 3010 1 172 86 1 18 174 $12,400,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $29,230,000 $5,642,222 $35,000

$4,260,000 $12,400,000 $344,000,000 $258,000,000 $29,230,000 $101,559,996 $6,090,000

JSTARS Infra-Red Missile Defense/Self-Protect Capability *Allows E-8C aircraft to fly in an environment of increasing threat complexity and lethality. C-130 Yoke-Mounted Dispense Switches *Provides capability for Pilot and Co-pilot to dispense countermeasures. C-17 Individual Crew Position Flare Dispense Switches *Provides capability for loadmaster to dispense countermeasures. C-17 Stick-Mounted Dispense Switches *Provides capability for Pilot and Co-pilot to dispense countermeasures. Security Forces M240/M249 Upgrades *Provides SF upgraded weapons. C-130 Digital Radar Warning Receiver(RWR) Replacement/Enhancement for ALR-69 *Provides/Upgrades the ANG C-130 fleet with a more capable RWR. C-130 Missile Approach Warning System Upgrade *Provides crews with an upgraded MWS. C-5 SAFIRE Lookout Capability *Allows for wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft KC-135 Fuel Tank Fire Explosion Protection *Reduces KC-135 fuel tank vulnerability to ground threats C-130 Loadmaster Crashworthy Seat *Provides the C-130 Loadmaster with a seat able to withstand excessive impact. LC-130 Crevasse Detection Radar *Implements radar capability to determine the presence of crevasses in operational areas HC/MC-130 LARS AN/ARS-6 V12 Upgrade *Displays additional survivor information (coordinates and messaging) in all aircraft cockpits. HC/MC-130 Dual Rails *Provides the capability to rapidly reconfigure in support of different missions. Security Forces Mobility Bag Upgrades *Provides SF mobility bag upgrades

3010

24

$630,000

$15,120,000

3010

24

$63,000

$1,512,000

Total 3080

3080 3600 3010 3010 1 160 186 10,000,000 $150,000 $150,000

$2,413,450 $10,000,000 $24,000,000 $27,900,000

3010

30

$500,000

$15,000,000

3010

190

$1,050,000

$199,500,000

3010

219

$150,000

$32,850,000

Integration Group B Integration Group B

3010 3010 3600 3010 3010

1 4 1 13 13

$4,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,200,000 $160,000 $320,000

$4,000,000 $6,000,000 $2,200,000 $2,080,000 $4,160,000

Total 3080

7000

$13,814,500

TOTAL

$2,881,581,944 $5,505,451,144

TOTAL COMBAT QUADRANGLE REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL

viii

PROPULSION MODERNIZATION REQUIREMENTS


SUSTAINMENT/SUPPORTABILITY
JSTARS Re-engining *Engine retrofit modification improving performance and reliability. LC/HC/MC-130 Electronic Propeller Control System *Replaces synchrophasers and propeller control systems with more reliable digital controls. NRE kits Integration LC-130 MC/HC-130 Integration

Type Funds
3600 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3010 3600 3010 Engines Install kits Spare parts 3010 3010 3010 3010

Units Required
1 80 1 10 13 1 27 1 204 24 8 1 80

Unit Cost
$120,500,000 $13,700,000 $4,000,000 $500,000 $500,000 $4,000,000 $1,100,000 $230,000 $1,220,000 $5,100,000 $110,000 $15,820,000 $2,980,000

Program Cost
$120,500,000 $1,096,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 $6,500,000 $4,000,000 $29,700,000 $230,000 $248,880,000 $122,400,000 $880,000 $15,820,000 $238,400,000

LC/HC/MC-130 Eight Bladed Propeller Upgrade *Replaces existing propulsion (propellers, engine sys) with high efficiency, low MX items A-10 Engine Upgrade *A-10 Propulsion Upgrade Program (PUP) required to sustain the A-10 for the next 25 years. F-16 Block 42 Re-Engine *Block 42 aircraft require increased thrust to perform assigned combat tasking.

F-15 -220E Engine Kits *Engine retrofit modification improving performance and reliability.

TOTAL

$1,892,310,000

SIMULATION SYSTEMS/TRAINING REQUIREMENTS


SIMULATION SYSTEMS/TRAINING
F-16 FCMT *Block 30 2-ship DMO-capable simulators for ANG combat units NRE O&M A-10 Full Mission Trainer (FMT) *Provides high fidelity DMO flight simulators I-FACT HMDs *Indirect Fire-Forward Air Control Trainer *Gateway and ASTI Radios KC-135 Boom Operator Simulation System (BOSS) *Provides high fidelity training ensuring increased readiness JSTARS (E-8C) MST *Provides high fidelity DMO flight simulators for formal and continuation training RC-26 MCT *Combines four ISR trainer requirements into one program increasing mission effectiveness C-130 MMCT *Provides high-fidelity, DMO capable simulator *Scathe View *Senior Scout *Commando Solo DTOC *Provides command, control, scheduling and management of the ANG DMO program MLS A-10 FMT F-15 FMT JTAC Dome Engineering Block 20 Block 30 O&M

Type Funds
3600 3010 3840 3840 3010

Units Required
1 20 5 5 2

Unit Cost
$1,800,000 $5,000,000 $3,840,000 $2,998,000 $4,200,000

Program Cost
$1,800,000 $100,000,000 $19,200,000 $14,990,000 $8,400,000

3080

36

$50,000

$1,800,000

3010 3840 3010

17 1 1

$800,000 $19,200,000 $47,150,000

$13,600,000 $19,200,000 $47,150,000

3080 3010 3080 3080 3080 3080 3010 3010 3080 3840 3080 3840 3080 3080

$600,000

$600,000

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 20

$600,000 $14,230,000 $8,200,000 $250,000 $4,200,000 $4,800,000 $1,500,000 $370,000 $800,000 $250,000 $50,000 $210,000

$600,000 $14,230,000 $8,200,000 $500,000 $4,200,000 $4,800,000 $1,500,000 $370,000 $800,000 $250,000 $600,000 $4,200,000

Mission Engineering Training Center (MTEC) *Provides engineering development of simulation systems and tech transfer for the ANG MQ-1/MQ-9 DTS *Provides a part task trainer for ANG operators. C-130/KC-135 Visual Threat Recognition & Avoidance Trainer (VTRAT) *Realistic training enabling aircrews to react quickly in an anti-aircraft threat engagement HH-60 Full Mission Trainer (FMT) *Provides high fidelity DMO flight simulators

NRE Desktop Traini

R&D O&M

3600 3840 3010 3840 3840 3840 3840 3010

1 5 1 12 12 1 1 200

$3,500,000 $88,000 $14,500,000 $40,000 $7,000 $1,750,000 $2,000,000 $130,000

$3,500,000 $440,000 $14,500,000 $480,000 $84,000 $1,750,000 $2,000,000 $26,000,000

ACS CRC CSP DMO Connectivity *Provides high fidelity mission rehearsal and distributed training for LD/HD assets Air Control Squadron Digicomp Air surveillance and Air Control (ASAC) *Increases required simulation and live mission training to maintain readiness Rangeless ACMI *P-5 Combat Training Systems to replace tethered system RC/C-26 Joint Weapon System Trainer *Training System that will support both the Army and Air Guard.

Gateways Circuit Installs ASAC Mod Maintenance P-5 Pods

3010

$3,000,000

$3,000,000

ix

SIMULATION SYSTEMS/TRAINING
Range Joint Threat Emitter (JTE) *Simulates a realistic integrated air defense environment AOC DMO Capability Gateways *Provides capability to train in-garrison within the Theater Air Control System (TACS) environme Circuit Installs Network Warfare Training and Integration (NWTI) Range *Provides simulated range tactics, techniques, and procedures training

Type Funds
3080

Units Required
12

Unit Cost
$5,000,000

Program Cost
$60,000,000

3840 3840 3840

9 9 1

$40,000 $7,000 $2,900,000

$360,000 $63,000 $2,900,000

TOTAL

$382,067,000 Program Cost


$200,000,000

NEW ACQUISITIONS
C-38 Replacement Aircraft *Supports Congressional, DOD, Air Force and National Guard Travel missions worldwide. C-40C (Boeing 737) Additional Aircraft *Supports Congressional, DOD, Air Force and National Guard Travel missions worldwide.

Type Funds
3010

Units Required
4

Unit Cost
$50,000,000

3010

$85,000,000

$85,000,000

TOTAL

$285,000,000

TOTAL ANG FY09 MODERNIZATION REQUIREMENTS

$8,064,828,144

Weapons System Reference Table by State (2009)


Refer to Weapon System Tabs for MDS Information
CE IO / Ai rbo rn ISR e
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X MQ-1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X IO X X X X X X X X X X X X X X IO ST X X X IO X X Space PJ

HH - 60 KC -13 5 UA S

ST

AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV

X X

X X

SP A

PJ

PJ /

X X X

X X X X X X X MQ-1 MQ-1 X Space

xi

DC GS

E-8 C

A10

C17

F-1 6

C13

F-2 2

F-1 5

C5

A OS

C2

SP AC E IO / Ai rbo rn ISR e

HH -60 KC -13 5 UA S

ST

NY OH OK OR PA PR RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY

X X

X X X X

X X X

MQ-9

X X IO

PJ X

X X X X

ST

X X X X X X X X X X

X MQ-1 X X X X X X X X IO IO X X X X X IO IO X X

X X

xii

PJ /

DC GS

C17 C13 0 E-8 C

OS A

A10

F-1 5

F-1 6

F-2 2

C5

C2

CONTACTS
Col Daniel Bader NGB/A5 Director, Plans & Requirements 301-836-8575 (DSN 278-8575) Email: dan.bader@ang.af.mil Col J.C. Witham NGB/A2/3 Director, Operations 703-607-3328 (DSN 327-3328) Email: james.witham@ang.af.mil Col John Mooney AATC Commander 520-295-6900 (DSN 844-6900) Email: john.mooney@aztucs.ang.af.mil Mr. Ron Moore AATC Director of Test 520-295-6927 (DSN 844-6927) Email: ron.moore@aztucs.ang.af.mil Lt Col Robert Martin 132 FW Commander, DTOC 520-295-6932 (DSN 256-8801) Email: rmartin@airdmt.net Mr. Frank Ballinger NGB/A5 Deputy Director, Plans & Requirements 703-607-5095 (DSN 327-5095) Email: frank.ballinger@ang.af.mil Lt Col Eric Mann NGB/A5 Chief, Operational Requirements, A5R 703-607-2914 (DSN 327-2914) Email: eric.mann@ang.af.mil Lt Col James Kriesel NGB/A5 Chief, Program Integration, A5I 703-607-2930 (DSN 327-2930) Email: james.kriesel@ang.af.mil Lt Col Pete Rabinowitch NGB/A5 Chief, Mobility Forces, A5RM 301-836-8589 (DSN 278-8589) Email: pete.rabinowitch@ang.af.mil Maj Chris Finerty NGB/A5 Chief, Combat Forces, A5RC 703-607-3512 (DSN 327-1312) Email: christopher.finerty@ang.af.mil

FY09 Modernization Requirements Book Credits: Editor: Lt Col James Kriesel, NGB/A5I Asst Editor: Maj Dominic Saxton, NGB/A5I Production: Mr Ron Kornreich, NGB/A5RC (SDS Intl) Graphics: ANGRC Multimedia/Public Affairs, ANGRC/CCL For additional copies of this book or CD-ROMs, please call Ron Kornreich At DSN: 278-8160 or COMM: 301-836-8160

A-10

Close Air Support Forward Air Controller - Airborne Combat Search and Rescue

The ANG operates 92 A-10 aircraft across five wings, representing one third of the total U.S. combat A-10 forces.
The venerable A-10 continues to perform superbly in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF). This aircraft remains the premier close air support platform of choice. With eleven weapons stations and a targeting pod, the A-10 is able to engage any target with a wide variety of munitions. The A-10C (Precision Engagement) achieved initial operational capability in September 2007, led by the 175 WG and the 110 FW. These were the first units to convert from the A-10A to the A-10C and deployed to OIF in September 2007, the first combat use of the A-10C. Precision Engagement brings a data link and JDAM capability to theater, along with many other integrated cockpit and airframe improvements. The 124 FW and 111 FW completed their conversion to the A-10A+ Smart Multifunction Color Display and deployed to OIF from May September 2007. This deployment marked the first combat use of a data link by the A-10. The A-10A+ provides increased capability over the A-10A with a digital moving map, data link, and improved targeting pod functionality. The 188 FW will complete its conversion from F-16s to the A-10A in 2008, and will begin converting to the A-10C by years end. Other notable improvements include the ARC-210 digital radio which will add a SATCOM capability in the near future. A-10s are now fielding the AAR-47 which provides the pilot with an advanced missile warning system. A low cost Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) is in the initial testing stages.

A-10 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Low cost, night-compatible Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) Improved self protection capabilities Fully integrated connectivity providing simultaneous rapid-sync secure voice and satellite communication (SATCOM), data link, image transfer, and personnel locator system (PLS) compatibility Precision, low-yield, low collateral damage (CD), low-cost, multi-carriage weapon compatible with current operational flight program (OFP) and suspension equipment for use in urban terrain Upgraded engines

Essential Capabilities List


Pilot-accessible, expandable, mass data storage in A-10C Continued Advanced Targeting Pod (ATP) spiral development 1760 compatible, digital, pneumatic, multiple-carriage suspension equipment Specialized Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) / Urban Close Air Support (CAS) Weapons (Smoke, Riot Control, Less Lethal Weapons) All-Weather Capable Sensor Four-channel, 1553, and electronic warfare (EW) bus recording capability in A-10C Sensor video capture and playback in cockpit Improved Wide Field-Of-View (WFOV) Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) Rangeless EW training and testing capability; Virtual Electronic Combat Training System (VECTS) Laser threat protection for eyes and sensors Combat fuel tank Small diameter bomb integration Off-board weather reception capability Parking brake

Desired Capabilities List


Voice Activation of Hands-On-Throttle-And-Stick (HOTAS) and Multi-Function Display (MFD) functions Next generation cargo pod 3-Dimensional audio NVG camera

A-10 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program HMCS Missile Warning System Digital RWR 2nd ARC-210 Radio LARS V-12 Engine Upgrade P.E. Number 027131F 027131F 027131F 027131F 027131F 027131F FY09 $2.20 3 $8.16 2 $7.65 2 $10.00 3 $9.18 2 $0.75 3 $58.25 3 $11.20 2 $7.25 2 $2.24 2
2

FY10 $8.46 2 $1.20 3 $8.16 2 $7.65 2 $1.23 2 $91.25 3 $7.25 2 3

FY11 -

FY12 $95.16 2 4

FY13 $95.16 2
-

Program Total $11.86 $16.32 $25.30 $9.18 $1.98 $478.88 $35.14

Advanced Targeting Pod 4th Generation Upgrade 207249F Video Downlink


Notes:
1

$58.56 2 $80.50 3 $7.20 2 -

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) - Provides off-boresight day/night targeting capability and builds pilot situational awareness. Missile Warning System - Provides warning against man-portable IR threats and other surface-to-air-missiles (SAMs). A digital radar warning receiver (RWR) will significantly improve all RWR functions such as increased response time and radar threat identification / location. A second ARC-210 radio will replace the remaining A-10 legacy radios and provide a state-of-the-art communications suite. Lightweight Airborne Radio System (LARS) Upgrade - Provides increased situational awareness during Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) Missions. Engine Upgrade - Required to increase agility at medium / high altitude, provide increased combat munitions loads, and sustain the A-10 for the next 20 years. Advanced Targeting Pods / 4th Generation Upgrade / Video Downlink - ANG A-10 units need an additional seven targeting pods to complete their allocated pod compliment. In addition, all targeting pods require a 4th generation upgrade to enhance overall targeting pod employment and a video downlink (VDL) capability.

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 DAY/NIGHT HELMET MOUNTED CUEING SYSTEM (HMCS) 1. Background. The addition of a day/night helmet mounted cueing system will significantly increase pilot situational awareness (SA), aircraft survivability, and lethality in every mission area. With the capability to cue sensors and weapons off-boresight, using a helmet line of sight (LOS) as the aiming reference, pilots can quickly engage targets of opportunity while still identifying friendly positions via data-link and other means. This enhances time sensitive targeting capabilities and reduces the risk of fratricide and collateral damage. The ability to see these locations outside the head-up display (HUD) allows the pilot to quickly build a three dimensional picture of the battle space and eliminates the need to fly near the target area, greatly reducing threat exposure. Due to extensive night operations, the HMCS must be compatible with current night vision goggles (NVG) and wide field of view (WFOV) NVGs. 2. Requirement. JHMCS-CAF 308-93 MNS, ORD CAF-USN 308-93-II-A Dec 1996. CAF Operational Requirements Document CAF 401-91-I/II/III-D for A/OA-10 Aircraft Multi-Staged Improvement Program (MSIP) Oct 1999. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Time sensitive targeting will be hampered by increased verbal coordination to identify the proper target. Target misidentification, collateral damage and fratricide remain at risk without a HMCS. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek, MI 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractors. BAE Systems, Kent, UK; Gentex, Aurora, IL; ITT Night Vision, Roanoke, VA; Rafael, Haifa, Israel; Vision Systems International, San Jose, CA. 6. Cost.
Units Required* NRE (3600) 102 HMCS (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million)** N/A $0.083 Program Cost ($ Million) $3.40 $8.46 $11.86

* Assumes 10% spares and 1 system per aircraft. ** Installation and test equipment included.

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 MISSILE WARNING SYSTEM 1. Background. The A-10 flies many of its missions at altitudes where it is particularly vulnerable to shoulder-launched, infrared (IR) surface-to-air missiles (SAM). The aircraft needs a missile warning system that notifies the pilot when a SAM is launched and automatically dispenses counter-measures. The AN/AAR-47 is a passive, missileapproach warning system that when installed on the A-10 consists of four IR sensor assemblies, a central processing unit and a control indicator. The AAR-47 is capable of detecting missile launches from 360 degrees around the aircraft. 2. Requirement. CAF 315-92-I/II/III Interim Close Air Support/ Interdiction and Covert Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) Combat Mission Need Statement (Nov 01). 3. Impact if Not Funded. The A-10 will continue to be vulnerable to missile threats as the man-portable SAM threat proliferates. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractor. ATK, Clearwater, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required 102 MWS (3010) Unit Cost* ($ Million) $0.16 Program Cost ($ Million) $16.32

* Cost includes aircraft installation, test equipment and 10% spares.

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 DIGITAL RECEIVER, THREAT GEO-LOCATION AND SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT/REPLACEMENT FOR ALR-69 RADAR WARNING RECEIVER (RWR) 1. Background. The current ALR-69 RWR provides threat radar warning indications to pilots for the A-10 as well as providing threat information to the ALQ-213. The legacy ALR-69 has subassemblies that are no longer supportable, is unable to provide acceptable defensive situational awareness and is incapable of supporting the onboard/off board warfighter requirements. Specific performance shortfalls include inadequate response time, overload conditions, unacceptable identification performance, inadequate threat detection capability, unacceptable threat geo-location and lack of digital information. Upgrading the legacy RWR with a modification that incorporates an advanced digital receiver or replacing it (internal or embedded with an advanced Electronic Attack pod) will address the aforementioned issues while providing accurate passive targeting information. The ability to pass target quality emitter coordinates to any net-centric aircraft is a key component of Air Combat Commands Sensors Forward concept of operations. This capability will enhance the Air Forces ability to safely prosecute assigned missions in a more lethal threat environment. 2. Requirement. A-10 Electronic Warfare Capability Development Document (In coordination). CAF Operational Requirements Document CAF 401-91-I/II/III-D for A/OA-10 Aircraft Multi-Staged Improvement Program (MSIP) Oct 1999. A/OA-10 Mission Area Plan (MAP). 3. Impact if Not Funded. The A-10 will remain at risk to current threats and have little capability against most advanced threat systems resulting in areas of denied access that will significantly impact the ability of their airborne platforms to accomplish missions. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek, MI 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractors. BAE, Yonkers, NY, Nashua, NH; EDO, North Amityville, NY; Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA; ITT Avionics, Clifton, NJ; Lockheed Martin, Owego, NY & Fort Worth, TX; Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL; Raytheon, Goleta, CA. 6. Cost.
Units Required * NRE (3600) 102 RWRs (3010) Total
* Includes geo-location 10% spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.15

Program Cost ($ Million) $10.00 $15.30 $25.30

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 IMPROVED RADIO COMMUNICATIONS 1. Background. The A-10 requires a multi-band and multi-mode digital radio that includes satellite communications (SATCOM). The SATCOM capability will allow beyond-line-of-sight (BLOS) data and communication connectivity to a variety of command centers and higher headquarters to improve time-sensitive targeting. This feature will greatly aid the A-10 in all mission areas, specifically in the forward air controller-airborne (FAC-A), combat search and rescue (CSAR) role and close air support (CAS) missions. The new radio should be able to interface with other aircraft sub-systems such as the Smart Multi-Function Color Display (SMFCD) and Precision Engagement (PE) architecture. A second ARC-210 radio will complete the A-10 voice communications suite and provide higher performance and reliability than current legacy radios. The second ARC-210 can be secure line of sight (SLOS) if a BLOS radio is already installed. 2. Requirement. Combat Air Forces (CAF) Operational Requirements Document CAF 401-91-I/II/III-D for A/OA-10 Aircraft Multi-Staged Improvement Program (MSIP). CENTAF Urgent Need Request (UNR), May 06. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The A-10 will be hampered by lack of communications with higher headquarters (HHQ) and/or ground controllers. Use of SATCOM will allow targeting information and battle damage assessment (BDA) to be transmitted to HHQ for further evaluation. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek, MI 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractors. Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 102 ARC-210s (3010)
* Includes installation.

Unit Cost ($ Million)* $0.09

Program Cost ($ Million) $9.18

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 LIGHTWEIGHT AIRBORNE RADIO SYSTEM (LARS) UPGRADE 1. Background. There are numerous fielded combat search and rescue (CSAR) survival radios that provide a wide spectrum of capability. Survival radios range from the basic PRC-90 to the PRQ-7 Combat Survivor-Evader Locator (CSEL) radio. The newer radios offer more accurate information to CSAR forces attempting to rescue downed survivors. The AN/ARS-6 Lightweight Airborne Radio System (LARS) cockpit radio currently installed in the A-10 can only display range and bearing to the survivor. The AN/ARS V12 is now capable of providing geographic coordinates and text messaging transmitted from the newer survival radios such as CSEL and the Hook-112G. The V12 is smaller than the original AN/ARS-6 radio and will fit into existing space in the cockpit and aircraft bays. The reduced size will permit the AAR-47 Missile Warning System to coexist with the LARS V12 in the only available aircraft bay. 2. Requirement. CAF Operational Requirements Document CAF 401-91-I/II/III-D for A/OA-10 Aircraft Multi-Staged Improvement Program (MSIP) Oct 1999. A/OA-10 Mission Area Plan (MAP). 3. Impact If Not Funded. CSAR missions will continue to be hampered by lack of coordination and accurate survivor information. This could result in failed missions to rescue downed aircrews and risk of potential capture by enemy forces. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek, MI 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractors. Cubic Corp, San Diego, CA. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 22 LARS (3010) Total
* Includes installation.

Unit Cost ($ Million)* N/A $0.056

Program Cost

($ Million)
$0.75 $1.23 $1.98

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 ENGINE UPGRADE 1. Background. The A-10 has documented thrust deficiencies in its operational environment. In order to meet Combatant Commander tasking at high-density altitude locations, A-10 pilots must reduce fuel loads, restrict take-off times to early morning hours, or refuse tasking that increases gross weights to unsupportable and unsafe limits. In addition, the aircraft does not perform well at medium/high altitudes putting pilots at increased risk for threats and forcing commanders to provide separate A-10 air refueling tracks. For the past ten years the Air National Guard/Air Force Reserve Weapons and Tactics Conference has listed engine upgrades as a high priority for the A-10. 2. Requirement. Concept Development Document (CDD) approved 17 Mar 05 by the Air Force Requirements Operational Capability Council (AFROCC). CDD Version 1.1 approved 21 Apr 06. 3. Impact If Not Funded. A-10 mission success is based on the ability of the airframe to adequately perform the assigned mission. Tasking has migrated from low altitude (the design criteria of the aircraft) to medium/high altitude. Future viability as a persistent, lethal platform is dependent on adequate thrust and agility in a maximum gross weight configuration both at take-off and medium/high altitude. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek, MI 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractor. GE Aircraft Engines, Lynn, MA. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 204 Engines (3010)* Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $1.22 Program Cost ($ Million) $230.00 $248.88 $478.88

INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 ADVANCED TARGETING POD (ATP) and VIDEO DOWNLINK (VDL) 1. Background. Procurement of advanced targeting pods (ATP) has been an ANG top priority for the past several years. In order to achieve the required 2:1 aircraft to ATP ratios and requisite spares, the ANG requires 193 pods. A total of 136 Northrop Grumman LITENING and 27 Lockheed Martin Sniper XR targeting pods have been funded between FY98 and FY07. ATPs feature star-of-the-art technology which allows full weapons exploitation and comprehensive ANG participation in contingency operations. Current pods employ third generation forward looking infrared (FLIR), electro-optical television / charge-coupled devices (CCD), and laser spot search and track (LSS/LST), to offer exceptional stand-off capability and the ability to target J-series weapons. The ANG is 30 pods short of its total requirement. Modernization with fourth generation capability (1K FLIR, 1K CCD) will bring vastly improved day and night target acquisition as well as combat identification at extended ranges in both air-toground and air-to-air roles. The ANG requires fourth generation capability on all ATPs. ATP video downlink (VDL) provides streaming pod video to Tactical Air Control Parties (TACPs) and Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTACs) equipped with ROVER III terminals. The ANG fielded 24 10-watt LITENING ATP VDL kits and has an additional 66 25-watt LITENING ATP VDL kits on contract to deliver in 2008. Funding is required to upgrade all remaining LITENING and Sniper XR ATPs with VDL. 2. Requirement. CENTAF Urgent Need Request, Nov 04. 3. Impact If Not Funded. If not funded ANG will be unable to effectively fulfill its AEF tasking and have reduced capability relative to target acquisition and identification. 4. Units Impacted.
110 FW Battle Creek, MI 175 WG Baltimore, MD 111 FW Willow Grove, PA 188 FW Ft Smith, AR 124 WG Boise, ID

5. Contractors. Lockheed Martin, Orlando, FL; Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL. 6. Cost.
Units Required* 7 ATPs (3010) 31 4th Gen Mods (3010) 16 VDLs (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.60 $0.70 $0.14** Program Cost ($ Million) $11.20 $21.70 $2.24 $35.14

* Additional requirements for 23 ATPs, 124 4th Gen Mods, and 49 VDL kits are stated in the F-16 section. **Includes modification of LITENING pods to plug-n-play standard

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10

C-5

GALAXY

The Air National Guard will operate 50 percent of the USAF C-5A fleet by the end of FY09. Currently the ANG has thirteen C-5s at the 105 AW in Stewart ANGB, New York. The 167 AW, Martinsburg, West Virginia, and 164 AW, Memphis, Tennessee received C-5 aircraft and have begun operational missions. The C-5 Galaxy, with its tremendous payload capability, provides AMC intertheater airlift in support of US national defense. The C-5 flys passenger and outsized or oversized cargo airlift, airland, and special operations missions even under adverse conditions. With the C-5s unique visor door and kneeling capability, the aircraft can both load and offload (roll on/roll off) simultaneously. The aircraft can carry fully equipped, combat-ready military units to any point in the world on short notice, then provide field support required to help sustain the fighting force. The West Virginia Air National Guards 167 Airlift Wing, which recently gained the Galaxy, flew to Djibouti to deliver two MH-53E Super Stallion helicopters and more than 60 Marines supporting Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa. Stewart ANGB is the only Air National Guard Base in the country with a C-5 flight simulator. The cockpit of Stewarts flight simulator is nearly identical to a C-5s cockpit. Every button, lever and gauge has the exact same function, and is in the same location as it would be on the real aircraft. Equipped with a high-resolution visual system that produces fullcolor imagery, trainees get to experience the benefits of enhanced graphic displays while flying the C-5 flight simulator. The C-5 flight simulator is supported by hydraulic lifts, which move the simulators cab around while in operation. From takeoff to landing, everything from high turbulence to rough landings can be felt by trainees flying the simulator. It also simulates other situations such as engine stalls, dangerous wind and rain conditions, mechanical failures, and poor runway conditions.

C-5 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Aircraft Defensive System (ADS) Advanced IRCM (LAIRCM) Surface to Air Fire (SAFIRE) Lookout Capability Check 6 New Brake System Structural Refurbishment

Essential Capabilities List


Combat Track II Install and Equipment Yoke Mounted Expendable Dispense Switch (YMEDS) MAF DLI (Datalink) Electronic Flight Bag

11

C-5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program Aircraft Defensive System Advanced IRCM SAFIRE Lookout Capability Check 6
Notes:
1

P.E. Number

FY09

FY10 -

FY11 -

FY12 -

FY13 -

Program Total $31.20 $260.97 $15.00

0401119 $31.20 2 0401119 $15.00 2


2

0401134 $52.19 2 $52.19 2 $52.19 2 $52.20 2 $52.20 2 3

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

C-5 Aircraft Defensive System (ADS) - Provides the C-5 with AAR-47 (V2+) Missile Warning System (MWS) and ALE-47 Countermeasures Dispensing System (CMDS) to detect and counter infrared (IR) Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS). C-5 Advanced Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) - Allows aircraft to survive in an environment of increasingly lethal and complex threats. C-5 Surface to Air Fire (SAFIRE) Lookout Capability Check 6 - Allows for wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind aircraft.

12

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-5 AIRCRAFT DEFENSIVE SYSTEM (ADS) 1. Background. Only C-5Bs are equipped with the Aircraft Defensive System (ADS) permitting operation in hostile areas. The ANG operates only C-5As, none of which have a defensive system installed. The C-5Bs ADS consists of an AAR-47A(V)2 Missile Warning System (MWS) and an ALE-47. This system adequately counters shoulder-fired, Man Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS) infrared seeking missiles that are widely available and a significant threat during take-offs and landings. Equipping the ANG C-5As with ADS would greatly enhance aircraft survivability, effectively doubling the in-theater fleet size as well as dramatically reducing stress to both AMC and the C-5B fleet. 2. Requirement. MAC Statement of Needs (SON) 07-81, for Defensive Systems on Airlift Aircraft and Airlift Defensive Systems (ADS) Operational Requirements Document (ORD), 20781-III, approved 2 Aug 1995; Program Management Directive (PMD) 2349(6), 8 Aug 2005. 3. Impact If Not Funded. C-5As will remain unable to fly into Central Command (CENTCOM) airfields reducing the effective fleet size by half and continuing to stress the C-5B fleet. Loss or damage of aircraft and loss of life from MANPADS will adversely impact Air Force missions. 4. Units Impacted.
105 AW Stewart, NY 164 AW Memphis, TN 167 AW Martinsburg, WV

5. Contractors. ATK, Clearwater, FL; BAE Systems, Austin, TX 6. Cost.


Units Required 24 ADS Kits (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.30* Program Cost ($ Million) $31.20

* Includes required spares, support equipment, technical orders, and training

13

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-5 ADVANCED INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (IRCM) SELF-PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. ANG C-5s operate in a low to medium threat environment worldwide where shoulder-fired, Man Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS) infrared seeking missiles are widely available and represent a significant threat during take-offs and landings. To counter MANPAD threats the ANG requires an Advanced IRCM system like the AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Counter Measure (LAIRCM) system that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best countermeasures. 2. Requirement. LAIRCM ORD 314-92, Aug 98. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The C-5 operates in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality. The aircrew and aircraft will be tasked to operate in this environment while employing less than state-of-the-art aircraft defensive systems. 4. Units Impacted.
105 AW Stewart, NY 164 AW Memphis, TN 167 AW Martinsburg, WV

5. Contractors. BAE Systems, Nashua NH; Lockheed Martin Corporation, Marietta, GA; Orland FL; Northrop Grumman Corporation, Rolling Meadows, IL. 6. Cost.
Product Type * 30 Group A Kits (3010) 30 Group B Kits (3010) 3 Support Equipment (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $ 3.44 $ 2.32 $29.39 Program Cost ($ Million) $103.20 $ 69.60 $ 88.17 $260.97

* The Configuration for these C-5A are GLTA lite ( 2 Turret with AAR-54 sensors). Three sets of support equipment will be purchased. (One set to support each base). One set of SRU spares will be purchased for each base also. Per the LAIRCM C-5 PM the C-5 line can support 5 per year. The C-5 will need installation of ALE-47 before LAIRCM can be installed - there is no estimate for that effort in these numbers.

14

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-5 SURFACE TO AIR FIRE (SAFIRE) LOOKOUT CAPABILITY CHECK 6 1. Background. During Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) 'look-outs' are directed to stand at the troop doors and view out the porthole windows from Combat Entry through the Combat Exit checklists. Loadmasters position themselves at the troop doors to scan the ground and horizon for Surface-To-Air Fire (SAFIRE) launches. Upon detection, Loadmasters immediately call-out evasive maneuver reactions to the pilots and dispense defensive flares as a means of preventing a direct SAFIRE hit. Windows used for observation in C-5s are relatively small with a restricted field of view. Loadmasters experience neck and back strain while striving to maintain their head in position against the window to obtain an aft-angled view out the porthole. Furthermore, the window glass is typically scratched and scuffed to the point that viewing becomes difficult. 2. Requirement. AMC Validated AF Form 1067; C-5 R&PC, AMCFEB070108-04-064. 3. Impact if not funded. When Loadmasters don helmets, flack vests, survival vests, NVGs, and then attempt to look out the troop door porthole during a tactical departure, vision is restricted. Without a clear, wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft, SAFIRE launches could go undetected during critical phases of flight. Undetected SAFIRE launches could result in a projectile striking the aircraft resulting in damage to the aircraft or loss of life. 4. Units Impacted.
105 AW Stewart, NY 164 AW Memphis, TN 167 AW Martinsburg, WV

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 30 SAFIRE Kits (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.50 * Program Cost ($ Million) $15.00

* Includes required spares, support equipment, technical orders, and training.

15

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16

C-17

GLOBEMASTER III

C-17s currently perform all strategic air evacuation actions from Operations ENDURING FREEDOM and IRAQI FREEDOM to Germany and points west. The Mississippi Air National Guard has returned over 19,000 patients safely to Germany and United Sates from Iraq via the C-17 Aeromedical Evacuation mission. During the same period, the unit transported 10,375 tons of cargo. The C-17 is the Nations core military airlifter and the only aircraft capable of delivering outsize cargo to small, austere airfields. It is also capable of aerial delivery, night vision goggle (NVG) operations, nuclear weapons transportation, and aeromedical evacuation. The C-17 provides the flexibility to support both intertheater and intratheater missions and allows AMC to significantly improve throughput during contingency operations. The Air National Guard operates eight C-17s at the 172 Airlift Wing in Jackson, Mississippi. A second unit, the154 Wing at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, is the first ANG C-17 PACAF associate unit; with the second associate C-17 wing being established by the 176 Wing, Elmendorf AFB, AK. A 172 AW C-17 airlifted a critical piece of equipment to assist rescue operations for six the Utah miners, who had been trapped deep inside the Crandall Canyon Coal Mine. Within hours of receiving the request for help from the Utah Governor, an airlift operation was coordinated for the vital piece of underground video equipment for the rescue efforts.

C-17 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Surface to Air Fire (SAFIRE) Lookout Capability Check 6 Advanced IRCM (LAIRCM) Individual Crew Position Flare Dispense Stick Mounted Expendable Dispense Switches (SMEDS) MWS Indicator Relocation

Essential Capabilities List


MAF DLI Electronic Flight Bag RWR/Jammer (ASACMS) Combat Track II Kits

17

C-17 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program SAFIRE Lookout Capability AN/AAQ-24 LAIRCM Individual Crew Position Flare Dispense Switches Stick-Mounted Expendable Dispense Switches P.E. Number FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 Program Total $18.00 $132.80

0401130 $18.00 2

0401134 $66.40 2 $66.40 2 0401130 $15.12 2

$15.12

0401130 $15.12 2
2

$15.12

Notes: 1 3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

C-17 Surface to Air Fire (SAFIRE) Lookout Capability Check 6 - Allows for wideangle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft. C-17 AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) - Allows C-17 aircraft to survive in an environment of increasing complexity of threats and lethality. C-17 Individual Crew Position Flare Dispense Switches - Adds an additional chaff and flare dispenser switch at the rear scanner position. C-17 (SMEDS) - Adds an additional chaff and flare dispenser switch hard-wired into or onto the pilot and copilot sticks.

18

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-17 SURFACE TO AIR FIRE (SAFIRE) LOOKOUT CAPABILITY CHECK 6 1. Background. During Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) look-outs are directed to stand at the troop doors and view out the porthole windows from Combat Entry through the Combat Exit checklists. Loadmasters position themselves at the troop doors to scan the ground and horizon for Surface-To-Air Fire (SAFIRE) launches. Upon detection, Loadmasters immediately call-out evasive maneuver reactions to the pilots and dispense flares. Windows used for observation in C-17s are relatively small with a restricted field of view. Loadmasters experience neck and back strain while striving to maintain their position against the window to obtain an aft-angle view out the porthole. Furthermore, the window glass is typically scratched and scuffed to the point that viewing becomes difficult. This modification is to provide C-17 crews with increased scanning field of view to better identify threats. 2. Requirement. Air Force Reserve Command AF Form 1067. 3. Impact if not funded. When Loadmasters don helmets, flack vests, survival vests, NVGs, and attempt to look out the troop door porthole during a tactical departure, they won't see anything between the 4 and 7 o'clock position, or 45-degrees below the horizon. Without a clear, wide-angle view from 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock and could result in damage to the aircraft and/or loss of life. 4. Units Impacted.
154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 172 AW Jackson, MS 176 WG Elmendorf AFB, AK

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 24 SAFIRE Kits (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.75* Program Cost ($ Million) $18.00

* Includes required spares, support equipment, technical orders, and training.

19

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-17 AN/AAQ-24 LARGE AIRCRAFT INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (LAIRCM) SELF-PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. ANG C-17s operate worldwide in a low to medium threat environment in which shoulder-fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPADS) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available, and represent a significant threat during take-offs and landings. To counter MANPAD threats the AN/AAQ-24 LAIRCM system is the defensive solution selected by the Air Force that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best countermeasures. 2. Requirement. LAIRCM ORD 314-92, Aug 98. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The C-17 operates in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality. The aircrew and aircraft will be tasked to operate in this environment while employing a less than state-of-the-art aircraft defensive systems, risking damage to aircraft and potential loss of life. 4. Units Impacted.
172 AW Jackson, MS 176 WG Elmendorf AFB, AK

5. Contractors. Boeing Company, San Antonio, TX; Northrop Grumman Corporation, Rolling Meadows, IL. 6. Cost.
Product Type 16 Group A Kits (3010) 16 Group B Kits (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.70 $6.60 * Program Cost ($ Million) $ 27.20 $105.60 $132.80

* Includes required spares, support equipment, technical orders, and training.

20

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-17 INDIVIDUAL CREW POSITION FLARE DISPENSE SWITCHES 1. Background. Worldwide proliferation of small arms and shoulder-fired infrared (IR) missiles makes mobility aircraft vulnerable to attack during low-altitude operations, particularly during approach and landing. Visual threat detection and reaction have become increasingly important based upon multiple real world missile attacks on air mobility and commercial cargo aircraft. The C-17 fleet has no means to manually dispense flares from the rear scanner position. Manual flare dispense switches are particularly important as C-17s land and operate in increased threat locations. The manual flare dispense switch modification is critical for supporting Operations IRAQI FREEDOM and ENDURING FREEDOM (OIF/OEF). 2. Requirement. Air Force Reserve Command CPC; Air Mobility Command CORT, Combatant Commander Defensive System Requirement. 3. Impact if not funded. An individual crew position flare dispense switch capability provides an increased capability and covers a gap during specific phases of flight to counter and defeat threats. C-17s remain vulnerable to infrared seeking weapons. During combat operations, delayed missile calls by the crewmember that has a visual with the missile may be delayed in alerting the pilots, risking damage to aircraft and potential loss of life. 4. Units Impacted.
154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 172 AW Jackson, MS 176 WG Elmendorf AFB, AK

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 24 Dispense Switch Kits * (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.63 Program Cost ($ Million) $15.12

* Includes all C-17s (2 dispense switches per aircraft).

21

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-17 STICK-MOUNTED EXPENDABLE DISPENSE SWITCH 1. Background. This C-17 modification proposal provides the capability for the pilot and copilot to dispense chaff and flares on the ANG C-17 fleet to enhance survivability in a combatthreat environment. Providing an stick-mounted expendable dispense switch capability is critical in mitigating the surface-to-air threats currently encountered by airlift aircrews in high threat environments. 2. Requirement. Air Force Reserve Command CPC; Air Mobility Command CORT, Combatant Commander Defensive System Requirement. 3. Impact if not funded. The stick-mounted expendable dispense switch capability provides an increased capability and covers a gap during specific phases of flight to counter and defeat threats most often faced by deployed crews. These crews will be operating in this environment for the foreseeable future and an immediate need exists to enhance and augment their ability to survive and accomplish the mission. C-17s remain vulnerable to infrared seeking weapons. During combat operations, delayed dispensing of expendable will risk damage to aircraft and potential loss of life. 4. Units Impacted.
154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 172 AW Jackson, MS 176 WG Elmendorf AFB, AK

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 24* (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.63 Program Cost ($ Million) $15.12

* Includes all C-17s (2 dispense switches per aircraft).

22

C-130
40 percent of the Air Force C-130 fleet resides in the Air National Guard (ANG).

MC-130, HC-130, LC-130, & EC-130J Commando Solo

C-130: In FY 07, ANG C-130s flew over 11,000 hours in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM and over 4200 hours in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Additionally, ANG C-130s flew over 7700 hours in support of Operations CORNET OAK, JOINT ENTERPRISE, DEEP FREEZE, and JUMP START. The ANG will be the first to field a new cockpit from C-130 Avionics Modernization Program (AMP), and is the lead for operational test and evaluation. Procurement efforts continue for Advanced laser based Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) system and APN-241 low-power color radar. Testing is underway for Electronic Propeller Control System (EPCS), and eight-bladed propellers (NP-2000). Finally, the ANG is adding enhanced capability by pursuing situational awareness datalink displays, yoke-mounted chaff/flare dispenser switches, and Virtual Electronic Combat Training System (VECTS). HC/MC/LC-130/EC-130J: The Air National Guard provides 35 percent of the Air Forces HC/MC-130 Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) air refueling capability. Air National Guard HC/MC-130s provide Combat Commanders (COCOMs) vital long-range, all weather CSAR capability while deployed during contingency operations. The HC-130Ns of Alaskas 176 Wing maintain 24-hour alert coverage and provide specialized rescue capability to 11AF through the 11AF Rescue Coordination Center. The California ANGs 129 Rescue Wing fly the only MC-130Ps in the Air National Guard. The HC-130P/Ns of the New York ANGs 106 Rescue Wing provide SAR coverage for the east coast while supporting rescue alert missions for periodic space shuttle launches. The AN/AAQ-24 LAIRCM continues as a critical aircraft defense modification program for a portion of the ANG HC/MC-130s while full funding is sought for the remainder. Upcoming modernization includes AN-ARS-6v12 LARS for ANG HC/MC-130s. LC-130: ANG LC-130s perform a unique mission: landing a large cargo aircraft directly on snowfields in remote areas of the Arctic and Antarctic. Keeping this aircraft safe is challenging because of austere operating and harsh environmental conditions. A new mission radar, propulsion modernization, and JATO production are required to continue operations for this difficult mission. The 193 SOW, PA has completed its conversion from the EC130E to the EC130J aircraft. Three EC130Js are fully mission capable hard-wired Commando Solos, while four wait funding to complete the conversion.

C-130 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


HC/MC-130: Oil Cooler Augmentation Upgraded Pressurization / ECS (70 Lb C-130: AC packs) Improved Self Protection Capability Intergraded Body Armor/Vest System (EO/IR/RF) Gas Turbine Compressor to APU Advanced Situational Awareness/Data Upgrade Link Digital Map Interface System Procure equipment used in combat for Universal Aerial Refueling Receptacle home station training (CT-II, JPADS) Slipway (UARRSI) Enhanced resource management Precision Employment of noncapability for combat operations lethal/low collateral damage munitions Complete installation of APN-241 radar HC/MC-130: Data Link (BLOS/LOS) with Color Display C-130: Enhanced SA Suite Electronic Flight Bag Dual SATCOM radios Advanced Hearing Protection Improved Short field Cockpit Active Noise Reduction performance/propeller reliability VTRAT Modified Dual Rails w/palletized PFPS remote displays internal fuel tanks DTED PFPS and moving map display EC-130J: HC/MC-130: LAIRCM VECTS and VTRAT RTIC situational awareness Variable Speed Drogue SATCOM / wideband installation Integrated Electronic Warfare Suite Direction finding DMO and Weapon System Training SOF-unique special mission equipment Simulators /software RF Jammer

Critical Combat Capabilities List

Desired Capabilities List

Essential Capabilities List

C-130: Virtual Electronic Combat Training System (VECTS) Improved MWS detection system AMP FMS Combined computer architecture Propeller Modernization AMP moving map sensor hardening Aircraft secure wireless LAN/WAN E-TOLD & Fuel Planning (PFPS) Defensive systems integration Next generation MWS
23

C-130 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program C-130 SAFIRE Lookout C-130 Advanced IRCM C-130J Advanced IRCM C-130 Tactical Data Link C-130 Cockpit Display Unit (CDU) LM Crashworthy Seat C-130 Digital RWR C-130 MWS Upgrade C-130 NVIS Compatible Cockpit C-130 Yoke-Mounted Dispensers
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0401115 0401134 0401134 0401115 0401115 0401115 0401115 0401115 0401115 0401115
2

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

$13.00 2 $13.00 2 $82.23 2 $113.76 2 $29.62 2 $29.62 2 $39.40 2 $13.75 2 $8.25 2 $8.20 2 $10.00 2 $6.00 2 $15.00 2 $12.90 2 $76.30 2 $76.30 2 $6.09 2 3

$13.00 2 $41.93 2 $41.92 2 $98.94 2 $117.59 2 $59.57 2 $29.62 2 $29.61 2 $8.20 2 $6.00 2 $8.20 2 $6.00 2 $6.00 2 -

Program Total $122.85 $472.09 $118.47 $39.40 $13.75 $32.85 $34.00 $27.90 $381.50 $6.09

$76.30 2 $76.30 2 $76.30 2 4

3080 Appropriation

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

C-130 Surface-to-Air Fire (SAFIRE) Look-Out Capability - Allows for wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft. C-130/C-130J - Advanced IRCM - Allows aircraft to survive in an environment of increasingly complex threats and lethality. C-130 Tactical Data Link (TDL) - Provides critical real-time information to C-130 aircrews and greatly increase their survivability in combat operations. C-130 Cockpit Display Unit (CDU) - View real-time data for aircrew mission flexibility. Loadmaster (LM) Crashworthy Seat - Provides the Loadmaster with a crashworthy seat able to withstand excessive impact or wheels up landing forces. C-130 Digital RWR - Provides the fleet with an advanced, digital RWR capable of ensuring adequate defensive situational awareness against present and future threats. C-130 MWS Upgrade - Enhances existing missile warning system to provide operationally acceptable probabilities of detection and false alarms. C-130 NVIS Compatible Cockpit - Integrated NVIS compatible cockpit provides an increased capability for aircrew during night modes of operations. C-130 Yoke Mounted Dispense Switches (YMDS) - Additional chaff and flare dispenser switch hard-wired into or onto the pilot and copilot yokes. The dispense switch is similar to the dispense switch installed and in use on the MC-130 SOF platforms.

24

HC/MC-130 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program P.E. Number FY09 $1.20 3 $1.25 3 $2.20 3 $0.50 3 $6.50 2 $8.50 2 $4.16 2 $23.55 2 FY10 $2.34 2 $4.88 2 $2.08 2 $1.69 2 $9.00 2 $8.40 2 3

FY11 $4.87 2 $8.40 2 -

FY12 $8.40 2 4

FY13 -

Program Total $3.54 $11.00 $4.28 $2.19 $15.50 $33.70 $4.16 $23.55

HC/MC-130 Tactical Data 0207224 Link HC/MC-130 Enhanced 0207224 AMC HC/MC-130 LARS 0207224 AN/ARS-6 V12 HC/MC-130 Dual 0207224 SATCOM HC/MC/LC -130 EPCS 0401115F HC/MC/LC -130 0401115F Propeller Upgrade HC/MC-130 Dual Rails 0207224 HC-130 AN/AAQ-24 0401134 (LAIRCM)
Notes:
1

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

HC/MC-130 Tactical Data Link - The HC/MC-130 networked with other assets in theater, enhanced SA for CSARTF missions, and reduced fratricide for CSAR forces. HC/MC-130 Enhanced Airborne Mission Commander - Upgrades all HC/MC-130 Rescue aircraft to full Airborne Mission Commander capability to include the ability to transmit full motion video (FMV) from EO/IR sensors, and Multi-Function Color displays. HC/MC-130 AN/ARS-6 V12 LARS - This Lightweight Airborne Radio System modernizes direction finding equipment to enable HC/MC-130s to interrogate survival radios. HC/MC-130 Dual SATCOM Provides Combat Rescue HC/MC-130 aircraft with a second SATCOM radio capability to fill CSARTF Airborne Mission Commander requirement. HC/MC/LC Electronic Propeller Control System (EPCS) - Updates the existing mechanical synchronizer and propeller control system with digital electronics for improved reliability. HC/MC/LC-130 Propeller Improvement Program - Changes propellers to an eight-bladed variant that improves takeoff performance and reduces the logistics footprint. HC/MC-130 Dual Rails Enhanced Cargo Handling System - Provides HC/MC-130 aircraft with rapid onload/offload of both cargo and internal fuel tanks adding mission flexibility. HC-130 AN/AAQ-24 (LAIRCM) - Allows aircraft to survive in an environment of increasingly complex threats and lethality.

25

EC-130 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program EC-130J Advanced IRCM EC-130J RTIC EC-130J SATCOM EC-130J Wideband Satellite Connectivity
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0401134 0401132 0401132 0401132


2

FY09 $45.35 2 $4.40 2 $2.00 2 $2.00 3

FY10 $4.80 2 3

FY11 $3.20 2 -

FY12 4

FY13 -

Program Total $45.35 $4.40 $2.00 $10.00

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

EC-130J - Advanced IRCM - Allows aircraft to survive in an environment of increasingly complex threats and lethality. EC-130J RTIC Situational Awareness - Provides real time information in the cockpit; critical to threat analysis and avoidance while limiting voice transmissions. EC-130J SATCOM Installation - Provides Satellite Communication to ensure compatibility and interoperability with other SOF assets and theater Command and Control (C2) structures. EC-130J Wideband Satellite Connectivity - Provide POTUS with the capability to broadcast to a target audience throughout the globe.

LC-130 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program LC-130 Crevasse Radar LC-130 JATO Replacement
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0401115F 0401115F


2

FY09 $4.00 2 $6.20 2

FY10 $3.00 2 $7.30 2


3

FY11 $7.60 2

FY12 $7.90 2
4

FY13 $8.20 2

Program Total $7.00 $29.30

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

LC-130 Crevasse Detection Radar - Implements radar capability to determine the presence of crevasses in operational areas. LC-130 JATO Replacement Program - Funds production of new JATO motors.

26

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130E/H/J SURFACE-TO-AIR FIRE OBSERVER REAR LOOKOUT CAPABILITY 1. Background. During Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) loadmasters stand watch at the porthole windows in the troop doors to scan check six the ground and horizon for Surface-to-Air Fire (SAFIRE) from the Combat Entry through the Combat Exit checklists. Upon detection of SAFIRE, loadmasters immediately advise the pilots to take evasive action, and initiate counter measures as a means of preventing a direct SAFIRE hit. Windows used for observation in C-130s are relatively small with a restricted field of view. Loadmasters experience neck and back strain while striving to maintain their position against the window to obtain an aft-angled view out the porthole. Furthermore, the window glass is typically scratched and scuffed to the point that viewing becomes difficult. 2. Requirement. AMC Validated AF Form 1067-04-064; AMC R&PC Critical Item. 3. Impact if not funded. When loadmasters don helmets, flack vests, survival vests, NVGs, and attempt to look out the troop door porthole during a tactical departure, vision is extremely restricted. Without a clear, wide-angle view from the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock continuum behind the aircraft, SAFIRE launches could go undetected during critical phases of flight. Undetected SAFIRE launches could result in damage to equipment and potentially loss of the aircraft and injury to the crew. 4. Units Impacted.
109 AW 133 AW 143 AW 146 AW 156 AW 175 WG 193 SOW Schenectady, NY Minneapolis, MN Quonset APT, RI Channel Is AGS, CA San Juan IAP, PR Martin State, MD Harrisburg IAP, PA 123 AW 136 AW 144 AS 152 AW 165 AW 182 AW Louisville, KY Ft Worth, TX Kulis, AK Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Peoria APT, IL 130 AW 139 AW 145 AW 153 AW 166 AW 189 AW Charleston, WV St Joseph APT, MO Charlotte IAP, NC Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE Little Rock AFB, AR

5. Contractor. Argon ST (formally Coherent Systems International), Fairfax, VA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 189 Lookout Windows* (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.65 Program Cost ($ Million) $122.85

* Units required includes 2 doors per aircraft.

27

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 ADVANCED INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (IRCM) SELF PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. ANG C-130s operate worldwide in a low to medium threat environment where shoulder fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPAD) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available, hence a significant threat during take-offs and landings. To counter MANPAD threats the ANG requires an Advanced IRCM system like the AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Counter Measures (LAIRCM) system that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best countermeasures. C-130s will be equipped at 100% Group A and 50% Group B. The configuration on the C-130 is two small laser transmitter assemblies (SLTAs), five AAR-54 sensors, one processor and one control interface unit (CIU). 2. Requirement. LAIRCM ORD 314-92, Aug 98. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The C-130 operates in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality. The aircrew and aircraft will be tasked to operate in this environment while employing the less than state-of-the-art aircraft defensive systems. 4. Units Impacted.
123 AW Louisville, KY 133 AW Minn - St Paul, MN 144 AS Kulis, AK 165 AW Savannah IAP, GA 182 AW Peoria, IL 124 WG Boise, ID 136 AW Carswell JRB, TX 145 AW Charlotte, NC 166 AW Wilmington, DE 130 AW Charleston, WV 139 AW St Joseph, MO 152 AW Reno, NV 179 AW Mansfield, OH

5. Contractors. Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems, Rolling Meadows, IL; BAE Systems, Nashua, NH; Lockheed Martin, Orlando, FL. 6. Cost.
Product Type 115 Group A Kits (3010) 56 Group B Kits (3010) 15 Support Equipment (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.12 $2.64 $13.03 Program Cost ($ Million) $128.80 $147.84 $195.45 $472.09

28

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130J ADVANCED INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (IRCM) SELF PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. ANG C-130Js operate worldwide in a low to medium threat environment where shoulder-fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPAD) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available, hence a significant threat during take-offs and landings. To counter MANPAD threats the ANG requires an Advanced IRCM system like the AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) system that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best countermeasures. The configuration for the C-130Js includes two Guardian Laser Transmitter Assemblies (GLTA), five AAR-54 sensors, one processor and one control interface unit (CIU). 2. Requirement. LAIRCM ORD 314-92, Aug 98. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The C-130J operates in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality. The aircrew and aircraft will be tasked to operate in this environment while employing the less than state-of-the-art aircraft defensive systems. 4. Units Impacted.
135 AG Baltimore, MD 143 AW Quonset, RI 146 AW Channel Island, CA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems, Rolling Meadows, IL; BAE Systems, Nashua, NH; Lockheed Martin, Orlando, FL. 6. Cost.
Product Type Group A Kits* (3010) Group B Kits (3010) Support Equipment (3010) Total Units Required 24 12 3 Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.31 $2.39 $19.45 Program Cost ($ Million) $ 31.44 $ 28.68 $58.35 $118.47

29

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 TACTICAL DATA LINK (TDL) 1. Background. Recent combat operations highlighted the need for comprehensive, networked command and control (C2) throughout all theaters of operation. Installation of a TDL provides this C2 link and maximizes C-130 aircrew situational awareness with Beyond-Line-of-Sight (BLOS) and Line-of-Sight (LOS) capabilities. It provides critical real-time information to C-130 aircrews so they can participate in the present day network-centric battlespace and greatly increase their survivability in combat operations. The resulting connectivity with C2 elements enhances the situational awareness of C-130 tactical aircraft including joint and coalition aircraft involved in theater operations. A TDL capability should be compatible with any situational awareness Cockpit Display Units (CDU) utilized by the community. 2. Requirement. MAF Network Enabling Concept, 26 Apr 06; AMC MAF Data Link Integration Technical Requirements Document (TRD), 25 Oct 06; Tactical Data link Transformation CDD, Increment 1, JROCM, 23 Jun 04; AMC R&PC Mission Essential 07. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without a tactical data link, ANG C-130 assets will remain outside the C2 networks in theaters of operation and blind to the wealth of real-time information available to the war fighter resulting in less effective mission performance. 4. Units Impacted.
109 AW 133 AW 139 AW 146 AW 156 AW 182 AW Schenectady, NY Minneapolis, MN St Joseph APT, MO Channel Island, CA San Juan IAP, PR Peoria APT, IL 123 AW 135 AG 143 AW 152 AW 165 AW 189 AW Louisville, KY Martin State APT, MD Quonset APT, RI Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Little Rock AFB, AR 130 AW 144 AS 145 AW 153 AW 166 AW 193 SOW Charleston, WV Anchorage, AK Charlotte IAP, NC Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE Harrisburg, PA

5. Contractors. AIRINC, Oklahoma City, OK; Boeing, Chantilly, VA; Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 197 TDL Radios* (3010)
* Includes spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.20

Program Cost ($ Million) $39.40

30

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 SITUATIONAL AWARENESS COCKPIT DISPLAY UNIT (CDU) 1. Background. C-130 aircrews lack equipment to gain timely battlespace knowledge of enemy threats, friendly positions, and other pertinent wartime information. The ability to view real-time data provides aircrew flexibility to adjust to situations as they unfold. Information such as GPS position on a moving map, real-time threat data, weather updates, and electronic flight publications must be available at the pilots fingertips for immediate viewing to increase mission effectiveness. The CDU should be expandable to accommodate future tactical data link information to further enhance C-130 survivability. 2. Requirement. MAF Network Enabling Concept, 29 Mar 05; MAF Data Link Integration Technical Requirements Document (TRD), 25 Oct 06; AMC R&PC Mission Essential 07. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without a situational awareness display with moving map and data link expandability, crews will continue to make critical decisions without accurate real-time information in the cockpit. 4. Units Impacted.
109 AW 133 AW 139 AW 145 AW 153 AW 166 AW 193 SOW Schenectady, NY Minneapolis, MN St Joseph APT, MO Charlotte IAP, NC Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE Harrisburg, PA 123 AW 135 AG 143 AW 146 AW 156 AW 182 AW Louisville, KY Martin State APT, MD Quonset APT, RI Channel Island, CA San Juan IAP, PR Peoria APT, IL 130 AW 136 AW 144 AS 152 AW 165 AW 189 AW Charleston, WV Ft Worth, TX Anchorage, AK Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Little Rock AFB, AR

5. Contractors. CMC Electronics, Chicago, IL; Raytheon, Indianapolis, IN; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 393 CDUs * (3010)
* Includes

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.035

Total Program Cost ($ Million) $13.75

spares

31

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 LOADMASTER CRASHWORTHY SEAT 1. Background. Air National Guard C-130 aircraft do not have a designated loadmaster seat in the cargo compartment designed to withstand excessive impact or wheels-up landing forces. Yet while carrying troops or passengers in the cargo compartment, the loadmaster is the crewmember responsible for ensuring their safe and expeditious evacuation of the aircraft during emergency egress situations (i.e. wheels-up landing). During Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) loadmasters are directed to stand at the troop doors for up to 8 hours while performing the Combat Entry and Combat Exit checklists. Loadmasters don a strap restraint harness and take positions at the troop doors to scan the ground for Surfaceto-Air Fire (SAFIRE). Due to the design, the restraint harness is only authorized during approaches and after departure, and not for use during takeoff and landing. The restraint harness is physically demanding on the legs, spine, shoulders and arms during low-level turbulence, thermal drafts, and combat and evasive maneuvers. 2. Requirement. AMC Validated AF Form 1067-04-065; Class A Mishap MC-130P 20020213FTEV016A SIB 2 Recommendation; Class A Mishap MC-130H 20020612FTEV033A Report, ORS 6; Fall 04/05/06/07 AMC R&PC Mission Critical Item. 3. Impact if not funded. The Safety Investigation Board (SIB) for an MC-130P Class A mishap recommended the development and procurement of a load master crashworthy seat. The same recommendation was made for an MC-130H Class A mishap in the Other Recommendation of Significance (ORS) section. If the loadmaster becomes a casualty during the wheels-up landing or impact due to inadequate restraint, not only does the Air Force lose a valuable resource, but expeditious evacuation of troops or passengers is jeopardized and survivability is at risk. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW 129 RQW 135 AG 143 AW 152 AW 165 AW 182 AW Suffolk, NY Moffett, CA Martin State, MD Quonset APT, RI Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Peoria APT, IL 109 AW 130 AW 136 AW 145 AW 153 AW 166 AW 189 AW Schenectady, NY Charleston, WV Ft Worth, TX Charlotte IAP, NC Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE Little Rock AFB, AR 123 AW 133 AW 139 AW 146 AW 156 AW 176 WG 193 SOW Louisville, KY Minneapolis, MN St Joseph APT, MO Channel Is AGS, CA San Juan IAP, PR Kulis, AK Harrisburg IAP, PA

5. Contractor. Argon ST (formely Coherent Systems International), Fairfax VA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 219* Loadmaster Seats (3010)
* Two seats per kit. Includes spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.15

Program Cost ($ Million) $32.85

32

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 DIGITAL RECEIVER, THREAT GEO-LOCATON AND SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT/REPLACEMENT FOR ALR-69 RADAR WARNING RECEIVER (RWR) 1. Background. The current ALR-69 RWR provides the aircrew with threat radar warning indications. The legacy ALR-69 has subassemblies that are no longer supportable, is unable to provide acceptable defensive situational awareness and is incapable of supporting the onboard/off board warfighter requirements. Specific performance shortfalls include inadequate response time, overload conditions, unacceptable identification performance, inadequate threat detection capability, unacceptable threat geo-location and lack of digital information. Upgrading the legacy RWR with a modification that incorporates an advanced digital receiver or replacing it will address the aforementioned issues while providing accurate passive targeting information. The ability to pass target quality emitter coordinates to any net-centric aircraft is a key component of Air Combat Commands Sensors Forward concept of operations and a flow down requirement for mobility aircraft. This capability will enhance the Air Forces ability to safely prosecute assigned missions in a more lethal threat environment. 2. Requirement. AN/ALR-69A Capabilities Production Document approved by AFROCC, 17 Nov 05. 3. Impact if Not Funded. The ability of C-130s to operate today in an increasingly complex and lethal threat environment is significantly impacted by aircraft with an inadequate RWR or no RWR. A combination of more lethal environments and future threat systems will create denied access regions for legacy ALR-69 equipped C-130s significantly impacting combatant commander and Air Force mission requirements. 4. Units Impacted.
109 AW 133 AW 145 AW 156 AW 176 WG Schenectady, NY Minneapolis, MN Charlotte IAP, NC San Juan IAP, PR Anchorage, AK 123 AW 136 AW 152 AW 165 AW 182 AW Louisville, KY Ft Worth, TX Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Peoria APT, IL 130 AW 139 AW 153 AW 166 AW 189 AW Charleston, WV St Joseph APT, MO Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE Little Rock AFB, AR

5. Contractors. BAE, Yonkers, NY; Nashua, NH; EDO, North Amityville, NY; Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA; ITT Avionics, Clifton, NJ; Lockheed Martin, Owego, NY; Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL; Raytheon, Goleta, CA. 6. Cost.
Units Required * Non-Recurring Engineering (3600) 160 RWRs (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.15 Program Cost ($ Million) $10.00 $24.00 $34.00

* Includes required spares, support equipment, geo-location and technical orders.

33

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 MISSILE APPROACH WARNING SYSTEM UPGRADE 1. Background. ANG C-130s operate worldwide in a low to medium threat environment where shoulder-fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPAD) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available. This threat is significant during take-offs and landings. To counter MANPAD threats the ANG requires a missile warning system that has a very high probability of detecting a missile launch as well as a very low false alarm rate. The missile approach warning system works in conjunction with pyrotechnic expendables and/or laser based countermeasures. An upgrade to the existing missile warning system or a more advanced missile warning system is required for the C-130 to provide operationally acceptable probabilities of detection and false alarms. 2. Requirement. AMC ANNEX 314-92 to LAIRCM ORD; NAVY AAR-47 ORD. 3. Impact if Not Funded. The C-130 operates in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality without pre-planned threats and therefore must have a robust MANPAD self defense capability. C-130 defensive systems that do not meet acceptable rates of detection and false alarms will result in either denied areas or loss of personnel and equipment. 4. Units Impacted.
109 AW 133 AW 139 AW 145 AW 153 AW 166 AW Schenectady, NY Minneapolis, MN St Joseph APT, MO Charlotte IAP, NC Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE 123 AW 135 AG 143 AW 146 AW 156 AW 182 AW Louisville, KY Martin State APT, MD Quonset APT, RI Channel Island, CA San Juan IAP, PR Peoria APT, IL 130 AW 136 AW 144 AS 152 AW 165 AW 189 AW Charleston, WV Ft Worth, TX Anchorage, AK Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Little Rock AFB, AR

5. Contractors. ATK, Clearwater, FL; BAE Systems, Nashua, NH; Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL. 6. Cost.
Units Required 186 MWS Upgrades (3010)* Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.15 Program Cost ($ Million) $27.90

* Cost includes aircraft installation, test equipment and 10% spares.

34

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 INTEGRATED NIGHT VISION IMAGING SYSTEM (NVIS) COCKPIT LIGHTING 1. Background. Flying with night vision goggles requires special cockpit lighting to ensure goggles perform properly. The original solution to place tape over high intensity lighting to decrease its intensity was primitive and presented a high safety risk. The emergence of lighting harnesses were designed and installed in C-130 cockpits to ensure compatibility with NVIS. However, the harnesses were not intended to be a long-term solution to the lighting problem. Newer C-130H3 aircraft have integrated NVIS cockpit lightning. Current lightning harnesses lack compatibility with some cockpit instrument lighting. 2. Requirement. Fall 06/07 E/H/AMP AMC R&PC Categorized as Mission Essential. 3. Impact if not funded. Integrated NVIS compatible cockpit provides an increased capability for aircrew during night operations. These crews will be operating in this environment for the foreseeable future and an immediate need exists to enhance and augment their ability to survive and accomplish the mission. 4. Units Impacted.
109 AW 139 AW 156 AW 189 AW Schenectady, NY St Joseph APT, MO San Juan IAP, PR Little Rock AFB, AR 123 AW Louisville, KY 144 AS Anchorage, AK 165 AW Savannah, GA 136 AW Ft Worth, TX 152 AW Reno IAP, NV 166 AW Wilmington APT, DE

5. Contractor. Oxley, Inc., Branford, CT. 6. Cost.


Units Required 109 NVIS Cockpits* (3010)
* Includes spares (excludes C-130H3, C-130J).

Unit Cost ($ Million) $3.50

Program Cost ($ Million) $381.50

35

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 YOKE MOUNTED DISPENSE SWITCHES (YMDS) 1. Background. This C-130 modification proposal provides the capability for the pilot and copilot to dispense chaff and flares on the ANG C-130 fleet to enhance survivability in a combat threat environment. Providing a yoke-mounted chaff and flare dispense capability is critical to mitigate the surface-to-air threats currently encountered by airlift aircrews. The modification is part of the C-130 avionics modernization program (AMP) and desired by aircrews for several years. Deployment of this capability for ANG C-130s, provides great benefit for a relatively low cost. The modification is AMP-compliant and like the C-130 APN-241 radar modification (also part of AMP), it provides capability to the field now rather than waiting for a modification that may be realized too late to protect our aircrews currently flying in combat. 2. Requirement. AMC Validated 1067-04-024. Fall 06/07 E/H/AMP AMC R&PC Categorized as Mission Need. 3. Impact if not funded. YMDS provide an increased capability and cover a gap during specific phases of flight to counter and defeat threats most often faced by deployed crews. In the absence of this capability, the aircrew may take longer to react to a threat which increases the risk of damage to the aircraft and potential loss of aircrew. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW 129 RQW 136 AW 152 AW 165 AW 182 AW Gabreski Field, NY Moffett FAF, CA Ft Worth, TX Reno IAP, NV Savannah, GA Peoria APT, IL 109 AW 130 AW 139 AW 153 AW 166 AW 189 AW Schenectady, NY Charleston, WV St Joseph APT, MO Cheyenne MAP, WY Wilmington APT, DE Little Rock AFB, AR 123 AW 133 AW 145 AW 156 AW 176 WG Louisville, KY Minneapolis, MN Charlotte IAP, NC San Juan IAP, PR Anchorage, AK

5. Contractor. EJM Aerospace, Crestview, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required 174 YMDS Kits (3010)* Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.035 ** Program Cost ($ Million) $6.09

* Kits include 2 YMDS per aircraft plus spares. ** Includes required support equipment, and technical orders.

36

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC-130 TACTICAL DATA LINK (TDL) 1. Background. Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) forces require improved situational awareness (SA). A tactical data link provides during Combat Search and Rescue Task Force (CSARTF) operations. With this capability, CSAR forces can quickly locate and recover survivors and provide critical data to command and control (C2) nets, and protective fighter and attack aircraft. The HC/MC-130 needs to be networked with other assets in theater to ensure enhanced SA for CSARTF missions and reduce the potential for fratricide among CSAR forces. The proposed solution is the Enhanced Position Location Radio System (EPLRS) with Situational Awareness Data Link (SADL) software because it is the solution possessed or being pursued by other CSAR platforms (HH-60G, A-10, Block 30 F-16s). The long term solution will be a Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) with similar capabilities. 2. Requirement. CAF MNS 315-92, Real Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC). Global Information Grid CRD, JROCM 134-01, 30 Aug 01. Air Force Tactical Data Link Master Plan. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Real time information into and out of the cockpit (RTIC/RTOC) is critical to CSAR, drop-zone identification, and threat analysis while reducing voice communications. Lack of RTIC through a data link creates high potential for mission failures, lost aircrew, and lost aircraft due to lack of situational awareness and airspace management in the battle area. The communications suites of ANG rescue aircraft will not be interoperable with CSAR force packages. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA 176 WG Kulis, AK

5. Contractor. Raytheon, Fullerton, CA. 6. Cost.


Units Required* 13 EPLRS w/SADL (3010) Integration/Testing (NRE) (3600) Total Cost
*No spares required.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.18 N/A

Program Cost ($ Million) $2.34 $1.20 $3.54

37

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC-130 ENHANCED AIRBORNE MISSION COMMANDER (AMC) 1. Background. Rescues performed in combat and in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina highlight the need to modernize the HC/MC-130 role as Airborne Mission Commander. Realtime information exchange is paramount during personnel recovery operations requiring great precision and speed in asymmetric battle space environments. Recent technical advancements provide the means to integrate existing HC/MC-130 sensors with modern off-board processors and data links facilitating superior C2 and tactical coordination from either an overhead or offset orbit. Equipping HC-130 AN/AAQ-36 and the MC130P AN/AAQ-38 electro-optical, infrared sensors with a Full Motion Video (FMV) link capability relieves reliance on high-demand ISR assets. Integrating eye-safe laser range finder, illuminator and designator capabilities to Find, Fix and Track (F2T) targets of interest, or to precisely commensurate survivor location information, takes the search out of search and rescue and provides the Combined Force Air Component Commander (CFACC) with a powerful collaboration tool in uncertain tactical environments. PC-based smart multi-function displays with off-board processing capability provide the flexibility, power and storage capacity to manage time-critical digital information without upgrading the legacy 1553 data bus and navigation systems. Persistent orbits require reduced acoustics and increased performance to reach and maintain higher altitudes minimizing threat exposure during clandestine operations. 2. Requirement. Critical capability required by US Air Force Central Command (CENTCOM) to integrate and synchronize CSAR with time-sensitive Combat Air Forces and Special Operations Force operations; and an essential capability for homeland security and natural disaster response. Tactical Line-of-Site/Beyond-Line-of-Site data link is a key enabler. Expect CENTCOM Urgent Operational Need (UON). 3. Impact If Not Funded. The CSAR task force has no organic FMV capability; no precision marking for fixed or dynamic targets; and no Find, Fix and Track (F2T) capability for cross cueing. CSAR is reliant on low-density, high demand weapons systems to provide these critical capabilities during recovery operations despite on-going tactical requirements of equal priority. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA 176 WG Kulis, AK

5. Contractors. MTC Technologies, Parsippany, NJ; DRS Technologies, Dayton, OH. 6. Cost.
Units Required 13 x CMDL (FMV) Mods (3010) 13x EO/IR sensor upgrades (3010) 13 x smart MFD / tactical server (3010) Integration/Testing (NRE) (3600) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) 0. 25 $0.25 $0.25 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $3.25 $3.25 $3.25 $1.25 $11.00

38

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC-130 LIGHTWEIGHT AIRBORNE RADIO SYSTEM (LARS) AN/ARS-6 V12 UPGRADE 1. Background. Numerous fielded combat search and rescue (CSAR) survival radios provide a wide spectrum of capability. Survival radios range from the basic PRC-90 to the Combat Survivor-Evader Locator (CSEL) radio. However, newer radios offer more accurate information to CSAR forces attempting to rescue the downed survivor. The AN/ARS-6 Lightweight Airborne Radio System (LARS) cockpit radio currently installed in the HH-60, HC-130 and A10, can only display range and bearing to the survivor. The AN/ARS-6V12 LARS radio will allow rescue forces to receive and display geographic coordinates, and text messages sent by isolated personnel using newer generation survival radios thereby greatly increasing the probability of a successful mission. 2. Requirement. HC/MC-130 Mission Area Plan. 3. Impact If Not Funded. CSAR missions will continue to be hampered by a lack of coordination and accurate information. This could result in failed missions to rescue downed aircrews and their potential capture by enemy forces. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA 176 WG Kulis, AK

5. Contractors. Cubic Corp, San Diego, CA; General Dynamics, Scottsdale, AZ. 6. Cost.
Units Required 13 AN/ARS-6v12 (3010) Integration/Testing (NRE) (3600) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.16 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $2.08 $2.20 $4.28

39

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC-130 DUAL SATCOM 1. Background. The HC/MC130 is the airborne mission commander (AMC) platform of choice for combat search and rescue (CSAR) and joint personnel recovery operations during peacetime and combat. The ability to transmit and receive voice, data or both, on two separate satellite communications (SATCOM) channels has emerged as a critical capability enhancing command and control as well as situational awareness. Dual SATCOM specifically facilitates several additional capabilities required in the Global War on Terrorism including: (1) ability to transmit and receive on two separate networks requiring different Communications Security (COMSEC); (2) ability to facilitate beyond line-of-sight (BLOS) data link in remote environments; (3) redundancy for high risk missions where SATCOM is the only means of external communication. Dual SATCOM must have 100% compatibility with existing CSAR/SOF task force SATCOM systems used in the air and by ground forces; a requirement that holds especially true for Demand Assigned Multiple Access (DAMA) communications. Dual SATCOM must have ability to operate simultaneously. 2. Requirement. Critical capability required by US Air Forces Central Command (CENTCOM) to integrate and synchronize CSAR with time-sensitive combat air forces (CAF) and special operations forces (SOF) operations; and an essential capability for homeland security and natural disaster response. Expect CENTCOM Urgent Operational Need (UON). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Inability to meet current requirements for tactical to operational level communications in the Global War on Terrorism. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA 176 WG Kulis, AK

5. Contractor. Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, OH. 6. Cost.


Units Required 13 SATCOM receivers (3010) Integration/Testing (NRE) (3600) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.13 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $1.69 $0.50 $2.19

40

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC/LC -130 ELECTRONIC PROPELLER CONTROL SYSTEM (EPCS) 1. Background. The Electronic Propeller Control System (EPCS) replaces current (1950s design) mechanical valve housings and synchrophaser (1970s) with modern Electronic Valve Housings and Electronic Propeller Controls. The EPCS enhances performance because of improved synchrophasing during ground operations and improved responsiveness from the controls (very little delay after making throttle adjustments). Pilots report instant response to throttle adjustments (verses delays experienced by the current systems) and noise and vibration generated from the current system due to inefficient synchrophasing is reduced by 400%. Also, the new system has a higher system reliability with a direct improvement to readiness and availability. This EPCS has an estimated Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) rate increase to approximately 12,000 hours, or 8 times the MTBF of the current system. Parts count is reduced by almost half and the digital electronics dont wear out or need adjustment. The system has built in diagnostics and all adjustments are automatically completed. The EPCS also improves crew comfort and reduces maintenance actions (due to vibration damage). The Navy has already incorporated this system in the P-2 aircraft and they have documented a 4% increase in mission completion due directly to the use of the EPCS. 2. Requirement. AMC Validated 1067. 3. Impact if not funded. If not funded the LC/HC/MC-130 aircraft would not benefit from the improved performance, increased mission availability, or reduced maintenance and operational costs of the EPCS. Also, the EPCS is a pre-requisite component for the eight-bladed propeller. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY Kulis, AK 176 WG 109 AW Schenectady, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA

5. Contractor. Hamilton-Sundstrand, Windsor Locks, CT. 6. Cost.


Units Required Integration Costs (3010) EPCS - 23 (10 LC/13 MCHC aircraft) (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $4.00 $0.50 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.00 $11.50 $15.50

41

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC/LC-130 EIGHT BLADED PROPELLER UPGRADE 1. Background. ANG LC-130Hs from Schenectady, NY have ski-equipped landing gear to enable landings and takeoffs on snow and ice. A significant portion of their mission requires landing on deep field runways and unimproved snow and ice. In order to ensure successful takeoff from deep field bases the use of Jet Assisted Take-Off (JATO) motors is required. Dwindling supplies of circa 1950 motors will require funding replacements which will cost approximately $7.0 million per year. The NP2000 is an 8-bladed, composite propeller that significantly improves the thrust output of the current C-130 engines during take-off. This additional thrust would offset future JATO requirements by enabling the aircraft to takeoff without the use of the supplemental thrust provided by JATO. An added benefit of the 8-bladed propeller is the availability of this additional power at any time during a mission. The HC/MC130s provide Combat Search and Recovery (CSAR) air refueling capability. The added power, improved supportability, reduced mobility footprint, and smaller noise signature make the eight bladed propellers a natural complement for this mission. 2. Requirement. AMC Validated 1067. 3. Impact if not funded. If a propulsion system upgrade for the LC-130 community is not funded, the JATO budget impacts may seriously reduce polar operations in the future. The HC/MC-130 aircraft would not benefit from the reduced cost of maintenance, experience the improved performance and reduced noise signature of the 8 bladed propellers. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY 176 WG Kulis, AK 109 AW Schenectady, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA

5. Contractor. Hamilton-Sundstrand, Windsor Locks, CT. 6. Cost.


Units Required Integration Costs (3010) NP2000* - 27 aircraft (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $1.10 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.00 $29.70 $33.70

* Electronic Propeller Control System (EPCS) is pre-requisite component replaces mechanical valve housing.

42

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC/MC-130 DUAL RAIL CARGO HANDLING SYSTEM 1. Background. The HC/MC130 currently lacks the capability to rapidly change its cargo compartment configuration in a timely manner commensurate with the requirements of the current Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) mission and Personnel Recovery (PR) operations during peacetime and combat. The internal fuel tank is required for missions that require longrange helicopter air refueling (HAR). HAR also significantly extends loiter time. Other CSAR missions require more cargo compartment space which involves removing the internal fuel tank including: (1) tactical airdrops of large or multiple Pararescuemen (PJ) vehicles; (2) CSAR organic airlift in theater; and (3) airland resupply missions for HH-60 regeneration at forward area Landing Zone (LZ) sites. Currently, both removal and installation of the internal Benson fuel tank requires four to six hours before the aircraft is mission ready. The internal Benson fuel tank now installed is incompatible with dual rails due to its hard-mount installation and would require removal for the dual rail installation. 2. Requirement. OIF/OEF Lessons Learned. AFSOC 1067. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without the dual rail cargo handling system HC/MC-130 aircraft will be unable to rapidly configure or reconfigure to support organic cargo requirements among rescue assets. The current cargo area configuration allows for an internal fuel tank and a very limited area for cargo. The dual rail cargo handling system supports the flexibility to maximize the capability of the HC/MC-130 platform. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski ANGB, NY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractor. AAR Cargo Systems, Livonia, MI. 6. Cost.


Units Required 13 Dual Rail Enhanced Cargo Handling Systems (3010) Unit Cost * ($ Millions) $0.32 Program Cost ($ Millions) $4.16

* No spares required, includes NRE, install and Technical Orders.

43

INFORMATION PAPER ON HC-130 AN/AAQ-24 LARGE AIRCRAFT INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (LAIRCM) SELF-PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. ANG HC-130s are tasked to rescue downed airmen worldwide in a low to medium threat environment of which shoulder fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPAD) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available. MANPADs are a significant threat during takeoffs, landings and missions such as HH-60 rescue helicopter refueling operations. To counter MANPAD threats, the AN/AAQ-24(V) LAIRCM system is the system of record selected by the Air Force that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best countermeasures. 2. Requirement. LAIRCM ORD 314-92, Aug 98. AFSOC Statement of Need, 001-91, Infrared Countermeasures Improvements. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The HC-130 operates in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality. The aircrew and aircraft will be tasked to operate in this environment while employing the less than state-of-the-art aircraft defensive systems. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski, NY 211 RQS Kulis, AK

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems, Rolling Meadows, IL. 6. Cost.


Product Type 5 Group B Kits (3010) Support Equipment (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.53 * $10.90 Program Cost ($ Million) $12.65 $10.90 $23.55

* Includes required spares, support equipment, and technical orders. All HC-130s have Group A installed. Only Group B is required.

44

INFORMATION PAPER ON EC-130J ADVANCED INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (IRCM) SELF PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. ANG EC-130Js perform demanding missions worldwide in a low to medium threat environment of which shoulder-fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPAD) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available, hence a significant threat during take-offs and landings. To counter MANPAD threats the ANG requires an Advanced IRCM system like the AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Counter Measures (LAIRCM) system that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best countermeasures. 2. Requirement. LAIRCM ORD 314-92, Aug 98. AFSOC Statement of Need, 001-91, Infrared Countermeasures Improvements. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The EC-130J operates in increasingly complex and lethal threat environments. The aircrew and aircraft will be tasked to operate in this environment while employing the less than state-of-the-art ALE-47 aircraft defensive system. 4. Unit Impacted.
193 SOW Middletown, PA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems, Rolling Meadows, IL; BAE Systems, Nashua NH: Lockheed Martin, Orlando, FL. 6. Cost.
Product Type 7 Group A Kits (3010) 7 Group B Kits (3010) Support Equipment (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.31 $2.39 * $19.45 Program Cost ($ Million) $9.17 $16.73 $19.45 $45.35

* Includes required spares, support equipment, and technical orders.

45

INFORMATION PAPER ON EC-130J REAL TIME INFORMATION IN THE COCKPIT (RTIC) 1. Background. The capability for bringing Real Time Information In the Cockpit (RTIC) was not included in the EC-130J communications suite. Currently it has a Tactical Information Broadcast System (TIBS) - a legacy carry on situational awareness system overlaid on a Portable Flight Planning Software (PFPS) moving map. However, this system is quickly becoming unsupportable and there are not enough to outfit all the aircraft. It is mandatory for survivability of the platform since the EC-130J often operates under due regard situations without AWACS or air traffic control making crews solely responsible to avoid commercial, friendly or hostile military traffic. This is especially critical on Commando Solo EC-130J aircraft due to degraded communications when broadcasting during Psychological Operations (PSYOP). 2. Requirement. AFSOC JORD 022-91-ID, CAF MNS 315-92, Real Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC); Global Information Grid CRD, JROCM 134-01, 30 Aug 01; AMC May 020671 R&PC Requirement; Air Force Tactical Data Link Master Plan. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Capability for providing real time information into and out of the cockpit (RTIC/RTOC) is critical to threat analysis and avoidance while reducing voice communications. Lack of RTIC creates high potential for mission failures, lost aircrew, and lost aircraft due to lack of situational awareness and airspace management in the battle area. The four current systems will soon become unsustainable due to lack of spares and replacement parts. The four Super J aircraft currently have no situational awareness capability. It is imperative that a replacement be procured and installed before the present system is unsustainable. 4. Unit Impacted.
193 SOW Harrisburg IAP, PA

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 8 RTIC Systems (3010) Integration/Testing (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.30 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $2.40 $2.00 $4.40

46

INFORMATION PAPER ON EC-130J SATCOM INSTALLATION 1. Background. Satellite Communication (SATCOM) is only installed on the stretch C-130J fleet, not the standard or stubby C-130Js. As a result, four of the seven EC-130Js are not equipped with SATCOM. It is imperative to install SATCOM on the remaining aircraft to ensure compatibility and interoperability with other special operation force assets and the theater Command and Control (C2) structure. 2. Requirement. WEPTAC 2007 Critical Item. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without SATCOM the EC-130J cannot meet current concept of operations and has inefficient or non-existent command & control communications in theaters or environments where line-of-sight communications are not available. AF Special Operation Command, in conjunction with the National Guard Bureau and U.S. Southern Command (USSOCOM) is developing a plan to use these aircraft for other USSOCOM tasked missions. SATCOM is a requirement/essential for all missions under consideration. 4. Unit Impacted.
193 SOW Harrisburg IAP, PA

5. Contractor. Lockheed-Martin, Marietta, GA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 4 SATCOMs (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.50 Program Cost ($ Million) $2.00

47

INFORMATION PAPER ON EC-130J WIDEBAND SATELLITE CONNECTIVITY 1. Background. A recurring deficiency since the 1990s is the EC-130Js inability to receive real-time Psychological Operations (PSYOP) audio/video from the Joint PSYOP Task Force preventing live President of the US (POTUS) broadcasts. Currently the aircrew receives generic, non-event driven messages prior to flight. These time delays may cause dissemination of information that is incorrect and unbelievable thus reducing the PSYOP campaigns effectiveness and credibility. This shortfall has been repeatedly identified by tasking agencies and a test system was installed on the EC-130E. However, lack of funding prevented further installation. 2. Requirement. CAF-AMC-AFSOC 002-95-III-C FOR ADVANCED WIDEBAND TERMINALS, 29 Mar 2004 reference Para 1.8.7 pg 20, Table 6-1, and Appendix A; AFSOC JORD 001-99 for POBS Airborne Special Mission Equipment, 28 Mar 05. 3. Impact If Not Funded. PSYOP programs will be a minimum of eight hours old when broadcast. POTUS will lack the capability to broadcast live to target audience throughout the globe. Since the 193 SOW does not produce PSYOP products, it cannot perform missions without the means of receiving products from other agencies. This connectivity would reduce or eliminate the need to deploy a dedicated US Army PSYOP team with the unit and result in a timely and effective PSYOP broadcast capability. It has been repeatedly proven during current operations that PSYOP effectiveness is highly dependent on timely and accurate PSYOP messages. 4. Unit Impacted.
193 SOW Harrisburg IAP, PA

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 5 SATCOM Systems (3010) Integration/Testing (NRE) (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.60 * N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $8.00 $2.00 $10.00

* Includes required spares, support equipment, and technical orders.

48

INFORMATION PAPER ON LC-130 CREVASSE DETECTION RADAR 1. Background. The New York Air National Guard (109 AW) has the responsibility for supporting the Air Forces only arctic environment capability. The 109 AW supports both Air Force polar operations and National Science Foundation (NSF) polar research missions using specialized, ski-equipped LC-130 aircraft. Over the last four decades, LC-130 aircraft have sustained serious damage while landing on unsurveyed ice and snow covered areas. The 109th has an immediate need for crevasse detection radar to protect the aircraft during deep field missions. The radar also has additional capabilities including polar search and rescue and airborne sensing. Additionally, current methods to identify hazards with national imaging assets entail long lead times and increasing unreliability. The crevasse detection radar is needed to operate safely and effectively in these areas. The ANG (in conjunction with Sandia Labs) successfully completed an evaluation of a production prototype, and have started an integration program to install the radar in the LC-130 and are continuing to improve the operation of the radar. 2. Requirement. MAJCOM (ANG) AF Form 1067, dated 19 Nov 04. 3. Impact if not funded. The crevasse detection radar is required to find hazards and dangers associated with operation in the polar deep field environment. Without this radar, the aircraft will continue to risk damage and personal injury from hidden crevasses. 4. Unit Impacted.
109 AW Schenectady, NY

5. Contractor. Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM. 6. Cost.


Units Required Integration Costs (3010) 4 Production Radar Units (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.75 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.00 $3.00 $7.00

49

INFORMATION PAPER ON LC-130 JET ASSISTED TAKE-OFF PROGRAM 1. Background. The New York Air National Guard (109th AW), provides 100% of the Air Force arctic environment requirements and the National Science Foundation's (NSF) polar research missions using specialized, ski-equipped LC-130 aircraft. The MK 6 Jet Assisted TakeOff (JATO) rocket motor enables ski equipped LC-130 operations in deep field locations. Currently, the LC-130 is using existing JATO bottles produced in the 1950s. By 2011, existing stocks of JATO bottles will be fully depleted. It is critical that ANG procures replacement JATO motors as soon as possible. If the motors are not replaced, the LC-130 will have to severally limit their deep field missions in the polar-regions. Indian Head Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) will complete the Phase I development of the new design but there is no funding to complete production efforts. Funding is required in FY08 to complete production and ensure continued operational capability. Also, continued production funding is required to establish a replacement program for assets consumed in the field. 2. Requirement. NGB ORD 002-03, dated 20 Feb 03. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The deficiencies described above, if not addressed, will result in the cancellation of all deep field operations for the LC-130 in 2011. This would include both the science and rescue missions. Alternate methods for transportation will have to be established and the loss of operational capability will need to be addressed. 4. Unit Impacted.
109 AW Schenectady, NY

5. Contractor. Indian Head NSWC, Indian Head, MD. 6. Cost.


JATO Replacement 1628 Replacement JATO Motors (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.018 Program Cost ($ Million) $29.30

50

E-8

JSTARS

EYES OF THE NIGHT

The Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) has provided 30,000 OEF/OIF combat hours since 2002 and is the premier command and control system of choice of Combatant Commanders. The E-8C is the worlds most advanced wide-area airborne battle management aircraft that brings a unique combination of robust communication and real-time ground surveillance to both the air and ground battle spaces and true network centric warfare. Through continued investment in modernization, the E-8C will remain relevant to joint force combat operations well into the 21st Century. The 116 ACW at Robins AFB, GA, is home to 17 E-8Cs and the only E-8(T)C and stands as a pioneer as the first Total Force wing, combining active-duty and Air National Guard Airmen in a single unit. An unblemished combat record and continuous deployment in the combat theater since 2001 with over 20,000 flying hours in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, stand testament to the success of the Total Force concept. The 116 ACW is manned by 1,625 active duty Air Force personnel, 90 active duty Army personnel, and 1141 ANG personnel. Modernization efforts are underway to enhance the war fighting capabilities of the E-8 by fielding the Interim Capability for Airborne Networking (ICAN), Force XXI Battle Command for Brigade and Below (FBCB2) blue-force situational awareness tool, an enhanced Fuel Quantity Indicating System (FQIS), and a secure beyond line-of-sight communications suite.

E-8C Joint STARS 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Enhance Aircraft viability through Engine Replacement, 8.33kHz VHF radio installation, and Control/Display Unit (CDU) 7000 Prime Mission Equipment Replacement GWOT Target Set Requirements Communication/Network Upgrade (CNU) Phase 1 Link 16 & IBS-1 Mission System Trainer Target ID Enhanced Land/Maritime Mode (ELMM), Aided Target Recognition (ATR), & Electro-Optical/Infra-Red (EO/IR) Sensor IR Missile Defense/Self-Protect capability Near Real Time Combat ID

Essential Capabilities List


APY-7 Radar Enhancement/Replacement J-Voice Enhanced Communication Suite UHF/VHF/SINCGARS selectable Airborne Web Enabled Services Multi-Tactical Digital Information Link Gateway Ground Moving Target Indication (GMTI) Exploitation/Dissemination Joint Blue Force Situational Awareness Inverse SAR

Desired Capabilities List


Communication and Networking Upgrade Phase II Communication and Networking Upgrade Phase III Unmanned Air Vehicle Integration Radar System Declassification Capability Support to Combat Search and Rescue Operations Mission Handover

51

E-8C Executive Summary


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program Re-engine 8.33kHz VHF Radio Control/Display Unit (CDU) 7000 Prime Mission Equipment Replacement Communication/Network Upgrade (CNU) Phase I Enhanced Land/Maritime Mode (ELMM) Aided Target Recognition (ATR) Infra-Red Missile Defense / Self-Protect Capability Near Real Time Combat ID
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 52581F 27581F 27581F 27581F 27581F 27581F 27581F 27581F 27581F
2

FY09 $152.40 2 $120.50 3 $11.20 2 $3.33 3 $2.00 3 $38.80 3 $41.00 3 $43.00 2 $71.50 3 $1.00 3 $2.00 3 $2.00 3

FY10 $245.50 2 $18.50 2 $2.50 3 $64.00 3 $20.90 3 $2.90 3 $7.16 3 $0.94 2 $17.10 3
3

FY11 $255.30 2 $4.00 2 $7.10 3 $75.00 2 $59.90 3 $19.50 2 $12.00 3 $9.30 3 $41.32 2 $18.72 3 $10.34 2 $8.10 3

FY12 $236.20 2 $5.25 2 $0.90 3 $52.80 2 $22.80 2 $1.70 2 $5.70 3 $46.88 2 $1.35 3 $5.64 2 $5.80 3
4

FY13 $206.60 2 $3.20 2 $20.80 2


-

Program Total $1216.50 $37.03 $20.95 $311.30 $124.30 $114.50 $24.70 $130.79 $66.92

$8.10 2 $4.10 2 $13.36 2 $17.00 3

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

Re-engine - Replacing the engines drastically reduces sustainment costs, boosts performance, and provides power for expanded mission system requirements. 8.33kHz VHF Radio - Allows for operation in and transit through Europe. CDU 7000 - Provides replacement CDU addressing obsolescence issue and providing growth capability to implement new requirements like Mode 5 and SAASM/M-Code GPS. Prime Mission Equipment Replacement - Addresses a diminishing manufacturer support for the current, obsolete components supporting the Ops & Control (O&C) Subsystem. CNU Phase I - Provides continued Link 16 (via MIDS/JTRS) and Broadcast Intelligence (BI) with additional Battle Management (BM) and Command & Control (C2) software applications. ELMM - Provides radar tracking and targeting ID capabilities. ATR - Characterizes cue and sort enemy, friend and neutral stationary targets in SAR imagery. IRMD/Self-Protect - Provides 116th ACW/CC-selected AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Counter Measure system to counter growing threat of shoulder-fired infra-red missiles. Near Real Time Combat ID - Includes Net-Centric Collaborative Targeting (NCCT) and Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) Integration efforts.

52

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS AIRCRAFT VIABILITY RE-ENGINING 1. Background. The current TF-33 engines are the biggest reliability problem and capability shortfall for the JSTARS. The Air Forces report to Congress in 2004 and the update requested in 2005 clearly outline these issues as well as the sustainment cost savings to be gained by reengining the aircraft. An updated power plant provides improved fuel economy, quicker climb to mission altitude, ability to use shorter runways, international noise and emission standards compliance, and, most importantly, enhanced reliability and maintainability. An initial NonRecurring Engineering (NRE) contract was awarded on 28 Feb 07. AF will buy the first two Propulsion Pod System (PPS) ship sets in FY08 to open the production line as well as award the remainder of the NRE. 2. Requirement Source. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. Reference paragraph: 5.14.4. 3. Impact if Not Funded. Continued failure to meet operational requirements, decreasing mission capable rates and exponentially increasing sustainment costs associated with the old engines. Overall mission degradation will continue to impact all air operations due to long intransit and retrograde times, slow time-to-climb, restricted altitudes, more frequent aerial refueling, continued need for longer runways, increased mission maintenance rates, and noncompliance with domestic and international pollution and noise standards. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractors. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL (prime); Pratt & Whitney, Hartford, CT. 6. Cost.
Units Required NRE (3600) 80* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $13.70 Program Cost ($ Million) $120.50 $1096.00 $1216.50

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

53

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS AIRCRAFT VIABILITY - 8.33 KHz VHF RADIO 1. Background. Installation of radios that support spacing of frequencies by 8.33 KHz in the very high frequency (VHF) radios is an Air Force initiative to ensure the JSTARS fleet is compliant with Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) standards. The modification is important for uninterrupted access to European airspace and replaces two of the three existing VHF radios and antennas. Production funds to install 8.33 KHz radios on the E-8 fleet have not been identified. Additionally, the requirement to add the Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) voice communications, allowing transfer of data and voice from JSTARS mission crews to ground commanders, would be met. Neither development funds for SINCGARS voice nor production funds to install 8.33 KHz, SINCGARS capable VHF radios on the E-8 fleet have been identified. 2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. CRD USAF 003-97. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The European nations have implemented CNS/ATM flight standards for their respective airspaces since 1999. Access to European airspace and air traffic control centers is constrained causing delays during deployments of JSTARS capability to a theater of operations. Restriction to operations below 24,000 feet, due to inability to comply with CNS/ATM standards, increases fuel consumption, decreases range and reduces the mission footprint of the synthetic aperture radar and ground moving target indicator. During Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) and IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) deployments, aircraft were routed much further away from Emergency Airfields to stay clear of European controlled airspace, increasing risk factors for flight safety. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractors. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required NRE (3600) Kit Proof & Install** (3010) 36 (2 each for 18 a/c)* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A N/A $ 0.233 Program Cost ($ Million) $3.33 $25.30 $8.40 $37.03

* Includes E-8(T)C **Kit proof and Install number includes Group A, trainer mods, test, misc. support

54

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS AIRCRAFT VIABILITY - CONTROL/DISPLAY UNIT (CDU) 7000 1. Background. The current E-8C JSTARS Control and Display Unit (CDU) 800 is on the Diminishing Manufacturing Source (DMS) watch list with end of support currently projected for FY10. New and required capabilities cannot be implemented in the current CDU due to memory and throughput processing power limitations. This project provides a replacement Control and Display Unit (CDU) 7000 which addresses DMS issues providing growth capability to implement new requirements such as Mode 5 and S and updated global positioning system (GPS). The current E-8C CDU is incapable of further expansion. 2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. CRD USAF 003-97. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Support ends for the current CDU 800 in FY10. Risk of NonMission Capable (NMC) aircraft due to lack of support creates sense of urgency for an FY10 solution. Day for day slip in eliminating DMS risk and providing required growth capacity until funding is made available. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required NRE (3600) Kit Proof & Install (3010) 90 (5 each for 18 a/c)* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A N/A $0.055 Program Cost ($ Million) $12.50 $3.50 $4.95 $20.95

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

55

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS PRIME MISSION EQUIPMENT (PME) REPLACEMENT 1. Background. Replacing PME due to diminishing manufacturer sources (DMS) is a top issue for fleet viability and is critical in maintaining net-centric Warfighter capabilities - Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) and Battle Management Command and Control (BMC2). The Joint STARS PME hardware was converted from military to commercial off-the-shelf when the Computer Replacement Program completed development in CY00. The commercial off the shelf (COTS) PME, including computers, storage, network equipment, radar signal processing equipment and displays, will become unsupportable and force aircraft to become Non-Mission Capable (NMC) starting in FY09. Integration work coupled with lead time for procurement makes replacement of the processor an urgent issue beginning in FY08. Modification will provide infrastructure to support future obsolescence initiatives. 2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The current processor in JSTARS will no longer be supportable starting in FY09, reaching critical rates by FY10. JSTARS will lose the current combat capability as well as any potential growth anticipated by that time. The loss of mission capability will preclude the combat air force (CAF) from providing GMTI, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and BMC2 in multiple theaters simultaneously. Furthermore, the reduction of combat ready aircraft would cripple the Wings ability to meet current and future combatant commander requirements to defeat the enemy. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 18 (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $8.26 Program Cost ($ Million) $162.70 $148.60 $311.30

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

56

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS COMMUNICATIONS & NETWORKING UPGRADE (CNU) PHASE I - LINK 16 & IBS 1. Background. CNU Phase I provides continued Link-16, Broadcast Intelligence (BI), and additional Battle Management & Command and Control (BMC2) software applications. It also addresses the National Security Agencys (NSA) Cryptographic Modernization Program (CMP) requirements impacting Link-16/Broadcast Intelligence future frequency re-mapping and hardware obsolescence and diminishing manufacturing sources (DMS) issues. Potential solutions include: Link-16, a multi-function information distribution and tactical radio system; BI: Integrated Broadcast Service (IBS) via International Marine/Maritime Satellite (INMARSAT) and standalone ultra-high frequency (UHF) satellite communication (SATCOM) receivers and enhanced BMC2 software. 2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. 3. Impact If Not Funded. BI hardware DMS is projected to start in 2010 and spread to the entire fleet in 2013. Link-16 and BI data will be vulnerable to exploitation due to noncompliance with NSA cryptographic requirements. Aircraft not upgraded with new crypto risk the ability to transmit and receive secured data. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 18* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $2.80 Program Cost ($ Million) $73.90 $50.40 $124.30

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

57

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS TARGET ID CAPABILITY ENHANCED LAND/MARITIME MODE (ELMM) 1. Background. JSTARS has a limited target ID capability and requires a robust machine-tomachine interface allowing sensor and shooter to share and correlate data in a rapid, efficient manner to retain full situation awareness during time sensitive targeting operations. The E-8 team must be able to accurately scan the surface and coordinate targets with others in a common visual format, receive correlating data from and pass targeting information directly to the supporting forces. Several JSTARS-specific projects contribute vital capability towards target ID capability, including: Enhanced Land/Maritime Mode (ELMM), Aided Target Recognition (ATR) and an Electro-Optical/IR Sensor. ELMM provides capabilities based on radar tracking and targeting capability to track maritime targets of interest in all weather conditions and various sea states. ELMM Risk Reduction was awarded in Dec 05 for early system definition, design, analysis, simulation and test aircraft installation. Full development of ELMM was put on contract in Dec 06.
2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5.

3. Impact If Not Funded. No capability to track maritime targets of interest in all weather conditions and various sea states. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 18* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $2.388 Program Cost ($ Million) $71.50 $43.00 $114.50

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

58

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS AIDED TARGET RECOGNITION (ATR) 1. Background. JSTARS has a limited target ID capability and requires a robust machine-tomachine interface allowing sensor and shooter to share and correlate data in a rapid, efficient manner to retain full situation awareness, during time sensitive targeting operations. The E-8 team must be able to accurately scan the surface and coordinate targets with others in a common visual format, receive correlating data from and pass targeting information directly to the supporting forces. Several JSTARS-specific projects contribute vital capability towards target ID capability, including: Enhanced Land/Maritime Mode (ELMM), Aided Target Recognition (ATR) and an Electro-Optical/IR Sensor. The Joint STARS ATR Integration program will provide a near all weather, day/night near real time means to accurately characterize and sort enemy, friend, and neutral stopped ground entities. ATR provides a tool to aid in locating and identifying high value stationary targets in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, providing rapid detection, location and classification of time critical stopped targets. It gives the warfighter operational capability to aid in locating and identifying high value time critical stationary targets, and a means to help attain high confidence positive ID while reducing operator workload. ATR develops approximately 25 additional targets for the JSTARS database. 2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. 3. Impact If Not Funded. If ATR integration is not funded, E-8C battle managers, other airborne sensor platforms, ground force commanders, and airborne shooters will continue to be denied a simple, robust means to share information in order to quickly distinguish between friendly and enemy forces. JSTARS will not have a means to accurately characterize and sort enemy, friend, and neutral stopped time critical ground entities resulting in slower reaction time to engage rapidly emerging enemy forces. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractors. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL; Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM. 6. Cost.
Units Required NRE (3600) 18* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.322 Program Cost ($ Million) $18.90 $5.80 $24.70

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

59

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS INFRARED MISSILE DEFENSE / SELF-PROTECT CAPABILITY 1. Background. E-8C JSTARS operate worldwide in a low to medium threat environment where shoulder-fired, Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPAD) infrared-seeking missiles are widely available, hence a significant threat during take-offs and landings. This project will leverage previous investments in a self-protection capability. The embedded Self-Defense Suite (SDS) uses the AN/AAR-44 Sensor and the AN/ALE-47 Dispensers. To counter MANPAD threats the ANG requires an advanced infrared counter measures (IRCM) system like the AN/AAQ-24 large aircraft infrared counter measures (LAIRCM) system that does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables and provides the best effective counter infrared capability.
2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5.

3. Impact If Not Funded. JSTARS will continue to operate in an environment of increasing threat complexity and lethality. Recent open source press coverage highlights the JSTARS unique value to the Joint Force Commanders. Without a self-protection capability, this low density, high-demand (LD/HD) national asset will be at significant risk. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required* NRE (3600) 18* (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $5.642 Program Cost ($ Million) $29.23 $101.56 $130.79

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft, trainer aircraft, and initial spares.

60

INFORMATION PAPER ON JSTARS NEAR REAL-TIME COMBAT ID CAPABILITY NCCT & UAV INTEGRATION 1. Background. JSTARS has a limited combat identification capability and requires a robust machine-to-machine interface allowing sensor and shooter to synchronize, share and correlate data rapidly and efficiently to retain full situation awareness, especially during time sensitive targeting operations. The E-8 team must be able to accurately scan the surface and coordinate targets with others in a common visual format, receive correlating data from and pass targeting information directly to the supporting forces. Several JSTARS-specific projects contribute vital capability towards obtaining combat identification capability in near real-time, including: blue force tracking with the existing Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2) module, the Network-Centric Collaborative Targeting (NCCT) system and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) Integration effort.
2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5. Paragraph reference: 5.9.9.

3. Impact If Not Funded. E-8C battle managers, other airborne sensor platforms, ground force commanders, and airborne shooters will continue to be denied a simple, robust means share information in near real-time in order to quickly distinguish between friendly and enemy forces and be able to obtain additional data on selected targets/tracks for identification purposes. Without this ID capability, there are increased chances of fratricide among the friendly forces and slower reaction time to engage rapidly emerging enemy forces. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required NCCT NRE (3600) UAV NRE (3600) 18* (3010) Total
aircraft.

Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A N/A $0.94

Program Cost ($ Million) $27.20 $22.80 $16.92 $66.92

* Includes kit procurement/install and all acquisition support costs for 17 operational aircraft and trainer

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F-15

Proven Air Superiority

104 Kills to Zero Losses


ANG F-15s will lead the Combat Air Forces (CAF) in next generation radar capability by fielding the APG-63 (V)3 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar starting in FY09.
The ANG operates seven squadrons of F-15A-Ds representing 50% of CAF F-15 air superiority capability. ANG F-15 squadrons continue conversion to the F-15C/D as a result of CAF redistribution of assets. Six squadrons operate 90 combat-coded F15s at the following bases: 102 FW, Otis ANGB MA 125 FW, Jacksonville IAP FL 131 FW, St. Louis IAP MO 142 FW, Portland IAP OR 154 WG, Hickam AFB HI 159 FW, New Orleans NAS LA The seventh squadron is an AETC F-15 flying training unit at the 173 FW, Klamath Falls IAP, OR. During FY08, F-15s from 102 FW Otis ANGB, MA, will begin transferring to the 104 FW Barnes ANGB, MA, as part of the Department of Defense 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) implementation plan. In FY09, F-15s from the 131 FW St Louis, MO, will begin transferring to the 120 FW, Great Falls, MT, as part of the Department of Defense 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) implementation plan. ANG F-15s support 24-hour Air Sovereignty Alert (ASA) in defense of the American homeland and represent 40% of all ASA assets. Since Sept 11, 2001, ANG F-15s launched 508 alert scrambles totaling 655 flying hours.

F-15 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
AESA Radar - Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Radar provides next generation capability precision to detect, track and eliminate asymmetric threats. VCC+ (Very High Speed Integrated Circuitry Central Computer (VHSICC) Plus) - Increased processing and memory growth required to support future F-15 Operational Flight Program (OFP) requirements. JHMCS (Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System) - Optimizes battlefield picture for offensive and defensive measures. Provides a quantum leap in air-to-air weapons employment and complete sensor-to-pilot fusion. Infrared Search and Track (IRST) system - Detects targets by their heat emissions. Designed as part of the integrated fire control system to ensure effective fire control in a radar jamming environment. Raptor (F-22A) Data Link Integration A Link 16 gateway is required for interoperability between F-22A and F-15. Radar Warning Receiver (RWR)/EPAWSS (Eagle Passive and Active Warning and Survivability System) - The current F-15 RWR does not meet operation requirements document (ORD) specifications and has significant degraded performance against present and future radar systems. An RWR replacement with digital receiver technology is necessary. EGI (Embedded GPS/INS) - Provides global positioning accuracy mandated by Congress. -220E Engine kits - Modifies F100-PW-100 to the -220E configuration. The PW-220E upgrade kit increases reliability, maintainability, safety and overall aircraft performance.

Essential Capabilities List


BOL Infrared Countermeasures - Next generation self-protection survivability against sophisticated threats worldwide. DVRS (Digital Video Recording System) - Multi-channel digital recording device for Fighter Data Link, Heads-Up Display, and Vertical Situation Display.

Desired Capabilities List


Cockpit Replacement - F-15 A-D model cockpit is virtually unchanged since initial production. Functional and hardware obsolescence an upcoming issue in 2010+ timeframe. 5th Generation Fighter Data Link Integration - Necessary for interoperability between current and 5th Generation technology.

63

F-15 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) P.E. Number 0207130F 0207130F 0207130F 0207130F 0207134F 0207130F 0207130F
2

Program AESA VCC+ JHMCS RWR/EPAWSS EGI -220E Engine Kit


FY09 $59.30 2 $20.70 2 $4.56 2 $30.75 3 $21.60 2 $47.68 2

FY10 $59.30 2 $4.56 2 $26.80 2 $92.25 3 $47.68 2


3

FY11 $59.30 2 $4.56 2 $72.10 2 $47.68 2

FY12 $59.30 2 $72.10 2 $47.68 2


4

FY13 $59.28 2 $72.10 2 $47.68 2

Program Total $296.48 $20.70 $13.68 $366.10 $21.60 $238.40

Notes: 1 3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

AESA Radar - Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Radar provides next generation precision capability to detect, track and eliminate asymmetric threats. VCC+ (Very High Speed Integrated Circuitry Central Computer (VHSICC) Plus) - Increased Processing and memory growth to support future F-15 Operational Flight Program (OFP) requirements. JHMCS (Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System) - Provides quantum leap in air-to-air weapons employment and complete sensor-to-pilot fusion. Radar Warning Receiver (RWR)/EPAWSS (Eagle Passive and Active Warning and Survivability System) - Advanced digital RWR for enhanced situational awareness, survivability, and mission effectiveness. EGI (Embedded GPS/INS) - Provides global positioning accuracy mandated by Congress. -220E Engine kits - Modifies F100-PW-100 to the -220E configuration. Upgrade kit increases reliability, maintainability, safety and overall aircraft performance.

64

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-15 ACTIVE ELECTRONICALLY SCANNED ARRAY RADAR 1. Background. The APG-63(V)3 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar will replace the current APG- 63(V)0 mechanically scanned radar by a stationary panel covered with an array of over one thousand transmitter-receiver modules. These modules leverage combined power and can perform different detection, tracking, communication, and jamming functions in multiple directions simultaneously. AESA provides significant increases in precision to detect, track, and eliminate multiple threats faster and with greater efficiency. Additionally, AESA eliminates the hydraulic and electrical systems associated with mechanically operated radars resulting in dramatically improved reliability and maintainability. The F-15s primary advantage in air-to-air remains the Beyond-Visual-Range (BVR) arena. The BVR arena requires an ability to detect current and future generation airborne threats to retain the first shot, first kill, which is essential to effective employment. In FY06 Congress appropriated $52.2M to procure 6 AESA systems for ANG. In FY07 Congress, appropriated $72M for procurement of AESA radars only for the ANG F-15C fleet; this will procure 8 AESA radars. 2. Requirement. Currently the APG-63(V)0 radar is unsupportable due to parts obsolescence and requires a reliability and maintainability upgrade. The Air National Guard requires a minimum of 48 total AESA systems for constant Homeland Defense presence throughout the United States. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG F-15s are tasked for threat areas throughout the world as part of the Air and Space Expeditionary Force (AEF) while defending our homeland. Without AESA radar, the F-15 is critically vulnerable in their ability to detect and target asymmetric and future airborne threats. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW Otis ANGB, MA 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 104 FW Westfield, MA 131 FW St. Louis, MO 159 FW New Orleans, LA 120 FW Great Falls, MT 142 FW Portland, OR 173 FW Klamath Falls, OR

5. Contractors. Raytheon, El Segundo, CA; Boeing Company, St Louis, MO. 6. Cost.


Units Required 34 AESA Systems (3010) Unit Cost * ($ Million) $8.72 Program Cost ** ($ Million) $296.48
*Includes installation and program costs. ** 3600 to be provided by USAF.

65

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-15 VERY HIGH SPEED INTEGRATED CIRCUITRY CENTRAL COMPUTER (VHSIC CC) Plus: VCC+ 1. Background. Current F-15 A-D VHSIC CC (VCC) has reached its maximum processing throughput. Increased processing and memory growth are needed to support future Combat Air Forces (CAF) Operational Flight Program (OFP) requirements. This is required for Suite 6 scheduled to field in 2010. 2. Requirement. Combat Air Forces F-15 A-D OFP Roadmap. 3. Impact If Not Funded. In its current VCC configuration, the F-15A-D will not be able to field Suite 6 in FY09. As a result, Mode S Interrogation, Combat ID improvements, future hardware improvements and weapon system modernization are not attainable. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW Otis ANGB, MA 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 104 FW Westfield, MA 131 FW St. Louis, MO 159 FW New Orleans, LA 120 FW Great Falls, MT 142 FW Portland, OR 173 FW Klamath Falls, OR

5. Contractors. Lockheed Martin Owego, NY; Boeing Company, St Louis, MO. 6. Cost.
Kits Required 138 VCC+ Kits (3010) Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.15 Program Cost ($ Million) $20.70
* Includes 10% spares, support equipment and installation

66

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-15 JOINT HELMET MOUNTED CUEING SYSTEM (JHMCS) 1. Background. JHMCS optimizes battlefield situational awareness for offensive and defensive measures. In addition, JHMCS provides capability for first look, first shot weapons employment advantage Within Visual Range maneuvering (WVR). This includes cueing off-boresight sensors and weapons, such as radar and next generation short range missiles. The helmet provides radar weapon symbology and visual cues of target location. This system is currently integrated or being considered for integration in the F-15, F-15E, F-16, F-18, AV-8B, and A-10. 2. Requirement. JHMCS - CAF 308-93 MNS, ORD CAF-USN 308-93-I-A dated Feb 1995, CAF-USN 308-93-II-A dated Dec 1996. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The WVR threat will increase with continued deployment of advanced short range infrared air-to-air missiles and high off-boresight cueing systems currently being fielded on exported Russian aircraft such as the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 FULCRUM, Sukhoi Su-30 FLANKER, and other foreign aircraft. The proliferation of advanced infrared AllAspect Missiles and off-boresight cueing systems will result in a lethal dogfight engagement for US fighter aircraft. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW Otis ANGB, MA 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 104 FW Westfield, MA 131 FW St. Louis, MO 159 FW New Orleans, LA 120 FW Great Falls, MT 142 FW Portland, OR 173 FW Klamath Falls, OR

5. Contractors. Vision Systems International, San Jose, CA; Boeing Company, St Louis, MO. 6. Cost.
Units Required 24 JHMCS Systems (3010) Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.57 Program Cost ($ Million) $13.68

*Includes 10% spares, TCTOs, installs & support equipment

67

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-15 ADVANCED RADAR WARNING RECEIVER (RWR) SUBSET OF EAGLE PASSIVE ACTIVE WARNING SURVIVABLILITY SYSTEM (EPAWSS) 1. Background. The current F-15 C/D RWR fielded in the late 1970s is no longer able to perform its primary warning role against existing and future radar systems (does not meet the original ORD requirements) and has significant obsolescence and diminished manufacturing sources (DMS) issues. Specific performance shortfalls include long response times, overload conditions and reduced identification performance. This effort will field a digital RWR replacement as part of the EPAWSS for F-15 C-E as well as providing synergistic capability with other planned upgrades such as AESA and EGI upgrades. 2. Requirement. TAF 304-80-I/II/III-C System ORD for the F-15 A-D Tactical Electronic Warfare Suite dated 7 Apr 92. EPAWSS CDD (approved version expected 2007). 3. Impact if Not Funded. The F-15 C/D will be at risk from current and future threat systems proliferating in projected deployment areas throughout the lifetime of the aircraft. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW Otis ANGB, MA 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 104 FW Westfield, MA 131 FW St. Louis, MO 159 FW New Orleans, LA 120 FW Great Falls, MT 142 FW Portland, OR 173 FW Klamath Falls, OR

5. Contractors. BAE, Yonkers, NY, Nashua, NH; EDO, North Amityville, NY; ITT Avionics, Clifton, NJ; Lockheed Martin, Owego, NY; Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL; Raytheon, Goleta, CA; Boeing Company, St Louis, MO. 6. Cost.
Units Required RDT&E (3600) 143 EPAWSS Systems (3010) Total Unit Cost * ($ Million) N/A $1.70 Program Cost ($ Million) $123.00 $243.10 $366.10

* Includes 10% spares, support equipment and installation

68

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-15 EMBEDDED GPS/INS (EGI) 1. Background. The F-15A-D is currently equipped with an Internal Navigation System (INS). Congressional direction, Public Law 103-160, dated 30 Nov 1993, prohibits obligation of funds to modify or procure any Department of Defense aircraft after 30 September 2000 which are not equipped with the Global Positioning System (GPS). The Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, Section 218 granted USAF F-15s an extension until 30 September 2005. In FY06, Congress approved a further extension until 30 Sept 2007. 2. Requirement. National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103160, 30 Nov 93, Section 152 (b). Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, Section 218. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG F-15s will not meet the Congressionally-mandated global positioning system requirement by 30 Sept 2007 which stipulates funds may not be obligated to modify or procure any Department of Defense aircraft. This limitation will severely impact current or future procurement programs for ANG F-15s, severely limiting their ability to maintain air superiority. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW Otis ANGB, MA 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 104 FW Westfield, MA 131 FW St. Louis, MO 159 FW New Orleans, LA 120 FW Great Falls, MT 142 FW Portland, OR 173 FW Klamath Falls, OR

5. Contractor. Honeywell, Clearwater, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required 120 EGI Kits (3010) Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.18 Program Cost ($ Million) $21.60
* Includes 10% spares, support equipment and installation

69

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-15 -220E ENGINE UPGRADE PROGRAM 1. Background. Currently, five ANG F-15 squadrons have completed the -220E engine upgrade. The remaining two squadrons still operate F100-PW-100 engines. The design configuration of the PW-100 engine has operational limitations due to engine age (20+ years) and parts obsolescence. The PW-220E upgrade kit increases reliability, maintainability, safety and overall aircraft performance. A finite number of F100-PW-220 engines are scheduled to flow down from F-16 units. To date, 141 -220E engines have been sourced. Post Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC) 2005, eighty (80) -220E engine upgrade kits are still required. 2. Requirement. CAF (AFLC 002-89)-III-A, dated 21 Feb 1996. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Combat capability is adversely affected because of reduced reliability rates and associated decreased performance. PW-100 engines declining mean time between failure (MTBF) rates are causing significant repair expenses. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW Otis ANGB, MA 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 104 FW Westfield, MA 131 FW St. Louis, MO 159 FW New Orleans, LA 120 FW Great Falls, MT 142 FW Portland, OR 173 FW Klamath Falls, OR

5. Contractors. Pratt & Whitney, San Antonio, TX; Boeing Company, St Louis, MO. 6. Cost.
Units Required 80 Engine Kits (3010) Unit Cost * ($ Million) $2.98 Program Cost ($ Million) $238.40

* Includes spares, support equipment and installation

70

F-16

THE FIGHTER OF CHOICE

ANG operates 486 F-16 aircraft comprising over 40% of the total US combat F-16 force. The ANG F-16C/D fleet consists of 386 Block 25/30/32, 72 Block 42, and 28 Block 52 aircraft. Since September 11, 2001, ANG F-16s flew over 115,000 hours in direct support of contingencies around the globe, including Operations NOBLE EAGLE, IRAQI FREEDOM, and ENDURING FREEDOM, and homeland defense scrambles. Since 2003, ANG F-16Cs fulfilled over 30% of CENTAF precision guided munitions (PGM) and close air support (CAS) taskings in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. In support of operations against Iraqi insurgents, ANG F-16s provided convoy escort, dedicated infrastructure defense, border patrol, Army raid support, and continuous show of force operations. ANG F-16s are the primary non-traditional intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (NT-ISR) platform. In armed reconnaissance missions, F-16s employ advanced targeting pods and the Theater Airborne Reconnaissance System (TARS) with data links to forces on the ground. ANG F-16s led LITENING AT Video Downlink (VDL) development, testing, and production in order to meet a CENTAF urgent need request in minimal time. The 174 FW at Syracuse, NY, was the first F-16 squadron to declare Initial Operational Capability (IOC) with the Sniper XR targeting pod. South Carolinas 169 FW became the first Block 50/52 squadron to reach IOC with the Sniper pod, leading the Air Force in bringing an integrated suppression and destruction of enemy air defense (SEAD/ DEAD) capability to the fight. ANG dedicates ten F-16 squadrons to support Operation NOBLE EAGLE, 24-hour Air Sovereignty Alert for Homeland Defense. Since September 11, 2001, F-16s from the 113 WG at Andrews AFB, MD, have scrambled numerous times and flown hundreds of hours defending the National Capitol Region airspace. Modernization efforts are underway to improve the war fighting capabilities of ANG F-16s by fielding secure line-of-sight and beyond line-of-sight communications suites, higher data processing capacity, helmet mounted cueing, and enhanced self protection.

F-16 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Increased avionics processing, bandwidth capacity, and display capability to support continued sensor and weapons modernization (CFCC, center pedestal display, ethernet) Dynamic day/night sensor cueing with a Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) Targeting pod procurement and enhancement (ATPs, 4th Gen mods, VDL) Improved threat detection, location, and self protection (EW) Improve communication suite with SLOS/BLOS and data transfer capabilities (ARC-210 / Center Pedestal Display) Increased capability to detect, track, and identify air-to-air targets (radar modernization, AIFF procurement and spiral development)

Essential Capabilities List


Precision A/G all-weather strike capability Distributed mission operations (DMO) / unit training device (UTD) upgrades Laser eye protection and sensor hardening Electronic Combat Range / Virtual Electronic Combat Training System (VECTS) Wide field of view night vision goggles (NVG) ALR-69 LSIP Fiber optic towed decoys (FOTD) / Comet Improved infrared countermeasures ALQ-213 Advanced Processor Upgrade Cockpit data port Low collateral damage estimate weapons Improved Digital Terrain Elevation Data Lead computing A/G strafe

71

F-16 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program CFCC Ethernet HMCS Aircraft Kits HMCS Display Units Night Vision Units ATP Procurement 4th Gen Mod VDL Digital RWR with Threat Geo-location ARC-210 BLOS BLOS Upgrade Kits Center Pedestal Color Display AIFF Kits Mode 5 Upgrade -229 Re-Engine for Block 42
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0207133F

FY09 $14.56 2 $4.46 2 $4.00 3 $4.00 2 $4.50 3 $0.70 2 $10.00 2 $36.80 2 $17.50 2 $6.86 2 $22.50 2 $5.00 3 $38.40 2 $4.20 2 $20.00 2 $3.50 3 $34.00 2 $3.60 2 $70.08 2

FY10 $10.50 2 $1.70 2 $3.25 3 $16.20 2 $0.50 3 $8.40 2 $20.00 2 $17.50 2 $22.50 2 $5.00 3 $36.72 2 $4.20 2 $15.80 2 $34.00 2 $3.00 2 $69.02 2
3

FY11 $1.00 2 $29.70 2 $17.50 2 $11.50 2 $17.50 2 $9.30 2 $24.48 2 -

FY12 $26.51 2 $9.38 2 $17.50 2 4

FY13 $16.80 2 -

Program Total $39.47

0207133F

$158.89

0207249F 0207133F 0207133F 0207133F 0207133F 0207133F


2

$130.46 $64.30 $83.52 $39.30 $99.08 $139.10

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

Commercial Fire Control Computer (CFCC) and Ethernet - Improves processing and bandwidth capability for future growth. The keys to any future flight program upgrades. Helmet Mounted Cueing System (HMCS) - Provides a quantum leap forward in day/night air and ground weapons employment and full sensor-to-pilot fusion. Advanced Targeting Pod (ATP) - Provides warfighter with the capability to employ precisionguided munitions, coordinate with ground elements, and target airborne threats. Digital Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) with Threat Geo-Location - Enhances threat detection and ability to locate threats with precision accuracy for enhanced survivability and lethality. ARC-210 - Provides advance secure and beyond line-of-site communications capability for integration with ground forces and homeland defense agencies. Center Pedestal Color Display - Replaces flight instruments with color display; allows image transfer, improved data processing, and robust input of mission planning information. Advanced Interrogator Friend/Foe (AIFF) - Enables identification of air targets via IFF interrogation for theater and homeland defense missions; includes Mode S/5 functions. -229 Re-engine for Block 42 - The F-100-PW-229 engine enables the Block 42 F-16 to perform the full range of combat missions with multiple weapons loads and aircraft configurations. Provides pilots the same level of performance as the Block 50/52 F-16.

72

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C COMMERCIAL FIRE CONTROL COMPUTER (CFCC) AND ETHERNET 1. Background. The Block 25/30/32 F-16 Expanded Enhanced Fire Control Computer (EEFCC) performs aircraft weapon delivery, sensor cueing, and navigation functions. Currently, the EEFCC is operating at maximum capacity and is incapable of providing the processing power required for planned upgrades. This limitation precludes upgrading connections between aircraft processors to increase bandwidth, a step required for Software Capability Upgrade-8 (SCU-8), Helmet Mounted Cuing System (HMCS) integration, Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) fielding, and Mode V advanced combat identification compliance. Replacing the EEFCC with the Commercial Fire Control Computer (CFCC) solves these problems and ensures future growth capacity. The CFCC will greatly increase F-16 processing power, serve as an avionics Ethernet hub, and allows implementation of advanced sensor, identification, and weapons requirements. This system is foundational to all future upgrades and required for the planned fielding of SCU-8 in 2011. New Ethernet connections between the CFCC and other aircraft processors will enable increased bus traffic for weapons such as SDB and HMCS integration. 2. Requirement. CAF 301-01-B, F-16C/D Block 25/30/32 MSIP ORD (15 Dec 04). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Unmodified aircraft will be unable to operate with SCU-8, HMCS, SDB, and Mode V capabilities, decreasing survivability and lethality in every mission area. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 140 WG Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT 162 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 187 FW Tucson, AZ Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractor. Modern Technology Corp (MTC), Sunset, UT. 6. Cost.


Units Required * 358 CFCCs (3010) Ethernet (3600) 358 Ethernet Kits (3010) Total
* Includes 10% spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.07 N/A $0.02

Program Cost ($ Million) $25.06 $7.25 $7.16 $39.47

73

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C DAY/NIGHT HELMET MOUNTED CUEING SYSTEM (HMCS) 1. Background. The addition of day and night, helmet mounted cueing and display capability to the F-16 Block 25/30/32 significantly increases pilot situational awareness, aircraft survivability, and lethality in every mission area. A helmet mounted cueing system allows pilots to quickly build a three dimensional picture of the battlespace by providing actual target, threat, and friendly Line-of-Sight (LOS) information into the pilots Field-of-View (FOV). This reduces the head down time along with the necessity to fly near the target area. With the capability to cue sensors and weapons off bore-sight using the helmet LOS, pilots can quickly engage targets of opportunity. Due to the extensive night operations conducted by F-16s, sensor cueing and display with night vision goggles (NVGs) is required. This enhances time sensitive targeting capabilities and greatly reduces the risk of fratricide or collateral damage. 2. Requirement. JHMCS-CAF 308-93 MNS, ORD CAF-USN 308-93-II-A Dec 1996, CAF 301-01-B, F-16C/D Block 25/30/32 MSIP ORD (15 Dec 04). 3. Impact If Not Funded. The risk of target mis-identification, collateral damage, and fratricide is significantly increased without HMCS. Pilots will remain unable to exploit the capabilities of high off boresight air-to-air and air-to-surface weapons. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 140 WG Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT 162 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 187 FW Tucson, AZ Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractors. BAE Systems, Kent, UK; Gentex, Aurora, IL; Rafael, Haifa, Israel; Vision Systems International LLC, San Jose, CA; Insight Technology Inc, Manchester, NH; ITT Night Vision, Roanoke, VA. 6. Cost.
Number Units * NRE (3600) 283 HMCS Aircraft Kits (3010) 514 HMCS Helmet Kits (3010) 415 Night Vision Units (3010) Total
*Includes 10% spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.27 $0.07 $0.10

Program Cost ($ Million) $5.00 $76.41 $35.98 $41.50 $158.89

74

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C ADVANCED TARGETING POD (ATP) and VIDEO DOWNLINK (VDL) 1. Background. Procurement of advanced targeting pods (ATP) has been an ANG top priority for the past several years. In order to achieve the required 2:1 aircraft to ATP ratios and requisite spares, the ANG requires 193 pods. A total of 136 Northrop Grumman LITENING and 27 Lockheed Martin Sniper XR targeting pods have been funded between FY98 and FY07. ATPs feature state-of-the-art technology which allows full weapons exploitation and comprehensive ANG participation in contingency operations. Current pods employ third generation forward looking infrared (FLIR), electro-optical television / charge-coupled devices (CCD), and laser spot search and track (LSS/LST) to offer exceptional standoff capability and the ability to target J-series weapons. The ANG is 30 pods short of its total ATP requirement. Modernization with fourth generation capability (1K FLIR, 1K CCD) will bring vastly improved day and night target acquisition and combat ID at extended ranges in both air-to-ground and air-to-air roles. The ANG requires fourth generation capability on all ATPs. ATP VDL provides streaming pod video to Tactical Air Control Parties (TACPs) and Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTACs) equipped with Remotely Operated Video Enhanced Receiver (ROVER) terminals. The ANG fielded 24 10-watt LITENING ATP VDL kits and has an additional 66 25-watt LITENING ATP VDL kits on contract to deliver in 2008. Funding is required to upgrade all remaining LITENING AT and Sniper XR ATPs with VDL. 2. Requirement. CENTAF Urgent Need Request, Nov 04. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Not funding will limit the ANGs ability to effectively fulfill its Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) tasking and reduced capability relative to target acquisition and identification. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 138 FW 140 WG Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Tulsa, OK Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW 162 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT Tucson, AZ 169 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 180 FW 187 FW McEntire, SC Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Toledo, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractors. Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL; Lockheed Martin, Orlando, FL. 6. Cost.
Units Required * 23 ATPs (3010) 124 4th Gen Mods (3010) 49 VDLs (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.60 $0.70 $0.14** Program Cost ($ Million) $36.80 $86.80 $6.86 $130.46

* Additional requirements for 7 ATPs, 31 4th Gen Mods, and 16 VDL kits are stated in the A-10 section ** Includes modification of Litening pods to plug-n-play standard. 75

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C ALR-69 RADAR WARNING RECEIVER (RWR) SYSTEM UPGRADE/REPLACEMENT INCORPORATING A DIGITAL RECEIVER AND THREAT GEO-LOCATON 1. Background. The current ALR-69 RWR provides threat radar warning indications to pilots for F-16 Block 30/32/42 as well as providing threat information to the ALQ-213 on Block 30/32 aircraft. The legacy ALR-69 has subassemblies that are no longer supportable, is unable to provide acceptable defensive situational awareness and is incapable of supporting the onboard/off-board warfighter requirements. Specific performance shortfalls include inadequate response time, overload conditions, unacceptable identification performance, inadequate threat detection capability, unacceptable threat geo-location and lack of digital information. Upgrading the legacy RWR with a modification that incorporates an advanced digital receiver or replacing it (internal or embedded with an advanced Electronic Attack pod) will address the aforementioned issues while providing accurate passive targeting information. The ability to pass target quality emitter coordinates to any net-centric aircraft is a critical requirement and a key component of Air Combat Commands Sensors Forward concept of operations. This upgrade will enhance the F-16s survivability and lethality during assigned missions in an increasingly advanced threat environment. 2. Requirement. CAF 301-01-B, F-16 C/D Block 25/30/32 MSIP ORD (15 Dec 04). 3. Impact if Not Funded. Block 30/32/42 F-16s will remain at risk to current threats and have little capability against most advanced threat systems resulting in areas of denied access that significantly impact all airborne platforms to accomplish missions. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 138 FW Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Tulsa, OK 140 WG 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW Buckley, CO Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT 162 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 180 FW 187 FW Tucson, AZ Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Toledo, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractors. BAE, Yonkers, NY, Nashua, NH; EDO, North Amityville, NY; Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA; ITT Avionics, Clifton, NJ; Lockheed Martin, Owego, NY & Fort Worth, TX; Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows, IL; Raytheon, Goleta, CA. 6. Cost.
Units Required * NRE (3600) 362 RWRs (3010) Total
* Includes geo-location & 10% spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.15

Program Cost ($ Million) $10.00 $54.30 $64.30

76

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C IMPROVED VOICE/DATA COMMUNICATIONS 1. Background. The F-16 radio suite provides UHF/VHF voice communications between stations within Line-of-Sight (LOS). Current secure voice communications are operationally limited due to poor transmission and reception quality. Additionally, F-16s are not interoperable with the Single-Channel Ground-to-Air Radio System (SINCGARS) used by Army units. This limitation directly reduces the F-16 pilots ability to support coalition ground forces. F-16s conducting homeland defense missions are currently unable to communicate with agencies operating in civil and marine bands, or communicate with command and control assets when at extended ranges from traditional antennas. A beyond line of sight (BLOS) capability employing satellite communications (SATCOM) is an urgent requirement for air sovereignty operations. The ARC-210 radio brings BLOS as well as expanded secure radio coverage, including UHF/VHF, FM, SINCGARS, and the civil/marine bands for homeland defense. The ARC-210 permits future growth for extended data and image transfer when linked to an advanced display. These capabilities are critical to operations in remote areas, dense threat environments, and in defense of the homeland. A total of 70 ANG Block 30/42 aircraft are funded for ARC-210 radios with improved secure line of sight for urgent in-theater use. These aircraft require installation of SATCOM capability. ARC-210s address two urgent operational needs. 2. Requirement. TAF 303-76-I/II/III-A SORD for the F-16C/D, CAF ORD 303-76-I/II/III-D F16C/D MSIP ORD (Draft 14 Aug 00), CENTCOM UON, NORTHCOM UON. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Aircraft remain unable to fulfill the urgent requirement to securely communicate with ground units and with control agencies over the horizon. Homeland defense aircraft continue to lack communications suites interoperable with other military, disaster response, and civilian agencies. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 138 FW 140 WG Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Tulsa, OK Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW 162 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT Tucson, AZ 169 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 180 FW 187 FW McEntire, SC Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Toledo, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractor. Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 313 ARC-210 w/ BLOS (3010) 70 BLOS Conversion Kits (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million)* $0.24 $0.12 Program Cost ($ Million) $75.12 $8.40 $83.52

* Costs include 10% spares for required items.

77

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C CENTER PEDESTAL COLOR DISPLAY 1. Background. The Block 25/30/32 F-16 requires a new center pedestal display in order to send and receive imagery, improve available processing power, and replace aging flight instruments. The new color display will directly connect to the ARC-210 radio and provide pilots with the ability to securely transfer still images, such as a targeting pod scenes, joint tactical air controller taskings, and updated target area imagery. This capability is critical to rapid coordination with ground units during close air support missions and with command and control assets during time sensitive and emerging target operations. The center pedestal display also contains additional processing capacity that will allow for the manipulation of data external to the aircraft operational flight program (OFP). This provides pilots with the ability to insert mission planning data pre-mission via USB like interfaces, while opening low cost pathways for the integration of future weapons and updates without the costly and time consuming process of changing the aircraft OFP. Pilot selectable display options will provide electronic instrument flight displays (attitude, performance, and navigation) when required. 2. Requirement. CAF 301-01-B, F-16C/D Block 25/30/32 MSIP ORD (15 Dec 04). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Pilots will be unable to effectively transfer imagery with Joint Tactical Air Controllers (JTACs) and command and control agencies, degrading their ability to effectively support ground operations and time sensitive taskings. Furthermore, the F-16 Block 30 series aircraft will not be able to integrate new technologies in a changing threat environment. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 140 WG Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT 162 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 187 FW Tucson, AZ Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractor. BAE, Greenlawn, NY; DRS, Dayton, OH; EFW, Fort Worth, TX; Raytheon, Indianapolis, IN; Rockwell Collins, San Jose, CA. 6. Cost.
Units Required * NRE (3600) 358 Center Displays (3010) Total
* Includes 10% spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.10

Program Cost ($ Million) $3.50 $35.80 $39.30

78

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C ADVANCED IDENTIFICATION FRIEND/FOE (AIFF) 1. Background. The ANG F-16 fleet consists of multi-role fighters fulfilling defensive counter-air tasking in the Air and Space Expeditionary Force (AEF) as well as air defense missions over the United States. The AIFF provides an interrogator capability enabling the F-16 to meet pre-established rules of engagement (ROE) and rapidly find tracks of interest in saturated airspace. The ANG received $35M through FY02 Defense Emergency Response Funding to equip ANG Block 25/30/32 F-16 aircraft that provide continuous air patrol over Washington, DC and New York, NY with AIFF. These funds were sufficient to accomplish all of the nonrecurring engineering and integrate the BAE APX-113 system on over 60 aircraft in the ANG inventory. Further funding has enabled the ANG to install AIFF systems on a total 82 Block 25/30/32 aircraft. The APX-113 is installed on all USAF Block 50/52 F-16s, including 28 ANG Block 52s. The APX-113 also addresses the new Mode S requirement for the Global Air Traffic Management (GATM) system and the mandatory Mode 5 upgrade. Funding is required to complete installation on the remaining Block 30/32/42 F-16s in the ANG inventory and the upgrade of fielded AIFF systems to Mode 5 capability via the -60 card. 2. Requirement. F-16 C/D Block 25/30/32 MSIP ORD (15 Dec 04). JROC validated Joint Capabilities Document for Homeland Air and Cruise Missile Defense of North America 28 Nov 2005 3. Impact If Not Funded. The ANG will be unable to meet the Combatant Commanders tasking and DoDs Combat Identification Task Force requirements during deployed and homeland defense taskings. Furthermore, aircraft without Mode S capability will be severely restricted in their ability to transit European airspace. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG 114 FW 115 FW 122 FW 132 FW 138 FW 140 WG Andrews AFB, MD Sioux Falls, SD Truax, WI Ft Wayne, IN Des Moines, IA Tulsa, OK Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW 162 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT Tucson, AZ 169 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 180 FW 187 FW McEntire, SC Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Toledo, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractors. BAE Systems, Greenlawn, NY. 6. Cost.


Units Required * 272 APX-113s 110 Mode 5 -60 Upgrades Total
*Includes 10% spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.34 $0.06

Program Cost ($ Million) $92.48 $6.60 $99.08

79

INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16C BLOCK 42 F-100-PW-229 RE-ENGINE 1. Background. Some ANG Block 42 F-16 aircraft are still equipped with Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 engines (25,000 lb thrust). Block 42 aircraft, similar to Block 40 (F-110-GE100; 28,000 lbs thrust) F-16 aircraft, were specifically designed to accomplish the Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) mission. However, F100-PW-220 powered Block 42 engine thrust and performance limitations have resulted in ANG pilots performing combat operations at increased risk. Equipping these aircraft with more powerful FIOO-PW-229 engines (29, 100 lbs thrust) immediately enables the Block 42 F-16 to effectively perform any assigned mission while providing combat pilots a level of performance comparable to the Block 52 F-16. With Base Re-Alignment and Closure (BRAC) changes considered, 57 PW-229 engines (including spares) are required to upgrade the entire Block 42 fleet. Since FY01, a total of 33 PW-229 engines have been procured. When combined with common configuration implementation program (CCIP) improvements, the addition of PW -229 engines to Block 42 F-16s places ANG aircraft at a similar level of capability with their active duty counterparts. Modified aircraft have been deployed to Operation NORTHERN WATCH in 2002 and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM in 2005 and 2007 and proven to be fully compatible in combat operations. Re-engining Block 42 continues to be a high ANG priority in order to provide maximum combat capability to pilots and to combatant commanders. 2. Requirement. TAF 303-76-I/II/III-A (revision 1) SORD for F-16C/D Block 40/42, LANTIRN TDE Report (422 TES, 1990, Classified). 3. Impact If Not Funded. F100-PW-220 powered Block 42 aircraft can not perform AEFtasked missions without incurring higher risk to the pilots. F100-PW-229 powered Block 42 aircraft are over-tasked to support AEF missions since full complement of these aircraft are unavailable. 4. Units Impacted.
138 FW Tulsa IAP, OK 180 FW Toledo, OH

5. Contractor. Pratt & Whitney (United Technologies), East Hartford, CT. 6. Cost.
Units Required 24 Engines * (3010) 8 Install Kits (3010) Spare Parts** (3010) Total
* Includes 5 spare engines. ** Includes other government costs.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $5.10 $0.11 N/A

Program Cost ($ Million) $122.40 $0.88 $15.82 $139.10

80

HH-60G
Combat Search & Rescue
The ANG operates 18 HH-60Gs comprising 23% of the total combat coded CSAR helicopters in the Air Force inventory.
Three ANG Wings operate these aircraft; the 106 RQW Francis S. Gabreski Airport, NY, the 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA, and the 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK. In FY07 the ANG HH-60Gs continued modernization efforts as the sole Air Force component to test and install the AN/ARS-6v12 Personnel Locator System greatly increasing the ability to recover downed airmen and isolated personnel. The ANG, along with Air Force Reserce Command, have funded a Color Display and Situational Awareness Data Link (SADL) program which greatly enhances capability and will serve as a cornerstone for future modernization. The professional aircrew of the three Air National Guard HH-60G combat rescue squadrons continue to provide the most experienced, cost effective capability to the Combatant Commanders while deployed worldwide in support of the Global War on Terrorism. Throughout FY07, these ANG aircrew deployed in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM continued to produce combat saves in the Area of Operations. When not deployed, these ANG forces also provide critical homeland defense, civil support and various State missions such as search and rescue, counter drug missions and disaster relief.

HH-60 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference Critical Combat Capabilities List
Multi Function Color Display CSAR Tactical Data Link CSAR Board Mobil Aircrew Restraint System (MARS) Improved Defensive Armament capability

Essential Capabilities List


Intelligence Broadcast Receiver Wide Field of View Night Vision Goggles Improved Ballistic Armor Sub-System (I-BASS) Improved Hover Infrared Suppression System (I-HIRSS) Aircraft Exit Lighting GPS Certified Aircraft Improved AIE Gear Combat Egress Gear

Desired Capabilities List


HH-60G Aircraft Windshield Film Full Motion Trainer (Simulator) Improved Rotor Blades Improved Engines Improved Arctic Heater Improved Generators Mode 5/S Crash Activated AirBag System Flight Data Recorder

81

HH-60 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($Millions) Program MFCD Tactical Data Link GPRS CSAR Board Defensive Armament
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0207224 0207224 0207224 0207224 0207224


2

FY09 $4.00 2 $3.98 2 $1.89 2 $0.77 2 $6.90 2

FY10 3

FY11 -

FY12 4

FY13 -

Program Total $4.00 $3.98 $1.89 $0.77 $6.90

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

Multi-Function Color Display - Equipment which allows a color display of current FLIR picture and integrates a digital moving map. The additional on-board processing power will give the capability to harness future modifications such as Situational Awareness Data Link, LARS V12, IBR threat receiver, and GPRS. HH-60G Tactical Data Link - Enhanced Position Location Radio System (EPLRS) with Situational Awareness Data Link (SADL) provides widely fielded information transfer capability in a digitized battlefield environment providing connectivity between Pararescue forces, helicopters, tankers, and fighters making up a Combat Search and Rescue package. Global Personnel Recovery System - New technology which allows over-the-horizon position tracking and data link capability in a small form factor and adaptable application. Ease of forming groups in the cell is a plus for short notice or no notice missions. CSAR Board - The Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) Board will allow Pararescue personnel to simultaneously administer immediate in-flight medical care on two recovered personnel by stacking these survivors vertically on litters in the aft cabin. Defensive Armament Upgrade - The Fabrique Nationale Herstal M3M .50 caliber machine gun has a high rate of fire and can suppress enemy threats up to 1500 meters. The Dillon Aero M134D minigun is an ultra-reliable, GAU-2B minigun replacement which provides aircraft gross weight savings. To prevent frequent reload time for the M240 machine gun, a Dillon Aero 500 round ammunition container would replace the 200 round container.

82

INFORMATION PAPER ON HH-60G MULTI FUNCTION COLOR DISPLAY (MFCD) 1. Background. The flow of an increasing volume of data necessitates HH-60G aircrew have the ability to receive, process, sort, display and correctly act on information from various entities. A Multi-Function Color Display (MFCD) with additional data processing power will enable pilots to cleanly display and manipulate current data streams using a single color display screen for each pilot and an additional color display to replace the current weather radar display. This MFCD will allow HH-60G aircrew to display current forward looking infrared (FLIR) picture and aircraft flight instrument data along with an integrated moving map display, eliminating the need for a separate pen tablet computer to display aircraft position. The future value of the MFCD lies in its ability to harness the capability of additional aircraft modifications such as Situational Awareness Data Link (SADL), LARS V12, the Intelligence Broadcast Receiver and the Global Personnel Recovery System (GPRS). 2. Requirement. ACC FY08 Unfunded Requirement; AFSOC and ACC Approved 1067 Aircraft Modification. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The HH-60G will continue to use unreliable carry-on pen tablet computers to display critical mission information with no ability to capture, process and harness threat, intelligence and survivor information gained from future aircraft modifications. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractors. Raytheon, Indianapolis, IN; DRS, Dayton, OH; EFW, Fort Worth, TX; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 40 MFCD (3010) Integration/Testing/T.O.s (NRE) (3010) Total
*Includes 10% Spares.

Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.06 N/A

Program Cost ($ Million) $2.40 $1.60 $4.00

83

INFORMATION PAPER ON HH-60G TACTICAL DATA LINK (TDL) 1. Background. Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) forces require the improved situational awareness (SA) capabilities that a TDL can provide during Combat Search and Rescue Task Force (CSARTF) operations. A TDL allows forces to more effectively locate and recover survivors, and provides/receives critical off-board data to/from other HH-60Gs in the flight, C2 nodes and protective fighter and attack aircraft. A TDL will allow the HH-60G to be interoperable with other air assets in theater, have enhanced SA for CSARTF missions, and will reduce fratricide for CSAR forces. Using Situational Awareness Data Link (SADL) for line of sight situational awareness coupled with the over the horizon capability of the Global Personnel Recovery System (GPRS) will provide a total solution for the HH-60G data link requirement. 2. Requirement. CAF MNS 315-92, Real-Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC); Global Information Grid CRD, JROCM 134-01, 30 Aug 01; Air Force Tactical Data Link Master Plan, ACC Approved 1067; ACC FY08 Critical Unfunded Requirement. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Lack of data link creates high potential for mission failure, lost aircrew, and lost aircraft due to lack of situational awareness and airspace management in the battle area. ANG rescue aircraft will be incompatible with Air and Space Expeditionary CSAR Force packages, jeopardizing the interoperability of the Total Force. A TDL is essential for reactive, time-critical missions that require dynamic planning and maximum flexibility in a very fluid environment. Real time information into and out of the cockpit (RTIC/RTOC) is critical to combat search and rescue (CSAR), drop-zone identification, and threat analysis while limiting voice emissions. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractors. Raytheon, Fullerton, CA; Innovative Solutions International, Vienna, VA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 18 EPLRS/SADL (3010) Integration/Testing (NRE) (3010) Total
*Includes Installation.

Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.11 N/A

Program Cost ($ Million) $1.98 $2.00 $3.98

84

INFORMATION PAPER ON GLOBAL PERSONNEL RECOVERY SYSTEM (GPRS) 1. Background. Combat Search and Rescue Forces (HH-60G, HC-130, MC-130, Guardian Angel) in the Air National Guard are required to provide Rescue/Personnel Recovery services to both the Combatant Commander during combat operations and to state/national authorities for civil rescue operations and other various state missions. During both civil and combat operations, Rescue aircrew have a requirement for Over the Horizon (OTH) data link communication capability and position tracking of participating elements. Additionally, command and control elements have a requirement for a reliable infrastructure to maintain communication with participating elements in an operation while also maintaining situational awareness on the status of those elements. Weight and space considerations in the HH-60G (and dismounted Guardian Angel personnel) are paramount and the ability to incorporate a lightweight, small foot print GPRS card is important. Finally, this over the horizon and situational awareness capability needs to be available across the spectrum of operational environments encountered by Rescue Forces. 2. Requirement. MNS 315-92, Real-Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC); Global Information Grid CRD, JROCM 134-01, 30 Aug 01; Air Force Tactical Data Link Master Plan. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG Rescue Forces will continue to be hampered by intermittent and unreliable OTH voice communication and a limited number of bolt-on blue force tracking technologies. This capability will solve the line of sight (LOS) limitation of current data link solutions. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractor. Innovative Solutions International, Vienna, VA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 35 GPRS Systems (3010)
*Includes 10% spares.

Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.054

Program Cost ($ Million) $1.89

85

INFORMATION PAPER ON HH-60G COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE (CSAR) BOARD 1. Background. Effective cabin space in an HH-60G is severely limited. It is imperative that Pararescue (PJ) personnel have the ability to administer quality medical care on two recovered isolated persons simultaneously. The current setup in the aft cabin, with space taken up by auxiliary fuel tanks, weapons, ammunition and personnel gear, is not conducive to effective medical treatment unless a system is implemented to efficiently use valuable and limited cabin space. The CSAR Board is equipment that will allow Pararescue personnel to simultaneously administer medical care on two recovered personnel by stacking these litter patients vertically in the aft cabin. 2. Requirement. HH-60G Mission Area Plan. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Combat Search and Rescue PJ personnel will be unable to effectively administer life saving medical care to multiple recovered isolated personnel. If proper medical care cannot be given to survivors in the back of an HH-60G due to correctable space limitations, entire CSAR missions are at risk of failure. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractor. L-3 Communications / TCS, Ft Walton Beach, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required 21 CSAR Boards (3010) NRE/Test/T.O.s (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.02 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $0.42 $0.35 $0.77

86

INFORMATION PAPER ON HH-60G DEFENSIVE ARMAMENT UPGRADE 1. Background. The HH-60G has a requirement to provide reliable defensive firepower between the currently fielded GAU-2B (800m) and supporting fighters employing special ordnance no closer than 1000 meters from the helicopter. The Fabrique Nationale Herstal (FNH) GAU-21 .50 caliber machine gun is an accurate, reliable, lightweight, high rate of fire, open bolt weapon that can effectively suppresses threats up to 1500 meters. Since the HH-60G routinely operates at maximum allowable gross weight, it is necessary to find weight savings whenever possible. The Dillon Aero M134D mini-gun is an ultra-reliable, GAU-2B mini-gun replacement which provides overall weight savings. Finally, to prevent frequent reload time for the M240 machine gun, a Dillon Aero 500-round ammunition container would replace the existing 200 round container. 2. Requirement. ACC Project 96-012A HH-60G Cabin Configuration FOT&E Final Report (U) dated April 1997 and CAF ORD 306-00-I/II/III HH-60G Block 152 (U) both state the requirement for a .50-caliber machine gun on the Rescue HH-60Gs; AAC/CENTCOM C-MNS 02-501, Approved ACC M3M 1067. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The HH-60G fleet will continue to have an unreliable defensive capability between the maximum range of the current system and the minimum range within which a supporting fighter can drop ordnance. Additionally, the HH-60G will continue to be mission limited by gross weight, while also increasing M240 down time due to limited ammunition container capacity. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractors. FN Herstal USA Inc, McLean, VA; FN Manufacturing Inc. (FNMI), Columbia, SC; Dillon Aero, Scottsdale, AZ. 6. Cost.
Units Required 36 Dillon M134D Miniguns (3010) 36 Dillon M240 500-rnd Container (3010) 36 FNH M3M .50 Caliber Machine Guns (3010) Total Unit Cost * ($ Thousands) $55.00 $1.50 $135.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $1.980 $0.054 $4.860 $6.90

* Includes spares, support equipment and non-recurring engineering.

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88

KC-135
The ANGs 21 Air Refueling Wings currently operate 228 KC-135R/T/E aircraft and represent 45% of the entire Air Force KC-135 fleet. This year, ANG tankers have flown over 26,500 hours in direct support of operations at home and abroad. ANG crews and aircraft have supported Combatant Commanders across the globe in such missions as inter-theater airbridge, aeromedical evacuation, theater combat support, and global strike operations. At home, ANG KC-135s continue to provide over 60 percent of Operation NOBLE EAGLE alert air refueling support to homeland defense interceptors.

Air Refueling Tanker

Many upgrades are required for this 50 year old aircraft to meet the continuous demands of global power projection and homeland defense. ANG continues to take delivery of upgraded Block 40 aircraft. This program improves the aircrafts operational readiness and gives it the communication, navigation, and surveillance (CNS/ATM) upgrades necessary to fly in worldwide airspace. Defensive systems are needed to prevent shoulder-mounted surface-to-air-missle systems from destroying aircraft during takeoff, landing, and low altitude flight profiles. Tactical data link technologies and situational awareness displays that bring moving map and real-time threat information to KC-135 crewmembers are required modifications that will greatly enhance worldwide refueling and aeromedical evacuation missions. The ANG KC-135 fleet is quickly moving to an all R/T-model fleet with E-model retirements continuing and the last units converting by summer 2008. In addition, the ANG anticipates participating as a Total Force partner in the Air Forces KC-135 recapitalization effort. Final source selection for the new tanker, one of CSAFs acknowledged top priorities is expected at the beginning of 2008.

KC-135 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Infrared (IR) Defensive Systems Integrated Tactical Data Link (TDL) Global, secure C2, BLOS connectivity Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) lighting capability External overt and covert lighting Situational awareness display technologies Fuel tank fire explosion protection

Essential Capabilities List


Boom Operator Simulation Systems (BOSS) Radar Threat Warning System (RWR) Vertical Navigation (V-Nav) Capable Flight Director Electronic Flight Bag Cockpit and Boom Operator Station NVIS Compatible Lighting New Air Cycle Machine Digital Engine Instrument Display Ground Cooling Capability Environmental Upgrades Noise Reduction Temperature Control Boom pod

Desired Capabilities List


Next Generation Autopilot Airline Lavatory Rear Aspect Video Capability Improved crew bunks

89

KC-135 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program Advanced Infrared Counter Measures (IRCM) Tactical Data Link (TDL) NVIS Compatible/Covert Lighting Situational Awareness Cockpit Display Unit (CDU) Fuel Tank Fire Explosion Protection

P.E. Number 0401134 41218F 41218F

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

Program Total $614.40 $25.65 $47.50

$122.88 2 $122.88 2 $122.88 2 $122.88 2 $122.88 2 $8.55 2 $10.00 2 $6.65 2 $39.90 2 $8.55 2 $13.75 2 $6.65 2 $39.90 2
3

$8.55 2 $13.75 2

$10.00 2

41218F 41218F
2

$39.90 2
4

$13.30 $199.50

$39.90 2 $39.90 2
3080 Appropriation

Notes: 1 3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

Advanced Infrared Counter Measures (IRCM) Systems - Provides an integral self-protection system to combat IR threats to large aircraft in a more complex and lethal threat environment. Tactical Data Link (TDL) - Provides global, secure command and control Beyond-line-ofsight (BLOS) connectivity with the network centric battlefield allowing tankers more flexibility to carry out effective operations deeper into enemy airspace. Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) Compatible/Covert Lighting - Provides night tanker refueling operations safer and more efficient allowing tanker formation station-keeping when electronic emissions are restricted and greatly enhancing receiver capability to rendezvous, refuel, and quickly return to the fight. Situational Awareness Cockpit Display Units (CDUs) - Allows pilots to have increased situational awareness by providing critical real-time information on displays immediately available to them on the instrument panel. Fuel Tank Fire Explosion Protection System - Provides protection for aircraft fuel tanks against small arms fire and shoulder-fired IR missiles.

90

INFORMATION PAPER ON KC-135 ADVANCED INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES (IRCM) SELF PROTECTIVE SUITE 1. Background. Changes in employment concepts are putting the KC-135 in higher threat areas more often. Low altitude refueling, forward positioning, and future efforts to establish the tanker as a command and control relay are creating increasingly hostile operational environments. This threat environment is widely populated with shoulder fired, man portable air defense systems (MANPAD) infrared seeking missiles. MANPADs are a significant threat during takeoffs, landings, and low altitude refueling missions. An advanced infrared Defensive System is needed to counter MANPAD threats and does not rely on pyrotechnic expendables which are incompatible with an air refueling mission. 2. Requirement. Based on the LAIRCM ORD 314-92, dated Aug 98, the Air Force will install LAIRCM on some of the KC-135 fleet; AMC Requirements and Planning Council ranked Defensive Systems as #4 at 2007 Executive Session. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The KC-135 will be unable to counteract any IR threat during takeoff, landing, and low altitude flight regimes. 4. Units Impacted.
101 ARW 108 ARW 117 ARW 121 ARW 126 ARW 127 WG Bangor IAP, ME McGuire AFB, NJ Birmingham APT, AL Rickenbacker ANGB, OH Scott AFB, IL Selfridge, MI 128 ARW Milwaukee IAP, WI 134 ARW Knoxville APT, TN 151 ARW Salt lake IAP, UT 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 155 ARW Lincoln MAP, NE 157 ARW Pease ANGB, NH 161 ARW Phoenix IAP, AZ 168 ARW Eielson AFB, AK 171 ARW Pittsburgh IAP, PA 185 ARW Sioux City IAP, IA 190 ARW Forbes FLD, KS

5. Contractors. BAE Systems, Nashua NH, Lockheed Martin, Orlando FL; Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems, Rolling Meadows, IL. 6. Cost.
Product Type NRE (3010) 172 Group A Kits (3010) 86 Group B Kits (3010) Total Unit Cost * ($ Million) $2.00 $3.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $12.40 $344.00 $258.00 $614.40

* Includes required spares, support equipment, and technical orders.

91

INFORMATION PAPER ON KC-135 TACTICAL DATA LINK (TDL) 1. Background. Recent combat operations have highlighted the need for comprehensive, networked command and control (C2) throughout all theaters of operation. Installation of a TDL provides this C2 link and maximizes KC-135 aircrew situational awareness with beyond-line-ofsight (BLOS) and line-of-sight (LOS) capabilities. It provides critical real-time information to KC-135 aircrews so they can participate in the present day network-centric battlespace and greatly increase their survivability in combat operations. The resulting connectivity with C2 elements enhances the situational awareness of both tanker formations and the joint and coalition aircraft involved in aerial refueling operations. A TDL capability should be compatible with any situational awareness cockpit display units (CDU) utilized by the community. 2. Requirement. Draft annex to Tanker ORD (AF/A5R). MAF Network Enabling Concept, 26 Apr 06. AMC MAF Data Link Integration Technical Requirements Document (TRD), 25 Oct 06. Tactical Data link Transformation CDD, Increment 1, JROCM, 23 Jun 04. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without a tactical data link, ANG tanker assets will remain outside the C2 networks in the various theaters of operation unable to receive critical tasking information and blind to broadcasted threats. 4. Units Impacted.
101 ARW 108 ARW 117 ARW 121 ARW 126 ARW 127 WG Bangor IAP, ME McGuire AFB, NJ Birmingham APT, AL Rickenbacker ANGB, OH Scott AFB, IL Selfridge, MI 128 ARW Milwaukee IAP, WI 134 ARW Knoxville APT, TN 141 ARW Fairchild AFB, WA 151 ARW Salt lake IAP, UT 154 WG Hickam AFB, HI 155 ARW Lincoln MAP, NE 157 ARW Pease ANGB, NH 161 ARW Phoenix IAP, AZ 168 ARW Eielson AFB, AK 171 ARW Pittsburgh IAP, PA 185 ARW Sioux City IAP, IA 190 ARW Forbes FLD, KS

5. Contractors. AIRINC, Oklahoma City, OK; Boeing, Chantilly, VA; Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 190 Group A (3010) 190 TDL Radios (3010) Total
* Includes initial spares.

Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.075 $0.060

Program Cost ($ Million) $14.25 $11.40 $25.65

92

INFORMATION PAPER ON KC-135 NIGHT VISION GOGGLE (NVG) COMPATIBLE LIGHTING 1. Background. Night has become the preferred flying environment for combat operations and there is a subsequent need to bring night vision tools to KC-135 aircrews. To enhance the survivability of the aircraft and to meet the needs of receiver aircraft requires modifying both the internal and external aircraft lighting. Night vision goggles (NVGs) give crewmembers the critical ability to see other aircraft in a blacked-out flying environment enhancing collision avoidance and tanker formation integrity when tactics calls for no lighting and limited electronic emissions. Modifying external lighting on the KC-135 allows for receivers to rendezvous and air refuel quicker while they are wearing NVGs increasing the time they can spend conducting their missions. Currently, receivers must remove goggles to refuel and must wait for their eyes to readjust to night operations. This takes valuable time away from executing operations. Finally, aircrews can approach and depart airfields blacked-out, keeping the enemy from visually tracking them and firing man portable air defense systems (MANPAD) or anti-aircraft artillery. 2. Requirement. HQ Air Mobility Command mandated that all mobility aircraft be modified for Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) operations. A-10 community is conducting operational testing for NVIS air refueling capability. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Aircraft are vulnerable to mid-air collisions in blacked-out conditions and vulnerable to enemy ground fire if standard lighting continues. In a dynamic targeting environment, receivers will be slower to refuel and return to the fight while over enemy territory. 4. Units Impacted.
101 ARW 108 ARW 117 ARW 121 ARW 126 ARW 127 WG 128 ARW Bangor IAP, ME McGuire AFB, NJ Birmingham APT, AL Rickenbacker ANGB, OH Scott AFB, IL Selfridge, MI Milwaukee IAP, WI 134 ARW 141 ARW 151 ARW 154 WG 155 ARW 157 ARW 161 ARW Knoxville APT, TN Fairchild AFB, WA Salt Lake IAP, UT Hickam AFB, HI Lincoln MAP, NE Pease ANGB, NH Phoenix IAP, AZ 168 ARW 171 ARW 185 ARW 190 ARW Eielson AFB, AK Pittsburgh IAP, PA Sioux City IAP, IA Forbes FLD, KS

5. Contractors. Support Systems Associates, Inc., Melbourne, FL; Air Force Research Lab, Mesa, AZ. 6. Cost.
Units Required 190 Kits (3010)
*Includes 8% initial spares.

Unit Cost * ($ Million) $0.25

Program Cost ($ Million) $47.50

93

INFORMATION PAPER ON KC-135 SITUATIONAL AWARENESS COCKPIT DISPLAY UNIT (CDU) 1. Background. With the reduction in crew complement as a result of the KC-135 PACER CRAG upgrade and combatant commanders calling for more flexible air refueling missions, there is a crucial need to provide pilots a situational awareness display with as much real-time tactical information as possible. Information such as global positioning system location on a moving map, real-time threat data, weather updates, and electronic flight publications must be available at the pilots fingertips for immediate viewing to increase mission effectiveness. The CDU should be expandable to accommodate future tactical data link information to further enhance KC-135 survivability. 2. Requirement. Draft annex to tanker ORD (AF/A5R) as an enhancement to KC-135 data link; MAF Network Enabling Concept, 29 Mar 05; MAF Data Link Integration Technical Requirements Document (TRD), 25 Oct 06. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without a situational awareness display with moving map and data link expandability, tanker crews will continue to make critical decisions without accurate realtime information in the cockpit. 4. Units Impacted.
101 ARW 108 ARW 117 ARW 121 ARW 126 ARW 127 WG Bangor IAP, ME McGuire AFB, NJ Birmingham APT, AL Rickenbacker ANGB, OH Scott AFB, IL Selfridge, MI 128 ARW 134 ARW 141 ARW 151 ARW 154 WG 155 ARW Milwaukee IAP, WI Knoxville APT, TN Fairchild AFB, WA Salt lake IAP, UT Hickam AFB, HI Lincoln MAP, NE 157 ARW 161 ARW 168 ARW 171 ARW 185 ARW 190 ARW Pease ANGB, NH Phoenix IAP, AZ Eielson AFB, AK Pittsburgh IAP, PA Sioux City IAP, IA Forbes FLD, KS

5. Contractors. CMC Electronics, Chicago, IL; Raytheon, Indianapolis, IN; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 380 CDU Kits (3010)
*Includes initial spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.035 *

Total Program Cost ($ Million) $13.30

94

INFORMATION PAPER ON KC-135 FUEL TANK FIRE EXPLOSION PROTECTION 1. Background. Worldwide proliferation of small arms and shoulder fired infrared (IR) missiles makes mobility aircraft vulnerable to attack during low altitude operations, particularly during approach and landing. Small arms fire and shoulder fired IR missiles constitute lethal threats to KC-135 operations. To counter these threats, a nitrogen based fuel tank fire protection system is needed to reduce the chance of catastrophic explosion by replacing oxygen with nitrogen in the fuel tanks. 2. Requirement. KC-135 Aircraft Extension Program (AEP) Capability Development Document (CDD) 20 Sep 07. 3. Impact If Not Funded. KC-135 fuel tanks remain vulnerable to the effects of small arms fire and shoulder fired IR missiles. The loss of any KC-135 aircraft degrades the ability to provide vital air refueling across the entire spectrum of operations. 4. Units Impacted.
101 ARW 108 ARW 117 ARW 121 ARW 126 ARW 127 WG Bangor IAP, ME McGuire AFB, NJ Birmingham APT, AL Rickenbacker ANGB, OH Scott AFB, IL Selfridge, MI 128 ARW 134 ARW 141 ARW 151 ARW 154 WG 155 ARW Milwaukee IAP, WI Knoxville APT, TN Fairchild AFB, WA Salt lake IAP, UT Hickam AFB, HI Lincoln MAP, NE 157 ARW 161 ARW 168 ARW 171 ARW 185 ARW 190 ARW Pease ANGB, NH Phoenix IAP, AZ Eielson AFB, AK Pittsburgh IAP, PA Sioux City IAP, IA Forbes FLD, KS

5. Contractor. Boeing, St. Louis, MO; Northrop Grumman, Melbourne FL. 6. Cost.
Units Required 190 (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.05 Program Cost ($ Million) $199.50*

*Includes 8% initial spares. Pricing is ROM.

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96

UAS

Unmanned Aircraft System

ANG is standing up 4 MQ-1 Predator Squadrons and 1 MQ-9 Reaper Squadron that will be capable of providing up to 12 combat air patrol missions operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.
MQ-1 PREDATOR UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE The MQ-1 Predator is a medium-altitude, long-endurance, remotely piloted aircraft. The MQ-1s primary mission is intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR). When the MQ-1 is not actively engaged in its primary mission, it is available to the Joint Forces Air Component Commander for interdiction and armed reconnaissance against critical, perishable targets, and as a theater asset for reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition. The MQ-1 Predator unmanned aircraft system (UAS) is flown by North Dakota, Arizona and California Air National Guard units. The Nevada ANG is supporting MQ-1 aircrew training. MQ-9 REAPER UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE The MQ-9 Reaper is a medium-to-high altitude, long endurance remotely piloted aircraft system. The MQ-9 is a persistent hunter-killer against emerging targets. The MQ-9s secondary mission is to act as an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance asset, employing sensors to provide real-time data to commanders and intelligence specialists at all levels. Larger and more powerful than the MQ1 Predator, Reaper is designed to go after time-sensitive targets with persistence and precision, and destroy or disable those targets. The New York Air National Guard will operate the MQ-9 Reaper in FY10.

UAS 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Subsonic weapon providing cockpit selectable fusing, 180 degree off-boresight capability, dual-mode guidance, and multiple weapons per pylon Advanced cockpit Fully integrated tactical data link Laser spot search and track capability SATCOM radio in ground control station

Essential Capabilities List


Sense/Detect and avoid other aircraft Additional airborne radio Digital video, voice and data recorder in the cockpit 120 degree field of view nose camera

Desired Capabilities List


Accurate time on target/time of release counter HQ I / II

97

UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program MQ-1/MQ-9 Integrated POC/ROC P.E. Number 0503218F/ 0503219F FY09 $7.00 4 $ 0.39 1 $38.26 3 $ 4.80 4 $19.80 2
2

FY10 $0.39 1 $4.80 4 3

FY11 $0.39 1 $4.80 4 -

FY12 $0.39 1 $4.80 4 4

FY13 -

Program Total $7.00

MQ-1/MQ-9 0503218F/ Advanced Cockpit 0503219F Sense/Detect & Avoid other 0503219F Aircraft Capability
Notes: 1 3840 Appropriation

$59.02

$19.80

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

MQ-1/MQ-9 Integrated PREDATOR/REAPER Operation Center (POC/ROC) Integrates communications equipment in an open architecture design for streamlined control for warfighting and homeland defense missions. MQ-1/MQ-9 Advanced Cockpit - Replaces the MQ-1 and MQ-9 ground control stations with a modernized cockpit providing an operator-centric focus on human factors, enhanced situational awareness and intuitive controls. Sense/Detect & Avoid other Aircraft Capability - Strap-on kits, and system integration to permit operation of MQ-1 PREDATOR within the majority of CONUS, and near CONUS airspace, in support of local authorities for disaster response, homeland security operations, and continuation training, and to reduce the chance of mid-air collisions in OCONUS AORs.

98

INFORMATION PAPER ON MQ-1/MQ-9 INTEGRATED PREDATOR/REAPER OPERATIONS CENTER (POC/ROC) 1. Background. ANG units started full-time MQ-1 operations in Aug 06, and reached initial operational capability (IOC) in interim facilities at three units as of July 2007. In FY08 a fourth unit will reach IOC and will be the first in a permanent facility. ANG requires integrated PREDATOR Operations Centers (POC) and a REAPER Operations Center (ROC) for installation in permanent facilities to incorporate current and future operations equipment in an open architecture design, smoothly integrating current and emerging needs for control of in theater homeland defense missions. The POC/ROC design integrates multiple systems running independently and allow for new tools to support emerging missions. The integrated POC/ROC will be incorporated into the three initial locations, and at two future MQ-1 and MQ-9 units scheduled to reach IOC by early FY10. Additionally, a test bed system is needed to allow for software and hardware upgrade testing thereby assuring configuration control. The ANG has a requirement to provide MQ-1 Predator intelligence collection and dissemination to support Central Command (CENTCOM) and continental US (CONUS) state and national mission. 2. Requirement. Air Combat Command MQ-1 CONOPS, Air National Guard MQ-1 Enabling Concept, and 2007 WEPTAC RD&A Requirements List. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Units will be forced to rely on ad hoc installation of evolving POC/ROC capabilities to meet current and future requirements without the advantage of being fully integrated into an open architecture. The ad hoc configured stand-alone (non-integrated) architecture hampers effective utilization of full POC/ROC capabilities. 4. Units Impacted.
174 ATKW Syracuse, NY (MQ-9) 214 RG Davis-Monthan AFB AZ

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 2 Systems (3080) 1 Test Bed System (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.40 $2.20 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.80 $2.20 $7.00

99

INFORMATION PAPER ON MQ-1/MQ-9 ADVANCED COCKPIT 1. Background. ANG units started full-time MQ-1 operations in Aug 06, and will reach initial operational capability with five units by the middle of FY10. As ANG units progress toward full operational capability they will have additional orbit support capability that can be employed worldwide, including in the continental US (CONUS) to support of Federal and State taskings. The advanced cockpit focuses on human factors to provide intuitive, pilot-like controls, and advanced visualization. Utilizing synthetic vision, mission crews gain enhanced situational awareness with wrap-around field-of-regard and a total air and ground picture. The advanced cockpit will use an open architecture to allow full integration of aircraft, sensor and weapons control, and allow for new requirements from emerging missions. Additionally, the advanced cockpit will incorporate ergonomic seating, ergonomically correct displays, and hand and foot controls, with individual memory function to allow for quick changeovers while mission is underway. 2. Requirement. Air Combat Command MQ-1 CONOPS, Air National Guard MQ-1 Enabling Concept, and 2007 WEPTAC RD&A Requirements List. The ANG has a requirement to provide MQ-1 Predator intelligence collection and dissemination to support current Central Command missions, and to support emerging missions in other combatant commands and CONUS State and Federal missions, which will require evolving capabilities of the Predator Operations Center (POC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Continued use of the current ground control station cockpit limits the crews for situational awareness and expose them and the aircraft to increased risk due to the poor operator interface and limited capabilities of the current cockpit design. 4. Units Impacted.
119 WG Fargo, ND 174 ATKW Syracuse, NY (MQ-9) 147 RW Ellington Field, TX 214 RG Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ 163 RW March ARB, CA

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 12 Cockpits (3080 & 3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $1.73 Program Cost ($ Million) $38.26 $20.76 $59.02

100

INFORMATION PAPER ON MQ-1 SENSE/DETECT & AVOID OTHER AIRCRAFT CAPABILITY 1. Background. ANG will have four MQ-1 units by FY08 that will support both overseas and continental US (CONUS) operational missions, and continuation training flights in the CONUS. Federal Aviation Administration regulations require that UASs be equipped with a system to sense and avoid any potential air traffic conflicts. To fully meet the need for ANG support to Federal and State missions supporting national security and homeland defense utilizing the long dwell capability of ANG UASs, a capable sense and avoid system is essential. The USAF AF Research Lab (AFRL) SAA, Phase 1, Man-in-the-Loop (MITL) Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) is the first to deliver a lightweight, low-power, low cost UAS collision avoidance system. AFRLs SAA system, developed by Defense Research Associates (DRA), consists of visible sensors, high-speed data processors, and detection and tracking algorithms. This effort leverages several AFRL efforts in passive/active ranging, data fusion and avoidance. DRA has been funded to develop a MITL SAA strap-on kit for the Predator. This program provides an interim capability for 16 operational MITL SAA systems (strap-on kits), and 4 spares (4 operational, 1 spare for each ANG MQ-1 unit) to fly ANG Predator aircraft in the Central Command and the US National Airspace System (NAS), providing deconfliction with other participating and non-participating air traffic. 2. Requirement. Air Combat Command MQ-1 CONOPS, Air National Guard MQ-1 Enabling Concept, and 2007 WEPTAC RD&A Requirements List. FAA Regulation 7610.4, AFI 11-202 Vol 3 and AFI 11-2MQ-1 Vol 3. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Increased potential for air-to-air collisions. Additionally, the FAA would deny or restrict access to the NAS required for domestic operational missions and required training. 4. Units Impacted.
119 WG Fargo, ND 214 RG Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ 147 RW Ellington Field, TX 163 RW March ARB, CA

5. Contractor. Defense Research Associates Inc, Beavercreek, OH. 6. Cost Estimate.


Units Required 20 MQ-1 SAA Systems (3010) * MQ-1 System Integration (16 aircraft) (3010) Total
* Includes spares.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.75 $0.30

Program Cost ($ Million) $15.00 $ 4.80 $19.80

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102

Operational Support Aircraft


C-40C, C-38 & C-21
The ANG supports special mission transportation of Distinguished Visitor (DV) and Congressional Delegation (CODEL).

Distinguished Visitor (DV) and Congressional Delegation (CODEL) missions have unique requirements beyond the traditional support provided to the rest of the ANGs fleet. The ANGs Operational Support Aircraft (OSA) includes the C-40C, C-38, and C-21. The ANGs newest OSA aircraft is the C-40C. The C-40s and C-38s are flown by the 201 AS at Andrews AFB and they provide VIP transportation for Congressional, DoD, Air Force and National Guard travel missions worldwide. Ensuring passenger safety and comfort on all OSA aircraft is our primary mission. The ANGs efforts will continue to focus on keeping these aircraft modern and safe. Since the ANG began the C-40C mission we have experienced a significant increase in the demand for the C-40C platform. In order to improve service and increase mission availability an additional C-40 platform is required. Recent OSA missions have highlighted the need to update the mission and plan for an extended range small capacity aircraft. The 201sts C-38 aircraft are nearing the end of their service life and replacement aircraft require extended range that would complement the capabilities of the C-40 fleet. Recently the ANG has assumed ownership of additional C-21 assets. They require updates to the avionics and airframe to address new FAA requirements. Without this change aircraft operations are restricted and the mission effectiveness and safety may be impacted.

OPERATIONAL SUPPORT AIRCRAFT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program C-38 Replacement Aircraft C-40C Procurement C-21A RVSM Upgrade C-21A Enhanced Mode-S Upgrade C-21A Dual FMS Upgrade
Notes:
1

PE Number

FY09

FY10

FY11 -

FY12 4

FY13 -

Program Total $200.00 $85.00 $3.20 $11.55 $6.09

0401314F $100.00 2 $100.00 2 0401314F 0401314F 0401314F 0401314F


2

$85.00 2 $3.20 2 $11.55 2 $6.09 2

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

C-38 Replacement Program - Replaces existing C-38 aircraft with more capable aircraft to support Congressional and DoD missions worldwide. C-40C Procurement - Completes the requirement for the C-40C aircraft in the ANG. This aircraft supports Congressional, DoD, Air Force, and National Guard travel missions worldwide. C-21A RVSM Upgrades - Implements program to install Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums capability. RVSM supports unrestricted movement above 29,000 feet, optimum for this type of aircraft. C-21A Enhanced Mode-S Transponder - Provides ATC with altitude trend data as well as true altitude information. Mandatory equipment for operations in RVSM as early as FY10. C-21A Dual FMS - Required for oceanic remote operations, replaces obsolete unsupportable equipment, and improves data base capacity.

103

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-38 REPLACEMENT AIRCRAFT PROGRAM 1. Background. A replacement aircraft for the C-38 aircraft is required to support the existing distinguished visitor (DV) transportation fleet at the 201 Airlift Squadron, Andrews AFB. The unit supports Congressional, Executive Branch, Department of Defense, Air Force, and National Guard travel missions worldwide. Current requirements call for four small DV support aircraft. They are currently operating only two C-38 aircraft. Replacing the C-38s would address several operational shortfalls and would significantly improve the mission capability. The replacement aircraft would extend the non-stop range of the aircraft well into European airspace and complement the existing C-40Cs for smaller contingents. This capability would eliminate timeconsuming enroute refueling stops and would decrease extended duty days for passengers and aircrews. 2. Requirement. Mission Need Statement (MNS) 002-94 and Operational Requirements Document (ORD) 002-94 dated 24 July 1994. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The unit is currently operating with only two short range aircraft to fulfill taskings. Requests for support are unfilled because the current aircraft are tasked or dont have the range to complete the mission. The replacement aircraft would improve mission capability by extending the range and increase mission readiness. Without the additional aircraft, the two assets currently owned by the ANG are over tasked and cannot effectively address the units primary mission. 4. Unit Impacted.
201 AS Andrews AFB, MD

5. Contractor. Bombardier, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Gulfstream, Savannah, GA. 6. Cost.


C-38 Replacement 4 Replacement Aircraft (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $50.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $200.00

104

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-40C PROCUREMENT 1. Background. The 201 Airlift Squadron District of Columbia Air National Guard provides worldwide air transportation for Congressional Members and Delegations (CODEL), the Executive Branch, Department of Defense (DoD) officials, high-ranking U.S. and foreign dignitaries and HQ USAF inspection team travel. The 201st currently operates three C-40Cs (military modified Boeing 737 Boeing Business Jets (BBJ)). ANG is still one aircraft short of meeting operational requirements. A fourth aircraft would significantly improve fleet readiness and reliability. Scheduled maintenance reduces unit capability and if unscheduled maintenance actions ground additional aircraft there is a good chance that flights will be cancelled. An additional aircraft allows the unit to overlap schedules and significantly improves aircraft availability. Also, the C-40C represents a vast improvement in performance and capability and the ANG already sees an increased demand for its use. In order to increase airlift capability and reliability and support additional airlift requests another aircraft is required. 2. Requirement. Mission Need Statement NGB MNS 001-97 dated 10 Jun 97 and Operational Requirements Document (ORD) ANG ORD 002-02 dated 19 Feb 04. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Not funding a fourth aircraft will significantly impact aircraft availability, mission readiness, and will impact the units ability to meet all Congressional taskings. 4. Unit Impacted:
201 AS Andrews AFB, MD

5. Contractor. Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, Seattle, WA. 6. Cost.


Units Required C-40C Aircraft (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $85.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $85.00

105

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-21 REDUCED VERTICAL SEPARATION MINIMUM (RVSM) MODIFICATIONS 1. Background. In 2003, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) converted US-controlled airspace to Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums (RVSM) requirements. Aircraft flying in RVSM airspace must be configured with avionics equipment that meets specific FAA standards. In FY07 the Air National Guard took possession of 16 C-21A aircraft that do not meet the minimum standards to operate in RVSM airspace. Additionally, the C-21A has an antiquated analog weather radar system which displays insufficiently detailed weather returns. Operating the C-21A at flight levels below 29,000 ft. severely limits the crews ability to climb to avoid adverse weather conditions. 2. Requirement. AF 1067 AMC 01-031, dated 28 Oct 2002. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without the RVSM modification, aircraft operations will be limited to flight levels below 29,000 ft. This will result in increased fuel consumption and limited crew ability to avoid thunderstorms with inferior weather radar systems. 4. Units Impacted.
103 FW Bradley IAP, CT 119 FW Hector Field, ND

5. Contractor. Computer Services Corporation Applied Technologies Division, Austin, TX. 6. Cost.
ITEM 16 RVSM Modifications (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.20 Program Cost ($ Million) $3.20

106

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-21 ENHANCED MODE-S 1. Background. Enhanced Mode-S equipment will be required to participate in the European reduced vertical separation minima (RVSM) airspace no later than FY09 and in the United States RVSM airspace as early as FY12. Enhanced surveillance takes the concept of elementary surveillance and adds new aircraft intent reporting fields. These fields will give ATC vertical intent information, aircraft track/turn information and heading/speed reports. In additional to the enhanced Mode-S this modification includes replacing outdated and unsupportable equipment including the dual Global Positioning Systems and dual Flight Management System (FMS) required for remote oceanic capability. 2. Requirement. AF 1067 AMC 01-031, dated 28 Oct 2002. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Currently no ANG C-21 aircraft are equipped with this capability. In addition, there is a waiver with the European Union to operate with enhanced Mode-S. After 2009, it is likely that the waiver will expire. Without these modifications C-21 operations in European airspace will have increased restrictions and limited utility. 4. Units Impacted.
103 FW Bradley IAP, CT 119 FW Hector Field, ND 200 AS Peterson AFB, CO

5. Contractor. Computer Services Corporation Applied Technologies Division, Austin, TX. 6. Cost.
ITEM 21 Enhanced Mode-S modifications (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.55 Program Cost ($ Million) $11.55

107

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-21 DUAL FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (FMS) 1. Background. Currently the C-21 has a single Flight Management System (FMS) that is rapidly becoming obsolete and will soon be unsupportable as well as a Global Positioning System (GPS) that is no longer supportable. In order to repair the GPS, the Air Logistics Centers must locate parts from current inventory or remove from aircraft in storage. Also, the FMS does not have enough memory to install the current databases for United States and European airspace. The proposed system will install dual GPSs and FMSs that support oceanic remote capability, have ample memory for current databases and will meet the updated Communications/Navigation/Surveillance / Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) requirements. 2. Requirement. AF 1067 AMC 01-031, dated 28 Oct 2002. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Currently no ANG C-21 aircraft have this equipment. This capability is required to address CNS/ATM requirements. Without these modifications future C21 missions will have increased restrictions and limited utility. 4. Units Impacted.
103 FW Bradley IAP, CT 119 FW Hector Field, ND 200 AS Peterson AFB, CO

5. Contractor. Computer Services Corporation Applied Technologies Division, Austin, TX. 6. Cost.
ITEM 21 Dual Flight Management System (FMS) Modifications (3010) Unit Cost ($ Millions) $0.29 Program Cost ($ Millions) $6.09

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C2
COMMAND AND CONTROL
ANG C2 warriors and weapons systems are enhancing the joint fight in the Global War on Terrorism, and transforming the expanding Homeland Defense mission area.
AIR CONTROL SQUADRON (ACS) An ACS is the Air Forces only 24/7 persistent deployable ground battle management C2 (BMC2) platform employed at the tactical level of war and the most forward-based link in the Joint BMC2 systems. It conducts C2, surveillance, weapons control and tactical communications and data links, providing mobile, combat-related air battle management of joint air operations. It also provides real-time shared situational awareness at the tactical level and common shared situational awareness at the operational level. AIR SUPPORT OPERATIONS CENTER (ASOC) AND TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY (TACP) An ASOC is a subordinate element of the AOC and is responsible for the direction and control of air operations directly supporting the ground combat element. A TACP provides advice and assistance in planning for the employment of air and space power and directs close air support firepower toward ground enemy targets. AIR AND SPACE OPERATIONS CENTER (AOC) An AOC, the senior element of the Theater Air Control System (TACS), is the weapon system employed by the Commander, Air Force Forces (COMAFFOR). It provides centralized control and decentralized execution of aerospace forces to the Joint Forces Air Component Commander (JFACC). The ANG augments active component AOCs. AIR DEFENSE SECTOR (ADS) An ADS provides tactical communications and datalink capabilities with other military and civil systems responsible for planning, directing, coordinating, and controlling forces for air surveillance, air defense, and control of sovereign U.S. airspace (including the National Capital Region), ensuring air defense and surveillance for the entire North American continent. RANGE CONTROL SQUADRONS (RCS) An RCS provides ground-controlled intercept and flight safety monitoring to ANG, Reserve, and active component assets, both deployed and at home, for live missile firings and combat training and test sorties.

Command and Control 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
AOC Full training capability (FTC) for all ARC units State-of-the-art client hardware to support multiple mission essential applications Equipment and bandwidth to support DMO units TACC2 Equipment and bandwidth to support DMO units TPS-75 replacement BCS-M to meet FY09 IOC Data link equipment for ACSs Distributive Training Operations Center (DTOC) gateways for each ACS ASOC/TACP Handheld full spectrum video and data link capability Three SADL radios per unit with sustainment funding TACP CASS SADL / mapping enhancements Lightweight day / night adjustable covert mark capability ASOC

Essential Capabilities List


ASOC/TACP Acquire hand-held, high power (>20 Watts) JTAC radio

109

COMMAND AND CONTROL EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program TACP: Ground Mobile Gateway TACP: SADL TACP: M-1145 HMMWV
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0502671F 0502671F 0502671F


2

FY09

FY10

FY 11 $0.27 4 -

FY 12 4

FY 13 -

Program Total $40.00 $2.14 $4.94

$20.00 4 $20.00 4 $1.47 4 $0.40 4 $2.62 4 $2.32 4


3

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 appropriation

TACP Ground Mobile Gateway - JTACS need a dismounted capability to process video/imagery and digitally communicate via data-link. TACP SADL - TACPs require funding to purchase EPLRS (Enhanced Position Location Reporting Systems). These systems will allow ground partyies to view aircraft information on a secure network and data burst information to and from the aircraft. This capability will limit fratricide in a CAS environment when working with ANG aircraft in the current AOR. TACP M-1145 Up-Armored HMMWVs - This is a mobility-driven requirement. TACPs require funding to procure the M-1145 HMMWV identified in the UTCs they are responsible for fielding.

110

INFORMATION PAPER ON HANDHELD FULL SPECTRUM VIDEO AND GROUND MOBILE GATEWAY (GMG) 1. Background. Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTAC) do not have a dismounted capability to process video/imagery nor to digitally communicate via data-link. Dismounted JTAC operations in this context imply: autonomous special operations/light infantry style on-foot operations within a reasonable distance of the nearest TACP or US Army Tactical Operations Center (TOC). The capability desired would involve one single piece of equipment which is light weight (less than 10 lbs), rucksack portable, rugged, handheld, with sufficient battery life to operate for extended periods of time across reasonable distances. This piece of equipment would be compatible with both Link-16 and Situation Awareness Data Link (SADL) equipped aircraft and Enhanced Position Location Reporting System (EPLRS). It would be capable of transmitting digital Close Air Support messages. It would also be capable of receiving and retransmitting video and/or imagery to and from higher echelon TACP, TOC or Air Support Operations Centers (ASOC), Advanced Targeting Pod (ATP) equipped aircraft, and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) platforms. 2. Requirement. CENTAF/CC. OIF/OEF Combined Forces Air Component Commander (CFACC). 2007 ANG Weapons and Tactics Conference number 1 Critical Combat Capability for TACP/ASOC community. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Dismounted JTACs will continue to be relegated to 1980s technology voice only operations in the middle of a 21st Century battlefield. Risk of fratricide and innocent civilian collateral damage remains significant until such capability is fielded. 4. Units Impacted.
111 ASOC 113 ASOS 116 ASOS 118 ASOS 122 ASOS 124 ASOS Camp Murray, WA Terre Haute, IN Tacoma, WA Badin, NC Pineville, LA Boise, ID 138 ASOS 147 ASOS 148 ASOS 165 ASOS 169 ASOS 177 ASOS Will Rodgers, OK Ellington, TX Ft Indiantown Gap, PA Brunswick, GA Peoria, IL Atlantic City, NJ 182 ASOC 238 ASOS 274 ASOS 284 ASOS Tacoma, WA Meridian, MS Syracuse, NY Smokey Hill, KS

5. Contractor. Argon ST, Fairfax, VA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 16 GMG (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.50 Program Cost ($ Million) $40.00

111

INFORMATION PAPER ON SADL ENABLING FOR JOINT TERMINAL ATTACK CONTROLLERS 1. Background. The Air Support Operations Center (ASOC) and Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) community does not have the capability to view ANG Situation Awareness Data Link (SADL) information from aircraft. Each ASOC and TACP needs three Enhanced Position Location Reporting System (EPLRS) systems per unit for training and deployment capability to facilitate entering the data link gateway. These systems will allow ground partyies to view aircraft information on a secure network and data burst information both to and from the aircraft. This capability will limit fratricide in and around the ground force commanders scheme of maneuver during Close Air Support operations. There are 14 Air Support Operations Squadrons (ASOS) and two ASOCs in the ANG. 2. Requirement. CENTAF Combat Mission Needs Statement (CMNS) for TAC Kit; TACP Modernization ORD; Close Air Support CRD, Special Tactics and Air Support Operations Group Equipment Requirements; JCAS Action Plan; AFI 13-112 Vol 1. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG F-16 Block 30/40s and A-10s have SADL. If the ASOC/TACP community cannot view aircraft data link information, the potential for fratricide exists in the CAS environment when working with ANG aircraft in the AOR. 4. Units Impacted.
111 ASOC 113 ASOS 116 ASOS 118 ASOS 122 ASOS 124 ASOS Camp Murray, WA Terre Haute, IN Tacoma, WA Badin, NC Pineville, LA Boise, ID 138 ASOS 147 ASOS 148 ASOS 165 ASOS 169 ASOS 177 ASOS Will Rodgers, OK Ellington, TX Ft Indiantown Gap, PA Brunswick, GA Peoria, IL Atlantic City, NJ 182 ASOC 238 ASOS 274 ASOS 284 ASOS Tacoma, WA Meridian, MS Syracuse, NY Smokey Hill, KS

5. Contractor. Raytheon, Fort Monmouth, NJ (PM Tracks). 6. Cost.


Required 48 EPLRS Radios (3080) 48 EPLRS Dual Power Adapter (3080) 48 AC Power Cable/Data Cable (3080) 48 Antenna, PC, Software (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousand) $36.00 $1.40 $0.60 $6.40 Program Cost ($ Million) $1.73 $0.07 $0.03 $0.31 $2.14

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INFORMATION PAPER ON TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PARTY M-1145 UP-ARMORED HIGH MOBILITY MULTIPURPOSE WHEELED VEHICLE 1. Background. Operations ENDURING FREEDOM and IRAQI FREEDOM identified limitations in the protection provided by current Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) in the inventory. As a result of the current worldwide threat analysis, there is an immediate need to field an Up-Armored HMMWV. The M-1145, or its suitable substitute, will provide increased protection for TACPs on the battlefield. Approximately $32M in PDM-III funding has been allocated to purchase these Up-Armored Variants. However, due to the increased cost in production, the PDM-III funding does not fully satisfy all ANG requirements. 2. Requirement. This is a Unit Type Code (UTC) requirement. TACPs require funding to procure the Up-Armored HMMWVs identified in the UTCs they are responsible for fielding. 3. Impact If Not Funded. UTCs are built with the assumption that all organizations assigned that UTC will be identically equipped. Without funding to purchase the UpArmored HMMWVs identified in the UTCs, the TACPs will be forced to use vehicles without the increased Up-Armored protection, and therefore deviate from established deployment and regeneration plans. Deployable Up-Armored HMMWVs, constructed of increased armor protection, are better suited to operate in the austere and hostile environments to which the TACPs typically deploy. The lack of Up-Armored HMMWVs will hinder the operational effectiveness and safety of TACP personnel when deployed. 4. Units Impacted.
113 ASOS 122 ASOS 147 ASOS 169 ASOS 274 ASOS Terre Haute, IN Pineville, LA Houston, TX Peoria, IL Syracuse, NY 116 ASOS 124 ASOS 148 ASOS 177 ASOS 284 ASOS Tacoma, WA Boise, ID Ft Indiantown Gap, PA Atlantic City, NJ Smokey Hill, KS 118 ASOS 138 ASOS 165 ASOS 238 ASOS Badin, NC Oklahoma City, OK Brunswick, GA Meridian, MS

5. Contractor. AM General, South Bend, IN. 6. Cost.


Units Required 26 M-1145 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.19 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.94

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DMO

Distributed Mission Operations and Simulation Systems

The Air National Guards DMO program supports all weapon systems and includes both flight and mission crew trainers to provide high fidelity, immersive simulators for individual, team, inter-team, and full mission rehearsal training.

The ANG maintains two unique organizations to develop and deploy DMO. The Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC), a detachment of the 132 Fighter Wing, IA ANG, focuses on virtual training events for the warfighter. A one-of-a-kind organization within the Air Force, the DTOC will support over 50 training sites in FY08 by providing persistent network operations, subject matter expertise, White Force support and scenario development. The Mission Training Engineering Center (MTEC), co-located with the Air Force Research Center (AFRL/HEA), in Mesa, AZ, is the focal point for engineering development and simulation technology insertion for the Guard. In partnership with AFRL, MTEC helps transition cutting edge technology. The Plans and Requirements Directorate (NGB/A5R) has an aggressive plan to field a high fidelity training system at every ANG unit. To that end, FY08 will see the initiation of the Multi-Mission Crew Trainer (MMCT) program to field systems to support four Guard-unique Intellegence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance platforms. The ANGs advanced simulation program will also see the deployment of the KC-135 Boom Operator Simulation System (BOSS) in FY08. In addition, the F-16 Block 30 next generation Full Combat Mission Trainer (FCMT) will reach Initial Operational Capability prior to deployment to the 158 FW in Burlington, VT. Other programs, such as the F-16 Unit Training Device and the A-10 Full Mission Trainer, will see major upgrades in the coming year.

Distributed Mission Operations and Simulation Systems 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference
Critical Combat Capabilities List Essential Capabilities List Desired Capabilities List
Reference individual weapon system tabs for capabilities related to specific simulation systems.

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DISTRIBUTED MISSION OPERATIONS AND SIMULATION SYSTEMS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program F-16 FCMT A-10 FMT KC-135 BOSS E-8C MST RC-26B MCT C-130 MMCT DTOC MTEC MQ-1/MQ-9 DTS MAF VTRAT HH-60G FMT ACS CSP DMO ACS ASAC Rangeless ACMI RC/C-26 JWST Range JTE AOC DMO I-FACT HMDs
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 0207701 0207131 051411F 0207581 0502889 0503115 0207701 0207701 0503218F/ 0503219F 0401115 0207224 052672 052672 0207429 0502889 0207429 052672 0207701
2

FY09 $1.90 1 $40.00 2 $0.40 3 $2.69 1 $8.40 2 $4.00 2 $16.70 1 $47.15 2 $0.60 4 $8.30 4 $1.75 4 $4.20 2 $0.37 1 $0.10 4 $0.25 1 $0.60 4 $2.10 4 $3.50 3 $0.57 4 $3.75 4 $6.50 2 $3.00 2 $20.00 4 $0.24 1 $1.80 4

FY10 $3.60 1 $30.00 2 $0.43 3 $2.80 1 $3.20 2 $2.50 1 $8.20 4 $0.25 4 $4.80 2 $0.49 1 $0.15 4 $2.10 4 $0.44 1 $4.80 2 $6.50 2 $20.00 4 $0.19 1
3

FY11 $4.10 1 $30.00 2 $0.47 3 $3.00 1 $3.20 2 $6.53 4 $0.60 1 $0.15 4 $0.69 1 $9.70 2 $6.50 2 $10.00 4 -

FY12 $4.60 1 $0.50 3 $3.20 1 $3.20 2 $0.60 1 $0.20 4 $0.80 1 $6.50 2 $10.00 4 4

FY13 5.00 1 $3.30 1 $0.65 1 $0.20 4 $0.80 1 -

Program Total $121.00 $23.39 $13.60 $66.35 $0.60 $23.03 $11.00 $3.51 $0.85 $4.20 $20.73 $0.57 $3.75 $26.00 $3.00 $60.00 $0.43 $1.80

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

F-16 Full Combat Mission Trainer - High fidelity Block 30 DMO-capable simulators for ANG units. Unit devices supplemented by 4 ship Regional Mission Training Centers. A-10 FMT - Provides follow-on procurement and sustainment of two DMO-capable flight simulators for A-10 aircrews. ANG 3840 funds provide engineering CLS and sustainment

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for simulators at the A-10 Training System Support Center while lead command 3010 funds are required for procurement. KC-135 Boom Operator Simulation System (BOSS) - Provides a high fidelity, fully DMO capable squadron level boom operator simulator for KC-135 squadrons. E-8C Mission System Trainer - The current MMT is insufficient to meet JSTARS mission crew training. In addition to upgrading the outdated MMT, a second MST device with DMO capability is required to meet initial and continuation training needs. RC-26B Mission Crew Trainer (MCT) - Immersive training device for RC-26B MSO formal and continuation training. C-130 Multi-Mission Crew Trainer (MMCT) Program - Provides three ISR platforms with a high fidelity, DMO capable Mission Crew Trainer (MCT), including SENIOR SCOUT, SCATHE VIEW, and COMMANDO SOLO. The Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC) - Provides command, control, scheduling, white force support and management of the ANG DMO training. Mission Training Engineering Center (MTEC) - NGB/A5 operating location at the AF Research Lab in Mesa AZ dedicated to engineering development of simulation systems and technology transfer for the USAF. ANG funded with AFRC and ACC participation. MQ-1/MQ-9 Desktop Trainer System (DTS) - Provides a PC-based, low-cost training device for formal and informal procedural training and review for aircrews to maintain the high level of proficiency required. C-130/C-5/C-17/KC-135 (MAF) Visual Threat Recognition and Avoidance Trainer (VTRAT) - Combines state-of-the-art visual, interactive simulations with intelligent tutoring methodologies to train visual scanners. HH-60G Full Mission Trainer (FMT) - High fidelity DMO-capable cabin simulator for ANG CSAR crews. ACS CSP (CRC Simulation Package) DMO Connectivity - ACSs require mission rehearsal training capability at home station within the TACS environment to fulfill AFI 13-1MCS Vol. 1 simulation training requirements. ACS ASAC - ANG Air Control Squadron Air Surveillance and Air Control (ASAC) require mission rehearsal training capability at home station to fulfill AFI 13-1MCS Vol. 1 live fly requirements. Rangeless ACMI (P-5 CTS) - Provides P-5 Combat Training Systems to replace the current tethered systems at the Combat Readiness Training Centers for centralized management and maintenance to be hubbed out to the field. RC/C-26 Joint Weapon System Trainer (JWST) - Provides a high fidelity, reconfigurable, DMO capable flight deck simulator for the ANGs RC-26B and the ARNGs C-26A aircraft. Joint Threat Emitter (JTE) - Simulates a realistic integrated air defense environment at Combat Readiness Training Centers and intermediate ranges. AOC DMO - Air and Space Operations Center (AOC) augmentation units require academic and positional training in live, virtual and/or constructive environments to emulate a contingency and wartime environment. I-FACT Head-Mounted Displays (HMDs) - Complements the Indirect Fire-Forward Air Control Trainer (I-FACT) by providing a full interactive view of a virtual battlefront for JTAC home station training.

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INFORMATION PAPER ON F-16 FULL COMBAT MISSION TRAINER (FCMT) 1. Background. The ANG does not have a high fidelity F-16 simulator that is fully capable of Distributed Mission Operations (DMO). The ANG supports a two pronged approach to filling this requirement. First, a fourship Mission Training Center (MTC) will be deployed beginning in FY 08/09 to provide enhanced capability for the Block 30 community. Each MTC will consist of four Full Combat Mission Trainers (FCMTs), brief/debrief facilities, and long-haul DMO connectivity. The FCMT is a next generation, very high fidelity cockpit and operating system encompassing state-of-the-art technologies. The heart of the FCMT concept is the common computational unit which allows rapid, low cost software concurrency with unit aircraft. In parallel, the ANG plans to field one or two FCMTs I each of the remaining Block 30/32 combat units. A future growth area for the MTC/FCMT concept is to include training systems for ANG Block 42/52 units. 2. Requirement. CSAF F-16 Block 30/40/50 Roadmap. ACC F-16 Block 30 CDD (Draft) and ACC F-16 Block 30/40 ORDs. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund this requirement precludes completion of the CSAF/ANG F-16 DMO Roadmap. Mission rehearsal and tactics development for ANG F-16 pilots will not meet current or future training requirements or be on par with active duty aircrew. 4. Units Impacted.
113 WG Andrews AFB, MD 114 FW Sioux Falls, SD 115 FW Truax, WI 122 FW Ft Wayne, IN 132 FW Des Moines, IA 138 FW Tulsa, OK 140 WG Buckley, CO 144 FW 148 FW 149 FW 150 FW 158 FW 162 FW Fresno, CA Duluth, MN Kelly AFB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Burlington, VT Tucson, AZ 169 FW 174 FW 177 FW 178 FW 180 FW 187 FW McEntire, SC Syracuse, NY Atlantic City, NJ Springfield, OH Toledo, OH Dannelly Fld, AL

5. Contractor. Lockheed Martin Government Systems, Mesa AZ.. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 20 FCMTs (3010) O&M (3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $5.00 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $1.80 $100.00 $19.20 $121.00

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INFORMATION PAPER ON A-10 FULL MISSION TRAINER (FMT) 1. Background. The ANG, AF Reserve Command, and Air Combat Command have jointly fielded a high fidelity flight simulator with 360 full field of vision displays and Distributed Mission Operations capability for the A-10 community. Funding by the lead command for additional procurement beyond the devices currently fielded ended in FY03, but restarted with two additional devices funded in FY07 and five in FY08 for active duty units. Once on contract, eighteen months are required for delivery to the field. The ANG has a final requirement for six FMTs to complete the deployment of one or two devices per unit with associated briefing and debriefing suite, threat systems, equipment and software. Four ANG units, 110 FW, 124 FW, 175 WG and 188 FW, currently have one FMT each. The FMT at the 175 WG was ANG funded in FY04. This FMT was the first A-10C model simulator in the USAF with the Precision Engagement upgrade. To meet post-BRAC requirements, there is an immediate need to fund an A-10 FMT for delivery to the 127 FW in 1QFY09 and to provide the second FMT at the 175 WG in 2QFY09. The FMT is a critical component for the A-10A to A-10C conversion and for aircrew continuation training and mission rehearsal. As ANG units convert to the A-10C model, unit owned A-10A FMTs will also be upgraded to the C configuration to assure concurrency. It is essential that ACC fund the final two required FMTs to complete fielding. 2. Requirement. A-10 ORD 19 Oct 1999 and Combat Air Forces DMO Roadmap. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund this requirement precludes completion of the CSAF A-10 DMO Roadmap. Mission rehearsal and tactics development for all ANG A-10 aircrews will not be available. Conversion training for the 127 FW will be impacted negatively. 4. Units Impacted.
124 WG Boise, ID 175 WG Baltimore, MD 188 FW 110 FW Ft Smith, AR Battle Creek, MI 127 FW Selfridge ANGB, MI

5. Contractor. Lockheed-Martin Systems Management, Mesa, AZ. 6. Cost.


A-10 FMT O&M * (3840) 2 FMT Procurement (3010) Total
* Initial years contractor logistic support.

Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.69 $4.20

Program Cost ($ Million) N/A $8.40 $8.40

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INFORMATION PAPER ON KC-135 BOOM OPERATOR SIMULATION SYSTEM (BOSS) 1. Background. No USAF tanker units have a squadron level training device for boom operators. Air Education and Training Command (AETC) will deliver the first Boom Operator Weapon System Trainer (BOWST) simulator to the formal training center at Altus AFB in December 2007. In order to meet a continuation training shortfall, the ANG is sponsoring development of a low cost, fully Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) capable, immersive simulator with a high fidelity replication of the pod, controls, aircraft and boom flight model and full external display. The device will be small enough to fit in a standard operations building and not require a purpose built simulator facility. The prototype will leverage existing development of the BOWST software to minimize costs repackaged into a smaller footprint. The major technical difference between the two devices will be the display systems. The BOSS will use a three channel digital stereo high definition display, including the side windows, to produce very high fidelity 3-D images. The boom operator is thereby provided with realistic depth perception and a fully functional periscope. The majority of the integration effort will be to employ the 3-D system and integrate DMO functionality including data bases, gateway and EXCite Ops threat environment. The prototype will undergo operational utility evaluation (OUE), DMO integration and platform testing at the ANGs Mission Training Engineering Center to leverage existing engineering capability and on-site A-10 and F-16C simulators. 2. Requirement. Training System Requirements Analysis and System Requirements Document under development by 12th MSG/TFD. A total of 17 BOSS production standard trainers are required for the ANG. 3. Impact If Not Funded. In the absence of squadron level, high fidelity devices with DMO capability, ANG boom operators will not have any on-station ability to perform continuation training. As aircraft training sortie availability declines, boom operators will not be able to maintain required levels of readiness. 4. Units Impacted. All ANG KC-135 units will benefit from this training capability. In addition, AF (both active duty and Reserve) units may participate in the program at a later date and purchase the BOSS. 5. Contractors. QuantaDyn Corp, Herndon, VA; 12th MSG/TFD (AETC). 6. Cost.
Units Required 17 - Production (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.80 Program Cost ($ Million) $13.60

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INFORMATION PAPER ON E-8C MISSION SYSTEM TRAINER (MST) 1. Background. The existing Block 20 Mission Maintenance Trainer (MMT) is not a true simulator, but it is currently used for Initial Qualification Training (IQT). As a result of not having two mission simulators, Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) events are forced to compete for time slots with the current IQT schedule from the training squadron. A second, more capable Block 30 Mission System Trainer (MST) is required to address limited simulator availability, to reduce the threat to the training pipeline from a single point of failure, and to enable instruction on recently fielded or emerging capabilities during the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). The current MMT only meets 8 out of 57 desired requirements. Upgrading the current MMT would meet approximately 20 out of the 57 requirements while new simulator would meet all 57 requirements. The cost estimates account for all components identified within the existing, but obsolete, Block 10 trainer which may be reused resulting in a substantial cost savings. This upgrade would enhance the joint war fighting capability across all the Services. 2. Requirement. JSTARS ORD, Version 5 Section 5.6.2.5.2, 5.e.2.j.3. 3. Impact If Not Funded. JSTARS formal training and follow-on continuation training (CT) for the mission crew depends upon relevant, updated simulation trainers. Without delivering a new MST, the existing MMT is a single point of failure for both the formal training unit and CT in operational squadrons forcing the 116 ACW to continue use of operational aircraft as training devices during exercises or on the battlefield, driving up operational cost and tying up a critical low density high demand asset. Recent spikes in fuel prices and the USAF effort to increase DMO capability have only made the need for simulated training even more critical. The ability to consistently train mission ready JSTARS crews will continue to worsen without a more redundant simulator configuration; it will also remain impossible for crews to be trained for recently fielded and emerging missions until the far more expensive flying phases of their training. 4. Unit Impacted.
116 ACW Robins AFB, GA

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman, Melbourne, FL. 6. Cost.


Units Required Procure 1 Block 30 MST (3010) Upgrade the Block 20 MMT (3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $47.15 $19.20 Program Cost ($ Million) $47.15 $19.20 $66.35

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INFORMATION PAPER ON RC-26B MISSION CREW TRAINER (MCT) 1. Background. The RC-26B is an airborne intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that supports counter drug as well as state and national emergency and contingency operations. The aircrew consists of 2 pilots and 1 Mission System Operator (MSO) with an additional crew position for a law enforcement representative. Currently, there are no training systems for MSOs as required by AF Instruction 36-2251. Training must be accomplished during live sorties, which presents cost and scheduling issues. As a critical low density/high demand (LD/HD) ISR platform, the RC-26B has been tasked heavily since 9/11 for operations involving Department of Defense, law enforcement and interagency operations. Additionally, funded mission system upgrades have created additional training requirements. As a part of the ANGs overall Multi-Mission Crew Trainer (MMCT) program for ISR platforms, the RC-26B mission crew trainer will ensure standardized training for all MSOs for both initial qualification and continuation training. The overarching MMCT combines four ISR trainer requirements into one program that provides economies of scale, solutions with shared technology, single program management, parallel spiral improvements affordability, common architecture and software. The RC-26B Formal Training Unit located in Bridgeport, WV will receive the RC-26B crew trainer to enhance MSO training. The MCT will also be used by the other ten RC-26B units for continuation training when available. 2. Requirement. The system is based upon Operational Requirements Document (ORD) USAF (CAF) 304-93-I/II/III-A dated 4 August 1994 and Program Management Directive (PMD) 2368 (2)/PE# 54314 dated 17 Dec 1997. 3. Impact If Not Funded. As mission areas expand, a lack of training capacity will degrade mission effectiveness and increase risks to mission accomplishment and safety of flight. 4. Units Impacted.
115 FW 125 FW 130 AW 141 ARW Madison ANGB, WI Jacksonville ANGB, FL Charleston ANGB, WV Fairchild AFB, WA 144 FW 147 FW 150 FW 162 FW Fresno ANGB, CA 174 FW Syracuse ANGB, NY Ellington ANGB, TX 186 ARW Meridian ANGB, MS Kirtland AFB, NM 187 FW Montgomery ANGB, AL Tucson ANGB, AZ

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 1 MCT (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.60 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.60

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INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 MULTI-MISSION CREW TRAINER (MMCT) 1. Background. The C-130 MMCT program is part of a larger MMCT initiative to provide all ANG ISR platforms with an immersive, high fidelity, DMO capable trainer. The overarching MMCT program will combine four trainer requirements, including the RC-26B, into one program that provides economies of scale, shared technology solutions, single program management / oversight, parallel spiral improvements and affordability. The program also includes development of a common architecture and software package and concurrency support in accordance with AFI 36-2251. A combined Training System Support Center will also be established. The C-130 portion of the MMCT includes SCATHE VIEW, a roll-on roll-off capability on eight modified C-130Hs located in Reno, NV; COMMANDO SOLO EC-130Js in Harrisburg PA; and SENIOR SCOUT, a sheltered and palleted system, designed for installation in specially configured C-130E/H aircraft. Initial developmental work on the SCATHE VIEW system will include non-recurring engineering that supports future funding for SENIOR SCOUT and COMMANDO SOLO. Due to the expanding need for low density/high demand (LD/HD) ISR platforms, all three systems have been tasked heavily since 9/11 for operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM and in search and rescue operations after Hurricane Katrina. This high Ops Tempo has identified a need for mission training in several different mission areas and environments. 2. Requirement. AFI 36-2251 requires a companion training system for all weapon systems. 3. Impact If Not Funded. In the absence of an mission specific MCT, units will lack the ability to effectively train personnel in a reduced flying hour environment. For example in FY06, over 250 dedicated flight hours required used to support SCATHE VIEW Operator training. 4. Units Impacted.
152 IS Reno, NV 169 IS Salt Lake City, UT 193 SOW Harrisburg, PA

5. Contractors. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 1 SCATHE VIEW MCT (3080) 1 SENIOR SCOUT MCT (3080) 1 COMMANDO SOLO MCT (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.60 $14.23 $8.20 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.60 $14.23 $8.20 $23.03

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INFORMATION PAPER ON DISTRIBUTED TRAINING OPERATIONS CENTER (DTOC) 1. Background. The DTOC is organizationally structured as a distributed warfare detachment at the 132 FW, Des Moines, IA. The DTOC manages a dedicated secure network called ARCNet that provides persistent distributed mission operations (DMO) capability to the air reserve component (ARC) as well as many active duty and joint sites. In the absence of actual or virtual players, the DTOC White Force has trained subject matter experts who can role play to round out the event scenario to enhance the training value to the warfighter. The DTOC, as the ARCNet nexus, provides a direct connection via portal to the USAFs Distributed Mission Network (DMON) and the Distributed Mission Operations Center (DMOC) at Kirtland AFB. The DTOC also maintains a Joint Training and Experimentation Network (JTEN) portal for connections with coalition partners and non-DMON joint sites. The DTOC requires two multilevel security (MLS) systems and a Joint Terminal Air Control (JTAC) dome simulator. 2. Requirement. ANG DMO CONOPS, dated 15 March 2006. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The DTOC provides Distributed Mission Training (DMT) capability to simulators operating at different classification levels. These DMT events must be isolated due to the differences in classification of information passed. Without a multi level security solution, DMT will continue to be limited to platforms that can operate at the same security level. Two MLS systems are required for current DMO users; one to work at higher security and one at lower security. If DTOC local simulators are not funded, training opportunities will be lost due to lack of availability of distributed sites to participate in DMO events. A JTAC dome is required to provide Joint Close Air Support (JCAS) training until the Joint Terminal Control Training and Rehearsal System (JTC TRS) is fully fielded. Local flight simulators, manned by DTOC personnel will provide virtual aircraft for training JTACs. Without simulators, JTACs will be controlling computer-generated aircraft with less fidelity and lower training value. 4. Units Impacted. The DTOC currently provides DMT training to 52 fighter, intelligence / surveillance / reconnaissance and command and control sites, including Homeland Defense sites. The DTOC will eventually provide DMO capability at up to 78 ANG flying and C2 locations and 7 AF Reserve Command locations plus additional active duty locations. 5. Contractors. AFRL/HEA, Mesa, AZ; Lockheed Marin Government Services, Mesa, AZ; Boeing Co, St. Louis, MO. 6. Cost.
Units Required 2 MLS Systems (3080) 1 A-10 FMT (3010) 1 F-15 FMT (3010) 1 JTAC Dome (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.25 $4.20 $4.80 $1.50 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.50 $4.20 $4.80 $1.50 $11.00

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INFORMATION PAPER ON MISSION TRAINING ENGINEERING CENTER (MTEC) 1. Background. The ANG developed the MTEC in collaboration with AF Reserve Command, AF Research Lab (AFRL) in Mesa, AZ, and ACC/A8 to provide technology and systems integration, technology transfer, and spiral development of simulators owned by the Combat Air Forces. Organizationally, MTEC is an operating location under the ANG Plans and Requirements Directorate (NGB/A5). The formal relationship between AFRL and the ANG is governed by a memorandum of agreement. The MTEC provides a sustained and configured DMO software library which supports USAF DMO systems. This software mirrors actual aircraft software and is integral to development of simulators, threat systems, and DMO training events. MTEC will be the quick reaction, technical support agency with engineering resources to transition research and development programs and integrate legacy simulation assets with government / commercial off the shelf (GOTS) / (COTS) solutions, enhancing the capability of the Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC) to provide DMO capability to the Air Reserve Component. As a primary source of high quality, government furnished hardware, software and documentation data, MTEC will also support USAF and coalition DMO. 2. Requirement. The USAF Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) Implementation Plan provides direction for implementation across the Air Force. Specific ANG tasks are delineated in the various Implementation Plan actions contained in Appendix 1 and are supported by MTEC. Funding is needed to procure hardware for engineering and development of simulation systems and engineering services. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Without the MTEC, users will have to rely upon commercial proprietary sources for engineering solutions at a much higher cost and less ANG control of schedule and performance. 4. Units Impacted. The benefit of having a viable MTEC will be shared by all units supported by the DMO, which equates to sixty-three ANG flying and command and control locations and seven AF Reserve Command locations as well as numerous active duty units. 5. Contractors. Lockheed-Martin Information Systems, Mesa, AZ; ISTS LLC, Mesa, AZ. 6. Cost.
MTEC Engineering Services * (3840) Procurement (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.37 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.80 $0.80

* Initial years contractor engineering services.

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INFORMATION PAPER ON MQ-1/MQ-9 DESKTOP TRAINING SYSTEM 1. Background. The ANG will have five operational MQ-1 Predator / MQ-9 Reaper units and a formal training unit by FY10. The Predator and Reaper aircraft are controlled through a ground control station that has a difficult human machine interface which requires a high level of proficiency to safely operate. With two-thirds of the aircrews programmed to be part-time personnel, a part-task procedural trainer is necessary for crews to remain at a high level of proficiency prior to assuming control of a combat mission in the Ground Control Station (GCS). This PC based, low cost training device will allow formal and informal procedural training and review for aircrews to maintain the high level of proficiency required. Each unit, including the Formal Training Unit (FTU), will be configured with two systems to meet crew training needs. Additional systems could be used in a classroom environment. The ANG has a requirement to provide MQ-1 Predator intelligence collection and dissemination to support current Central Command missions, and to support emerging missions in other combatant commanders and continental US state and national missions, which will require evolving capabilities of the Predator Operations Cell / Reaper Operations Cell. 2. Requirement. Air Combat Command MQ-1 Concept of Operations, ANG MQ-1 Enabling Concept, and 2007 WEPTAC RD&A Requirements List. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Units will be required to rely on the Predator Mission Aircrew Training Simulator (PMATS) for procedural training, thereby reducing the time available for full-up mission scenario training. If PMATS cannot support needed training, part-time aircrews will be forced to assume additional risk during combat with minimal proficiency. 4. Units Impacted.
214 RG Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ 174 ATKW Syracuse, NY 163 RW March ARB, CA 147 RW Ellington Field, TX 119 WG Fargo, ND

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Required Units NRE (3840) 12 MQ-1/MQ-9 Desktop Training System (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.25 $0.05 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.25 $0.60 $0.85

126

INFORMATION PAPER ON C-130 / KC-135 VISUAL THREAT RECOGNITION AND AVOIDANCE TRAINER (VTRAT) 1. Background. The VTRAT initiative combines state-of-the-art visual, interactive simulations with intelligent tutoring methodologies to train visual scanners in Mobility AF (MAF) weapons systems. In addition, the Advanced Airlift Tactics Training Center (AATTC) is extending VTRAT capabilities to address its need for realistic training that will enable forces to respond quickly and operate effectively threat engagements. VTRAT is developed at the Information Systems Training Branch of the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL/HEAI), Brooks AFB, Texas, in cooperation with the 19th Special Operations Squadron and AFSOC/A3T at Hurlburt Field, FL. 2. Requirement. AMC Master Plan 2006; AFSOC Mission Need Statement #003-97. 3. Impact If Not Funded. MAF aircraft currently operate in environments of increasing levels of threat complexity and lethality. The current training available to aircrew members is insufficient in meeting current and future combat demands. VTRAT enables aircrew members to rapidly respond and effectively operate during threat engagements. 4. Units Impacted.
C-130 8 Units KC-135 12 Units

5. Contractor. MTC Technologies Inc., Dayton, OH. 6. Cost.


Units Required 20 VTRATS (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.21 Program Cost ($ Million) $4. 20

127

INFORMATION PAPER ON HH-60G FULL MISSION TRAINER (FMT) PROTOTYPE 1. Background. The ANG has three rescue wings, each are equipped with six HH-60G, and either four or five HC-130 aircraft. Although AF Reserve Command (AFRC) and active duty rescue units also have HH-60G aircraft, the only simulator available is located at the training center at Kirtland AFB NM. ANG aircrews are required to attend three refresher sorties every two years. Current funding by the lead command does not include any additional FMTs for the ANG or AFRC. The ANG has proposed a prototype development program for a trainer to meet requirements with a high fidelity, full cabin, non-motion simulator that will incorporate state-ofthe-art technology and DMO capabilities. The prototype will be constructed at the ANGs Mission Training Engineering Center as part of a technology demonstration initiative. Following development and operational testing of the prototype, a follow-on production decision will be made. FMTs will allow ANG aircrews to conduct frequent mission rehearsal and Air Expeditionary Force training events as well as continuation, emergency procedures and upgrade training at home station at significant savings. DMO capability will enhance readiness by providing opportunities for full combat search and rescue training scenarios. 2. Requirement. USAF DMO Implementation Plan. The ANG has a requirement for a total of three FMTs with associated briefing and debriefing suite, threat systems, equipment and software. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund this requirement precludes completion of the CSAF HH-60G DMO Roadmap. Mission rehearsal and tactics development for all ANG HH-60G aircrews will not be available. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Suffolk, NY 129 RQW Moffett, CA 176 RQW Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractors. Lockheed-Martin Information Systems, Mesa, AZ; ISTS LLC, Mesa AZ. 6. Cost.
HH-60G FMT R&D (3600) O&M * (3840) Procurement (3010) Total
* Initial years contractor logistic support.

Unit Cost ($ Million)


N/A $0.44 $14.50

Program Cost ($ Million) $3.50 N/A $ 14.50 $18.00

128

INFORMATION PAPER ON ACS CONTROL AND REPORTING CENTER (CRC) SIMULATION PACKAGE (CSP) DMO CONNECTIVITY 1. Background. Air Control Squadrons (ACS) are low density/high demand (LD/HD) assets deployed to several combat theaters in support of the Global War on Terrorism, and additionally support all presidential movements. They currently lack mission rehearsal or distributed training capability and are unable to practice realistic theater wide mission scenarios prior to deployment into combat theaters. The CRC Simulation Package (CSP), funded by Air Combat Command, provides the ACSs the capability train to operational levels of warfighting, but does not allow them to participate in training events at home station. The Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC) provides persistent distributed mission training capability for a part-time force and many active duty and joint sites. The DTOC is the network and operations center that connects all Air Reserve Component (ARC) simulators into the Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) environment and provides a direct connection to the USAFs Distributed Mission Network (DMON) and the Distributed Mission Operations Center (DMOC) at Kirtland AFB. The network, called ARCNet, also provides the link between ARC simulators and many active duty simulator systems. In the absence of actual, virtual players, the DTOC White Force has trained subject matter experts who can role play to round out the event scenario to enhance the training value. 2. Requirement. AFI 13-1MCS Vol 1. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Per AFI 13-1MCS Vol 1, mission crew members must have the capability to accomplish required mission types via simulation to maintain Crew Mission Readiness (CMR). Without ARCNet connectivity through the DTOC, ACSs will not have access to the DMO assets that provide vertical and horizontal integration of theater C2ISR assets and will be controlling computer generated aircraft with less fidelity and lower training value. 4. Units Impacted.
103 ACS 107 ACS 109 ACS 116 ACS Orange, CT Phoenix, AZ Salt Lake City, UT Warrenton, OR 117 ACS 123 ACS 128 ACS 133 TS Savannah, GA Blue Ash, OH Volk Field, WI Fort Dodge, IA 134 ACS 141 ACS 154 ACS 255 ACS McConnell AFB, KS Punta Borinquen, PR Barking Sands, HI Gulfport, MS

5. Contractor. 132 FW, Det. 1 (DTOC) Government furnished. 6. Cost.


Units Required 12 Gateways (3840) 12 Circuit Installs (3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.040 $.007 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.48 $.09 $0.57

129

INFORMATION PAPER ON AIR CONTROL SQUADRON DIGICOMP AIR SURVEILLANCE AND AIR CONTROL (ASAC) 1. Background. Air Control Squadrons (ACS) control air-to-air, air refueling, and air-tosurface missions. The primary weapon systems components are the AN/TPS-75 radar, AN/TYQ23 Operations Module (OM) and AN/TSC-147 Joint Tactical Information Distribution System (JTIDS). Typically, not all ACS training requirements are satisfied in their locally designated airspace. ANG ACSs experience sporadic availability for missions followed by periods of increased sorties for several weeks or periods of severely decreased sorties. ACSs require robust training suites to ensure their crews attain and retain combat readiness. The reduction and realignment of OMs to support mission unit type codes (UTCs) prevent ANG ACSs from simultaneously controlling missions and performing surveillance, and data link training. They cannot accept missions on short notice without impacting scheduled critical training. ACS mission crew training is impossible due to the lack of available OMs. The ASAC system gives ANG the capability to increase operator control positions, work with additional flying wings, remote airspaces, weapons ranges, resulting in increased ACS crew proficiency. Of the total program cost of $3.5M, $0.5M was funded in FY07; however, the amount was insufficient to execute a contract. The remaining funding requirement is detailed below. 2. Requirement. AFI 13-1MCS Vol. 1, Table 4.2. increased simulation training requirements. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ACS mission crews will be unable to accomplish required simulation and live mission training to maintain crew mission readiness. 4. Units Impacted.
103 ACS 107 ACS 109 ACS 116 ACS 173 OSF Orange, CT Phoenix, AZ Salt Lake City, UT Warrenton, OR Klamath Falls, OR 117 ACS 123 ACS 128 ACS 133 TS Savannah, GA Blue Ash, OH Volk Field, WI Fort Dodge, IA 134 ACS 141 ACS 154 ACS 255 ACS McConnell AFB, KS Punta Borinquen, PR Barking Sands, HI Gulfport, MS

5. Contractor. Digicomp Inc., Ithaca, NY. 6. Cost.


Units Required ASAC Contract Mod (3840) Multi-year Maintenance Contract (3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $1.75 $2.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $1.75 $2.00 $3.75

130

INFORMATION PAPER ON RANGELESS AIR COMBAT MANUVERING INSTRUMENTATION (ACMI) 1. Background. Rangeless capability has been a long-standing requirement of the Combat Air Force (CAF). The next generation of pod (P-5) carried by aircraft provides this by leveraging global positioning system receivers, data recorders and on-board simulation technology to provide Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation (ACMI) training independent of ground instrumentation, allowing this training to occur at any location and through Distributed Mission Operations (DMO). This capability provides greater training to pilots by increasing development of situational awareness and more effective debriefing. Currently most ANG units must deploy to a Combat Readiness Training Center (CRTC) to train with a traditional tethered ACMI system. The P-5 system also reduces operations tempo while providing higher levels of more complex training. With the limited availability of traditional, part-time ANG pilots, and the high operations tempo being maintained, it is essential to maximize training opportunities. The CAF Combat Training Range Review Board has programmed 80 P-5 pods for the ANG as well as an additional 100 pods being replaced at the Gulfport ACMI range as a result of Hurricane Katrina. The ANG needs 200 more pods to meet immediate requirements. 2. Requirement. Ready Aircrew Program Tasking messages; CAF Training Ranges and Airspace Mission Support Plan, FY 03; ANG MD 10.01; CAF MNS 330-88 Improved Combat Training Space, 22 Sep 99 and is revision #5 to CAF ORD #305-76-I/II/III-H for P-5 Combat Training System, dated 29 July, 2004 (based upon TAF ROC 305-76, Improvements to TAF Ranges, validated 6 Dec 76). 3. Impact If Not Funded. The current Quadrennial Defense Review states: The uniquely American superiority in training is eroding, particularly as evident in the aging infrastructure and instrumentation of US training ranges. The rangeless pod is necessary to restore that training capacity. 4. Units Impacted.
CRTC Savannah, GA CRTC Alpena, MI CTRC Volk Field, WI

5. Contractors. Cubic Corp., San Diego, CA; Metric Systems, Ft Walton Beach, FL; Bering Sea Ecotech, Anchorage, AK. 6. Cost.
Required Units 200 P-5 Pods (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.13 Total Program Cost ($ Million) $26.00

131

INFORMATION PAPER ON RC/C-26 JOINT WEAPON SYSTEM TRAINER (JWST) 1. Background. The C-26 aircraft is flown exclusively by the ANG and Army National Guard in two configurations. The dedicated Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) RC26B flown by the Air National Guard is a highly mobile platform that supports counter drug, Homeland Defense and overseas contingency operations. The aircrew consists of 2 pilots and 1 Mission System Operator (MSO) with an additional crew position for a law enforcement representative. The C-26A model is flown by the Army Guard as a utility transport aircraft. The flight deck instrumentation differs with a glass cockpit upgrade installed on only the A models. The ARNGs Fixed Wing Army Aviation Training School (FWAATS) and the 130 AW RC-26 Formal Training Unit are both co-located in Bridgeport, WV. Currently, all simulator training is contracted at Flight Safety International, Inc. facilities in San Antonio, TX. This contract costs the ANG and ARNG over $1.2 million per year plus additional travel and per diem costs. The actual training is conducted in a civilian Metroliner 23 simulator very different from the C-26. The Adjutant General of West Virginia has proposed that the JWST be a quickly reconfigurable, high fidelity, DMO capable simulator for both formal school house training, continuation and mission rehearsal training. For ANG training, the JWST will be locally networked to the RC-26B Mission Crew Trainer being developed under a different program. The JWST will be the first simulator in the ANG inventory designed for multi-service use eliminating the need for duplicate simulator systems. 2. Requirement. Both the RC-26B FTU and the C-26 FWAATS syllabi have simulator requirements for the formal course students. 3. Impact If Not Funded. As mission areas expand, limited training assets will degrade mission effectiveness and increase risks to mission accomplishment and safety of flight. 4. Units Impacted.
115 FW 125 FW 130 AW 141 ARW Madison ANGB, WI Jacksonville ANGB, FL Charleston ANGB, WV Fairchild AFB, WA 144 FW 147 FW 150 FW 162 FW Fresno ANGB, CA Ellington ANGB, TX Kirtland AFB, NM Tucson ANGB, AZ 174 FW Syracuse ANGB, NY 186 ARW Meridian ANGB, MS 187 FW Montgomery ANGB, AL

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required 1 JWST (3010) Unit Cost ($ Million) $3.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $3.00

132

INFORMATION PAPER ON JOINT THREAT EMITTER (JTE) 1. Background. The ANG has a shortfall in electronic warfare (EW) training. To meet Ready Aircrew Program (RAP) tasking requirements, the ANGs intermediate training ranges require the JTE to simulate a realistic Integrated Air Defense (IADS) environment. These ranges are located at the four Combat Readiness Training Centers (CRTC) plus Smoky Hill Range, KS. These ranges have the airspace and real estate infrastructure necessary to fully utilize the JTE full capabilities. The JTE has been selected as the next generation threat emitter to replace existing systems that are becoming obsolete. The acquisition of JTE will provide regional access to ANG units to accomplish realistic IADS training from home station and during deployments to the CRTCs. Utilizing Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) technology, units will be able to link to geographically dispersed training assets. The Combat Air Force (CAF) Combat Training Range Review Board has programmed nine JTEs for the ANG but are not scheduled to be delivered until outside the FYDP. The JTE provides aviators with the most realistic electronic threat simulation possible (short of the real threat). This accurate re-creation of threat signals will allow aviators to hone their initial EW skills and add increasingly difficult threat scenarios for a constantly changing challenge. The realistic battlefield allows these aviators to evaluate and execute sophisticated targeting based on the electronic order of battle (EOB). Threat simulators will be tied into the Air Combat Maneuver Instrumentation (ACMI) systems at the CRTCs. 2. Requirement. JTE USAF awarded program, FY 2002; RAP Tasking messages; CAF Training Ranges and Airspace Mission Support Plan, FY 03; ANG MD 10.01; Operations Requirement Document CAF 330-88-II-B, Joint Threat Emitter, 18 July 02. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Units will not have home station access to regional advanced EW capability to meet minimum training requirements. 4. Units Impacted.
CRTC Savannah, GA CTRC Volk Field, WI CRTC Gulfport, MS CRTC Alpena, MI Smoky Hill Range, KS

5. Contractor. Northrop Grumman Corporation, Buffalo, NY. 6. Cost.


Required Units 12 JTEs (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $5.00 Total Program Cost ($ Million) $60.00

133

INFORMATION PAPER ON AIR AND SPACE OPERATIONS CENTER (AOC) DISTRIBUTED MISSION OPERATIONS (DMO) CAPABILITY 1. Background. The Air Reserve Component (ARC) AOC augmentation units are increasing from five to thirteen beginning in FY08 as a result of Base Realignment and Closure and Total Force Initiatives (TFI). The ability for these units to train in-garrison will be a major hurdle in meeting Chief of Staffs vision to field a fully qualified and mission ready AOC force. Lack of DMO connectivity and equipment shortfalls will adversely affect integration with COCOM AOCs. ARC personnel must remain competent in the daily duties of their AOC positions in order to maintain mission ready status. With external and advanced training opportunities diminishing due to fiscal constraints, AOC participants require systems and associated communications infrastructure to participate with the Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC) and its weekly exercise scenarios. AOC units need the capability to connect on a daily basis to a DMO gateway in order to participate in distributed, virtual, live and constructive operations. This connectivity must allow units to participate in AF, joint, and ARC training venues. Until a full complement of Block 10 training equipment is received, the ARC AOCs need robust DMO capability to effectively train all applicable AOC divisions and squadrons. The acquisition of DMO capability will greatly enhance each units ability to train and support contingency operations. 2. Requirement. Listed as a Critical Combat Capability requirement on the C2ISR 2006 Weapons and Tactics Conference list. AOC ORD, CAF DMO I-Plan, AFI 13-1AOC Vol 1. 3. Impact If Not Funded. If not funded, ARC AOC augmentation units will not have access to the DMO assets that provide training on vertical and horizontal integration of theater C2ISR assets. Per AFI 13-1AOC Vol. 1, AOC training consists of both academic and positional training in live, virtual and/or constructive environments to emulate a contingency and wartime environments. 4. Units Impacted.
102 FW 103 FW 110 FW Otis ANGB, MA 111 FW Willow Grove, PA Bradley ANGB, CT 154 ACS Honolulu, HI Battle Creek, MI 183 FW Springfield, IL 186 ARW 601 AOC TBD AOG Meridian, MS Tyndall AFB, FL Jefferson Barracks, MO

5. Contractor. 132 FW, Det 1 (DTOC) Government furnished. 6. Cost.


Units Required 9 Gateways (3840) 9 Circuits (3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.040 $0.007 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.360 $0.065 $0.425

134

INFORMATION PAPER ON I-FACT DISTRIBUTED MISSION OPERATIONS HEAD-MOUNTED DISPLAY 1. Background. The Indirect Fire-Forward Air Control Trainer (I-FACT) provides ANG Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTACs) with the ability to simulate guiding precision air and artillery strikes at home station. It is the first commercially available system designed to train ground controllers in tactics, techniques and procedures for successful joint close air support (JCAS) operations. Connecting the TACP I-FACT to the Air Reserve Component Network (ARCNet) via the Distributed Training Operations Center (DTOC) will connect Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTAC) to pilots for persistent training. It allows the JTACs to practice missions prior to deployment and get more bang for the buck with live fighters. In addition, IFACT offers a rehearsal feature that is useful in preparation for combat deployments as well as an immediate after action review to reinforce lessons learned. The Head Mounted Display (HMD) complements the I-FACT by providing a full interactive view of a virtual battlefront for JTAC home station training. 2. Requirement. The HMD provides the required degree of resolution to identify aircraft in live training. The I-FACT, along with the HMD, allows JTACS to improve aircraft simulation qualities and recreate live training exercises. This requirement aligns with Joint Close Air Support Action Plan, Issue 2. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The JTACs key role is to guide precision air and artillery strikes. Without the HMDs, they will lack the degree of resolution the required to identify aircraft in live training. 4. Units Impacted.
116 ASOS 118 ASOS 122 ASOS 123 STS Tacoma, WA Badin, NC Pineville, LA Louisville, KY 124 ASOS 165 ASOS 169 ASOS 125 STS Boise, ID Brunswick, GA Peoria, IL Portland, OR 238 ASOS 274 ASOS 148 ASOS 113D ASOS Meridian, MS Syracuse, NY Ft Indiantown Gap, PA Terre Haute, IN

5. Contractor. Meggitt Defense Systems, Suwanee, GA. 6. Cost.


Units Required 36 HMDs (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.05 Program Cost ($ Million) $1.80

135

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136

SPACE & IO
The mission of the United States Air Force is to fly and fight in air, space, and cyberspace. Air National Guard Space and Information Operations provide a significant role in this mission. SPACE
The 137 Space Warning Squadron, Greeley, Colorado provides critical, timesensitive missile warning, space launch, and nuclear detonation data to NORAD, COCOMs, JCS, SECDEF, and POTUS. The 137th provides a unique, one-of-a-kind mission and is the sole operator of the USAFs survivable and endurable mobile warning system. The 137th provides direct support to the warfighter by supplying threat data while deployed as well as on a 24-hour a day basis while in-garrison. The 137th is manned by 81 full-time ANG personnel and 204 traditional ANG personnel. Arizona Headquarters Detachment 2, a 27-person unit, operates the high altitude operations portion of the joint warfighting space mission for AFSPC. The high altitude operations mission consists of a free-floating balloon known as Combat SkySat. Currently the payload provides ground-to-ground communications but the payload has the ability to conduct ISR missions with a simple modification. Det 2 is the only unit in the USAF currently conducting the developmental testing for the high altitude operations mission. Det 2 has successfully demonstrated the capability with the 162 Combat Communication Group during their annual disaster response scenario exercise in June 07. Several unified commands have expressed an urgent need for a high altitude operations capability in their AORs.

INFORMATION OPERATIONS
The Network Warfare Training and Integration (NWTI) Range allows the 273 Information Operations Squadron (IOS) personnel to develop and test tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs). Currently, personnel only have access to the live, active duty range, if and when it is available, causing training and mission inefficiencies. This range, a CITS Block 30, gives the 273 IOS and the ANG its own, dedicated NWTI range, enabling their own training in addition to enabling other ANG Network Warfare Squadrons the capability to fire for training or test technology-based Network Defense.

Space 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Combat SkySat Mobile Ground System - Evolution Mobile Ground System - Evolution (Option 2) Mobile Ground System High Altitude Electro-Magnetic Pulse (HEMP) Certification

137

SPACE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million)

Program Combat SkySat MGS-E HEMP Certification

P.E. Number 0503116F 0503116F 0503116F


2

FY 09 $0.83 4 $5.00 2 $2.50 2

FY 10 3

FY 11 -

FY 12 4

FY 13 -

Program Total $0.83 $5.00 $2.50

Notes: 1 3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

Combat SkySat - A free-floating, balloon-borne, high altitude radio repeater system developed by the Space Battle Lab for Space Command. The system is operated by AZ ANG Detachment 2. At altitude, it provides a single channel UHF radio repeater that works with standard military radios (PRC-148, PRC-117, and PSC-5). Mobile Ground System-Evolution (MGS-E) - A program to upgrade the current MGS system with proven hardware and software used in the Mission Control System (MCS), which is the fixed-base that supports the National Integrated Tactical Warning and Attack Assessment (ITW/AA) mission. This new hardware and software will ensure the MGS remains sustainable and viable throughout all future planned ITW/AA system upgrades. Funding will provide complete modification and operational capability for six mission vehicles. Mobile Ground System-Evolution (MGS-E) High Altitude Electro-Magnetic Pulse (HEMP) Certification - This effort is necessary to complete modification and check for compliance with new MIL-STDs.

138

INFORMATION PAPER ON COMBAT SKYSAT PAYLOADS 1. Background. The Combat SkySat system is a free-floating, balloon-borne, high altitude, radio repeater system developed by the Air Force Space Battlelab for Air Force Space Command (AFSPC). The system is operated by Arizona ANG Detachment 2. At altitude, it provides a single channel ultra high frequency (UHF) radio repeater that works with standard military radios (PRC-148, PRC-117, and PSC-5). Currently, neither the ANG nor AFSPC maintain a supply of payloads for immediate response, rather payloads are purchased from the vendor in response to a specific request. The vendor then has 90-120 days to build and deliver the payloads for use. As a result, payloads are not ready for immediate use in response to a short notice requirement. 2. Requirement. AFSPC concept of operations requires the unit to operate and maintain 75 Starfighter version 1 payloads (UHF repeaters) and to have them ready for a short notice, worldwide deployment tasking. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund this requirement will preclude the use of the Combat SkySat system for unforeseen domestic emergencies and short notice worldwide tasking. 4. Unit Impacted.
AZ ANG Det 2, Phoenix, AZ

5. Contractor. Space Data Corporation, Chandler, AZ. 6. Cost.


Units Required 75 SkySats (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.011 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.83

139

INFORMATION PAPER ON MOBILE GROUND SYSTEM EVOLUTION 1. Background. The Colorado Air National Guard, 137 Space Warning Squadron (SWS) supports the National Integrated Tactical Warning and Attack Assessment (ITW/AA) mission. This mission is supported with a unique, one-of-a-kind Mobile Ground System (MGS). The critical information generated by the MGS provides situational awareness to the National Command Authority (NCA), Commander, US Strategic Command (CDRUSSTRATCOM) and the entire survivable national command and control community. The MGS processes and transmits missile warning data and attack assessment information using the Defense Support System (DSP) satellites. The 137 SWS maintains 6 deployable units to support this mission. The primary mission vehicle is the AN/MSQ-118. This vehicle is used to downlink and process the DSP satellite data. These vehicles were fielded in the early 1980s and have been maintained to an unprecedented operational standard throughout their career. The age of the equipment is quickly making the AN/MSQ-118 processing system unsupportable. An effort is under way to modify the MGS with proven hardware and software used in the Mission Control System (MCS), which is the fixed-base system that supports the ITW/AA mission. This new hardware and software will ensure the MGS remains sustainable and viable throughout all future planned upgrades to the ITW/AA system. 2. Requirement. Draft Mission Need Statement for Unit Type Code (UTC) 6SAA1 (Mobile Ground System) Deployed Infrastructure Program, 9 Apr 04. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund an upgrade will affect the ability of the MGS to maintain its critical operational status. Additionally, without an upgraded MGS maintenance costs will continue to spiral upwards due to acquisition delays for reverse engineering and extended repair cycles. If a modernization program is not funded, the MGS will not be compatible with future satellite systems and the ITW/AA function. 4. Unit Impacted.
137 SWS Greeley, CO

5. Contractor. Lockheed-Martin, SMC/ISO, CO. 6. Cost.


Units Required 1 MGS (3010) Unit Cost ($ Millions) $5.00 Program Cost ($ Millions) $5.00

140

INFORMATION PAPER ON MOBILE GROUND SYSTEM, HIGH ALTITUDE ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (HEMP) CERTIFICATION 1. Background. The Colorado Air National Guard, 137 Space Warning Squadron (SWS) supports the National Integrated Tactical Warning and Attack Assessment (ITW/AA) mission. The Mobile Ground System (MGS) is the only survivable and endurable ITW/AA warning asset. The critical information generated by the MGS provides situational awareness to the National Command Authority (NCA), Commander, US Strategic Command (CDRUSSTRATCOM) and the entire survivable national command and control community through all phases of attack. The MGS processes and transmits missile warning data and attack assessment information using the Defense Support System (DSP) and MILSTAR satellites. The MGS requires a certification and validation of the equipment and shelter in accordance with MIL-STD-188-125-2 on a recurring basis. The MGS was engineered to an old MIL-STD and requires minor modifications to meet the MIL-STD-188-125-2 standard. There has also been a renewed emphasis put on all nuclear command, control, and communications assets from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. This effort will fully fund the HEMP certification of the MGS through the ongoing modification process currently on contract through SMC/ISO. 2. Requirement. MIL-STD-188-125-2. OSD MSG # 76443-07, Compliance with Electromagnetic Pulse Survivability for Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund the HEMP re-certification of the MGS will affect the ability of the MGS to maintain its critical survivable and endurable operational status. 4. Unit Impacted.
137 SWS Greeley, CO

5. Contractor. Boeing, SMC/ISO, CO. 6. Cost.


Units Required 5 Pairs (3010) Unit Cost ($ Millions) $0.50 Program Cost ($ Millions) $2.50

141

Information Operations 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List
Network Warfare Training and Integration (NWTI) Range

142

INFORMATION OPERATIONS SYSTEMS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program Network Warfare Training and Integration (NWTI) Range
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 053056F


2

FY09 $2.90 1

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

Program Total $2.90

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

NWTI Range - Allows the 273 Information Operations Squadron (273 IOS) personnel to develop and test tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs). Currently, Guardsmen can only use the active duty range causing training deficiencies. This range would allow ANG IO units to connect to and utilize the range for operationalizing and weaponizing IO. This range gives the 273 IOS and the ANG its own, dedicated NWTI Range, ends training deficiencies, and significantly increases and enhances warfighter and combat capabilities.

143

INFORMATION PAPER ON NETWORK WARFARE TRAINING AND INTEGRATION (NWTI) RANGE MISSION ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT 1. Background. This range allows 273 Information Operations Squadron (273 IOS) personnel to develop and test tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs), on both Combat Information Transport System (CITS) Block 25 and Block 30 systems. Currently, Guardsmen can only use the active duty ranges. The 273 IOS and the ANG requires its own range to increase availability or range time, thereby ending training deficiencies. 2. Requirement. IO-INT-N-08-09 (Test / Eval IO technologies), IO-NetA-N-08-03 (Relevant NetA Weapons), IO-NetA-N-08-08 (SOPs and TTPs), and IO-NetD-N-08-10 (Distributed NetD Test and Training Range). 3. Impact if not Funded. The ANG will not be able to train, test, or integrate with the latest, state-of-the-art Information Operations (IO) weapon system, CITS Block 30. Commercial training will require excessive allocation of resources. Finally, TTPs will not be accomplished in a timely manner, and when they are accomplished, they will not be validated by aggressor personnel and other ANG IO units. 4. Unit Impacted.
Detachment 1, HQ TX ANG (273 IOS (P))

5. Contractor. TBD. 6. Cost.


Units Required NWTI (3840) Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.90 Total Cost ($ Million) $2.90

144

Airborne Manned ISR


INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, & RECONNAISSANCE
The U.S. intelligence community calls upon ANG airborne manned reconnaissance assets to fill critical surveillance and situational awareness requirements. These ANG resources for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) and Counter-Drug (CD) operations can be called upon for the Homeland and for overseas Combatant Commander (COCOM) Areas of Responsibility (AORs).
C-130 SENIOR SCOUT Senior Scout provides the USAFs premiere medium altitude Signals Intelligence capability. It excels in tactical environments for supported Army, Marine, and Special Forces units. The program seeks critical system upgrades and a training simulator to ensure continued award winning support to troops in contact. One mission squadron (169 Intelligence Squadron, UTANG) and four ANG C-130 wings with pre-modified C-130H2 carrier aircraft (118 AW, TNANG; 152 AW NVANG; 165 AW GAANG; 166 AW DEANG) currently conduct Senior Scout operations. RC-26B CONDOR The RC-26B is the preferred manned ISR platform providing full motion day/nigth video sureillance/ reconnaissance and high resolution still frame imagery. The RC-26B is a low density, high demand (LD/HD) platform rapidly employable to operations overseas and within the United States. The RC-26B operates OCONUS supporting the Global War on Terrorism missions and within the CONUS and Alaska supporting Department of Homeland Security and Defense Support of Civilian Authorities missions filling critical roles for counterdrug, diasaster response, maritime patrol, and national special security events. Eleven aircraft are based throughout the United States (AL, AZ, CA, FL, MS, NM, NY, TX, WA, WI, WV ANG).

Airborne Manned Intelligence / Surveillance / Reconnaissance (ISR) 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference
Critical Combat Capabilities List
SENIOR SCOUT SENIOR SCOUT Communications Security Upgrades SENIOR SCOUT Situational Awareness SENIOR SCOUT Mission Crew Trainer (SSMCT) RC-26 RC-26 Block 20 Spiral 2 (software/hardware) RC-26 BLOS Communications RC-26 Fully Integrated Glass Cockpit (CNS/ATM Compliance)

Essential Capabilities List


SENIOR SCOUT SENIOR SCOUT Multiple Source Intelligence Capability SENIOR SCOUT Interference Cancellation RC-26 RC-26 Full Avionics Upgrade w/NVG Compatibility RC-26 Multi Spectral Imaging RC-26 SAR with GMTI and Maritime capability

Desired Capabilities List


SENIOR SCOUT Air National Guard Mobile SCIF SENIOR SCOUT Mission Crew Part-Task Trainer SENIOR SCOUT J-Model Interface Capability RC-26 RC-26 Acquire a new MDS RC-26 Weaponize aircraft Upgrade Law Enforcement Agent Station
145

AIRBORNE MANNED INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE (ISR) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) P.E. Program FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 Number SENIOR SCOUT 0503115F $6.56 2 COMSEC Upgrades $6.30 2 RC-26B Block 20 $8.40 2 $8.40 2 0502889F 3 $4.50 Spiral 2 Upgrade 2 2 2 RC-26B BLOS $4.80 $4.80 $3.60 0502889F 3 Communications $2.25 RC-26B CNS/ATM $7.20 2 $7.20 2 $5.40 2 0502889F 3 Compliance $4.50 SENIOR SCOUT $1.05 2 0503115F 3 Situational Awareness $0.50 Notes:
1

Program Total $6.56 $27.60 $15.45 $24.30 $1.55

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 appropriation

SENIOR SCOUT COMSEC Upgrades - Numerous airborne, cryptologic subsystems require upgrades in order continue operations in the near future, both for CONUS and OCONUS operations; provides SENIOR SCOUT the engineering and testing with multiple COMSEC equipment types to avert obsolescence and guarantee airborne connectivity. RC-26B Block 20 Spiral 2 - Allows mission equipment to be fully utilized, adding video storage/editing capability, additional power requirements, and accurate position information for positive target identification. RC-26B BLOS Data Link and SATCOM Capability - Adds the capability to pass real time data through beyond line of sight (BLOS) Satellite Communications (SATCOM) voice and data links. RC-26B CNS/ATM Compliance - Updates the RC-26B avionics suite to address CNS/ATM compliance requirements. SENIOR SCOUT Situational Awareness - Continues to provide increased mission crew and flight deck situational awareness during operations; includes multi-function display for flight deck with interface to Blue Force Tracking (BFT) capability and ROVER receivers connected to SENIOR SCOUT capsule for shared operational picture enhancing crew resource management.

146

INFORMATION PAPER ON SENIOR SCOUT COMSEC OBSOLESCENCE AVOIDANCE

1. Background. Numerous crypto subsystems require upgrades in order to be allowed to continue operations in the near future, both for CONUS training and OCONUS deployments. The effort will provide the engineering, installation, and flight testing with multiple types of COMSEC equipment and validate data link connectivity. 2. Requirement. Cryptographic Modernization Program, CJCSI 6510.02C, 21 July 2006. 3. Impact If Not Funded. These upgrades are critical to insure continued support to tactical, theater, and national command authorities. Without this action, it is very likely the SENIOR SCOUT will be unable to conduct OCONUS operations. 4. Unit Impacted.
169 IS Salt Lake ANGB, UT

5. Contractors. L-3 Communications, Salt Lake City UT; Lockheed-Martin Integrated Systems and Solutions, Littleton CO; Sierra Nevada Corporation, Sparks, NV. 6. Cost.
Units Required Crypto Equipment Airborne/Ground (3010) Subsystem/Shelter/Datalink NRE (3010) Accreditation/Certification (3010) Kitproof/Installs (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A N/A N/A N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $3.53 $1.26 $0.35 $1.42 $6.56

147

INFORMATION PAPER ON RC-26B BLOCK 20 SOFTWARE/HARDWARE SPIRAL DEVELOPMENT 1. Background. The RC-26B is a low density, high demand intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that can be rapidly deployed to operations in the US and overseas. The RC-26B platform operates in the continental US and deploys to theaters outside the US to conduct counter narco-terrorist missions or directly support the Global War on Terrorism. Aircraft mission systems record and downlink full motion video for use by Special Operations Forces (SOF), the law enforcement community, host nations, and other government agencies. After completion of system upgrades to 5 SOF modified aircraft for deployment it has been determined that several mission system shortfalls need to be corrected in order to exploit the modifications to their fullest. Additionally, the remaining 6 aircraft will require the same modifications due to replacement of the current forward looking infra-red (FLIR) sensor. These shortfalls include: high definition (HD) video storage and tagging; a second mission systems monitor; updated laser cutout setting; addition of a 60 Hz inverter, digital video recorders (DVR) with Mission Systems Operator (MSO) control to include AVI format/video edit capability; higher accuracy altimeter reading at MSO station (from flight management system (FMS) to global positioning system (GPS)) and a secondary source of aircraft positioning if GPS at MSO station is lost. 2. Requirement. MAJCOM (ANG) approved AF Form 1067. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Degraded systems negatively impact mission effectiveness and efficiency. Without the required mods video storage is near impossible, temp installed monitor creates a hazard to crew safety, current inverter cannot handle power load, no editing of video creates huge unnecessary storage bandwidth requirements and inaccurate altitude and GPS position information can lead to misidentifying targets. 4. Units Impacted.
115 FW Truax, WI 141 ARW Fairchild AFB, WA 150 FW Kirtland AFB, NM 186 ARW Meridian, MS 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 144 FW Fresno, CA 162 FW Tucson, AZ 187 FW Dannelly Field, AL 130 AW Charleston, WV 147 FW Ellington, TX 174 FW Syracuse, NY

5. Contractor. Alliant Techsystems, Inc. (ATK), Ft Worth, TX. 6. Cost.


Units Required NRE (3600) 11 Modification Kits (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $2.10 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.50 $23.10 $27.60

148

INFORMATION PAPER ON RC-26B BEYOND LINE-OF-SIGHT (BLOS) DATA LINK 1. Background. The RC-26B is a low density, high demand intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that can be rapidly deployed to operations in the US and overseas. The RC-26B platform operates in the continental US and deploys to theaters outside the US to conduct counter narco-terrorist missions or directly support the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). Aircraft mission systems record and downlink full motion video for use by Special Operations Forces, the law enforcement community, host nations, and other government agencies. The RC-26B requires a beyond line of sight (BLOS) data link that permits dissemination of still and full motion imagery to operations centers removed from the affected area. Decision makers require real time imagery and data for situational awareness during GWOT operations, to prepare for initial damage assessment of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) events and natural disasters, and to support critical actions during national special security events. The addition of a BLOS data link reduces the risk posed to ground forces by eliminating the need to locate in the area of interest. The addition of a BLOS data link also improves the RC-26Bs capability to support GWOT operations by reducing the footprint of the photo processing cadre and support equipment. 2. Requirement. MAJCOM (ANG) approved AF Form 1067. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Currently, ground forces must locate within range of a line-of-sight system to intercept video signals, which places them too close to the area of interest and may require too long to deploy. In addition, taskings outside the US require deployment of photo processing cadre to handle digital images. With a beyond line-of-sight data link, there is no need to delay a mission due to lack of ground forces and also reduces the footprint for operations. 4. Units Impacted.
115 FW Truax, WI 141 ARW Fairchild AFB, WA 150 FW Kirtland AFB, NM 186 ARW Meridian, MS 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 144 FW Fresno, CA 162 FW Tucson, AZ 187 FW Dannelly Field, AL 130 AW Charleston, WV 147 FW Ellington, TX 174 FW Syracuse, NY

5. Contractor. Alliant Techsystems, Inc., Ft Worth, TX; Dragoon, Huntsville, AL., L-3 Comm, Salt Lake City, UT; Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA. 6. Cost.
Units Required NRE (3600) 11 BLOS Kits (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $1.20 Program Cost ($ Million) $2.25 $13.20 $15.45

149

INFORMATION PAPER ON RC-26B COMMUNICATION NAVIGATION SURVEILLANCE / AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT (CNS/ATM) COMPLIANCE 1. Background. The RC-26B is a low density, high demand intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that can be rapidly deployed to operations in the US and overseas. The RC-26B platform operates in the continental US and deploys to theaters outside the US to conduct counter narco-terrorist missions or directly support the Global War on Terrorism. Aircraft mission systems record and downlink full motion video for use by Special Operations Forces, the law enforcement community, host nations, and other government agencies. Currently the RC-26B is operating outside the US; however, the aircraft avionics do not meet any CNS/ATM requirements for communications and navigation abroad. In addition, dangerous nighttime operations over hostile ground and remote operations in mountainous terrain are much higher risk due to the poor avionics currently installed. As a result, air operations continue to be impacted negatively. Aircraft must utilize other aircraft for escort, or fly lengthy routes to reach certain destinations, and avoid missions at night in the mountains. A complete modernization of the RC-26B avionics suite is required to ensure that the aircraft can operate without restrictions wherever it may be deployed. 2. Requirement. CRD USAF 003-97, GATM Phase I and Phase II (Aug 2004). 3. Impact If Not Funded. The RC-26B will not comply with mandated CNS/ATM operational requirements. Currently the RC-26B has restrictions for operations outside the US and will be unauthorized to operate within the United States within three years. 4. Units Impacted.
115 FW Truax, WI 141 ARW Fairchild AFB, WA 150 FW Kirtland AFB, NM 186 ARW Meridian, MS 125 FW Jacksonville, FL 144 FW Fresno, CA 162 FW Tucson, AZ 187 FW Dannelly Field, AL 130 AW Charleston, WV 147 FW Ellington, TX 174 FW Syracuse, NY

5. Contractor. Alliant Techsystems, Inc. (ATK) , Ft Worth, TX; Boeing, Wichita, KS; Joint Venture YULISTA and SES (JVYS), Huntsville, AL; Rockwell Collins, Colorado Springs, CO. 6. Cost.
Units Required NRE (3600) 11 Aircraft Modified (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $1.80 Program Cost ($ Million) $4.50 $19.80 $24.30

150

INFORMATION PAPER ON SENIOR SCOUT SITUATIONAL AWARENESS 1. Background. SENIOR SCOUT is a low profile, reliable, low-cost tactical capsulated signals intelligence (SIGINT) system capable of being carried on any modified C-130 H/H1/H2. SENIOR SCOUT is a multi-faceted system capable of a multi-discipline, intelligence collection, processing and exploitation. It is closely coordinated and integrated with the overall theater intelligence architecture. Locating and coordinating with forces on the ground and air as well as front end coordination is the responsibility of the SENIOR SCOUT mission supervisor. Currently, situational awareness for the front end and back end is limited to voice interphone. This severely limits entire aircrews ability to plan for threats as well as coordination of flight tracks. With this proposal, SENIOR SCOUT will have an advanced Blue Force Tracking (BFT) capability and will be able to more effectively prioritize collection for force protection. A multifunction display allows the front end to have a real time big picture and free-up radios for rapid threat warning or other priority information. 2. Requirement. Tactical Air Force (TAF)/Electronic Security Command (ESC) Statement of Need (SON) 1-83, 1983; Network Centric Collaborative Targeting (NCCT) requirements as pertains to wideband reachback capability; Operational Requirements Document, Air Force Command and Control Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Center (AFC2ISRC), 002-88-I/II/III-a, 9 May 1999; USCENTCOM Urgent Need Request, Date-Time Group 052020Z Jan 06; Department of Defense Quadrennial Defense Review, pp 55-58, 2006. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Inability to fund this action possibly jeopardizes C-130 SENIOR SCOUT aircrews where SENIOR SCOUT mission data should be available to all aircrew members to insure safety and force protection. Further, shared awareness between front end and back end crew members permits efficient surveillance and targeting operations for supported forces. 4. Unit Impacted.
169 IS Salt Lake City ANGB, UT

5. Contractors. L-3-Com, Greenville, TX; Lockheed-Martin Integrated Systems and Solutions, S&R Systems/Tactical Solutions Program, Littleton, CO. 6. Cost.
Units Required Follow-on NRE for Build/Test (3600) 3 BFT Kits (3010) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) N/A $0.35 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.50 $1.05 $1.55

151

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152

PARARESCUE/ SPECIAL TACTICS


ANG Rescue Squadrons comprise 30% of the Air Forces high-demand combat deployable pararescue capability and ANG Special Tactics Squadrons provide 25% of Air Forces Special Tactics capability. The Air National Guard has three Pararescue (PJ) Squadrons: 103 RQS Francis S. Gabreski Airport, NY; 131 RQS Moffett Federal Airfield, CA; 212 RQS Kulis ANGB, AK. The two ANG Special Tactics Squadrons (STS) are 123 STS Standiford Field ANGB, KY, and 125 STS Portland IAP, OR. FY07 found the ANG Pararescue and Special tactics units continuing to modernize equipment and capabilities ensuring a highly experienced, reliable and ready force for both deployed combat missions and homeland defense/disaster relief contingencies. While not deployed in combat, these squadrons provide rescue coverage for Space Shuttle launches and also provide full time search and rescue coverage for the state of Alaska. The ANG Pararescue and Special Tactics Squadrons continue to deploy in FY07 in support of the Global War on Terrorism. Over the past year, these ANG Pararescue and Special Tactics squadrons supported contingencies in both Operation ENDURING FREEDOM and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM.

Pararescue and Special Tactics 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List

PJ/ST Situational Awareness Suite PJ/ST Enhanced Survivability Suite PJ/ST Tactical Ground Vehicle PJ/ST High Altitude Equipment Modernization Special Tactics Mounted (Heavy) Suite Special Tactics Enhanced Survivability Suite

Essential Combat Capabilities List


PJ/ST Personnel Scheduling Program PJ/ST Side Searching/Scan Sonar PJ/ST Combat Simulator PJ/ST Static High Angle/AIE Training Tower

153

PARARESCUE/SPECIAL TACTICS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($M) Program PJ/ST Situational Awareness Suite PJ/ST Enhanced Survivability Suite PJ/ST Tactical Ground Vehicle PJ/ST High Altitude Equipment Modernization Special Tactics Mounted (Heavy) Suite Special Tactics Enhanced Survivability Suite
Notes
1

P.E. Number 53114F 53114F 53114F 53114F

FY09 $0.75 3 $3.11 4 $1.84 4 $0.20 3 $4.26 4 $4.70 4 $7.47 4

FY10 $1.20 4 $0.75 4 -

FY11 -

FY12 -

FY13 -

Program Total $5.06 $1.84 $0.95 $4.26

53130F

$4.70

53130F
2

3080 Appropriation

$7.47

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

PJ/ST Situational Awareness Suite - Provides a situational awareness data link to PJ/ST personnel operating on the ground allowing for integration into digitized battle space. PJ/ST Enhanced Survivability Suite - Provides improved small arms weapons capability and improved personal protection body armor and gas masks increasing operator survivability. PJ/ST Tactical Ground Vehicle - PJ/ST has a requirement for an All-Terrain Rescue Vehicle (ATRV) with roll over protection for operators and patients, the ability to carry a 3 man PJ team, offers multiple positions for litter patients, and provides stations for mounting weapons, navigation equipment, communication gear and additional fuel. PJ/ST High Altitude Equipment Modernization- PJ/ST forces have a requirement for an oxygen system capable of supporting High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) and High Altitude High Opening (HAHO) operations as a means of tactical insertion into the mission area. Special Tactics Mounted (Heavy) Suite - Provides Combat Controllers the capability to rapidly move around the battlefield with a variety of equipment necessary during airfield seizures, close air support and other Special Operations combat employments. Special Tactics Enhanced Survivability Suite - Provides Combat Controllers tactical advantage with firepower, personal protection gear and a variety of essential communications equipment.

154

INFORMATION PAPER ON PARARESCUE/SPECIAL TACTICS SITUATIONAL AWARENESS MODERNIZATION SUITE 1. Background. Real-time and near real-time Situational Awareness (SA) during highly fluid Special Tactics (ST) and Pararescue (PJ) operations is essential. Since PJ/ST operations often occur in austere and isolated environments, it is essential for them to have connectivity to multiple data links, communication nodes and other SA increasing entities. The capability must include streaming video reception and provide organic, self-contained Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAVs). In addition, this modernization suite allows PJs to effectively locate, track and recover isolated personnel. 2. Requirement. CAF MNS 315-92, Real Time Information in the Cockpit (RTIC). Global Information Grid CRD, JROCM 134-01, 30 Aug 01. 3. Impact If Not Funded. Lack of real-time and near real-time Situational Awareness creates high potential for mission failures, lost aircrew, and fratricide. In addition, ANG PJs will remain incompatible with Air Expeditionary CSAR Force packages, jeopardizing the interoperability of the Total Force. A tactical data link is essential to the success of reactive, time-critical PJ/ST missions that require dynamic planning and maximum flexibility in a fluid environment. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 123 STS Standiford Field ANGB, KY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractor. Raytheon, Ft Wayne, IN; Innovative Solutions Incorporated, Vienna, VA; L-3 Comm, Salt lake City, UT and San Diego, CA; Aerovironment, Simi Valley, CA; General Dynamics, Scottsdale, AZ. 6. Cost.
Units Required 60 SADL-LITE/GPRS* (3080) SADL Integration/Testing (3600) 50 MVR or ROVER V (3080) 28 QuickDraw Interrogator (3080) 20 RAVEN or BATMAN UAV (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.020 N/A $0.035 $0.020 $0.040 Program Cost ($ Million) $1.20 $0.75 $1.75 $0.56 $0.80 $5.06

155

INFORMATION PAPER ON PARARESCUE AND SPECIAL TACTICS ENHANCED SURVIVABILITY SUITE 1. Background. Pararescue (PJ) and Special Tactics (ST) missions in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM require improved versions of existing weapons and personal protection capability. Improved weapon capability in the form of suppressors, upper receivers and scopes will ensure Pararescue and Special Tactics personnel have the reliable and effective firepower necessary to perform demanding Personnel Recovery and Special Operations missions. Improved body armor and gas masks will ensure PJ/ST personnel have the protection necessary for mission success. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Pararescue and Special Tactics operators will continue to rely on dated weapons and personal protective equipment possibly risking safety and mission accomplishment. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 123 STS Standiford Field, KY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractors. Heckler & Koch, Trussville, AL; SureFire LLC, Fountain Valley, CA; Avon Protection, Cadillac, MI. 6. Cost.
Item Description 310 Weapon Suppressors (3080) 620 H&K M4 Upper Receiver (3080) 310 Body Armor (3080) 310 Gas Masks (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousand) $1.050 $1.300 $2.000 $0.258 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.33 $0.81 $0.62 $0.08 $1.84

156

INFORMATION PAPER ON PARARESCUE/SPECIAL TACTICS TACTICAL GROUND VEHICLE 1. Background. Pararescue (PJ) and Special Tactics (ST) personnel have relied on highly modified All-Terrain Rescue Vehicles (ATRV) for surface transportation since the early 1990s. As a result, Rescue surface operations are impacted by limited range, available payload and functionality. The current all-terrain vehicle provides no roll over protection for occupants and has contributed to one fatality. Commercial market ATRVs offer additional crash protection for operators and patients. They have the ability to carry a 3 man PJ team with multiple positions for litter patients and stations for mounting weapons, navigation equipment, communication gear and additional fuel. The vehicle can be maintained by existing Air Force vehicle operations. Additionally, the vehicle dimensions and weight allow transportation by heavy lift helicopters and can be airdropped by fixed wing transport aircraft. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. PJ/ST personnel will continue to rely on legacy ATRVs vehicles with limited range and capability, risking operator/patient safety and mission accomplishment. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 123 STS Standiford Field, KY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractor. SXOR Offroad Products, Clearfield, UT. 6. Cost.


Item Description Development and Test (3600) 15 Tactical Ground Vehicle (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $0.20 $0.05 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.20 $0.75 $0.95

157

INFORMATION PAPER ON PARARESCUE / SPECIAL TACTICS HIGH ALTITUDE EQUIPMENT MODERNIZATION 1. Background. Current Pararescue (PJ) and Special Tactics (ST) missions in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM require improved high altitude rescue capability. PJ/ST forces have a requirement for an oxygen system capable of supporting High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) and High Altitude High Opening (HAHO) operations as a means of tactical insertion. Newer high altitude jump oxygen systems support higher altitude operations, are a light weight mask, and have low profile design elements for safely satisfying PJ/ST high altitude combat mission requirements. Portable oxygen system technologies have progressed for both PJs and survivors to the point where high altitude effectiveness has substantially increased by using low cost, highly portable commercial off-the-shelf products. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM., unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. PJ/ST forces will continue to rely on outdated high altitude oxygen equipment risking personnel safety and mission accomplishment. Pararescue personnel will be unable or unprepared to conduct missions at high altitudes or provide critical lifesaving measures to isolated personnel. 4. Units Impacted.
106 RQW Gabreski Field, NY 123 STS Standiford Field, KY 129 RQW Moffett Federal Airfield, CA 125 STS Portland IAP, OR 176 WG Kulis ANGB, AK

5. Contractors. PARA-FLITE Incorporated, Pennsauken, NJ; Essex Corp, St Louis, MO; HYPOXICO Inc, New York, NY; Summit Oxygen Ltd., U.K. 6. Cost.
Item Description 144 PHAOS or Carlton System (3080) 40 Spare Oxygen Masks (3080) 16 Medical Oxygen (3080) 6 Mountaineering Oxygen System (3080) 6 Personnel Acclimization Kit (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousand) $20.00 $2.50 $20.00 $80.00 $80.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $2.88 $0.10 $0.32 $0.48 $0.48 $4.26

158

INFORMATION PAPER ON SPECIAL TACTICS MOUNTED (HEAVY) CAPABILITY SUITE 1. Background. Combat Control Technicians (CCT) divide their duties between providing Joint Terminal Attack Control (JTAC) services for US or Coalition Special Operations Forces (SOF) and providing Air Field Seizure/Air Traffic Control Services to the US Air Force. CCTs need a variety of special vehicles to meet combat requirements. Lessons learned indicate the need for specially modified vehicles to rapidly move about the battlefield while carrying a host of heavy, close air support specific equipment needed to quickly bring airpower to bear while avoiding fratricide. CCTs operating in support of airfield seizure missions need specially equipped vehicles for surveillance, reconnaissance and assessment. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to equip CCTs with purpose-built or specially modified vehicles will result in decreased mission capability, fratricide incidents, and reduced survivability of Combat Control personnel. 4. Units Impacted.
123 STS Standiford Field ANGB, KY 125 STS Portland IAP, OR

5. Contractors. American General Motors Inc., South Bend IN; Letter Kinny Inc., Chambersburg PA; Northrop Grumman Inc. 6. Cost.
Item Description 8 M-1165A1 HMMWV (3080) 8 Armor Modifications M-1165 (3080) 4 FLIR (Targeting/SAR) (3080) 8 Airfield Seizure Motor Cycles (3080) 8 Modifications to Motor Cycles (3080) 4 Air Drop Mini Motorcycle (3080) 4 Modifications to Mini Motorcycle (3080) 2 Prowler Combat ATV (3080) 4 Ranger/Gator ATV (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousand) $110.00 $100.00 $700.00 $6.50 $0.50 $2.00 $0.50 $50.00 $14.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.880 $0.800 $2.800 $0.052 $0.004 $0.008 $0.002 $0.100 $0.060 $4.706

159

INFORMATION PAPER ON ENHANCED SURVIVABILITY FOR SPECIAL TACTICS COMBAT CONTROLLERS 1. Background. Combat Control Technicians (CCT) often engage the enemy in close combat with their personal weapons at ranges up to 300 meters or performing close air support at ranges out to 3,000 meters. Over half the recent engagements in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM have been in response to enemy initiated ambushes. Rapid response from CCT is the key factor in disrupting the ambush and ensuring the survival of coalition forces. CCTs need the lightest, most efficient equipment possible to move rapidly, engage the enemy with rifle fire, and gain accurate situational awareness to quickly bring airpower to bear while avoiding fratricide. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to equip CCTs with lighter and easier to use equipment will result in decreased mission capability, fratricide and reduced survivability of personnel. 4. Units Impacted.
123 STS Standiford Field ANGB, KY 125 STS Portland IAP, OR

5. Contractors. Vectronics Inc., Leesburg VA; General Dynamics Inc, Spokane, WA; Insight technologies, Londonberry, NH; RF Concepts, Virginia Beach, VA; Protective Solutions Co., Dulles, VA; ADS Inc., Virginia Beach, VA; Comm Ex Inc. Forest Park, GA, Northrop Grumman Inc., Orlando, FL; Raytheon, Ft Wayne, IN; ISI, Vienna, VA; L-3 Comm, Salt Lake City, UT. 6. Cost.
Item Description 75 Pocket Laser Range Finder (3080) 75Mini Computer (3080) 75 ATPIAL Laser Aiming Device (3080) 75 Rapid Deploy Satellite Antenna (3080) 75 Light Weight Body Armor Plates (3080) 75 Light Weight Ballistic Helmet (3080) 75 M-53 Improved Gas Mask (3080) 75 Noise Canx Radio Ear Piece (3080) 75 Pocket Laser Designator (3080) 75 Man-pack Situation Awareness Data Link (3080) 75 Man-pack VDL Receiver (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousand) $6.64 $7.00 $2.95 $5.04 $1.50 $0.22 $8.75 $2.50 $30.00 $20.00 $15.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.49 $0.53 $0.22 $0.38 $0.11 $0.02 $0.66 $0.19 $2.25 $1.50 $1.13 $7.47

160

SENTINEL

AN/GSQ-272, Air Force Distributed Common Ground System (AF DCGS)

ANG investments in SENTINEL Reachback operations have provided large returns in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) and Homeland Defense.
The Air Force Distributed Common Ground System (AF DCGS), officially designated the AN/GSQ272 SENTINEL, is the worldwide, network-centric, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) weapon system primarily responsible for all processing, exploitation, and dissemination (PED) of intelligence data from airborne, national, and commercial reconnaissance platforms and sensors. Primary ISR sources include the U-2 DRAGONLADY, RQ-4 GLOBAL HAWK, MQ1 PREDATOR, and MQ-9 REAPER. Future sources in SENTINEL Increment 2 operations will include data from the E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) as well from emerging intelligence collection platforms. A single weapon system enterprise conducting worldwide round-the-clock ISR operations from Reachback garrisons, the SENTINEL includes six ANG Distributed Ground Sites (DGS) in Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, and Nevada conducting multi-intelligence PED and fusion operations. It also includes two ANG classic associate units conducting operations at active duty Air Force DGS locations in California and Virginia. Further, ANG units in Georgia, Hawaii, Ohio, and Utah provide daily support to SENTINEL operations. Lastly, the 217 Training Squadron, TX ANG, has a secondary mission of providing formal weapon system familiarization training for ANG SENTINEL operators in close cooperation with its active duty Air Force counterpart unit. In the Global War on Terrorism, accurate information and derived precision intelligence from SENTINEL enables commanders to own the battlespace. ANG SENTINEL units, as full partners in Total Force SENTINEL operations, provide the needed continuity and long-term analytical persistence enabling these commanders to make critical and informed combat decisions to fight and win the GWOT.

SENTINEL AN/GSQ-272 (Air Force Distributed Common Ground System AF DCGS) 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference
Critical Combat Capabilities List
Voice Communications with ISR platform crews Tactical receive system to access common operating picture and common collaborative tools from combat theaters and civilian entities Unclassified baseline system to support HUMRO/NEO/DSCA Operations

Essential Capabilities List


Standardized Equipment Suite for DGS-NV to ensure it has the same systems as other ANG Sites Collateral Enclave IESS at each ANG DGS Site

Desired Capabilities List


ANG DCGS Program Administrators

161

AN/GSQ-272 SENTINEL (Air Force Distributed Common Ground System AF DCGS) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($ Million) Program Medium Multi-INT HLS/DSCA Enclave GUARDNET Integration ANG Alternate Landing Site Nevada Block 10.2 Suite Collateral Enclave
Notes:
1

P.E. FY09 Number 0305208F/ 0503115F $11.02 4 0503117F 0503117F 0305208F 0305208F
2

FY10 $3.00 1 $7.88 4 $6.30 4 $4.65 4


3

FY11 $3.09 1 $11.02 4 $7.88 4 $4.34 4 $3.94 4

FY12 $3.20 1 $3.50 4 $5.69 4


4

FY13 $3.31 1 $11.02 4 $3.50 4 $1.75 4

Program Total $45.66 $30.64 $24.07 $7.72 $20.68

$7.88 4 $13.43 4 $7.72 4 $4.65 4

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 appropriation

Medium Multi-Intelligence (Multi-INT) - Allows ANG unit personnel to fully participate in distributed operations on a daily basis, providing augmentation for the current high operations tempo in the SENTINEL enterprise; permits connectivity with intelligence fusion assets and agencies, the common operational picture (COP), and with operators of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets. Homeland Security (HLS) / Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) Enclave Provides an Official Use Only (FOUO) network for ANG SENTINEL units operating in support of local authorities for disaster response and homeland security operations; incorporates NGB GUARDNET at ANG SENTINEL sites for HLS/DSCA operations. ANG Alternate Landing Site - Ensures Total Force continuity of imagery and signals intelligence operations in the event the primary SENTINEL communications management and distribution node ceases to function; ensures continuity and connectivity with intelligence fusion assets and agencies, the COP, and with operators of ISR assets. Nevada Block 10.2 Suite - Provides 10.2 equipment update to Nevada SENTINEL site to ensure same baseline with the worldwide SENTINEL weapon system. Collateral Enclave - Allows ANG unit personnel to fully participate in distributed operations on a daily basis, providing augmentation for the current high operations tempo in the SENTINEL enterprise; permits connectivity with intelligence fusion assets and agencies, the COP, and with operators of ISR assets.

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INFORMATION PAPER ON DISTRIBUTED COMMON GROUND SYSTEMS (DCGS) MULTI-INTELLIGENCE DISTRIBUTED GROUND STATION (DGS) 1. Background. AF DCGS processes imagery and data collected by U-2, Global Hawk, Predator, and national sensors on a daily basis, providing critical reachback support. The SENTINEL weapon system which processes both Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) and Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) supports multi-source intelligence operations for units co-located with active duty hosts as well as stand-alone ANG units. The equipment suite is designed so multiintelligence capabilities are not mutually exclusive. Installing these additional components of the SENTINEL baseline at three ANG squadrons will allow these units to fully participate in distributed operations on a daily basis, providing augmentation for the current high operations tempo in the AF DCGS enterprise, at the same time providing critical software and hardware upgrades to match SENTINEL weapon system baseline. 2. Requirement. Combat Air Forces (CAF) AF DCGS Operational Requirements Document (ORD), 21 Feb 2000. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG personnel will not be able to fully support combat operations and provide relief to the active force high operations tempo (OPSTEMPO) and personnel tempo (PERSTEMPO). 4. Units Impacted.
117 IS Birmingham ANGB, AL 123 IS Little Rock AFB, AR 152 IS Reno ANGB, NV

5. Contractors. Raytheon, Garland, TX; Lockheed-Martin Integrated Systems and Solutions, S&R Systems, Littleton, CO; Electronic Systems Command, 950 ELSG, Hanscom AFB, MA; WR-ALC, 560 ACSS, Robins AFB, GA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 3 DCGS Block 10.2 (3080) 3 Misc. GFE System Purchases (3080) 3 CETS/S&W (3080) 3 Hardware Technical Refreshes (3080) Sustainment Costs (3840) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $5.60 $2.06 $0.80 $2.56 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $16.80 $6.18 $2.40 $7.68 $12.60 $45.66

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INFORMATION PAPER ON AN/GSQ-272 SENTINEL (AIR FORCE DISTRIBUTED COMMON GROUND STATION AF DCGS) HOMELAND SECURITY (HLS) / DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIES (DSCA) ENCLAVE 1. Background. AF DCGS processes imagery and data collected by U-2, Global Hawk, Predator, and national sensors on a daily basis, providing critical reachback support. The SENTINEL weapon system supports multi-source intelligence operations with units co-located with active duty hosts as well as stand-alone ANG units. Currently, no stand-alone ANG SENTINEL units are capable of processing imagery at the Unclassified or For Official Use Only (FOUO) level to permit quick transmission of raw and analyzed imagery to local authorities for homeland security, disaster response, and rescue operations. Installing these additional HLS/DSCA components at all six ANG squadrons will allow unit personnel to fully participate in distributed operations with local and national organizations and agencies. It would also incorporate NGB GUARDNET for linkage of ANG SENTINEL sites with state Joint Operation Centers (JOCs) for HLS/DSCA operations. Installation of this capability with the ANG will provide a backup processing, exploitation, and dissemination (PED) method to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) conducting HLS and civil support operations. 2. Requirement. USAF Katrina/Rita Lessons Learned, 2006; USAF Homeland Defense Conference Briefs, 27 Feb - 1 Mar 2007. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG personnel and reconnaissance assets will not be able to fully support HLS/DSCA operations, particularly for search and rescue efforts. 4. Units Impacted.
102 IW Otis ANGB, MA 123 IS Little Rock AFB, AR 181 IW Holman Field, IN 117 IS Birmingham ANGB, AL 152 IS Reno ANGB, NV 184 IW McConnell AFB, KS

5. Contractors. Raytheon, Garland, TX and Falls Church, VA; Electronic Systems Command, 950 ELSG, Hanscom AFB, MA; WR-ALC, 560 ACSS, Robins AFB, GA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 6 DCGS Block 10.2 enclave (3080) 6 GFE for enclave (3080) Technical Refresh Costs (3080) Total Program Cost Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.82 $1.12 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $16.92 $6.72 $7.00 $30.64

164

INFORMATION PAPER ON ANG COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND LANDING SITE FOR THE AN/GSQ-272 SENTINEL (AIR FORCE DISTRIBUTED COMMON GROUND SYSTEM AF DCGS) WEAPON SYSTEM 1. Background. SENTINEL is the one-stop shop for Air Force tactical intelligence tasking, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TPED), and provides the intelligence foundation for the kill chain [find, fix, target, track, engage, assess (F2T2EA)]. The AF DCGS processing, exploitation and dissemination (PED) Operations Center (DPOC) is the single manager of distributed mission communications and processing capabilities. Alternate DPOC and satellite downlink sites provide redundant fallback capability to the current sites. Installing an ANG landing site and DPOC, co-located with the ANG Network Operations Support Center (NOSC), will provide the worldwide SENTINEL enterprise with a reliable, low cost, standby system with experienced network managers to ensure operations can continue in the event the DPOC at Langley AFB becomes non-operational. Standing up an alternate satellite site with an experienced ANG communications unit will provide the SENTINEL a redundant capability for supporting uninterrupted operations. 2. Requirement. Combat Air Forces (CAF) AF DCGS Operational Requirements Document (ORD) dated 21 Feb 2000. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The Air Forces reachback capability will be detrimentally impacted if connectivity is lost during austere weather conditions at Langley AFB, VA. As a result, AF DCGS will not be able to meet the intelligence requirements of theater commanders. 4. Units Impacted.
161 IS McConnell AFB, KS 223 CBCS Springfield ANGB, OH 178 IS Springfield ANGB, OH 184 CF McConnell AFB, KS

5. Contractors. L-3 Communications, Salt Lake City, UT; General Dynamics, Denver, CO; Electronic Systems Command, 950 ELSG (SPO), Hanscom AFB, MA; WR-ALC, 560 ACSS, Robins AFB, GA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 1 DCGS Block 10.2 DPOC (3080) 3 TMET (3080) 3 Satellite Interfaces (3080) 2 CAN (3080) 1 WAN (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Million) $3.53 $2.80 $1.54 $1.96 $3.60 Program Cost ($ Million) $3.53 $8.40 $4.62 $3.92 $3.60 $24.07

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INFORMATION PAPER ON AN/GSQ-272 SENTINEL (AIR FORCE DISTRIBUTED COMMON GROUND STATION AF DCGS) BLOCK 10.2 FOR NV ANG SITE 1. Background. AF DCGS processes imagery and data collected by U-2, Global Hawk, Predator, and national sensors on a daily basis, providing critical reachback support. The SENTINEL weapon system which processes both Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) and Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) supports multi-source intelligence operations with units co-located with active duty hosts as well as stand-alone ANG units. The equipment suite is designed so multiintelligence capabilities are not mutually exclusive. This action provides Block 10.2 baseline technical refresh for the SENTINEL unit at 152nd Intelligence Squadron, Reno, NV ANG, to bring this site to same configuration as the entire worldwide SENTINEL enterprise. 2. Requirement. Combat Air Forces (CAF) AF DCGS Operational Requirements Document (ORD) dated 21 Feb 2000. 3. Impact If Not Funded. The Nevada SENTINEL site will not have the same capability to meet Combatant Commander (COCOM) and Air Combat Command (ACC) requests to determine enemy Courses of Action (COAs) and activity leading to overall SENTINEL mission degradation. 4. Unit Impacted.
152 IS Reno ANGB, NV

5. Contractors. Raytheon, Garland, TX and Falls Church, VA; Electronic Systems Command, 950 ELSG, Hanscom AFB, MA; WR-ALC, 560 ACSS, Robins AFB, GA. 6. Cost.
Units Required NV Block 10.2 upgrade (3080) Unit Cost ($ Million) $7.72 Program Cost ($ Million) $7.72

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INFORMATION PAPER ON AN/GSQ-272 SENTINEL (AIR FORCE DISTRIBUTED COMMON GROUND STATION AF DCGS) COLLATERAL ENCLAVE 1. Background. AF DCGS processes imagery and data collected by U-2, Global Hawk, Predator, and national sensors on a daily basis, providing critical reachback support. The SENTINEL weapon system which processes both Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) and Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) supports multi-source intelligence operations with units co-located with active duty hosts as well as stand-alone ANG units. The equipment suite is designed so multiintelligence capabilities are not mutually exclusive. Currently, six stand-alone ANG units are capable of processing imagery only at the TS/SCI level. Installing these additional components of the SENTINEL baseline at all six ANG squadrons will allow unit personnel to fully participate in distributed operations on a daily basis, providing augmentation for the current high operations tempo in the AF DCGS enterprise. ANG SENTINEL units require continual software and hardware upgrades to match AF DCGS baseline. 2. Requirement. Combat Air Forces (CAF) AF DCGS Operational Requirements Document (ORD), 21 Feb 2000; Air Combat Command (ACC) AF DCGS Master Plan, Oct 2006. 3. Impact If Not Funded. ANG personnel will not be able to fully support combat operations and provide relief to the active duty high operations and personnel tempo. 4. Units Impacted.
102 IW Otis ANGB, MA 152 IS Reno ANGB, NV 117 IS Birmingham ANGB, AL 181 IW Holman Field, IN 123 IS Little Rock AFB, AR 184 IW McConnell AFB, KS

5. Contractors. Raytheon, Garland, TX and Falls Church, VA; Electronic Systems Command, 950 ELSG, Hanscom AFB, MA; WR-ALC/560 ACSS, Robins AFB, GA. 6. Cost.
Units Required 4 DCGS Block 10.2 enclave (3080) 4 GFE for enclave (3080) 2 Crew comm. Suites (3080) Technical Refresh Costs (3080) Total

.
Unit Cost ($ Million) $2.82 $1.12 $0.71 N/A Program Cost ($ Million) $11.28 $4.48 $1.42 $3.50 $20.68

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SECURITY FORCES
Ninety-four ANG Security Forces units enforce standards of conduct, discipline, and adherence to laws and directives while providing security of personnel and assets both at home-station and deployed locations through law enforcement patrols, integrated base defense, and antiterrorism/force protection initiatives. Security Forces professionals also provide nuclear security, information security, combat training, combat arms training, and maintenance services. Nearly 7,000 Air National Guard Security Forces personnel are stationed throughout the United States and its territories with the dual mission of training in preparation of contingency deployments and responding to State emergencies. By using Integrated Base Defense principles, Security Forces control terrain both inside and outside the base perimeter. As the battlefield dictates, Security Forces are trained to counter hostile threats while conducting Military Operations in Urban Terrain, Close Precision Engagement, RAVEN missions, mounted/dismounted individual and team patrols, convoy operations, high-risk vehicle stops/searches, random vehicle inspections, suspect apprehension/detention, installation access control, and heavy weapons support.

Security Forces 2007 Weapons and Tactics Conference


Critical Combat Capabilities List

SF Personal Protective Equipment SF M4 Rifle Upgrades SF M240/M249 Weapons Upgrade SF Mobility Bag Upgrades

Essential Combat Capabilities List


SF Communications Interoperability SF Medical Equipment Enhancements

Desired Combat Capabilities List


SF Shelter kits SF Range finder SF Clearing barrel SF Tactical Weapons Simulator Kits SF Portable weapons qualification range SF Mobile Fighting Positions

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SECURITY FORCES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Unfunded Modernization Priority List Funding Profiles ($M) Program SF Personal Protective Equipment SF M4 Rifle Upgrades SF M240/M249 Weapons Upgrades SF Mobility Bag Upgrades
Notes:
1

P.E. Number 52625F 52625F 52625F 56625F


2

FY09 $13.83 4 $29.79 4 $2.43 4 $13.40 4

FY10 3

FY11 -

FY12 4

FY13 -

Program Total $13.83 $29.79 $2.43 $13.40

3840 Appropriation

3010 Appropriation

3600 Appropriation

3080 Appropriation

SF Personal Protective Equipment - Security Forces have a requirement for Individual Body Armor; critical protective equipment which provides essential protection against Improvised Explosive Devices (IED), hostile fire, and associated threats common in a combat zone. SF M4 Rifle Upgrades - Upgrades M4 include: addition of the M203 grenade launcher, PVS14 NVD low-light combat capability and the PEQ-2A laser sighting device. This capability provides our security forces the latest technology to fight the War on Terrorism in both day and night-time environments. SF M240/M249 Rifle Upgrades - The AN/PVS-17B Night Vision Scope enhances combat capability to fight/operate in a low visibility environment. SF Mobility Bag Upgrades - Security Forces have a requirement for each member to deploy with an Individual First Aid Kit. As first responders, members are required to provide immediate first aid care until medical personnel arrive.

170

INFORMATION PAPER ON SECURITY FORCES PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 1. Background. Security Forces have a requirement for individual body armor to provide protection against improvised explosive devices, hostile fire, and associated threats common in a combat zone. The body armor ensemble consists of: individual body armor outer shell (ACU pattern), level IV ballistic plates, and the deltoid armor protective system. The outer shell will be used to transform existing desert camouflage patterned individual body armor to the new ACU pattern. The level IV ballistic plates provide protection against 7.62mm small arms fire. The deltoid armor protective system is used by Security Forces personnel manning the M240B machinegun located in the vehicle heavy weapons turret. The current personal protective equipment has reached its shelf life and requires replacement. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. HQ USAF Equipment Standardization Letter. Unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to procure these protective equipment items significantly increases the vulnerability of Security Forces personnel while simultaneously degrading mission accomplishment. Current equipment shortfalls require units to rotate equipment between individuals and other units prior to deployment. Personnel are prohibited from deploying without this required equipment. Limited stock on-hand translates to limited number of deployable personnel per Security Forces squadron. 4. Units Impacted.
All 92 ANG Security Forces Squadrons will be impacted within the 54 States and US Territories.

5. Contractors. Point Blank Body Armor, Pompano Beach, FL; Protective Products International, Sunrise, FL. 6. Cost.
Item Description 3,500 Individual Body Armor Shell (ACU) (3080) 15,000 Level IV Ballistic Plates (3080) 6,000 Deltoid Armor Protective System (3080) Total Unit Cost ( $ ) $265 $700 $400 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.93 $10.50 $2.40 $13.83

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INFORMATION PAPER ON SECURITY FORCES M4 RIFLE UPGRADES 1. Background. The M4 rifle is the latest weapon system in the inventory replacing the Vietnam era M-16. To retain 24-hour advantage, night optics and rail interface adapters need to be installed. The AN/PVS-14 monocular night vision device is the current standard for Air Force Security Forces. The M203 infrared quadrant optic sight allows the Security Force (SF) grenadiers to be more effective during night operations. Finally, to properly store the M4, both at home station and while in transit to deployed locations, weapons racks and cases must be procured. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM., unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. The acquisition of these devices increases the effectiveness of deployed SF personnel by increasing the weapons 24-hour capability and overall lethality. 4. Units Impacted.
All 92 ANG Security Forces Squadrons will be impacted within the 54 States and US Territories.

5. Contractor. FN Manufacturing, Columbia, SC; Night Vision Systems, Allentown, PA; Knights Armament, Machine Co (MATECO), Air Group, and J & S Product Incorporated Patriot Manufacturing, Division of Patriot Technology Sales, Inc, Cairo, GA; Hardigg Industries, South Deerfield, MA. 6. Cost.
Item Description 964 M4 rifles (3080) 6,850 AN-PVS 14 (3080) 6,850 Rail adaptor kits (3080) 950 AN-PQS18A, M203 IR quadrant sights (3080) 850 PSAR 820M4B weapons rack (3080) 1,200 Weapons storage case (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousand) $0.587 $3.689 $0.328 $1.140 $0.450 $0.181 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.57 $25.27 $2.25 $1.10 $0.38 $0.22 $29.79

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INFORMATION PAPER ON SECURITY FORCES M240/M249 WEAPONS UPGRADES 1. Background. Security Forces (SFS) deploy with the M240B Machinegun and the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW). The M240B machinegun is the newest and most lethal security forces weapon system in the inventory replacing the Vietnam era M-60. The AN/PVS17 Night Vision Scope enhances 24-hour combat capability of the SFS personnel who fight with the M240B. The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon is the secondary heavy weapon used by Security Forces and fires the smaller 5.56mm round in the automatic mode. As such, it has the capability of attaching a collapsible stock which provides greater operational flexibility and versatility during mounted and dismounted operations. Both the M240 and M249 require weapons racks and transportation cases for safe storage/transportation. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to fund this requirement reduces SF combat effectiveness during 24-hour operations. 4. Units Impacted.
All 92 ANG Security Forces Squadrons will be impacted within the 54 States and US Territories.

5. Contractor. Night Vision Systems, Allentown, PA; Picatinny Arsenal, NJ; Hardigg Industries, South Deerfield, MA; Patriot Manufacturing, Division of Patriot Technology Sales, Inc, Cairo, GA. 6. Cost.
Item Description 286 AN/PVS-17B (3080) 286 M197 Heavy weapons vehicle mount (3080) 1,042 M249 collapsible stock (3080) 567 PSAR CSAW240 weapons rack (3080) 100 M240 weapons case (3080) 100 M249 weapons case (3080) Total Unit Cost ($ Thousands) $5.00 $0.55 $0.50 $0.45 $0.25 $0.25 Program Cost ($ Million) $1.43 $0.16 $0.52 $0.26 $0.03 $0.03 $2.43

173

INFORMATION PAPER ON SECURITY FORCES MOBILITY BAG UPGRADES 1. Background. Three specific items of the SF mobility bag must be upgraded: clothing, eye protection, and infrared/low visibility tactical illumination. The Protective Combat Uniform (PCU) is flame retardant to better protect personnel from severe burn injuries. Also, many Air National Guard SF units do not have Air Force Surgeon General authorized ballistic eyewear used to combat environmental hazards inherent to force protection missions. SF has a shortfall of infrared tactical illumination devices which hinders SF Force Protection duties in low light and low visibility environments. The replacement of existing SF mobility bag equipment items must be initiated to keep pace with unserviceable equipment due to high ops tempo. 2. Requirement. Lessons Learned Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Surgeon Generals Ballistic Eyeware Program. Unit required equipment items defined by Unit Type Code (UTC). 3. Impact If Not Funded. Failure to procure these individual equipment items significantly increases the vulnerability of SF personnel during combat missions. 4. Units Impacted.
All 92 ANG Security Forces Squadrons will be impacted within the 54 States and US Territories.

5. Contractors. Drifire, Albany, NY; XGO Longworth Industries Incorporated, West End, NC; Wiley-X Eyeware, Livermore, CA; Night Vision Systems, Allentown, PA. 6. Cost.
Item Description 7,000 Infrared/individual tactical illumination (3080) 7,000 Mobility Bag Replacement (3080) 28,000 PCU Lvl 1 Boxer (3080) 14,000 PCU Lvl 1 Long Sleeve Shirt (3080) 14,000 PCU Lvl 1 Pant (3080) 28,000 PCU Lvl 1 T-Shirt (3080) 7,000 PCU Lvl 2 Long Sleeve Shirt (3080) 7,000 PCU Lvl 2 Pants (3080) 7,000 PCU Lvl 3 Shirt (3080) 7,000 Protective eyewear (3080) 7,000 Protective goggles (3080) Total Unit Cost ( $ ) $30.00 $1,375.00 $17.00 $28.00 $35.00 $21.00 $38.00 $33.50 $84.00 $80.00 $55.00 Program Cost ($ Million) $0.21 $9.63 $0.48 $0.39 $0.49 $0.59 $0.27 $0.24 $0.59 $0.56 $0.39 $13.84

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