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Postcard Marketing Handbook

Center for Technical Communication. 2008 1














Center for Technical Communication
22 East Quackenbush Avenue
Dumont, NJ 07628
(201) 385-1220
rwbly@bly.com

A Note to the Reader

This manual is intended to give guidance on how to start and run a freelance copywriting business. These forms are
for general guidelines on freelance business practices, and all contracts and agreements you make with clients,
vendors, and others should be reviewed by your own attorney.

The Postcard Marketing Handbook is copyrighted by the Center for Technical Communication. No portion of this
manual may be reprinted or reproduced in any way without the authors express written permission except by the
authorized purchaser of this e-book, who may make copies of forms, checklists, and letters for his or her own use.

2008, by the Center for Technical Communication. All rights reserved.

Note: Chapter 8 Alternatives to Creating Your Own Postcard was borrowed with permission from Robert Blys
book, Ads That Sell published by Asher Gallant Press in J anuary 1988.






This is NOT a free e-book!

Purchase of this e-book entitles the buyer to keep one copy on his or her computer and to print out one copy only.

Printing out more than one copyor distributing it electronicallyis prohibited by international and U.S.A.
copyright laws and treaties, and would subject the purchaser to penalties of up to $100,000 PER COPY distributed.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 2




Table of Contents

Introduction................................................................................................................................. 6
Expectation #1. ....................................................................................................................... 6
Expectation #2. ....................................................................................................................... 6
Expectation #3. ....................................................................................................................... 7

1 Why Use Postcards?............................................................................................................... 8
When To Use Postcards....................................................................................................... 9
Case study #1: Haag Engineering Company. ............................................................ 10
Case study #2: The USA Rice Federation. ................................................................... 10
Case study #3: Coopersmith List Consultants (CLC). ............................................. 11
Case study #4: Peter Miserendino. ................................................................................ 11
Case study #5: Apogee Rockets. .................................................................................... 11

2 Mail Order Math: How to Determine Your Budget ............................................... 13
How Much Does Postage Cost? ..................................................................................... 13
How Much Does Printing Cost?...................................................................................... 14
Do You Need A Graphic Artist? ...................................................................................... 15
How Much Does A Graphic Artist Cost?...................................................................... 15
How Do You Choose A Mailing List And How Much Do They Cost?............... 15
Where Do You Get A Mailing List? ................................................................................ 16
12 Things To Consider When Renting Mailing Lists............................................... 17
1. Be Specific................................................................................................................... 17

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Center for Technical Communication. 2008 3
2. What Are Your Demographics?.......................................................................... 18
3. What Are Your Psychographics?........................................................................ 18
4. Response List vs. Compiled List. ........................................................................ 18
5. RFM Analysis. ............................................................................................................. 19
6. Determine Your CPMT. .......................................................................................... 19
7. Is a Minimum Required?........................................................................................ 20
8. Sampling. .................................................................................................................... 20
9. Dates. ............................................................................................................................ 20
10. Multiple Uses. ........................................................................................................... 21
11. Seed Names. ............................................................................................................. 21
12. Delivery Guarantee. ............................................................................................... 21
How Much Should You Expect To Pay For A Mailing List? .................................. 21
Determining Your Acquisition Cost ............................................................................. 21

3 The Strategy............................................................................................................................ 25
Single Mailing vs. Multiple Mailings............................................................................. 25
Reduce Your Production Time........................................................................................ 26
Feature A Low-Cost Or No-Cost Offer.......................................................................... 26

4 The Design ............................................................................................................................. 28
The Aesthetics....................................................................................................................... 28

5 Writing the Postcard Copy............................................................................................... 32
The Motivating Sequence ................................................................................................ 32
Give The Reader Useful Information............................................................................ 33
The 13-Point Postcard Writing Checklist ................................................................... 35
Attention-Grabbing Headline......................................................................................... 35

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Identify Pain........................................................................................................................... 38
Testimonials........................................................................................................................... 41
List Benefits ............................................................................................................................ 43
Credentials.............................................................................................................................. 45
Anticipate Objections ........................................................................................................ 47
Solution.................................................................................................................................... 49
Take Away............................................................................................................................... 51
Deadline .................................................................................................................................. 52
Call to Action ......................................................................................................................... 54
Response Mechanism........................................................................................................ 55

6 After You Write..................................................................................................................... 57
Read Your Copy Out Loud................................................................................................ 57
Do Multiple Passes .............................................................................................................. 57
Check for Scanability.......................................................................................................... 58

7 The Testing............................................................................................................................. 60
How to Conduct a Split Test ............................................................................................ 60
What to Test First ................................................................................................................. 61
Getting Accurate Results .................................................................................................. 61

8 Alternatives to Creating Your Own Postcards ......................................................... 63
Postcard Decks: Direct ....................................................................................................... 63
Marketing's Secret Weapon............................................................................................. 63
A Surprisng Discovery........................................................................................................ 63
What Exactly Is A Postcard Deck?.................................................................................. 64
Advertising In Postcard Decks........................................................................................ 64

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Choosing A Postcard Deck............................................................................................... 65
Calculating Cost-Per-Thousand..................................................................................... 65
Comparing Results .............................................................................................................. 66
How People Read Decks ................................................................................................... 67
How To Write A Postcard Deck Headline ................................................................... 68
The 6 Secrets To Writing Effective Postcard Deck Copy....................................... 73
Visuals....................................................................................................................................... 76

9 Hiring Out Your Postcard Copywriting Services..................................................... 77
How Much Should You Charge For Your Services?................................................ 78
How Should You Charge For Your Services? ............................................................ 78
What Does a Good Contract Look Like? ..................................................................... 78

About the Authors................................................................................................................... 81

Appendix: Sources and Resources................................................................................... 83


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Introduction

Yes, Postcards Really CAN WorkDespite What
Youve Been Told

Whether youre using them for the first time or the hundredth time, youve probably
heard this tired refrain, Postcards just dont work. Maybe youve even said it yourself.

Good news! Being completely and totally wrong has never been so excitinguntil now.

Why? Because marketing with postcards is not only EFFECTIVE and CHEAP, its
EASY. And that, my friend, is a hard combination to beat.

The secret? Knowing what to do with postcards, when to do it and how. J ust as you
wouldnt use a lug wrench when the job calls for a crescent, so too must you understand the
proper application and use of postcards.

And that is exactly what well be covering in the next 9 chapters.

But before we get started unlocking your marketing potential with postcards, lets take a
couple of minutes to balance your expectations against the content of this book.

Expectation #1.

For the purposes of this e-book, Im going to assume youve already conducted the basic
preliminary steps to creating a successful marketing campaign. What are those steps?

1. Youve identified a niche with the means to purchase from you.
2. You have a product or service your niche desires.
3. You know who your competition is and how you stack up.
4. You know what your unique selling proposition is, i.e. what makes you different.

Expectation #2.

While I do highlight the best aspects of each postcard example in this book, that does
NOT mean EVERYTHING is right about every postcard. If youre looking for detailed,

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painstaking critiques of postcards or other marketing materials, visit
www.mycopywritingplaybook.com for more information.

Expectation #3.

To make it as easy as possible to create your next postcard, Ive laid out the table of
contents in a start to finish fashion.

This way you can begin creating your postcard immediately, taking each step as it comes,
rather than waiting until youve read the entire book to get started.

On that note, lets get to it!

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1
Why Use Postcards?

Before we get to how you should use postcards, lets review why you would even want
to. In other words, how could a cheap, flimsy piece of paper ever serve you better than other,
more sophisticated, direct mail tactics?


1. Postcards dont need to be opened. The headline, copy and graphics are all right there for the
viewing, unlike other marketing collateral that comes in an envelope and requires the prospect to
at least open it.

Why is this significant? Because it gives your marketing piece more opportunities to catch the
prospects attention and get read before being tossed.

2. Postcards are short. This appeals to the short-attention-span reader or skimmer because she
can get to the point quickly, without wading through what she sees as a bunch of unnecessary
filler material.

3. Printing and postage costs are cheaper. Traditional sales letters or direct mail packages often
cost twice as much as postcards, if not more.

So if youre working on a small budget, if you want to reach thousands of people you couldnt
afford to mail to otherwise, or you simply want to test the waters, postcards can be a cost
effective means of doing just that.

4. Writing and designing postcards is easier and less costly. If you choose to write your own
copy and do your own design, postcards take a fraction of the time youd invest in a typical direct
mail package.

Alternatively, if you hire out the writing and design to a third party, you may spend a bit more than
doing it yourself, but again not nearly as much as you would with a traditional direct mail package.

5. Postcards work for any businessincluding yours. Whether youre in retail, an information
marketer, direct marketer or any other type of vendor, postcards have worked for ALL business
classifications.

The question is not whether postcards will work for you, but WHEN you should put them to
work for you.



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When To Use Postcards
Because of limited space for graphics, copy and the response form, postcards work best
under these conditions:
1. The product is familiar to the reader or, if not familiar, simple in nature and easy to
explain.
2. The marketing objective is to generate a lead or inquiry, rather than to generate mail
orders accompanied by checks and credit card payments.
3. The offer features a premium or other free item the prospect can send for, such as a
demo disk, CD, catalog, or brochure.

Postcards can drive response to a Website URL or
toll-free phone number. Add a perforation with a
tear-off business reply card to create a double
postcard, and you can generate
mail response as well.
Why use postcards instead of a traditional direct mail package, tri-fold self-mailer, or
other formats?
Postcards offer immediate impact, says Perry Frank of Modern Postcards. The message
is immediately visible, with no envelopes to open. Postcards stand out in the mail with a brief,
to-the-point message. Even when someone is sorting incoming mail over the trash can, the
postcard will get noticed and readeven if its on its way to getting tossed.
Creative and printing costs for postcards are much less than for a full-blown direct mail
package, because there are no envelopes, letters, brochures, buck slips, or other inserts.
Ease of production. With no folding, bindery, or packaging, postcards have only two
sidesthe front and the back.
Postcards offer an affordable option for testing offers and creative components prior to
launching a more costly campaign. They can also be used to qualify prospects prior to mailing
catalogs and other, more expensive direct mail packages.
Many postcards wind up on the refrigerator or cubicle walls, giving them greater
visibility and shelf life than regular direct mail. Mail someone a postcard that really grabbed
their attention, and chances are theyll hang onto it, says Frank. Copywriter Roscoe Barnes
adds: Some postcards are collectors items. They are designed to be kept and praised. To work,
however, they must have a striking drawing, painting, or photograph. Using the works of a
famous artist helps.

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Postcards are extremely versatile. They can be used for coupons, invitations,
announcements, save-the-date reminders, thank-you cards, follow-ups, special offers, inserts in
magazines, admission tickets, mini-newsletters, bookmarks and quick-reference guides.
Postcards also offer a quick, affordable way to create clever campaigns with a consistent
theme. We see many of these mailings on a regular basis to the same audience with trivia
questions, creating anticipation for the next mailing, says Frank.
These are just a few of the benefits to postcards, but youre probably thinking, Wheres
the actual proof? Im glad you asked. Below are 5 different examples of recent, successful case
studies.
Case study #1: Haag Engineering Company.
Haag Engineering Company specializes in failure and damage consultingthe analysis
of why a structure, such as a bridge or building, collapsed. Clients include manufacturers,
insurance companies, and law firms.
Accredited in several states to provide continuing education, Haag recently mailed
20,000 postcards to promote their seminars. Recipients of the card are driven to their Website to
view course offerings and locations. The card can also be kept as a reminder, which is exactly
what one Haag engineer observed when visiting clients who had it pinned to their walls.
Response rates for this postcard, according to Marketing Manager Cheryl Markstahler,
average between 10 and 25 percent.
Case study #2: The USA Rice Federation.
The USA Rice Federation is a trade association promoting the eating of rice.
They recently mailed a postcard promoting September as National Rice Month to 6,800
food professionals. The postcard offered free brochures, posters, recipes, and other materials,
driving response to a phone number or e-mail address.
Because the federation is in the business of promoting rice, they have an extensive library
of beautiful food photographs in stock, allowing them to produce high-quality postcards
inexpensively.
Postcards work extremely well in establishing or maintaining relationships and keeping
rice top-of-mind among our target audience, says Kimberly Park, Director of National
Consumer Education. The postcards generated a response rate of almost 3 percent.




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Case study #3: Coopersmith List Consultants (CLC).
Coopersmith List Consultants is a boutique list consulting firm. They specialize in
working with business-to-business marketers who use direct mail but are not direct marketers
per se; e.g., industrial manufacturers and technology firms.
These companies often need highly specialized niche lists that are difficult to find. But
they typically mail in quantities too small to command much attention and personalized service
from larger list brokers.
As for the postcard marketing results, a previous mailing of 1,000 pieces from this
company pulled only 2 inquiries with no new clientsa 0.2 percent response rate. The new
educational postcard that Bob Bly created pulled 250 inquiries from a mailing of 10,000
piecesa 2.5 percent response, more than 10 times the previous effort. And more important,
many of the inquiries converted into new clients.
Case study #4: Peter Miserendino.
Peter Miserendino is an acoustic guitarist who wanted to promote his critically acclaimed
CD, Well Strung & Solo. He believed that sales would most likely come at live performances.
To get quality bookings Peter, who is also a professional illustrator and designer,
designed his own postcard and sent it to high-end clubs. Recipients were asked to phone or e-
mail for information on booking Peter as a performer.
Peter mailed this postcard three times, with three weeks between mail drops.
Only three days after the first drop, calls came in inquiring about dates. The same held
true for the second drop, and the third, even though the club managers had received the exact
same postcard each time.
This confirms that consistency and frequency are a major component of direct mail
strategy, says Miserendino. He also attributes his good response rates to the right design,
succinct copy, and four-color printing.
Case study #5: Apogee Rockets.
Apogee makes model rocket kits for hobbyists and enthusiasts. They did a small test
mailing of 500 postcards to sell a Saturn V rocket kit.
The postcards were printed on a digital press with the back showing a four-color photo of
the rocket. On the front, the digital press allowed each card to be personalized.
I wanted to make each postcard look like it was handwritten, says Tim Van Milligan of
Apogee. Thats why I selected the font used. I also changed the line spacing on each paragraph,
and skewed paragraphs because it would look less perfect.

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For the short run of 500 cards, the digital printing cost $1 per card. The kits cost $200
each. Of the 500 recipients, 25 people ordered the producta 5 percent response.
Would I do this again? Yes, says Tim. From the response I got, it appeared that the
recipients did think the postcards were handwritten.
Okay, I get that postcards work, now what?

Since weve covered when you should use postcards, their major benefits and several
success stories proving they really can work when executed properly, the next step question is
how do you get started making your own profitable postcard?

Brace yourself. It isnt complicated and it doesnt take long, but its probably the most
boring aspect of creating a postcardthe mail order math.

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2
Mail Order Math: How to
Determine Your Budget

Before you write one word of copy
Before you uncap your lucky pen or give your keyboard tapping fingers a lucky blow
Before you even utter a single prayer to your copywriting muse

You MUST determine your budget.

Its boring, its tedious and only geeks like doing it but alasit is also unavoidable if you
want to ensure a successful postcard marketing campaign.

So hows it done? By first determining the hard costs, then doing the mail order math.

The hard costs essentially come down to 4 variables

Postage (Note: Its better to use stamps than indicias, postage meters or pre-
printed US post office postcards. Why? Because stamps are more personal. The
EXCEPTION to this rule is when you are trying to make your postcard look like
an official government mailing or something of that ilk.)
Printing (See the Resources section for sample pricing.)
Mailing list.
Graphic artistry.
Copywriting (if you decide to hire it out.)

Well take them one at a time.


How Much Does Postage Cost?

According to the U.S. Postal Service mailing rates at the time this book was published,
you have only two rates to choose from.




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Figure 1.1 Standard Postage Rates






According to the U.S. Postal Service Website:
Any item smaller than the minimum dimensions is not mailable.
Postcards must be rectangular and be made of unfolded and uncreased paper or card
stock.
Large cards that exceed the maximum dimensions of a postcard pay the First-Class Mail
Letter rate or First-Class Mail Large Envelope rate.
Also, keep in mind that while any postcard meeting the criteria listed above is mailable,
your printing costs will usually be cheaper if you stick with one of two sizes:

Standard Postcard: 4.25 x 6 inches
Over-sized Postcard: 6 x 9 inches

It is also useful to know that you will typically be required to use a minimum 100 lb.
paper stock in order to meet the U.S. Post Offices minimum thickness requirement. Some 80 lb.
papers will also work, but many do not so be sure to double check with your printer before
ordering anything less than 100 lb.

For additional information, or to verify that the numbers quoted in this chapter have not
changed, please visit the United States Postal Service Website at www.usps.gov.

How Much Does Printing Cost?

Unfortunately, theres no one right answer to this question. Depending on whether you
use full color, black and white, black and white on colored paper, bleeds, die-cuts, odd-shaped
postcards, how many you order and any number of other variables you can spend anywhere from
2 to 3 per postcard to a dollar or more. For a list of postcard printers and their current pricing
structure, please see the Resources section at the end of this book.

If, however, youd rather go with a local printer, I recommend taking these 3 steps:

1. Ask your colleagues for referrals to their favorite printing companies.
2. Get at least 3 quotes.
3. Be specific about what is necessary and what is negotiable with respect to your design
and layout.

Cost Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum
Length Length Height Height Thickness Thickness
Standard
Postcard $0.26 5 inches 6 inches
3.5
inches
4.25
inches
0.007
inches
0.016
inches
Over-sized
Postcard $0.41 N/A 11 inches N/A 6 inches
0.009
inches
0.250
inches

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Do You Need A Graphic Artist?

It depends. Later on in this book Ill be sharing several examples with you, some of
which required the expertise of a graphic artist and many that did not. Whether or not you NEED
one all depends on how you envision your piece.

Ive seen fabulous-looking postcards and ho-hum-looking postcards both produce terrific
results. Ive also seen them produce horrific results. Ultimately it has less to do with the
sleekness of your presentation and more to do with the content.

Regardless of whether you choose the sleek or the utilitarian look, pay particular attention
to the Websites listed in the Resources section at the end of this book. They, and most others like
them, will offer dozens of effective templates to choose from at no extra charge. This is the route
I recommend taking, if you are NOT going to hire a graphic artist to create your postcard for
you.

Some local printing shops will also throw in graphic design services free, depending on
how much youre going to spend with them.

How Much Does A Graphic Artist Cost?

Depending on the caliber of the graphic artist, you can expect to pay anywhere between
$50 an hour to $200 an hour. Most will design a postcard for $350 to $1,500.

Of course you can get them even cheaper by targeting students at local colleges and
universities and exploring www.e-lance.com or other similar Websites. Keep in mind, however,
that the cheaper the solution the greater the risk it wont turn out as planned. (See the Resources
section at the end of this book for additional references.)

How Do You Choose A Mailing List And How Much Do They Cost?

You have four options when it comes to selecting a mailing list.

1. Use your own in-house mailing list.
2. Trade lists with a reputable, complementary service or product provider.
3. Rent a list.
4. Buy a list.

The first option is usually your best provided the list is clean, current and the recipients
are interested in whatever product or service youre promoting. If those qualifiers hold true, this
list will likely give you the best results because you already have a relationship with these
people. In theory, they already know and trust you, which makes the selling process that much
easier.


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Center for Technical Communication. 2008 16
But lets say you decide to mail to your in-house list as well as a rented list. The next
question is, do you give your in-house list the same offer as the rented list? There are two
schools of thought on this point. The first is that the in-house list is made up of special clients
who deserve a special deal for their loyalty and continued patronage. Airlines, for example,
capitalize on this all the time with VIP and other frequent-flyer bonus offers.

On the other hand, many companies run successful campaigns by giving their best deals
to new clients. Magazines, for example, regularly offer huge subscription discounts and even
multiple free issues to new clients. Then 6 months to a year later the cost begins increasing
incrementally or is raised to the regular full price. Either method can work.

Your second option is something youd want to approach your colleagues or even your
competitors withprovided they dont offer the exact same product/service. For example, if
youre a cosmetic dentist, you might exchange lists with a general practitioner who doesnt do
cosmetic workor does very little.

Your third and fourth options, however, are a bit more complicated and where well
spend the bulk of our time.

Where Do You Get A Mailing List?

For this I recommend list brokers. A list broker is someone who monitors the list industry
and acts as a consultant to potential buyers, handling all aspects of the list ordering process for
his clients.

When searching for a good list broker, youll want to make sure he will do 3 things:

1. Clearly identify what youre searching for, then find the list(s) to match.
2. Charge you only for the list(s) you rentnot for their research time.
3. Will rent you the list for the same price the list owner wouldno mark-ups.

Yes, there are other ways to rent or buy a list. And yes, you can get good results with
them, but Ive found list brokers are the most reliable when it comes to being assured youre
getting what you paid for.

Of course that doesnt mean you get to skip doing your homework. There is a
TREMENDOUS amount of fraud out there when it comes to purchasing mailing lists. For that
reason Ive included a few tips and screening questions below.

1. Get referrals first (see the Resources section at the end of this book).
2. Choose the BEST list broker for your needs, whether they are next door or
across the country.
3. Make sure the list broker will guarantee that at least 93% of the names are
good or qualified and get that promise in writing. Otherwise you could
end up with a list thats 50-75% duplicates.

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4. Ask how often they clean their list (i.e. how often they purge it for outdated
information, duplicates, etc.).
5. Ask how they clean their list (*Hint: if they arent putting it through a
National Change of Address service at last once a month, keep looking).
Once youve selected a list broker its time to take the 3 remaining steps:

1. Get free list recommendations.
2. Select the lists you want to test.
3. Place your list order.

If you decide to select a list broker on your own, be
certain you go to a direct mail shop for the list
processing.

Its possible to do this on your own but its time-
consuming and usually ineffective if your company
does not have the computer capabilities youll find
with larger companies such as Rocket Direct,
MBS/Multimode, RELYCO, Creative Automation,
Printronic, Hibbert and others.


12 Things To Consider When Renting Mailing Lists

1. Be Specific. Especially if you are not personally choosing the list(s), but relying on
your list broker to find ones that match your prescribed criteria. Remember, the more
specific you are and the more narrow your niche, the more successful your mailing
will be.

This means youll need to know more about your audience than the standard male,
age 18-30, plays video games. When it comes to a successful mailing campaign,
vague descriptions like this just dont cut it.

Instead, youll want to do a little brainstorming then ask your list broker for lists that
highlight as many of those characteristics as possible.

For example, if we analyze the profile of a male, 18-30-year-old gamer, we might
discover he:

Subscribes to PC Gamer Strategy Guide magazine.
Has purchased a computer worth more than $800 in the last year.
Owns an XBox, PlayStation or other gaming unit.
Has a high-speed Internet connection.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
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Is part of Best Buys, Game Stops or some other similar rewards
program

These are the kinds of additional details that can mean the difference between getting
a great list and wasting money on a mediocre list. The difference between cashing in
on a great ROI for your mailing or settling for a so-so or lousy ROI.

2. What Are Your Demographics? The more demographics you can nail down, the
better your list selection will be. Demographics include things like:

Race.
Gender.
Education.
Socioeconomic status.
Religion.
Marital status.
Ownership (home, car, pet, etc.).

3. What Are Your Psychographics? Likewise, youll also want to pin down as many
of your target markets psychographics as well. These might include:

Social class.
Lifestyle (smoker, athlete, weekend gardener, etc.).
Behavior (dines out 6 days a week, takes metro to work, buys books online,
etc.).
Values.


4. Response List vs. Compiled List. Sometimes called a buyers list or mail-order list,
a response list includes every known factor about a customers previous response to a
direct-response offer.

That means people on a response list all have two things in common:
1. They have somehow identified themselves as having a particular interest.
2. They have indicated a willingness to take action, when properly motivated by
a direct-response mechanism.

The important point here is that people on these lists are RESPONSIVE. They are
tested and proven to be willing recipients when the right offer is made in the right
way.

It is important to note, however, that their responsiveness to direct-response
marketing is not synonymous with direct-mail marketing.

So how would you use a response list effectively? Well, if youre running an ad for a
new sleep medication, you might get a list of people whove recently purchased

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 19
books on insomnia. If youre promoting a catalog of camping and fishing gear, you
might rent the names of people who belong to local adventure clubs or who subscribe
to magazines like Outdoors.
A compiled list, by contrast, does NOT indicate any previous inclination to subscribe,
buy, donate or otherwise respond by mail.

These lists are often gathered from directories, telephone books, membership
associations and other sources.

The benefits are that these lists often cover a much larger market area than response
lists and allow precision segmentation.

These lists are often segregated initially by broad-based characteristics like new
parents, newlyweds, new home-buyers, etc. From there, these lists are often
further segmented according to hobbies, health problems, product usage, etc.

So while they may not indicate previous buying or response habits, they do give you
access to a larger population with a possible affinity for your product or service.

5. RFM Analysis. RFM stands for recency, frequency, and monetary.

Recency refers to the length of time between the date you rent the list and the date
the people on the list made a purchase, sent in an inquiry, made a donation or
whatever.

Frequency refers to the number of times a prospect has purchased from the list
owner, or in the case of membershipshow long they subscribed.

Monetary refers to the highest transaction the prospect made, or the total value of
their transactions. This is particularly useful if you are selling a high-end product, in
which case you would probably only want to target people whove made those kinds
of purchases in the past.

6. Determine Your CPMT. CPMT stands for Cost per Thousand Target Audience. In
other words, this figure tells you what your cost per thousand will be to select certain
characteristics like men only, a specific age group, a particular zip code, etc.

Fees for this option, called selects, generally run from $5 to $10 per thousand per
selection criterion.

But dont let the lure of cheap selects fool you.

For example, if your target audience is men ages 22 to 34 and youre looking at a
publication that charges $50 per thousand but only half the total circulation is men
and only half of that group meets the age requirement, youre looking at a cost of
$200 per thousand because only 25% of the list is relevant to you.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 20

If , on the other hand, another publication charges $100 per thousand, but 90% of the
list is usable, your cost is $111 per thousandclearly the better choice of the two.

7. Is a Minimum Required? Before deciding which list(s) you want to use, be sure to
determine whether you are required to place a minimum order. Most list owners and
managers require you to purchase a minimum of 5,000 names.

Avoid using the fifth-digit zip select sampling
mechanism. This procedure arbitrarily sends your
mailing to people with a certain number at the end of
their zip code.

The problem is zip codes ending in the numbers 0, 1
or 2 are often for downtown or business areas. And
zips ending in a number higher than 2 are for more
suburban areas.

Using this method will not give you accurate results
when it comes to predicting the performance of the
entire list.

8. Sampling. If you decide to test a cross-section of a given list before committing to a
full-scale campaign, youll want to ask your list broker for an Nth-name sample, to
be taken from all reels.

This procedure ensures that you will get the most accurate and representative test
sample possible, before launching the full campaign. Using this method means your
list broker will take the total number of people on your list, lets say 100,000, then
divide that by the size of your test list, lets say 10,000. The resulting number is 10,
which means your test mailing will be sent to every 10
th
person on the list.

9. Dates. You must give the list providers your drop date(s) in writing. Why? Because
most list providers offer a protection period including the week before and the week
after your mailing.

This means no on else can mail to the same list youre mailing to during that time
frame. Longer protection periods may be negotiated, but this must be done in
advance.

You should also let your list provider know if you run into any substantial delays
regarding your drop date(s). Doing so might allow you to alter your protection period.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 21
10. Multiple Uses. If you plan to use a list multiple times, negotiate the rental price for
all uses up front.

11. Seed Names. Including a list of seed names and addresses with your order will allow
you to check the accuracy of the mailing house and the post offices delivery time.
Seed names might include you own mailing address, your business mailing address,
and that of any other friends or colleagues who would be willing to report when the
piece arrived in the mail.

12. Delivery Guarantee. Get this in writing from your list provider. They should be able
to guarantee a 93% or better delivery rate and be willing to pay for any mail returned
in excess of that 7% margin.

How Much Should You Expect To Pay For A Mailing List?

Rented mailing lists typically rent, for a one time use, for $100 to $150 per thousand or
more.

Of course the more specific and highly qualified your list is, the more its going to cost you.

The trick to deciding whether the price in question is reasonable is a little mail order math.

Before you launch a postcard campaign, or any other campaign for that matter, you must
first determine if it is VIABLE. In other words, does it have any hope whatsoever of working?

That means the question you should be asking yourself is not What kind of response rate
CAN I get, but What kind of response rate do I NEED to get.

In other words, what response rate do I NEED to get to justify the cost of the campaign,
i.e. the acquisition cost.

Acquisition cost can represent any number of different things. It can be the cost to
acquire a sale, a lead, an inquiry, a valid contact address, request for a coupon book, etc.

Determining Your Acquisition Cost

The easiest way to determine your acquisition cost is to follow the example below. In
Direct MarketingScenario A Figure 1.2 a company sells a 12-month subscription for the
equivalent of $40 a month, generating an annual gross revenue of about $480 per customer.

The average customer stays with the company for 2.5 years, generating a gross lifetime
value of about $1,200. After the companys expenses are paid for, it keeps a gross margin of
50%, or $600, over the life of the customer.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 22
In this scenario, the company has set aside 10 percent of its lifetime gross margin (or
$60) as the allowable cost to acquire one customer. (Note: this number could be higher provided
you can make the math work for your situation.)
Now that we know the business math, we can determine the marketing mathwhich
determines whether or not a postcard campaign would be feasible or even beneficial.

At the beginning of this chapter, we reviewed the most common hard costs you will face
when putting together a postcard. These included postage, printing, mailing list purchase/rental,
graphic artistry and copywriting. In this scenario, lets say the marketer chose a combination of
price factors that totals 75 per mailing.

In addition to that, this marketer says he can expect to close approximately 50% of all
inquiries he receives.

Figure 1.2 Business Math

Annual Revenue from product $480
Gross Margin 50%
Years as a Customer 2.5 years
Lifetime value of customer $1,200
Lifetime gross margin $600
Marketing Acquisition Allowable $60


Marketing Math

Cost Per Prospect Contact $0.75
Closing Rate 50%


Given that information, all we need do now is slot the appropriate numbers into the
appropriate algebraic formula. That formula is:

Cost Per Prospect Contact = Response Rate
(Marketing Acquisition Allowable x Closing Rate)

Using this formula, we discover the REQUIRED response rate is 2.5%. That means the
campaign is only worth doing, if he can reasonably expect to get a 2.5% response rate.

So the next question becomes; is this a realistic goal? In this case the answer is yes.
How do we know that? Because national averages put typical response rates for postcard
campaigns in the .5 to 5% range.

But the good news gets better. Not only does this work with postcard mailings, it also
works on just about every other form of marketing as well.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 23
To get those averages, I refer you to the Direct Marketing Associations yearly
publication. Of course there are other organizations that track this sort of thing as well, but DMA
is a reliable favorite. The following table is excerpted from the Direct Marketing Associations
2004 Response Rate Study: Direct & Interactive Marketing Campaign Metrics.
Figure 1.3 Response Rates For Direct Order Campaigns

Average Median High Low
Media % % % %
Direct Mail 1.88 1.04 9.57 0.1
Dimensional Mail 2.3 1.03 8.33 0.1
Catalog 2.18 1.81 7.61 0.27
E-mail 1.12 0.31 15 0.001
Inserts 0.45 0.13 4 0.004
Coupons 1.65 1 7.5 0.005
Telephone 5.78 4.45 20 0.07
Newspaper 0.09 0.02 0.62 0.005
Magazine 0.13 0.05 0.56 0.005
Freestanding
Inserts 0.13 0.1 0.4 0.01
DRTV 0.04 0.03 0.1 0.02
Radio 0.1 0.01 0.63 0.006

Keep in mind, this chart reflects response rates for direct order campaigns. That means
the respondents included here actually made purchases directly from these solicitations.

But what if you arent looking for a purchase? What if you just want to generate leads
and get the prospect to raise his/her hand, to take the next step in a series of steps to the final
purchase?

In that case, you might want to take a look at this chart, also from the Direct Marketing
Associations 2004 Response Rate Study: Direct & Interactive Marketing Campaign Metrics.

Figure 1.4 Response Rates For Lead-Generation Campaigns

Average Median High Low
Media % % % %
Direct Mail 1.86 1.06 12.5 0.04
Dimensional Mail 5.28 2.45 18.4 0.15
E-mail 3.39 2 15 0.1
Inserts 1.19 0.84 3.09 0.004
Coupons 3.21 3.21 6.17 0.25
Telephone 5.53 3.7 15.63 0.5
Newspaper 0.01 0.01 0.03 0.002
Magazine 0.44 0.04 1.78 0.001
Freestanding
Inserts 0.72 0.3 1.67 0.03
DRT 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 24
Radio 0.24 0.07 0.87 0.0001

Now, remember, these numbers are a guide based on national averages. That means good
marketers and bad marketers alike are included so take these last two charts with a grain of salt.
They by no means indicate that the best you can hope for in a direct mail campaign, for example,
is a 1.86% response rate. By the same token, however, it probably also means that EXPECTING
a 12, 15 or 20% response rate is unrealistic.





Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 25





3
The Strategy

Single Mailing vs. Multiple Mailings

Allow me to save you a lot of heartache and disappointment by saying right now, dont
bother with postcard marketing if you only plan to do a single-step campaign. In fact, dont
bother with marketing at all.

I cant tell you how many business professionals Ive encountered who decide postcards,
sales letters, TV commercials, coupons, advertisements or anything else you can think of dont
work in their market because they didnt get the results they wanted after a single-step campaign.

And whats worse is that they draw these false conclusions AFTER repeated warnings
from their consultants that:

Single-step marketing rarely, if ever, works,
You have to build relationships with your prospects before theyll trust you
enough to buy from you, and
It often takes an average of 7 to 11 touches before a prospect can even
REMEMBER seeing your message, much less do something about it.

Now, Im not saying you shouldnt expect to get decent results on your first postcard
mailing. If you follow ALL of the advice in this book, you will. But I am saying if youre
thinking, All I have to do to sell 1,000 widgets is send out A postcard, you might want to
rethink your marketing strategy.

Why? Because the more mailings you send a prospect and the more mediums you use to
communicate your message, the more likely you are to enjoy a successful campaign.

Remember, POSTCARDS ARE NOT MIRACLE WORKERS. If all it took was one
mailing to make all the people you desire buy or do what you wanted, there wouldnt be much
need for regular, consistent marketing, much less multi-media marketing, would there?


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 26
So, if you havent already, sit down and plan out your marketing strategy. Figure out how
many different ways you can communicate with your audience and how many times you can
afford to touch them over a given period of time.

Only then should you proceed with designing, writing and sending your postcard mailing.

Let me also say that if you are on a strict budget, postcards are an excellent low-cost
option for multi-part mailings because of the low cost per thousand.

Reduce Your Production Time

How? By tweaking the message you already have, then re-mailing. Yes, its important to
touch your prospects multiple times and in multiple ways but that doesnt mean you have to
create a new message from scratch every single time.

On the contrary, once you find a message that works (through testing which well discuss
later), youll want to use it over and over again.

Now perhaps each piece will have a different headline, different proof points or feature a
different benefit, but the USP and overall message should remain largely the same. After all, it is
a series mailing and each piece should be related to the previous and subsequent ones.


Feature A Low-Cost Or No-Cost Offer

Second only to the single-mailing mistake, the worst mistake I see marketers make is
trying to use a little-bitty postcard to move mountains. What do I mean? Simply that its not
reasonable to expect a 3.5 x 5 or even a 6 x 9 postcard to sell expensive products and
services.

There just isnt enough room on a postcard to persuade someone to fork over thousands
or even hundreds of dollars for your product or service. Thats what long sales letters,
teleseminars and other marketing mediums are used for.

Instead, your strategy should be to graduate your prospect to the next step in your sales
funnel by getting them to call in, write in or fax in their request for a free or low-cost book,
special report, teleseminar, CD or some other item with a high perceived value.

Of course you can sell low-cost items quite effectively with postcards, but if thats not
your market, youll want to use the approach described above.

Remember, the trick is to get your prospects in the habit of saying yes to you by
making it easy, not by requiring an act of congress to pass a budget amendment. Got it?


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 27
See Figure 3.1 for an excellent example of a free offer that not only has a high perceived
value but gets the prospect to directly interact with the vendor, thus dramatically increasing their
chances of closing the sale or at least collecting valuable, additional information.

As an aside, it is also important to note that this postcard does an excellent job of re-
educating a misinformed audience in a subtle but compelling way. As a company that specializes
in helping small and medium-sized businesses sell products and services to other businesses,
Coopersmith discovered most of their prospects were being taken advantage of when it came to
list rentals.

How so? Because their prospects erroneously assumed renting a list would be cheaper if
they went directly to the source. In reality, doing so actually cost them more. Why? Because
when they purchase a list directly from the seller, the seller has no incentive to investigate
whether or not the list will actually work for them or whether there is another, better list out there
somewhere.

A list broker, on the other hand, has every incentive to choose the best list available for
his client because he wants to keep the client coming back for more purchases. After all, thats
the business hes in. Not to mention that list brokers dont collect their commissions from the
company renting the list. Their fees are paid by the list owner. And, no, these costs do not get
passed on to the list renter.


Figure 3.1 Coopersmith List Consultant Postcard



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 28




4
The Design

The Aesthetics

Now that you have your mailing list and strategy figured out, its time to consider your
postcards design.

But dont worry. The rules for good postcard design are simpler than you might think. In
fact, its one of the smallest sections in this book.

Size
Nine times out of 10, bigger is better. If you can spring for the extra postage and printing
costs, youre better off doing an over-sized postcard rather than a regular-sized postcard. Ill
even go so far as to say that youre generally better off sending a larger postcard to a slightly
smaller list than a small postcard to a slightly larger list. Note: over-sized postcards generally
measure 6 x 9 inches but can be as large as 6 x 11 inches.

Color
What about color? The more the merrier, but its not essential. Color postcards tend to
pull better than black and white ones, but that doesnt mean black and white doesnt work.

In fact, if you are sending a postcard that is designed to look like an official mailing from
DMV, the State Treasurer or some other official office, black and white is the best choice and the
layout should be as simple and no-nonsense as possible.

Pictures
Where appropriate and applicable, pictures can be a huge asset. Whether its a full-body
picture of you, a headshot, a picture of the product, pictures of the people whose testimonials are
featured or some other valuable image, pictures not only draw the eye in, but lend credence and
credibility to your offer. See Figure 4.1 for an excellent example of this technique.

Having said that, there are instances where you do NOT want to use a picture. Again, I
reference the official government notice example where you want the piece to look like a
government agency sent it.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 29
Commercial Property Services, a company that specializes in securing tax reductions for
property owners paying too much, used this trick beautifully when they sent out an official
looking postcard saying, Your property tax is probably too high. Send this postcard back and
well give you a free

As a result, their response rate went through the roof.


Figure 4.1 Information Marketer T.J . Rohleders highest-performing postcard (front)
























Let me also say I do NOT advise using pictures for the sake of using pictures. Every
single thing you put on your postcard, from the stamp, to the pictures, to the font, to the response
mechanisms, to each and every word should serve a purpose. If not, leave it out.

Copy Length
Effective postcards are content-rich and that usually means lots of copy. Again, Im not
talking about filler material. Im talking about making a compelling and complete case for the
product/service youre offering. Remember, youre competing against 32,000 other marketing
messages on any given day. If you dont explain exactly why the prospect should do what you
ask in the most compelling and complete language possible, theyre going to spend those dollars
with someone who will.



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 30
Response Space
J ust a quick note on this point. If you are asking the prospect to respond directly on the
postcard (i.e. by filling out their contact information and mailing the card or a portion of the card
back to you) leave enough room on the back so they can fill out their information legibly and
without using a magnifying glass.

Prospects will not take the time or make the effort to write their information in 8-point
font. Give them plenty of room and youll increase your response rate.

Coupons
Whether you create a real coupon on your postcard or you simply announce a special
deal in the headline, this is one of the most effective tools you can use to increase your response
rate. J ust look at Bed, Bath & Beyond, Amazon and any other company you regularly receive
coupons from. They spend this money every month for a reason. IT WORKS! Tip: putting a
dashed border around a copy block creates a coupon-like appearance.

See Figures 4.2 and 4.3 for examples of the effective use of this technique.

Figure 4.2 Bed, Bath & Beyond Postcard (back)

























Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 31
Figure 4.3 Golds Gym Postcard (back)


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 32




5
Writing the Postcard Copy

Your 13-Point Checklist to Powerful Postcard Copy

In this chapter, each point on our 13-point checklist is broken down into four sections:
rules, money words, examples and formulas.

Ive done this to help you quickly identify not only what you should be doing in your
copywriting, but why and how. But before we get started on the actual checklist, let me share a
couple of general points to keep in mind before you begin writing.

The Motivating Sequence

First is the motivating sequence. This is a five-step formula for writing lead-generating
copy that is particularly well-suited to direct mail. The 5 steps are:

1. Get attention.
2. Identify the problem or need.
3. Position your product or service as the solution or answer.
4. Prove your case.
5. Tell the reader what to do next.

How do you do all of this in the space of a postcard? Succinctly. For more specifics, lets
take these steps one at a time.

1. Get attention. Doing this can be as simple as promising a benefit in the headline such
asNow reduce your telephone bill 50 percent or more!

Or you can ask a provocative question like What do J apanese managers have that
American managers sometimes lack?

You can even promise a reward or make an attractive offer up front with something like,
Reply now to receive a FREE special report on how to restore your personal credit.

2. Identify the problem or need. This might seem like a monumental waste of time at
first glance. I mean, after all, shouldnt the prospect already know he/she has a problem or need?
As Bob Bly puts it, Yes, but what are the chances that the prospect is thinking about the

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 33
problem or need your product addresses at the moment he picks up and opens your direct-mail
package? Pretty darn slim. In fact, studies show the likelihood is only somewhere between one
in 100 and one in 200.

Therefore, you need to get the prospect thinking about the problem before you begin
talking about the problem. Below are two examples of how you can effectively do this.

One, state something the prospect already knows like, The diagnostic-imaging business
is more competitive than ever. Or, you can just ask a question like, Are you sick and tired of
getting ads from your ad agency that dont help sell your product?

3. Position your product or service as the solution or answer. Make this point VERY
clear. A good example of this can be found above in Figure 3.1 where it says, Why spend
countless hours searching for mailing lists? Let CLC do the list research for you. Our services
are FREE!

4. Prove your case. Once youve successfully accomplished the first 3 steps including
gaining attention, highlighting the need and promising to fulfill that need, your prospect is going
to begin wondering, Okay, but why should I buy from you?

You can answer this question in several ways. First, you can list the clients for whom
youve done similar work, give references or include testimonials. You can also describe the key
benefits, list the most important features and/or compare your product to the competition in such
a way that yours is revealed as the more favorable of the two.

5. Tell the reader what to do next. The final step is to present your offer and make a
call to action. That means telling the prospect what to do, why they should do it, what they will
get when they do it, and why they should do it now rather than later.

For an excellent example of ALL these elements see Dr. Andrew Linicks postcard
featured in Figure 5.1. This postcard, which pulled a 10% response rate (truly phenomenal in the
world of postcard marketing where most marketers are happy with a 1 to 5% response rate), is
one of the few Ive seen that does very nearly EVERYTHING right.

Give the Reader Useful Information

This means exactly what it says. Dont fill your postcard with a lot of hype, fluff and
sales sleaze. Instead, give your reader valuable information that will truly make a difference to
them. See Figure 5.2.

If your product or service is worth paying the price youre asking, thats all youll need to
convince your audience. Anything less, anything dishonest or sleazy and your postcard will be
spending a long, lonely life in some landfill.




Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 34
Figure 5.1a Veterinarian Dr. Andrew Linicks Dog Bedz Postcard (front)





















Monkey-See, Monkey-Do 14-Point Checklist

Figure 5.1b Veterinarian Dr. Andrew Linicks Dog Bedz Postcard (back)






















Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 35
Figure 5.2 Kennedy Lillo Associates Postcard (front)



















The 13-Point Postcard Writing Checklist

At last, were getting down to the nitty-gritty of postcard writing! As I mentioned above,
youll find each of the following points broken down into four sections: rules, money words,
examples and formulas.

But remember, the smaller your postcard the more direct, clipped and merciless your
copy needs to be. Throughout this chapter youll see several examples that will work well on
oversized postcards, but which you just wont have the luxury of using on a 3 by 53/8 inch
postcard. For more information on what works best for that size, which is the smallest of
postcards, see Chapter 8: Alternatives to Creating Your Own Postcards.

Attention-Grabbing Headline

Headlines are NOT multi-taskers. They have one job and one job onlyto get the prospect
to read the next sentence. Rules of thumb for effective headline writing:

Rules

1. Be clear, direct and concise. DO NOT indulge in cutesy phrasing, puns, plays on
words, etc.

2. The message should be reader-centered (you not we).

3. Highlight the product or services most important benefit TO THE READER.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 36
i. Mention NO MORE than two benefits in the headline (to avoid confusing
the reader and diluting your message).

4. Arouse curiosity (To test whether youve accomplished this, imagine your headline
is the only thing a prospect can see while standing in a checkout line; would their
curiosity be piqued enough, simply by reading your headline, to pick it up and read
further?).

5. Appeal to the readers self-interest. Answer the question, Whats in it for me?

6. DO NOT overstate the benefits of the product/service (or you will lose credibility).

7. Identify a highly specific, extremely narrow target audience.
i. Exercise 1: Imagine what your perfect prospect looks like, sounds like,
walks like, talks like. Imagine everything from hair color and height to
hobbies, occupation, family dynamics, life stressors, etc. Then write as
though you are writing to THAT person.

8. Use meaningful specifics.

9. Instead of saying, Time Management Techniques for Managers. Say, How 25
Managers Save 3 Hours a Week With These Time Management Techniques.

Instead of saying, Stop J oint Pain For Good say, Arthritis Sufferers: How to End
Pain in 59 Seconds.

10. Use odd numbers instead of even numbers.

Money Words

At last Free You Gift
Finally How Sex Instantly
New Why Money Get
Now Who else Guaranteed Surprising
Announcing Which Easy Yes
Introducing Wanted Save Discover


Examples (Also see Figures 5.3 and 5.4 for real-life examples in action.)

3 Ways To Sell Your House Faster And For More Money.
The Truth About Homeowners Insurance.
What Every Woman Should Know About Bargain Shopping.
How To Help Your Website Traffic Skyrocket in 60 Days.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 37
Who Else Wants A Whiter WashWith No Hard Work?
Which Of These Car Buying Mistakes Will You Make?
The Top 5 Mistakes Self Publishing Authors Make.

Formulas

1. What Do _(your product or service)__ And __(unexpected comparison)__ Have
In Common?

2. Who Ever Heard Of __(unexpected something)_ From A __(your product or
service)_?

3. The Truth (solve a problem or get a result).

4. Which Of These _(area of concern)_ Mistakes Will You Make?

5. The Top __(X#)_ Mistakes _(your audience)_ Make.

6. How To Prevent __(pain)__.

7. All __(subject of article) Are Not Created Equal.

8. If _______, then _______.


Figure 5.3 Information Marketer T.J . Rohleders Postcard (back)
























Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 38
Figure 5.4 Golds Gym Postcard (front)


























Note: Youll notice in the above examples, one has very long, dense copy and the other is mostly
pictures and almost no copy. Which should you use? It all depends on what youre promoting.

In Figure 5.3, the business owner is promoting a product that is less familiar to the reader and
requires a fair amount of explanation and persuasion in order to get the reader to act.

Figure 5.4, however, is promoting a well-known service with well-known fees, terms and
conditions. Plus, the Golds Gym offer lends itself to representation through pictures much better
than the MP3 recording being promoted in Figure 5.3. In Figure 5.4, its easier and more
effective to communicate the two main selling points using pictures i.e. how great youll look
and the personalized attention youll get from a trainer than it would be to describe the same
thing with words.

Identify Pain

When stoking the emotional fire in prospects by targeting their pains, its important to
remember it doesnt have to be major pain and it doesnt even necessarily have to be real pain. It
just has to be perceived pain.

Rules

1. Interrupt the conversation going on in the prospects head (i.e. what are their hopes,
dreams, fears, worries, etc.).


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 39
2. Always, always, always write to a specific, singular person you can envision in
your mind. How do you do that? By starting with the basics.

i. First write down everything you can think of to describe this person:

Age
Height
Weight
Eye and hair color
Hobbies
Income
Family dynamics
Profession
Type of house
Buying habits
Sports
Favorite vacation spot

You get the idea. Make this person as real as possible in your mind then write
your copy as though youre writing a letter, postcard, whatever to him or her. You
can even use the same person for every product or service you have.

Now, before you balk, let me say I know how counterintuitive this is. Youre
thinking, But all my clients arent the same! Not a single one of them has all
those characteristics in common!

Doesnt matter. You see when you write to a specific person, your copy
automatically sounds more personal, congenial and approachable. It
AUTOMATICALLY becomes more readable and engaging. And thats what you
want, right? It doesnt matter who you envision because it isnt that person who
shows up in the copy, its you. Your personality, your attitude, your presence as it
would be if you were talking to a real live person. Got it?

3. Be conversational. Once you get the first two steps down, this is a piece of cake. J ust
pretend youre talking to a buddy, friend or relative when you write.

Quick and Easy Tips for Getting Conversational

Use everyday language.
Use simple words and sentence structure.
Write in the second person
Dont go on and on about how fantastic you are.
Dont stress about proper grammar.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 40
Money Words

Tired Challenged Exhausted Wish
Your turn Deserve Work Stress
Treat Hassle Money Tension
Nervous Fear Worry Emergency
Dread Scared Anxious Longing

Examples (Also see Figure 5.5 for a real-life example.)

1. Feeling overwhelmed by the demands of your day? Regain control in less than
5 minutes.

2. It is easy to get lost in all the advertising, marketing, direct marketing, lead
generation strategies, direct-mail, online medialost in the myriad of tools
and strategies and techniques and opportunities, lost in the sophistication and
complexity, lost in the

3. You might fantasize about giving up e-mail, your cell phone, and other
technology that keeps you in a crazy busy mode.

4. Through quick exercises (perfect for busy people), your Survival Guide takes
you step-by-step through the process of unsnarling a frantic life.

5. Instantly wipe out any fear, hurt, procrastination, worry, angst, anger,
resentment or obstacle to achievement.

6. Dont get duped by the five biggest debt, credit and investing rip-offs that can
steal more than half your wealth!

Formulas

1. Feeling _______ by the demands of ________?

2. Overstressed? Overwhelmed? Overscheduled? Feel so _____ its just about
driving you crazy?

3. It really is a crazy and unfair world out thereOn the one hand, there are
people who _______. And on the other hand, there are people who ________.

4. In fact, it is my observation that most _______ are doing a very good job with
________, but are hideously dropping the ball when it comes to _________.

5. If you want to _____, ______ or ______, its just not realistic to give up
________.



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 41
Figure 5.5 SurfControl Postcard (front)


























Testimonials

Testimonials are your most powerful persuader when it comes to the written word. No
promise, guarantee or clever phraseology will come close to wielding the power testimonials
do when used properly. Dont tell your prospects how great you are. Let your clients do it
for you. Why? Because like it or nottheyre more credible than you.

Rules

1. Testimonials should be powerful and communicate specific benefits that are
important to the reader.

2. Include pictures when possible.

3. Do NOT make up your testimonials.

4. To get better testimonials faster, write up several then ask your clients,
colleagues, etc. to CHOOSE one they like. And let them know they are free to
edit it before sending it back to you.

5. Include as many numerical and factual specifics as you can.



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 42
Money Words

Results Success On-time On-budget
Easy Personal Clear Honest
Professional Expert Money Profits
Saved Grow Solution Thank you
Achieve Free time Work less Stress less


Examples (Also see Figure 5.6 for a real-life example. Note that pictures are a big
bonus if you can work them in.)
I feel so strongly about ExpertInAMinute because its all about getting you in
front of your best customers in a non-threatening way with information that really
helps them.
--Heather Brogan, Investment Broker
After spending thousands of dollars getting information from almost every
Internet and marketing expert out there, I can say that, without a doubt, Maria
Velosos book, Web Copy That Sells, is the best investment that anyone wanting
a profitable career on the Internet could make.
--Rick Miller, Certified Master of Web Copywriting, Author of Internet Mind
Control and Founder of ScientificInternetMarketing.com
Formulas

1. _____ was able to immediately identify the areas of my business that could
produce _______ quickly. When _____ helped me implement _________, well,
the results speak for themselves. In ____ months alone, Ive made an extra
_________ in profit I can directly trace back to ________.

2. There is absolutely a direct link between the number of _____ and the _______.
I made over _____ sales with the help of _______.

3. ______ has freed up my nights and weekends to focus on my ________.

4. I have less stress so I can actually enjoy my free time. Before, I didnt want to
get up in the morning because I didnt feel I had anything to look forward to.
But with _______, Im excited to see ___________!

5. Before ______ my life was 24-7 mayhem. Now Ive been using ________ for
______ and it already has helped me ______ in a way I never anticipated and
can hardly believe.



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 43
Figure 5.6 Dr. Erich Breitenmosers Postcard (front)





















List Benefits

These are NOT features, facts or figures about your product or service. Benefits are the
emotional reasons a person would take the action you want (i.e. more money, time savings,
fewer headaches, happier family, more self-confidence, get the guy/gal of your dreams, get
the promotion you deserve, etc.).

Rules

1. People buy emotionally and justify it intellectually. For example, Stan may have
needed a new truck because he totaled his old one, but you can bet the decision to
buy a fully loaded F-150 wasnt made because it was a wise investment of $39,970.
No, what tipped the scales was the feeling he got from the sound of that dual
exhaust V-8 engine. Intellectually, however, he justified it by telling himself he
required the hauling capacity at work and at home. Of course this justification may
very well be valid, but the fact is, it wasnt the features that compelled him to buy.
2. Facts and figures are necessary (at some point) to the buying decision, but only
insofar as they justify what the emotional side of the prospect wants to do.

3. The best benefits also reveal bits and pieces of the whole solution.

Money Words

Money Relax Stop Start
Never again Master Enjoy Begin

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 44
Free Eliminate Stress-free Profit
Reduce Win Time-saving Belong
Control Cutting-edge Limitless Simplify

Examples of benefit statements (Also see Figure 5.7 for a real-life example).

A series of questions to help you prioritize what matters most to you.
The handy-dandy anti-worry plan.
Tips for getting back to the C State (a state where your brain operates at its
best).
A unique scoring system for determining your worth factor: Tailored to suit
your own priorities so youll know where to reclaim and create time.
The six-step plan for dealing with overload.
Seven steps for a better, less hectic, daily schedule.

Formulas

1. Powerfully transform ______ and make your biggest dreams materialize.
2. Directly experience _________ and enjoy the ultimate satisfaction of
fulfillment.
3. How one simple exercise can make your _______, even when ________.
4. How and why youve been misled and taken advantage of when it comes to
_______.
5. Why you dont have to worry about ________ any longer.
6. Specific ways to cut ________ without sacrificing __________.
7. How to save ________ by simply ________.





















Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 45
Figure 5.7 Intech Power-Core Postcard (back)






























Credentials

Credentials answer the question every prospect is thinking, What makes you qualified to
make these claims? Wheres the proof? And whats your track record?

Rules

1. Provide concrete credentials where possible. Hard facts and data are hard to argue
with and appease the logical side of the prospects brain. The side that has to justify
making an emotional decision later on.
2. Use anecdotes and success stories to convey your expertise. This makes your
qualifications appear stronger and more memorable. It also gives prospects someone
to identify with, someone in whom they can see themselves.
3. Do NOT reprint your resumenot even a modified version of it. The key is to entice,
not bore, your readers.

4. As proud as you may be of your credentials, dont let them take center stage.
Remember, a good marketing piece is about the prospect, not you.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 46
Money Words

Expert Authority Recognized Trained
Professional Outperformed Experienced Mastery
Talent Qualified Pioneered Created
Coached Won Solved Invented
Leading Converted Discovered Founded

Examples (Also see Figure 5.8 for a real-life example. Pay particular attention
to the highlighted sections.)

Elder Law Attorney Bill Hammond built his business from nothing into a
thriving business that grossed more than $939,000 last yearall in just 48
months.

Lee Milteer has shared the speaking platform with many well-known
personalities, including Dan Kennedy, Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen,
Tony Robbins, Zig Ziglar, the late Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, Stephen
Covey, Brian Tracy, Og Mandino, Ted Koppel, Lynn Redgrave, Marlo
Thomas and T. Harv Eker just to name a few of the famous names you
might know.

Ive spent more than $50,000.00 over 15 years researching, learning,
developing, creating, refining and implementing many of the tools and
strategies in this legal system until I had it just right.

Dave Frees has presented trainings, seminars, and speeches to employees,
executives, and faculty or administrators of:

Aramark
General Electric
Verizon
JP Morgan
Smith-Barney
Harvard
Yale
Cornell University
And more


Formulas

1. When I was (where your prospect is today), I had resigned myself to _______.
Now _____ years later, Im ______ and feeling _________.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 47
2. This gives you my ________ which Ive used to generate __(amount of
money)_ in _(field youre targeting)_ in less than _____ years.

3. ____ _____ is a frequent speaker on ______ issues and has been interviewed on
programs including ____, ____, ____ and more. He has also written books
addressing _______ including _____, _____ and ______.

4. It all began in _____, when _______ asked me to _______. I quickly agreed
without giving a lot of thought to the potential it had to change my life.


Figure 5.8 Mortgage Professional J immy Vees Postcard (back)























Anticipate Objections

If you were in the prospects shoes, what questions would you be asking yourself, what
kind of additional proof would you want, what would you be suspicious or circumspect about?

Rules
1. Compare apples to orangesalways. It makes your product look like a steal.
Example 1: For as little as $19.95, you can purchase this fitness e-book and get
the same benefits you would from Buff Bodies fitness machine, which would
cost you $2,477. Its even cheaper than a gym membership, which costs $600
per year or a personal trainer, which costs $50 per hour. Get the same results for
a lot less

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 48
2. Make the cost insignificant by comparing it to the price of gum, a cup of
coffee, etc.
Example 2: For the same price you pay for a cup of coffee at Bigbucks each
day, this widget can be yours
3. Introduce one or two weaknesses about your product or service then turn them
into positives if possible. Being honest and admitting to less than perfection will
actually make your claims more believable AND buyable.

4. NEVER attempt to make the prospect feel silly, uneducated or inept by trying to
bulldoze your way through an objection. Be straightforward and respectful
when you address it. No one likes a bully and they certainly dont want to buy
from one.
Money Words

Yet Despite Even though But
Alternative The real payoff See for yourself Yes
No risk The first Exclusive Secure
Guaranteed Easy Simple Improved
Too good to be true Trial offer No obligation Proof

Examples

Objection: Either youre born with it or you arent.
Answer: Yet, in spite of this widely held belief, the fact remains: the woman
who was at one time considered one of the most charismatic figures in the world
was clearly not born with it.

Objection: I cant afford it.
Answer: If there is one thing that is absolutely, abundantly, inarguably clear
about the members and clients of mine who are topping their own incomes and
financial successes, hitting one new peak after another, it is that they invest
heavily in acquiring and using ALL the information and assistance they can get,
no matter how uncomfortable the price might initially seem. Theres a long list of
these folks who

Objection: Im not a very good writer.
Answer: You dont have to know how to writenot in the traditional sense, that
is. So long as you can write conversationally, you dont really have to know the
rules of grammar. You dont need to discern a preposition from a noun in a line-
up.




Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 49
Formulas

1. Objection: It costs too much money.
Answer: Its true. This life-changing product does cost _____. The real
question though isnt can you afford to spend _____, but can you afford to lose
______. Because thats exactly what youll be doing if you dont take advantage
of this opportunity today. You see

2. Objection: I dont have time.
Answer: The great thing about _____ is you dont have to use it/do it/learn it
all at once. You can take your time and go at your own pace. In fact

3. Objection: My business is different.
Answer: We get this one a lot and while we can understand how you might
feel that way at first glance, the truth is this works for any business that ____,
_____ or ______. How do we know? Because weve helped professionals from
all walks of life including ____, ____, _____, _____, and more.

4. Objection: What if I buy it and discover I made the wrong decision?
Answer: Great news! Thats where our 100% Money Back Guarantee comes in.
When you decide to invest in your _____ today, well guarantee you


Solution

This is the climax of your piece. This is where you lay all the cards on the table (almost)
and reveal the perfect answer to your prospects problem.

Rules
1. Recap the pain and emotional aspects.

2. Present the solution as easy and effortless. Present it as the natural next course
without sounding condescending.

3. Reveal the VALUE of the product/service, then the actual price.

4. Offer a FREE booklet or other bait piece. Ease your prospects into the habit of
saying, Yes to you by making the first one a no-brainer.

Money Words

Real Increase Save Feel
Look Experience Enjoy Discover
See for yourself Reward Get Profits

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 50
Step-by-step Straightforward No headaches Clear
Foolproof No assembly required Simple Automatic

Examples (Also see Figure 5.9 for a real-life example. And remember,
solutions dont have to be complicated or life-changing. They can
be as simple as providing the perfect gift for someone your
prospect cares about.)

Our program will help you get started by showing you sure-fire ways to land
your first assignment and launch your six-figure copywriting career. Well show
you how to put yourself in front of marketing people who are looking for
copywritersand how to negotiate your fees. Youll even have an opportunity to
write a letter for us! And if youre letters a winner, well write you a big fat
check for $10,000.

Suddenly, whatever challenges youre facing wont look so bad. Youll find
yourself flying over the top of any obstacle or conflict youre confronted with.
Naturally youll feel better about yourself and where your life is headed. Dreams
that previously looked impossible will suddenly seem a lot bigger, brighter and
closer to fruition than they ever appeared to be in the past. And best of all

This business in a box is the real world equivalent of the goose that lays the
golden eggs. All you have to do is attend the training and assemble all the
components using the 30-day step-by-step action plan, and youll have an exact
replica of the most successful NLP/Hypnotherapy practices in the world. Its so
simple and takes such little time.

Formulas

1. As we go through this _______, Im going to be giving you a number of tips and
tools so you can develop _______ for ________. All of them are easy to
implement.

2. How to join the _____.
Discover why _______.
Erase the ____ barriers to ______.
Reach every _____ goal you set by _____.
Become more _____, ____ and _____ by learning how to use _____.

3. Your ____ includes the core program which will take you step-by-step
through____. Youll get your own _____. Youll even get _____. Plus theres an
additional bonus of _____.






Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 51
Figure 5.9 A.R.E. Postcard (front)





























Take Away

Create a sense of exclusivity, of something special.

Rules
1. Make it unexpected.
2. Use it as a tool of reverse psychology.
3. Simultaneously paint a picture of all the prospect would be losing out on if he/she
doesnt purchase/sign up today.

Money Words

If Dont Make certain Think
Try before you buy Doubt Find out Guarantee
Limited time Qualified Exclusive Special
Limited number Dont buy if I invite you J ust for
Not for Your competition Only if Compare

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 52
Examples

If the fee sounds like a lot, or you'll have to dip into your rent money to pay for
this, the Master-Mind-Inner Circle Coaching Club definitely isn't for you. Please
do not contact us about this offer if the cost will be a hardship in any way. I'd hate
to have to talk you out of it.

However, if you want a 10 to 1 return OR more and are willing to
IMPLEMENT right awaythis may be for you.

This is not a group for voyeurs or people who like to sit in the back of the
classroom. Your contribution is expected and encouraged, and if we don't think
you are adding to the group, you will receive a prorated refund and be
excused.

For you, this is one of those choice points in life because now you are going to
be asked to make a decision.

And the decision you will make may be the difference between worrying that
your documents are out of datethat youre out of touch with the latest laws and
strategiesthat youre unprepared for a long-term care situationor that you
havent helped the generations above and below you plan.

Or you will choose to be the person who understands how to control the
entire processnot just for the short term but for the long haul, and have the
expert support and guidance behind you that makes keeping current fast, easy and
economical. You will find comfort in the confidence and peace of mind you
acquire.

Formulas

1. This program is only for serious business owners will to commit to ___________. If
you have neither the time nor the inclination to ______________, please DO NOT
sign up with us today.

2. Please do not sign up today. Do not call us. And do not send us your money if you
_______.

3. This program is not for you if you _________, are happy with the status quo, do
not wish to learn how to _____________, believe only the lucky become
____________, want to keep ____________ the hard way or are unwilling to
reach your peak potential.


Deadline

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 53
Give the prospect a reason to take action now. Create a sense of urgency.

Rules
1. Use limited-time or limited quantity offers.
2. Offer a discount for fast response and a penalty for slow response.
3. Make the deadline obvious and include it in multiple places (at the top of the piece,
at the end and in the P.S.).
Money Words

Limited time Dont wait Hurry Fast
Right now Now Quick Lose out
Limited number Urgent Wont last Dont miss
Today Run out Too late J ump on
Seize Grab Sell out Gone

Examples

Make sure you dont delay, because these Free Cosmetic Examinations will
only be available until our remaining available spots are filled. We have a
total of 45 slots to book and 13 are already gone. Dont put off your future
another day! Claim your gift of confidenceby taking the first step now.

You DO Have to HURRY though!

Keep in mind, my generous offer is good only for the first 250 people who sign
up!

And DONT MAKE THE BIG MISTAKE of thinking, Im busy this yearIll
go next year. I could never possibly assemble THIS slate of speakers and experts,
and cover these 3 seminars in one again. Their schedules, their compensation
demands preclude even the thought. This really is a Now or Never. And it is the
ONLY opportunity you can have this year to hear MY coach, Bob Moyer,
addressing ANY dental audience

FAIR WARNING. In the interest of a spirit of cooperation and teamwork, Phillip
only admits 1 agent or broker from each area. Only 1 person from each area can
join this program, use his system and make that money.

Formulas

1. Reserve your spot before it fills up! Complete the attached _________ and fax it to
__________ or call ___________ (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) before ______ at

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 54
________a.m./p.m.

2. If you are interested in ________, you must fax ______ the fast response
acceptance form right now while its still fresh in your mind. After the last ____
spots fill up, thats it! No more applicants will be accepted. No matter how moving
or original your story might be.

3. I cannot hang my financial butt on the line for very long like this. ________, my
accountant would have me committed. So you can understand why I must make this
a limited-time offer. Because Ive had this letter rushed to you, my offer stands for
the next ____ days (stamped in red on the enclosed free look enrollment
form)and then its gone forever.
Call to Action
The most effective calls to action include a bonus, deadline, limited quantity
notification, penalty for not responding quickly or other strong incentive to act right away.
Rules
1. Tell your prospect EXACTLY what you want him/her to do.
2. Supply at least two response methods.
3. Provide a sufficient incentive. DO NOT use a boring, non-committal close like For
more information, call
Money Words

I invite you Apply online Reply today Learn more
J ust hit reply Now Mail your order Ask your
For faster service Call now Respond promptly Avoid
Its important you Call or e-mail Send for Come in
Complete and mail For a free demo Time is running out

Examples

For a FREE demonstration of how our widgets can save you up to 30% every
quarter, call 1-800-WIDGETS by J une 12th.

Get the vibrant, fulfilling, joyous life youve always wanted and the brighter,
whiter smile youve always deserved. Simply call our office today to schedule
your Free Cosmetic Examination, 804-320-6800. (In case you missed it the first
time, thats a 100% Free Initial Clinical Exam.) good oneis it from a
postcard?


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 55
And as a special bonus youll also get our FREE 32-page report, How To Get
The Radiant Smile Youve Always WantedNo Matter How Ugly, Chipped,
Stained Or Crooked Your Teeth Are.

If youre finally ready to see your Profits Double or Triplethen youre ready
to uncover the Single Biggest Secret to Easy, Effortless, Profit-Producing
Marketing.

I invite you now to fill out your enrollment form by clicking here now. Your
Risk-Free, Guaranteed Solution to 24-7 Automated Marketing is waiting.
Click here to get started today. Or you can call 1-800-858-8889. Dont put off
until tomorrow, the wealth, success, freedom and happiness you could be
enjoying today. Start turning your prospects into profits now!
Formulas

1. Fill out your contact information on this card and just drop it in the mail for your
FREE_________.

2. REGISTER NOW at www._________.com. (If the site is shut down, youll know
you were too late.) Remember, only the first _____ will be accepted into this
exclusive course

3. You must act now to secure your spot at this years ________. Seats are limited and
so you should register while seats and _______ discounts are still available. Dont
lose out on one of the most ______ events youll ever experience! Call now
Response Mechanism
The best response mechanism is SEVERAL response mechanisms. Why? Because
everyone has their preferences and the easier you make it on your prospect, the more youll sell.
Possible mechanisms include:
Toll-free 800 number.
Regular phone #.
900-number (not so widely used today).
Go to a specific Website URL to register for free offer.
Fax.
E-mail your inquiry to
Mail completed response form or staple business card to postcard and mail back
to us at this address



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 56
Rules
1. Cater to the technologically savvy and the not-so-savvy. And dont forget the lazy.
Heres an example of what I mean. For months Ive been interested in a particular
newsletter subscription. THREE times Ive gone to fill out the registration form but
because I have to fax it in, which requires me to print it off the Website because its a
locked PDF, fill out all my information BY HAND, then scan it into my computer so
I can use my e-fax system, Ive yet to do it. THREE times Ive printed the darn thing
out and THREE times Ive never gotten around to it. And I gotta tell you, almost
NOBODY I know would be so diligent as to take the first step 3 separate times.
2. Give your prospect AT LEAST two options and preferably three or four. I
recommend including a Website address, an e-mail address, a phone number and a
mail-in or fax-in option. The more options you give them, the more sales theyll give
you.
Money Words

Fax us at E-mail us today Call Phone us
Go to www Trade in your Get your Visit www
Leave a message Mail this card

Examples

For FREE list recommendations on an upcoming direct mail, e-mail or
telemarketing campaign, call us toll-free at 866-888-8888.

Call now to arrange a free, no-obligation demonstration of product XYZ.

Mail the enclosed reply card for a free brochure.

Formulas

1. For your FREE ________, fax us today at ___________.

2. Redeem this 20% off coupon by going to ____________.

3. Mail the attached reply card for a free _______________.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 57




6
After You Write

In our factory, we make lipstick. In our advertising, we sell hope.
Charles Revson

Once youve completed the rough draft of your postcard, let it sit for at least a few hours
and preferably overnight. This permits the most effective use of your subconscious to find
solutions to difficulties you may be having, to find a better way of stating a sentence, or to hatch
the inspirational details that make good copywriting great.

Read Your Copy Out Loud

This is an absolute must. Reading your copy aloud gives you the opportunity to hear what
your readers will hear, to hear the pieces cadence and rhythm, to find stumbling blocks in poorly
juxtaposed words, to determine where clarity is lacking, and to experience the flow of your work.
Each of these components is critical and noticed by your readerwhether they consciously
realize it or not.

So do yourself a favor and help increase your sales by taking the time to read EVERY
word out loud.

Do Multiple Passes

Read through your copy once to get a feel for the quality and clarity of the message
youre communicating. Are you communicating the most valuable information possible, given
your space restrictions? Is the message unmistakably clear?

Then once youve answered these questions, read for the power and purpose of your
words, sentences and paragraphs. Does each word, sentence and paragraph draw you inexorably
forward? Does each one compel you to continue reading? Do they advance the story or message
or do they just take up space?

And finally, read once more for correct punctuation, grammar and syntax. Of course you
may not want these to be 100% correct at all times, particularly when youre trying to
communicate in a conversational voice that may require incomplete sentences, dangling
participles and so on. But as much as is possible, obey the standard rules of grammar,
punctuation and syntax for the sake of clarity and understandability.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 58
Now I realize that at first glance this may seem like overkill, but trust me! Ive NEVER
encountered someone who could read EFFECTIVELY for all three of these components in one
pass.


Check for Scanability

After completing your final draft, review the piece for scanability. Why? Because more
than 30% of the U.S. population classifies themselves as scanners, which means they WONT
be reading your copy word-for-word. Whats more, this number surges even higher when
reading online, newspapers, direct mail, and magazines.

So how do you check for scanability? By making certain you can understand ALL the
important points of your message, offer and call to action even if you ONLY read the words and
phrases printed in bold, italics or some other identifying characteristic.

Additional tricks for improving readability include:

Using bullets.
More white space.
Creating anchors for peoples eyes in the form of pictures or bold
subheads.
Using screened boxes to highlight important points or testimonials.
Yellow highlighting.
Circling and/or underlining important points.
Cross-outs.
Simulated handwriting in the margins.
Photo captions (Hint* These have a similar impact, if slightly
lesser, to great headlines and subheads).

See Figure 5.11 a and b for a great example of scanability.
















Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 59
Figure 5.11a Information Marketer T.J . Rohleder Postcard (front)
























Figure 5.11b Information Marketer T.J . Rohleder Postcard (back)

















Replace Rational Words With Emotional Words




Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 60




7
The Testing
Marketing is fundamentally persuasion and persuasion happens to be not a
science, but an art.
William Bernbach

After youve written your copy, your next step is to begin split testing. Split testing
means taking two or more marketing ideas and making them compete. Whether you do this at the
very beginning by segmenting your list into smaller pots or after your initial mailing to the entire
list, the importance of testing cannot be ignored.

A/B split testing is the most common form of testing and the most effective, particularly
if you are NOT working with several thousand mailing addresses. Why? Because in most cases
youll need at least 2,000 names in each test group to produce a statistically significant sample
on which to base your decisions.

That means to test just two different marketing approaches, lets say two different
headlines for example, youll need a test group of 4,000 people.

How to Conduct a Split Test

Depending on which response mechanism you use (see Chapter 5), any split testing you
do will need to incorporate some sort of tracking device.

For example, if youre asking prospects to respond by telephone, youll want to provide a
different phone extension for each test group to call so you can determine which postcard
prompted the call.

If, on the other hand, youre asking prospects to respond via a Website, youll want to
provide different forward slash URLs. For example, if youre an airline testing two different
colored postcards you might supply two different Web addresses that read:
www.freedeltamiles.com/gold and www.freedeltamiles/white.

Alternatively, if youre asking the prospect to return the postcard itself to you (either by
mail or by coming into your store), youll want to print key codes on each card. These are simply
multiple-digit tracking numbers that allow you to track everything from different headlines to zip
codes to household incomes and more depending on how you assign the numbers.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 61
What to Test First

The 5 most important areas for testing a new campaign, in this order, are:

1. Audience (list).
2. Offer.
3. Copy.
4. Art.
5. Format.

Audience. How do you test audience? There are dozens of ways but the most useful ones
to start with are demographics, geographics and psychographics.

Demographics refers to things like age, income, marital status, race, etc. Any good list
can be easily segmented according to these characteristics.

Geographics refers to your prospects physical locations. An easy way to test this is by
zip codes or by rural vs. suburban vs. urban.

Psychographics refer to the prospects lifestyle. In other words, their hobbies, restaurant
preferences, favorite vacation spots, etc.

Again, all of these things can be easily segmented and tested with a good mailing list.

Offer. This usually includes testing things like price, whats included in the purchase,
discounts, bonuses, and the deadline. But remember to choose only one per test.

Copy and Art. When testing copy, your time will be best spent testing the headline and
first subhead. The odds that changing one sentence or one subhead in the middle of your
message is going to make a difference are pretty slim.

When testing art, focus on the big elements first.

Format. Test your copy as a postcard, as a sales letter, as an e-mail, etc. Different
formats may have more or less appeal to your specific audience than others and theres no sense
spending hundreds if not thousands of dollars on a sales letter if a postcard will do just as well.

Getting Accurate Results

When it comes to getting accurate results I encourage 95% of all marketers to use an
established and reputable mailing house. Why? Because even though you can figure out the
numbers for yourself, i.e. how many people you need to mail to for a statistically significant
result, or how to randomly select your test lists to avoid unintentional biases, its still a tricky
process.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 62
And if you arent in the habit of doing it, the odds of you making a costly mistake are
very high. Expert mailing houses do this every day, however, and are likely to have access to
information you havent even thought of.

For example, mailing houses know that direct mail is most successful between the
months of J anuary and March and August to December. They know that during the summer and
holidays, consumers and business people are either away on vacations or simply do not exhibit
the same buying habits they do at other times of the year.

Mailing houses can also ensure that your mailings are replicated EXACTLY every time.
They have excellent quality control and can guarantee delivery times, quantities and so on.

If it helps to have an analogy, using a mailing house versus doing it yourself is like taking
your car to the mechanic for a tune-up versus doing it yourself. Yeah, you can probably figure it
out on your own, but is it really worth the time, effort and potential problems youll create?


Postcard Marketing Handbook
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8
Alternatives to Creating Your
Own Postcards

When you think postcard decks think ants. They may be unpleasant-
looking buggers but who cares when they can carry up to 50 times
their weight!

Postcard Decks: Direct Marketing's Secret Weapon

This chapter is dedicated to the puny but powerful postcard deck.

A Surprising Discovery

Years ago, a marketer working as the advertising manager for an industrial manufacturer
was asked to create a full-page advertisement for a new product. "And oh, yes," the manager
added at the end of their meeting, "I'll want to run a postcard, too."

The marketer soon discovered the magazine in which the ad would run, Chemical
Engineering, also published a "card deck"something hed never heard of before.

To put it mildly, the marketer was unenthusiastic about the deck. Who, he wondered,
would really leaf through a stack of postcard advertisementsespecially when the target
audience already received Chemical Engineering magazine?

Shaking his head, he set to work letting his agencys creative powerhouse produce a
brilliant ad. Then, almost as an afterthought, they slapped together the requisite postcard without
much fuss or bother.

The results were shocking. The full-page ad, which cost over $2,500 to produce and more
than $4,000 per insertion, pulled about 100 or so inquiries.

The postcard, however, which cost less than $300 to produce and approximately $1,000
to run, generated more than 500 replies!

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Center for Technical Communication. 2008 64
At this point the marketer got to thinking, "These postcard decks are worth looking into!"
What do you think?

What Exactly Is A Postcard Deck?

Postcard decks are packs of loose postcards, sealed in a paper, poly (clear plastic), or foil
wrapper, and distributed to a mailing list of prospects who will, hopefully, be interested in the
products and services advertised on the cards. (A few publishers mail decks of postcards bound
into booklet form. An example of this is the Executive Mart, published by Hamel Publishing
Company, Inc. But the majority are loose decks.)

And while there are postcard decks with as few as a dozen cards and as many as a
hundred, the average deck probably contains 40 to 60 separate cards.

The typical card, which measures 3 by 53/8 inches, is black and white but larger folded
formats and color cards are available.

The front of the card, or mailing side, usually contains the advertiser's address, business
reply imprint, and permit numberso that when the prospect drops it in the mail, the card will
be returned directly to the advertiser.

The back of the card, or advertising side, generally contains a miniature ad. In this tiny
space, you must fit a headline, some brief copy, and, if appropriate, a visual. You must also leave
a space for the prospect to write in name, address, company, and phone number.

Because the space is so limited, copy must be brief and visuals small. There is no room
for complex diagrams or explanations or a detailed listing of features. You have to quickly state
your offer, highlight a few key benefits, and prod the reader to respond.

Advertising In Postcard Decks

The first step is to locate postcard decks that are right for your offer.

This process is similar to choosing which magazines to advertise in. The difference is that
there are only 600 or so postcard decks that accept outside postcards, against more than 6,000
magazines that accept outside ads. Also, all postcards in a deck are basically the same size and
format, while magazines offer a greater variety of sizes and shapes to choose from. This makes it
a little easier to plan postcard advertising.

In addition, most postcard decks are mailed only 3 times a year. This limited mailing
schedule, combined with the limited number of decks being published, makes it nearly
impossible to rely on postcard decks as your sole method of direct marketing. So, despite the low
cost of postcard decks, it will only be part of your overall effort. You will have to supplement
postcards with other inquiry and sale-generating activities, such as direct mail and print
advertising.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 65
How do you select the right postcard decks? A good place to start is with postcard decks
you receive or know about. Take a look at the postcards in these decks. Do they seem to be
aimed at the market you are trying to reach? Are there postcards advertising products similar to
yours? Also ask your customers which postcard decks they receive.

SRDS (Standard Rate and Data Service) publishes a directory of postcard decks and their
publishers. The listings include the name of the deck, description, price to insert a card,
publication schedule, and contact information. SRDS is available in the reference rooms of larger
libraries, or call (800) 851-7737 or go to www.srds.com for more information.

One alternative to running a postcard in an existing deck is to create your own deck and
mail it to your customers and prospects. J ohn Wiley, a book publisher, regularly mails decks
featuring business and technical books. The Wiley decks feature only Wiley books and Wiley
does not accept outside advertising. If you have many related products and a large mailing list,
creating your own postcard deck may be an option for you. But for most of us, with limited
product lines and budgets, it is more likely that we will run postcards in one or more of the
existing decks.

Choosing A Postcard Deck

First find the postcard decks mailed to people who are likely to be potential prospects for
your product.

If you advertise in a magazine, for example, you might also want to run a postcard in
their card deck. There's a possibility that if people receiving the deck have read your ad in their
magazine, response to your postcard will go up.

Postcards are segmented by markets in one of three different ways:

1. Industry. Many postcard decks are aimed at specific industries, such as chemical
processing, pulp and paper, food processing, pollution control, etc. Most of these are
published by companies that also publish trade journals in these fields.

2. Affinity. A second category is postcard decks aimed at people with similar interests,
such as investors or personal computer users.

3. Geographic. Perhaps the fastest-growing segment of the postcard deck industry is
card packs aimed at businesses within a specific geographic market region, such as
Boston, New York, Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, or Miami.
An example is Business-to-Business, Inc., which publishes a card deck mailed three
times a year to 75,000 prospects in Manhattan.


Calculating Cost-Per-Thousand


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Center for Technical Communication. 2008 66
Once you've found the card decks that reach your industry, you have to determine which
one will give you the biggest bang for your buck. In other words, which card deck reaches the
most prospects for the lowest cost?

One important measure is cost-per-thousand, which is how much it costs to reach one
thousand prospects with your message. The formula is:

Cost of advertising in the card deck x 1,000
Number of people card deck is mailed to

Let's say a publisher with a deck that mails to 32,000 business executives charges
advertisers $1,200 to run a card in the deck. The cost-per-thousand is:

$1,200 x 1,000 =$37.50 per thousand
32,000

Put another way, the cost-per-contact, i.e. the amount of money you have to spend to put
your postcard in the hands of one prospect, is:

$37.50 cost-per-thousand =$0.0375
1,000

The conclusion? Using this particular deck, you can send a postcard mailing to your
prospects for about 4 per person. Thats about ten times less expensive than a regular direct
mail package.

Comparing Results

The cost-per-contact, however, only tells you how much you'll have to spend to reach
people who receive the postcard deck. It does not tell you whether they will read your postcard.
And it does not tell you whether they will respond to your offer.

The real measure, then, is how many leads or sales the deck produces for you and at what
expense. And as you might expect, this varies widely based on several factors including whether
youre running your card in the right deck and the quality of the mailing list receiving the deck.

As with anything else, there are good postcard decks and not-so-good decks. Some will
perform for you. Others won't. Of course, you can't know how well your card will work in a
particular deck until you test it.

Once you do, count up the sales or leads then divide the cost of advertising in the deck by
the volume of orders or leads generated. This gives you cost-per-lead (or cost-per-sale)an
accurate yardstick by which to measure performance of the deck.

Cost of advertising in the deck =cost-per-lead
Number of leads generated

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 67
Cost of advertising in the deck =cost-per-sale
Number of orders received

Total sales generated Cost of advertising = profit.

How many responses will you receive? It depends on whether your product and offer
appeal to most of the people receiving the deck or just a fraction of them. And some decks are
more responsive than others.

"In terms of numbers, your company can expect a statistical response of between 1/4 and
1 percent in returned cards and telephone inquiriesall within a month," states a promotional
brochure for the postcard deck published by Business-to-Business Inc. To their credit, these
figures are fairly typical of the industry.

Once you know which postcard decks generate the most leads or sales per dollar,
postcard success becomes a matter of refining and testing different headlines, visuals, and
layouts to come up with the postcard that will pull the most response for you every time you run
it.

Note that many postcard decks allow "split testing," which means they will mail two
versions of your card (or two different cards) to each half of their mailing list. This provides an
easy, inexpensive means of testing card A versus card B.

Items you might consider testing include price, headline, offer (free gift versus no free
gift), benefit headline versus free-booklet headline, one-color versus two-color cards, one-color
versus four-color, visual versus no visual, or format (number of panels, address block on front of
card versus on back of card).

How People Read Decks

Prospects read postcard decks the same way you read them: quickly.

So when youre contemplating the creation of your postcards, keep this exercise of Bobs
in mind. He pictures his prospects flipping through the deck with a wastebasket positioned
between their knees.

As quickly as they can, they go through the deck, pitching cards into the trash. After all,
theyre busy with plenty of other things to get to. At best, they view reading postcard decks as a
necessary evilsomething they would avoid altogether except for the fact that they occasionally
find an interesting or helpful offer or two buried in with the rest of the cards.

So just how much time do you actually have to get their attention? Well, one study
estimates that the average prospect spends 1 minute going through the entire deck
approximately 1 second per card. Others say readers spend up to 3 seconds scanning each card.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 68
The point is that your card is glanced at, not studied in detail. J ust as a highway billboard
has only five seconds to gain attention and deliver a message before drivers speed by it, a
postcard has but a few seconds to catch the reader's eye and say, "Hey, stop a minute. Here's
something worth paying attention to."

The studies also show that people do not stop and read cards of interest. Rather, they pick
out those cards that get their attention and set them aside for later reading.

"I hypothesize that card scanners do not fully read the cards of interest as they scan but
put them aside for later scrutiny," says Wayne Hepburn, a writer and consultant specializing in
card deck advertising, writing in Direct Marketing. "There is a subtle self-induced pressure to go
through the entire pack and react to each card before getting serious about any of them. This is
the opposite of magazine reading."

The most important factor in getting attention as people scan cards is a headline that leaps
off the card and grabs the reader. A good visual can also help, especially if it is a picture of
something the reader can identify with. Body copy is less important, although some is needed to
provide supporting evidence for those readers who like to know a little more about a product
before responding. And you need to use a portion of the card as a coupon in which the reader can
fill in name, address, and phone.

Since the headline is the most crucial element, let's take a closer look at some successful
postcard deck headlines.

Research shows the average American is exposed to
more than 32,538 marketing messages per day either
by TV, radio, newspaper, mail, billboards or any
other means. And, as a result, you usually have no
more than 3-7 seconds to get their attention.

How To Write A Postcard Deck Headline

Unlike an advertisement, which seeks to build image or awareness over an extended
period of time, the postcard headline's main mission is to grab attention so the reader pauses long
enough to decide to remove the card from the deck for immediate response or later consideration.

There are a number of different approaches you can take when writing postcard
headlines.

Free offer. The word "FREE" is pure magic in postcard headlines. I'm sure there are a
large number of people who are attracted to postcard decks because of the numerous free offers.
(I'm one of them! I love to get things for free.)


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Center for Technical Communication. 2008 69
If you give away a free gift, a free product sample, or a free booklet, stress the free offer,
not the product itself, in your headline and body copy. Show a picture of the free sample, gift, or
bookletnot the product. Sell your offer, not the product.

Here are some of the best examples of successful free-offer headlines Bob has come
across in his work with postcard decks. (Please note: We say "successful" because most of these
cards have run repeatedly in card decks. We assume the advertisers would not continue to run the
cards unless they were pulling well.)

FREE ISSUE OFFER (Fact magazine)

FREE ISSUE (Computer Shopper magazine)

WRITE FOR FREE BOOK: (Murlas Commodities)
"HOW THEY WIN AT
COMMODITIES"

FREE CATALOG SUBSCRIPTION (Cabela's)

SEND FOR YOUR FREE REPORT: (Murlas)
"HOW TO PROFIT IN PRECIOUS
METALS"

AMAZING FREE OFFER: (SMI International)
THINK & GROW RICH

FREE PENNY STOCK MARKET (Stuart J ames Company)
REPORT

Benefit headline. Another powerful technique is to state the key benefit of your product
in a crisp, to-the-point headline. This benefit can be a low price, cost savings, wealth-building
opportunity, productivity accelerator, or the ability to do something you couldn't do without the
product.

Granted, advertising writers sometimes write vague or coy headlines in order to arouse
curiosity. Then they explain the payoff in the body copy.

Unfortunately, you don't have this luxury with postcards because body copy is limited to
a few well-chosen sentences. When writing a postcard headline, make your headline as direct, as
specific, and as clear as possible. Try to tell the whole story in the headline. Leave nothing to the
imagination.

Here are some postcard headlines that do an admirable job of getting right to the heart of
the key product benefit.

UP To 75% DISCOUNT ON (Charles Schwab)

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 70
COMMISSIONS WHEN YOU
TRADE WITH CHARLES
SCHWAB

35mm PRINTS AND SLIDES (Seattle FilmWorks)
FROM THE SAME ROLL

YOUR INVESTMENT CAN GROW (Federal Mailers)
FROM $7,500 to $20,000

REDUCE PAYROLL UP TO 8% (Coastal Data Products)
WITH THE SMART CLOCK

HOW TO SAVE MONEY ON OFFICE (Quill)
SUPPLIES

AVIS WANTS YOU TO SAVE TIME (Avis)
AND MONEY

HINT* Don't worry about whether your headline is similar in content and style to
another card in the deck. People do not sit and comparison shop between one postcard and
another. Instead, they respond to any card in the deck that has a headline and offer that appeals to
them. If your main benefit is saving time and money, stress time and money savings in your
headline. If you offer a free booklet, say "free booklet" in the headline and so on.


Question. A proven response-getter in print advertising and direct mail is to ask a
provocative question in the headline.

You don't see this technique applied much in postcards, but I suspect it would work well.

The key is to ask a question that promises a benefit, a reward for reading the postcard, or
arouses curiosity on the part of the reader.

Some examples:

HOW LONG MUST YOU KEEP (Destroyit Paper Shredders)
IMPORTANT PAPERS?

HOW MANY SLIDES DO YOU (Multiplex Display Fixture Co.)
KEEP? HUNDREDS?
THOUSANDS?
APPLYING ADDRESS LABELS BY (Heyer, Inc. labeling machine)
HAND?

MOVING YOUR OFFICES? (Relocation Management Systems)

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 71
DO YOU USE FEDERAL EXPRESS? (Citipostal)

PRINTING CRISIS? WE CAN HELP! (Penn Copy Center)

Command headline. A classic example of a command headline is Exxon's famous
slogan, "Put a Tiger in Your Tank."

Command headlines generate action by literally telling the reader what to do. Another
example from a recent print ad: "Buy Scott Towels."

This type of headline is a logical choice for postcards, because our main job is to tell (or
rather persuade) the reader to mail our card back to us.

Here are some examples of command headlines used in recent postcards:

PROTECT YOUR COMPANY'S (Seton Name Plate Corporation)
VALUABLE ASSETS

DEVELOP A WINNING BUSINESS (American Management
PLAN WITH THIS EASY-TO- Association)
FOLLOW GUIDE

DISCOVER THE EXCITING WORLD (Hoke Communications)
OF DIRECT MARKETING

LEARN TO THINK AND (SMI International)
GROW RICH

BE A PRINTERWITHOUT (Norco Printing Corp.)
A PRESS

INCREASE VALUABLE STORAGE (Office Efficiency Systems, Inc.)
CAPACITY

DISCOVER THE POTENTIAL OF (OTC Stock J ournal)
OVER-THE-COUNTER
INVESTING

EARN INSURED TAX-FREE (Clayton Brown & Associates)
INCOME

News headline. Postcard decks bring people news of new products, new ideas, and new
ways to save time and money. As with other forms of direct response, postcards are especially
successful when offering products or information readers believe they cannot get elsewhere.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 72
If your product or idea is new, stress the news aspect in your headline. You can do this by
using such words as new, discover, announcing, now, it's here, at last, and just arrived.

Here are some postcard headlines containing news:

ANNOUNCING A BREAKTHROUGH (Best Power Technology)
IN COMPUTER POWER
PROTECTION

OPTICAL SCANNING: THE (Skan Technologies, Inc.)
FUTURE IS HERE TODAY!

DISCOVER NEW WAYS TO (Methods Research Corp.)
SCHEDULE PERSONNEL

NEW OLYMPUS FLEXIBLE (Olympus Corporation)
FIBERSCOPES

NEWANTI-SLIP PVC (Tepromark International)
DUCKBOARD

NEW! MURPHY'S LAW SLIDES, (Visual Horizons)
POSTERS, OVERHEADS

Mail-order headlines. When going after sales rather than leads, many advertisers state
the offer directly in the headline. This includes the name of the product, the price, the discount
being offered, and, if space allows, a statement summarizing the key product benefit. In selling
directly from a postcard, it pays to be direct. Here, subtlety is the enemy of sales. Some
examples:

1000 FULL COLOR BUSINESS (Southern Color Corp.)
CARDS ONLY $53.50

80 FROSTED WRITE-ON SLIDES (Visual Horizons)
SAVE $4.00 Off List $8.00/BOX
PLAN YOUR SLIDE SHOWS
Easy to Write-on and Type-on!

RECHARGEABLE AEROSOL SPRAY (Abbeon Cal, Inc.)
CAN!
$29.95 each
Includes at no extra charge 5 nozzles
Save 50% on ESQUIRE and get (Esquire magazine)
this important bookA MAN'S
BODYFREE!


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 73
16-CENT CUSTOM TOTE BAGS. (Art Poly Bags)
FAST DELIVERY. LOW
QUANTITIES. For trade shows,
meetings, promotion, retail-
any occasion

IMPRINTED GOLF TEES & BALL (Highlander Company)
MARKERS
2Ys" WOOD GOLF TEES
500-$22.50

Headlines to avoid. Avoid headlines that are generalizations, vague, boastful, or
involve broad claims or word-play. Ineffective in ordinary print ads, these say-nothing headlines
can dramatically suppress response in a postcard deck. Some examples from actual postcards:

Headline Comment
A NEW BREED OF
FLEXIBILITY
Says nothing: could apply to virtually any
product.

ARKANSAS. WHERE AUTUMN IS
THE BEST BARGAIN YOU
NEVER BROUGHT.
I call this one, "What did he say?" Unclear
and confusing.

THE MOSTEST FOR THE
LEASTEST.
This from a major business manufacturer
selling a costly Facsimile machine. Says
nothing!

COPIER UPTIME. IT'S PART
TECHNOLOGY, PART PEOPLE,
AND ALL KODAK!
Appropriate for a corporate Brochure or image
campaign (maybe), but not for a response-
getting postcard. Where's the hook?

GAIN UNIVERSAL ACCEPTANCE. This postcard offered a Microfilm/microfiche
reader/Copier. But the headline could
just as easily apply to a Dale Carnegie course
on how to be popular.

SMALL IN THE OFFICE, BIG ON
THE J OB.
For a card offering details on a
copier. A better headline
might read. "MINI-DESKTOP
THAT TURNS OUT 11 COPIES
A MINUTE!"

The 6 Secrets To Writing Effective Postcard Deck Copy

Keep it short. You don't have much room on a 3-1/2 by 5-3/8-inch postcard panel.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 74
Copy must be brief and to the point. Maximum length is approximately one hundred to 150 words.

Don't use an overly verbose or descriptive style. Write in terse, almost clipped prose.
Make sure each sentence gives the reader a new piece of information; you don't have room to
repeat yourself. Avoid transitional phrases, warm-up paragraphs, and other stylistic habits that
waste words.

Design your copy. Do a rough layout showing how your copy should be positioned on
the card.

Don't just write copy in ordinary paragraph format. Use headlines, subheads, captions,
bullets, bursts, arrows, underlining, boldface type, and graphic devices to highlight various
components of your copy.

The promise of the headline should be fulfilled in the body copyimmediately.
Your first few sentences should immediately explain, elaborate on, and support the promise
made in the headline.

Here's an example from a postcard selling a $69.95 book, Tests for Hiring Office
Personnel:

HIRING THE WRONG PERSON
CAN BE A VERY EXPENSIVE MISTAKE!

Now you can avoid it with The Complete Portfolio of Tests for Hiring Office Personnel. Be sure
the person you hire has the right skills for the job.

Don't guess anymore! Use these scientifically designed tests to:

Differentiate between similar candidates.
Identify a person's strengths and weaknesses.
Predict success or failure on the job.
Make a more objective hiring decision.
Know you hired the right person for the job


Nine times out of 10, your audience couldnt care
less how the watch works. They just want you to
guarantee that it does!


Stress benefits, not features. Highlight the benefits of what you are selling. For
example, if you are selling a machine that folds papers into booklets, don't say, "Stainless steel
hopper, 10 inches wide." Say, "Makes up to 600 booklets per hour."


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 75
Of course, if you are after a direct sale instead of a lead, you have to give a description of
exactly what the reader is getting for his money. But these features should be secondary to a
discussion of the benefits of your product or offer.

If you are selling a simple product the reader is already familiar with, such as office
supplies, stress the benefits of your offer rather than the product itself. Talk about your low price,
volume discount, free catalog, or fast shipment.

Postcards are inadequate for explaining complex products and concepts. If the reader
needs a basic education in your product before he can make a buying decision, postcards may not
work well for you. Of course, you can write a booklet or report presenting the background
information, then offer it free through a postcard.

Include a fill-in blank. As if the postcard's advertising side wasn't small enough,
between a quarter and a third of that area is taken up by a name-and-address block where the
prospects fill in their name and address, answer any questions you've asked, and might also
check off a box to indicate their area or level of interest.

In addition to bringing back an inquiry or order, the name-and-address block can also be
used to ask questions for market research purposes or to pre-qualify prospects. For instance, a
card offering free information on computer security might ask the prospects how many
computers they have or how many people have access to their system.

If you use your card for survey purposes or to screen leads, ask only one or two questions
and keep it simple. Don't ask too many questions or you'll discourage readers from responding.

Some advertisers free up this space for more copy by putting the name-and-address block
on the front of the card (the business reply side). This is something you may want to test.

Its probably best though if the name-and-address block is integrated with the headline,
visual, and copy on the selling side, just as it is in the reply card or order form included in a
regular direct-mail package. The name-and-address block is more than just a means of capturing
orders or requests for information; it is a visual device that says, "Hey, I'm a response card. Fill
in your name here and then drop me in the mail!"

Without this name-and-address block, the card doesn't look like a response deviceand
that may hurt results. Remember, the reader only glances at the advertising side of the card for a
second or two before trashing it or putting it aside for later consideration. Almost no one turns
cards over to look at the mailing side because they know it merely contains a standard business
reply mail imprint.


Include instructions. Even though it may seem obvious, don't assume the reader knows
what to do with your card. Include instructions on what to do next. Copy should tell the reader,
"For more information, fill out the space below and mail this card today." A card that doesn't ask
for the order just sits flat in the pack. Tell the reader what to do.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 76
Visuals

Because you need room for headline, copy, and name-and-address block, the space for
your visual is extremely limited: usually no more than 2-1/2 inches wide by 1-1/2 inches high.

Most postcards are illustrated with either a picture of the product or, if you are offering
free information, a picture of the front cover of your free booklet, catalog, or brochure.

Take a look at some postcard decks. The quality of photo reproduction may not match a
glossy magazine or annual report, but it's much sharper than a newspaper. So it pays to use good-
quality photographs in your card.

Diagrams, charts, graphs, schematics, and other complex visuals do not work well in
postcard decks. The reason is that the original must be reduced in size to fit the space, rendering
fine detail unreadable.

If you are advertising a cassette program or book, and the author is well known to people
in the field, you might increase response by showing a photo of the author in addition to the
cover of the book or cassette album.

Although some advertisers are successful with postcards that are all-copy, I recommend
you include a visual. The picture gives the postcard the graphic appeal needed to catch the
reader's eye as he rapidly flips through the card deck.

Product photos already taken for slide presentations, print advertisement, or press
releases are usually ideal for card-deck advertising. Many advertisers routinely create postcard
versions of all of their product ads using the same visual plus an abbreviated version of the ad
headline and copy.



Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 77




9
Hiring Out Your Postcard
Copywriting Services

Now that you know how to write a postcard, the next question is how does this help you
become a successful copywriter? Especially when the going rates for postcards arent as high as
those for sales letters or a full-fledged marketing campaign.

First of all, some clients are going to ask for postcards and if you want to be their go-to
copywriter, you need to be prepared to deliver them.

Second, unless youre extremely well-known, youll probably get a number of clients
who want to test the waters with you before committing to a large-scale project. Postcards are a
great way to do that because you can earn a fair fee while proving your copy can do what youve
promised.

Third, if your postcard performs well, thats a HUGE incentive for your client to give you
even more work including those pricey multi-step marketing campaigns.

Fourth, if your prospect is on a very limited budget, you can offer postcards as an
alternative to a larger writing package. So instead of caving in to a prospect and offering a
discount on a larger project, you can recommend a reasonable and effective alternative that
allows you to collect your full fee without depressing your value as a copywriter. Lets face it,
the minute you discount your fees is the minute your prospect assumes you werent really worth
that price anyway.

Fifth, suggesting your client use a postcard when it will work just as well, if not better,
than a more expensive option will earn you her respect and loyalty. Not only will she appreciate
the fact that you did a good job, but that you were looking out for her best interests and not just
your bottom line.

Sixth, most copywriters do NOT know how to create effective postcards and do not
actively chase this work. That gives you lots of wiggle room in a good-sized niche.

And last, postcards work. They are an extremely effective marketing tool when used
properly so why not add them to your arsenal for a successful campaign?


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 78
How Much Should You Charge For Your Services?

One of the toughest questions beginning and experienced copywriters wrestle with is:
How much should I charge?

And depending on your level of expertise and experience the answer to that question will
vary, but for purposes of illustration Ive included my fee schedule below.

Standard Size Postcard (4.25 x 6 inches) $750 to $1,200
Over-sized Postcard (6 x 9 inches) $1,000 to $1,750
Double Postcard $2,000 to $2,500
Postcard Deck Postcard $1,000

How Should You Charge For Your Services?

When it comes to postcards I charge a 50% deposit then the remaining 50% at
completion. On much larger projects, i.e. several thousand dollars worth, Im often willing to
accept payment in thirds, but I dont recommend this for fairly low-budget items like postcards.

Note: If your prospect cant afford the 50/50 plan on a postcard, odds are they cant
afford to pay you period. Better to discover that upfront than after youve done the work.

What Does a Good Contract Look Like?

You have a couple of options when it comes to contractssimple or complicated. I
personally prefer simple and have reprinted a sample contract below. Note that I make a special
point of reiterating the clients pain as well as my solution to that pain. You dont want them
hanging up the phone then forgetting just why you sounded so good in the first place after they
receive your quote.

Figure 9.1 Sample Copywriting Contract

The Write Solution, LLC
7734 Lemoyne Lane
Springfield, VA 22153
Tel: (757) 271-6782
Fax: (757) 299-8355


November 16, 2007

Dear [ FI RST NAME] ,

As pr omi sed, t hi s i s a f or mal est i mat e f or pr of essi onal
copywr i t i ng ser vi ces.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 79
Current Situation
[ Descr i pt i on of t he pr ospect s exi st i ng busi ness and mar ket i ng
si t uat i on f or whi ch your ser vi ces ar e bei ng r equest ed. ]

Current Challenges
[ Numer i cal l i st of 3 t o 7 di l emmas t he cl i ent s cur r ent
mar ket i ng si t uat i on, or l ack t her eof , i s causi ng. Exampl es mi ght
i ncl ude poor r esponse r at es on mar ket i ng pi eces, l ow conver si on
r at es, t he owner s need f or someone t o meet a qui ck deadl i ne,
t he owner s need t o st op wor ki ng i n hi s busi ness and st ar t
wor ki ng on i t by handi ng of f t he copywr i t i ng, et c. ]

Target Audience
Pr i mar y: [ Descr i be]
Char act er i st i cs:
[ I ncl ude any demogr aphi c and/ or psychogr aphi c dat a you
have i n a l i st f or mat her e]

Project Goals
The pr i mar y obj ect i ves ar e t o compel r eader s t o:

[ Li st t he pr i mar y obj ect i ves her e such as i ncr easi ng r esponse
r at es, i ncr easi ng t r af f i c t o a Websi t e, r edeemi ng coupons,
et c. ]

Recommended Copywriting Elements to Employ
Bel ow i s a partial l i st of r ecommended per suasi ve devi ces f or
t he var i ous mar ket i ng pi eces when and wher e t hey appl y.

General
1. [ Cr eat e a st andar d l i st of t he var i ous copywr i t i ng
devi ces/ el ement s/ t act i cs et c. you wi l l empl oy t o get t he
r esul t s you pr omi se. You wi l l pr obabl y cover most of t hese
i n your i ni t i al phone conver sat i on, but I l i ke t o
r ei t er at e i t so t he pr ospect doesn t f or get why I mt hei r
best choi ce. ]

Pricing
The f ol l owi ng ser vi ces ar e i ncl uded i n t he pr i ce l i st ed bel ow:
Suppl y quest i onnai r e f or pr el i mi nar y r evi ew pr i or t o
t el ephone i nt er vi ew.
One 45- mi nut e t el ephone i nt er vi ew t o gat her addi t i onal
r el evant i nf or mat i on.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 80
Revi ew and become f ami l i ar wi t h pr evi ous mar ket i ng
mat er i al s and success r at es.
Resear ch your compet i t i on.
Wr i t e and del i ver [ descr i be pr oj ect her e] .

For t hese pr of essi onal wr i t i ng ser vi ces, I woul d l i ke t o pr esent
my est i mat e of [ i nser t pr i ce her e] .

Est i mat es ar e good f or 30 days af t er t hi s dat e[ i nser t dat e
her e] .

Fee Schedule
1/ 2 due at pr oj ect i ni t i at i on
1/ 2 due upon compl et i on

Any addi t i onal r equest s f or ser vi ces, or addendums t o t he
subsequent l y appr oved pr oj ect wi l l be bi l l ed separ at el y. Shoul d
you choose t o t er mi nat e any appr oved pr oj ect at any t i me and f or
any r eason, as t he wr i t er , I wi l l be ent i t l ed t o f ul l payment
f or al l t i me i nvest ed t o t hat poi nt . Si gni ng t hi s l et t er of
agr eement wi l l be consi der ed accept ance of t hese t er ms.

Deadline
[ I nser t deadl i ne( s) her e] .

Accust omed t o deadl i nes and get t i ng i t r i ght t he f i r st t i me, I
f eel conf i dent t hat I can meet your needs f or on- t ar get , on-
t i me, on- budget wor k.

I l ook f or war d t o t he possi bi l i t y of wor ki ng wi t h you soon.

Si ncer el y,
Li na L. Penal osa


Pl ease si gn bel ow and f ax t o ( 757) 299- 8355. Payment may be
mai l ed t o:
7734 LeMoyne Lane, Springfield, VA 22153


Si gnat ur e Dat e





Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 81




About the Authors

Lina Penalosa, owner of The Write Solution LLC, is a marketing
consultant, expert copywriter and professional speaker who works with
clients like:

Direct Marketer, Alex Mandossian
Motivational Speaker, Lee Milteer
American Red Cross
United Way
Resource Mortgage
Automated Marketing Solutions
GEMS Insider Circle
Elder Law Attorneys, Inc.
Mile High Karate
Dr. Charles Martin
Dr. Ernesto Fernandez
And others

Lina has also recently launched a new coaching program for small and medium-sized
businesses teaching effective marketing and copywriting tactics, techniques and strategies that
gets results.

Her specialties include the art of the soft-sell, teaching others to write results-generating
copy with integrity and purpose, and marketing to women. For more information on Lina
Penalosa and her services or coaching program, please visit www.mycopywritingplaybook.com.

She can be reached at:
Lina Penalosa
7734 Lemoyne Lane
Springfield, VA 22153
Phone: 757-271-6782
Fax: 757-299-8355
E-mail: lina@thewritesolutionllc.com
Web: www.mycopywritingplaybook.com

Bob Bly is a freelance copywriter with more than 25 years of
experience in business-to-business and direct marketing. McGraw-Hill
calls Bob Bly Americas top copywriter. Clients include IBM, the
Conference Board, PSE&G, AT&T, Ott-Lite Technology, Intuit,

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 82
ExecuNet, Boardoom, Medical Economics, Grumman, RCA, ITT Fluid Technology, and
Praxair.

Bob has given presentations to numerous organizations including: National Speakers
Association, American Seminar Leaders Association, American Society for Training and
Development, U.S. Army, American Society of J ournalists and Authors, Society for Technical
Communications, Discover Card, Learning Annex, and New York University School of
Continuing Education.

He is the author of 70 books including Selling Your Services (Henry Holt; over 50,000
sold) and The Elements of Business Writing (Alyn & Bacon; over 100,000 copies sold). Bobs
articles have appeared in Cosmopolitan, Writers Digest, Successful Meetings, Amtrak Express,
Direct, and many other publications.

Bob writes monthly columns for Early to Rise (circulation 400,000) and DM News
(circulation 50,000). The Direct Response Letter, Bobs monthly e-newsletter, has 50,000
subscribers who, as a group, spend approximately $5,000 a week buying Bobs books, tapes, and
other information products.

Awards include a Gold Echo from the Direct Marketing Association, an IMMY from the
Information Industry Association, two Southstar Awards, an American Corporate Identity Award
of Excellence, and the Standard of Excellence award from the Web Marketing Association. He is
a member of the Specialized Information Publishers Association (SIPA) and the American
Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

He can be reached at:
Bob Bly
22 E. Quackenbush Avenue
Dumont, NJ 07628
Phone 201-385-1220
Fax 201-385-1138
E-mail: rwbly@bly.com
Web: www.bly.com







Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 83


Appendix:
Sources and Resources

Online Printers & Postcard Printing Prices

*Postcard specs for all pricing provided below are as follows:

Amount: 5,000
Size: 4 x 6 inches
Color: Black and white or full color both sides (the prices are the same)
Paper: 100 pound, glossy on 2 sides

**Note, the postcard specs are the same for each site, but different sites offer different additional
services such as addressing, mailing list services, templates and more.

Website Price

www.discountedprinting.com $99.99

www.gotprint.net $106.00

www.fastpostcards.com $147.00

www.printplace.com $176.50

www.colorprintingcentral.com $225.00

Clip Art
www.clipart.com
Cartoons
The Cartoon Bank
A division of New Yorker Magazine
Cartoon Editor: Bob Mankoff
New York, NY
(212) 286-5400
e-mail: toon@cartoonbank.com

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 84
Website: www.cartoonbank.com

Ted Goff
PO Box 22679
Kansas City, MO 64113
e-mail: tgoff@tedgoff.com
Website: www.tedgoff.com
(816) 822-7370

Katrien Van Den Broecke
Managing Director
telephone: +32-2-646-47-62
fax: +32-2-534-53-67
katrien.van.den.broecke@cartoonbase.com
http://www.cartoonbase.com

Dan Rosandich
www.danscartoons.com

Andrew Grossman
CARTOON RESOURCE
757-220-3076
www.cartoonresource.com

Mark Anderson
1616 Kingston Lane
Schaumburg, IL, 60193
847-534-6442
Fax: 847-620-2509
www.andertoons.com

Patrick Seaton
Phone: 1-800-897-8666 x181
Patrick@cartoonbank.com
www.cartoonbank.com/pro

Stock Photography
www.istockphoto.com

J oel Feih Foto Search Stock Photography
joel.feih@fotosearch.com
www.fotosearch.com
21155 Watertown Road

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 85
Waukesha, WI 53186 USA
262-717-0740/800-827-3920

Stock Illustration
Stock Illustration Source
16 W. 18th Street
New York, NY 10011
(212) 691-6400
Website: www.sisstock.com

Freelance Placement Agencies
These companies match freelance commercial writers with potential clients who may need their
services. Fee arrangements vary.

Copywriter's Council of America
7 Putter Lane
Middle Island, NY 11953
(631) 924-8555

Creative Freelancers
99 Park Avenue, Suite 210A
New York, NY 10016
(888) 398-9540
www.freelancers.com

Direct Marketers On Call
45 Christopher Street
New York, NY 10014
(212) 691-1942
www.dmoc-inc.com

Paladin Staffing Solutions
South Dearborn Street, #305
Chicago, IL 60603
(888) 725-2346
www.paladinstaff.com

Staffwriters Plus
2150 J oshuas Path, #102
Hauppauge, NY 11787
(631) 582-8828


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 86
Associations, Clubs, Organizations

American Medical Writers Association
160 Fifth Avenue, Suite 625
New York, NY 10010
(212) 645-2368
American Writer's Institute
245 N.E. 4
th
Avenue, #102
Delray Beach, FL 33483
(561) 278-5789
www.awaionline.com

Direct Marketing Association, Inc.
1120 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10036-6700
(212) 768-7277
Direct Marketing Club of New York
224 Seventh Street
Garden City, NY 11530
(516) 746-6700
Education Writers Association
2122 P Street NW, #201
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 452-9830
www.ewa.org

Florida Freelance Writers Association
CNW Publishing, Editing & Promotion, Inc.
PO Box A
North Stratford, NH 03590
(603) 922-8338

International Association of Business Communicators (IABC)
One Hallidie Plaza, Suite 600
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 544-4700
www.iabc.com

National Association of Science Writers
PO Box 890
Hedgesville, WV 25427
(304) 754-5077
http://nasw.org

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 87
National Mail Order Association
2807 Polk St. NE
Minneapolis MN 55418-2954
(612) 788-1673
www.nmoa.org

National Writer's Union
113 University Place, 6
th
floor
New York, NY 10003
(212) 254-0279
www.nwu.org

Outdoor Writers Association of America, Inc.
121 Hickory Street, #1
Missoula, MT 59801
(800) 692-2477

Society for Technical Communication
901 N. Stuart St., Suite 904
Arlington, VA 22203
(703) 522-4114
www.stc.org

Self-Employed Writer's and Artist's Network (SWAN)
P.O. Box 175
Towaco, NJ 07082

Society of American Travel Writers
1500 Sunday Drive, #102
Raleigh, NC 27607
(919) 861-5586

Mailing Lists

Creative Access
3701 N. Ravenswood Ave., #207
Chicago, Illinois 60613
(312) 440-1140

Edith Roman Associates
One Blue Hill Plaza, 16
th
floor
Pearl River, NY 10956
(800) 223-2194
www.edithroman.com


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 88
Software

Act
1505 Pavilion Place
Norcross, GA 30093
(770) 724-4000
www.act.com

Scriptor Professional Script Formatting Software
138 N. Brand Blvd., #201
Glendale, CA 91203
(818) 843-6557
www.screenplay.com

Telemagic
(800) 835-MAGIC
www.telemagic.com

PowerPoint
(800) 426-9400
www.microsoft.com/office

Word for Windows
(800) 426-9400
www.microsoft.com

Books
Bly, Robert. The Copywriter's Handbook: A Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Copy That Sells,
Third Edition. New York, NY: Henry Holt, 2006. How to write effective copy.

Bowerman, Peter. The Well-Fed Writer. Atlanta, GA, Fanove Publishing, August 2000.
Marketing and self-promotion for freelance commercial writers.

Boyd, Amanda. Writers Digest Handbook of Making Money Freelance Writing. Cincinnati, OH:
Writers Digest Books, 1997. Collection of useful articles on the commercial aspects of freelance
writing.

Cates, Bill. Unlimited Referrals. Wheaton, MD., Thunder Hill Press, 1996. How to get lots of
referral leads.

Collins, Mary Claire. How to Make Money Writing Corporate Communications. New York, NY:
Perigree, 1995. How to freelance for large corporations.


Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 89
Davis, Paul D. How to Make $50,000 or More a Year as a Freelance Business Writer. Rocklin,
CA: Prima Publishing, 1992. Good advice on starting and running a freelance commercial
writing business.

Floyd, Elaine. Make Money Writing Newsletters. St. Louis, MO: Newsletter Resources, 1994.
How to make money writing and producing promotional newsletters for corporations, small
businesses, and nonprofits.

Flynn, Nancy. The $100,000 Writer: How to Make a Six-Figure Income as a Freelance Business
Writer. Holbrook, MA: Adams Media, 2000. Shows how to earn $100,000 a year as an editorial
services consultant.

Foote, Cameron. The Creative Side of Business. New York, NY: William Morrow, 1996.
Comprehensive and informative guide to the business of freelancing for corporations and ad
agencies.

Holtz, Herman. How to Start and Run a Writing and Editing Business. New York, NY: J ohn
Wiley & Sons, 1992. How to make money doing freelance editing and writing for corporations,
nonprofits, individuals, and the government.

Kopelman, Alexander. National Writers Union Guide to Freelance Rates & Standard Practice.
New York, NY: National Writers Union, 1995. Somewhat dated guideline to rates.

Shaw, Eva. Ghostwriting: How to Get Into the Business. New York, NY: Paragon House, 1991.
How to ghostwrite books for executives, companies, celebrities, and other clients.

Slaunwhite, Steve. How to Start and Run a Successful Copywriting Business. North Vancouver,
British Columbia: Self-Counsel Press, 2001. Excellent guide to getting started as a freelance
copywriter.

Sorenson, George. Writing for the Corporate Market: How to Make Big Money Freelancing for
Business. Denver, CO: Mid-List Press, 1990. A successful writer who works in the business
market tells how you can follow in his footsteps.

Periodicals

Advertising Age
740 North Rush Street
Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 649-5200

Adweek
49 East 21st Street
New York, NY 10010
(212) 529-5500

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 90
B-to-B
740 North Rush Street
Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 649-5260

Commerce Business Daily
Government Printing Office
Washington, DC 20401
(202) 512-0132

Creative Business
275 Newbury Street
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 424-1368

Direct Marketing
Hoke Communications
224 Seventh Street
Garden City, NY 11530
(516) 746-6700

DM News
19 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10010
(212) 741-2095

Freelance Success
801 Northeast 70th Street
Miami, FL 33138
(305) 757-8857

New Writer's Magazine
Sarasota Bay Publishing
P.O. Box 5976
Sarasota, FL 34277-5976
(813) 953-7903

Public Relations J ournal
33 Irving Place
New York, NY 10003
(212) 998-2230

Sales and Marketing Management
633 Third Avenue
New York, NY 10017
(212) 986-4800

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 91
Target Marketing
North American Publishing Co.
401 North Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19108
(215) 238-5300

Writer's Digest
1507 Dana Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45207
(513) 531-2690

Writer's J ournal
27 Empire Drive
St. Paul, MN 55103
(612) 486-7818

E-Zines

Bencivengas Bullets
www.bencivengabullets.com
Master copywriter Gary Bencivengas cant-miss e-newsletter based on his decades of tested
results.

Early to Rise
www.earlytorise.com
Daily e-newsletter on business success, wealth, and health by marketing guru Michael
Masterson.

Excess Voice
www.nickusborne.com/excess_voice.htm
Nick Usbornes e-newsletter on online copywriting. Informative and great fun.

Marketing Minute
www.yudkin.com/markmin.htm
Weekly marketing tip from consultant Marcia Yudkin.

Paul Hartunians Million-Dollar Publicity Strategies
www.prprofits.com
Great marketing e-newsletter focusing on publicity.

The Copywriters Roundtable
www.jackforde.com
J ohn Fordes superb e-newsletter on copywriting.

The Direct Response Letter
www.bly.com

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 92
My monthly e-newsletter on copywriting and direct marketing.

The Success Margin
Ted Nicholass must-read marketing e-zine.
www.tednicholas.com

The Well-Fed Writer
Peter Bowermans e-zine on succeeding as a freelance commercial writer.
www.wellfedwriter.com

Websites

www.awaionline.com
Home study courses and conferences on copywriting.

www.monthlycopywritinggenius.com
Monthly Copywriting Genius
Regular reviews of winning promotions and interviews with the copywriters who wrote them.

www.smallbusinessadvocate.com
The Small Business Advocate
Radio show and Website dedicated to small business.

www.theadvertisingshow.com
"The Advertising Show" (radio show on advertising).

www.agora-inc.com/reports/700SCBMO/W700D643/
Mailbox Millionaire
Home-study course on how to start and run a profitable direct response business.

Directories

Bacon's Publicity Checklist
332 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60604
(800) 621-0561
Media lists for mailing press releases.
Directory of Major Mailers
North American Publishing Co.
401 North Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19108
(215) 238-5300
Good prospecting directory for direct-mail writers.

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 93
Encyclopedia of Associations
Gale Research
Book Tower
Detroit, MI 48226
(313) 961-2242
Good prospecting directory for writers who want to do work for associations.
Interactive Multimedia Sourcebook
R. R. Bowker
121 Chanlon Road
New Providence, NJ 07974
(908) 464-6800
Good prospecting directory for writers who want to do CD-ROMs, Websites, and other
interactive multimedia projects.
NJ Source
Calsun, Inc.
P.O. Box 327
Ramsey, NJ 07446
(201) 236-9099
Lists New J ersey ad agencies, printers, and other suppliers.
O'Dwyer's Directory of Corporate Communications
J . R. O'Dwyer & Co., Inc.
271 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016
(212) 679-2471
Prospecting directory listing communications directors at large corporations and associations.
O'Dwyer's Directory of Public Relations Firms
J . R. O'Dwyer & Co., Inc.
271 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016
(212) 679-2471
Prospecting directory of public relations firms.
Philadelphia Creative Directory
153 J ames Mill Road
Elverson, PA 19520
(610) 286-7990
Lists Philadelphia-area ad agencies, printers, and other suppliers.
Standard Directory of Advertisers
R. R. Bowker
121 Chanlon Road
New Providence, NJ 07974

Postcard Marketing Handbook
Center for Technical Communication. 2008 94
(908) 464-6800
Excellent prospecting directory of major national advertisers.
Standard Directory of Advertising Agencies
R. R. Bowker
121 Chanlon Road
New Providence, NJ 07974
(908) 464-6800
The best prospecting directory for advertising agencies.
Standard Rate and Data Service
1700 Higgins Road
Des Plaines, IL 60018-5605
(800) 851-7737
www.srds.com
Comprehensive directory of publications that accept advertising.
Thomas Register
Thomas Publishing Company
One Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10119
(212) 290-7200
(212) 695-0500
Starting in 2006, available online at www.thomasnet.com
Lists thousands of businesses that advertise and would be good potential clients for you.
Writer's Market
F&W Publishing
1507 Dana Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45207
(800) 289-0963
Lists magazines you can write for and their editorial requirements.