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Introduction to Logix Controllers

For Classroom Use Only!

Publication Number -- Date

Copyright 2009 Rockwell Automation, Inc.

Important User Information


This documentation, whether, illustrative, printed, online or electronic (hereinafter Documentation) is intended for use only as a learning aid when using Rockwell Automation approved demonstration hardware, software and firmware. The Documentation should only be used as a learning tool by qualified professionals. The variety of uses for the hardware, software and firmware (hereinafter Products) described in this Documentation, mandates that those responsible for the application and use of those Products must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps have been taken to ensure that each application and actual use meets all performance and safety requirements, including any applicable laws, regulations, codes and standards in addition to any applicable technical documents. In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc., or any of its affiliate or subsidiary companies (hereinafter Rockwell Automation) be responsible or liable for any indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of the Products described in this Documentation. Rockwell Automation does not assume responsibility or liability for damages of any kind based on the alleged use of, or reliance on, this Documentation. No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in the Documentation. Except as specifically agreed in writing as part of a maintenance or support contract, equipment users are responsible for: properly using, calibrating, operating, monitoring and maintaining all Products consistent with all Rockwell Automation or third-party provided instructions, warnings, recommendations and documentation; ensuring that only properly trained personnel use, operate and maintain the Products at all times; staying informed of all Product updates and alerts and implementing all updates and fixes; and all other factors affecting the Products that are outside of the direct control of Rockwell Automation. Reproduction of the contents of the Documentation, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation is prohibited. Throughout this manual we use the following notes to make you aware of safety considerations: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in a hazardous environment, which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.

Identifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product.

Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss. Attentions help you: identify a hazard avoid a hazard recognize the consequence

Labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert people that dangerous voltage may be present.

Labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert people that surfaces may be dangerous temperatures.

Introduction to Logix Controllers

Contents
Before you begin ......................................................................................................................................... 6 About This Lab .................................................................................................................................................................................. 6 What You Will Accomplish In This Lab ............................................................................................................................................. 6 Who Should Complete This Lab ....................................................................................................................................................... 6 Lab Materials ............................................................................................................................................... 7 Software ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 7 Files .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Document Conventions .............................................................................................................................. 7 About Logix Controllers ............................................................................................................................. 8 ControlLogix: Perfect for high-speed, high-performance, multidiscipline control ............................................................................. 8 ControlLogix Platform and Components ........................................................................................................................................... 8 ControlLogix Chassis ........................................................................................................................................................................ 9 ControlLogix Backplane .................................................................................................................................................................... 9 ControlLogix Controller ................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Safety Controllers ........................................................................................................................................................................... 10 ControlLogix I/O Modules ............................................................................................................................................................... 10 ControlLogix Communications Modules ......................................................................................................................................... 11 ControlLogix Platform Modularity .................................................................................................................................................... 11 Example: Platform Modularity ......................................................................................................................................................... 11 CompactLogix: Perfect for smaller, machine-level control applications ......................................................................................... 12 CompactLogix Controller ................................................................................................................................................................ 12 SoftLogix Platform and Components .............................................................................................................................................. 13 Identifying RSLogix 5000 Software Components .................................................................................. 14 Creating and Modifying an RSLogix 5000 Project ................................................................................. 19 RSLogix 5000 Project Files............................................................................................................................................................. 19 Project Components ....................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Tasks .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 20 Programs ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 21 Routines .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Creating Tags and Monitoring Data in an RSLogix 5000 Project ......................................................... 23 Tags ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 23

Data Types...................................................................................................................................................................................... 23 Alias Tags ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 24 Scope .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 24 Monitor Tags Tab ............................................................................................................................................................................ 24 Tags and Members ......................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Display Style ................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Array ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 26 User-Defined Data Types ............................................................................................................................................................... 28 Section 1: Creating a Project ................................................................................................................... 30 Objective: ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 30 Launching RSLogix 5000 Configuration Software .......................................................................................................................... 30 Creating a New Controller Project .................................................................................................................................................. 32 Adding Ladder Logic to the Main Routine ....................................................................................................................................... 34 Creating Tags for the Ladder Code ................................................................................................................................................ 41 Monitoring/Editing Tags .................................................................................................................................................................. 48 Transferring a Project File to a Logix5000 Controller ........................................................................... 53 Uploading, Downloading, and Going Online to a Logix5000 Controller .......................................................................................... 53 RSLinx Classic Software................................................................................................................................................................. 54 Selecting and Changing a Controllers Operating Mode ................................................................................................................. 56 Section 2: Connecting Your Computer to the Controller ...................................................................... 57 Objective: ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 57 Launching RSLinx Software............................................................................................................................................................ 57 Adding the AB_ETHIP-1 (Ethernet/IP) Driver ................................................................................................................................. 59 Section 3: Downloading the Project from the Computer to the Controller ........................................ 61 Objective: ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 61 Downloading the Project to the Controller ...................................................................................................................................... 62 Configuring Local 1756-I/O Modules....................................................................................................... 65 1756-I/O Module Components ........................................................................................................................................................ 65 RIUP (Removal and Insertion Under Power) .................................................................................................................................. 66 LED Status Information ................................................................................................................................................................... 66 Digital and Analog I/O Modules ...................................................................................................................................................... 67 Local and Remote I/O Modules ...................................................................................................................................................... 67 1756-I/O Module Identification ........................................................................................................................................................ 68 I/O Configuration ............................................................................................................................................................................. 68 General Tab .................................................................................................................................................................................... 69 Connection Tab............................................................................................................................................................................... 70 Configuration Tab ........................................................................................................................................................................... 70 Asynchronous Updates ................................................................................................................................................................... 71 Identifying an I/O Module Tag ......................................................................................................................................................... 71

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Section 4: Configuring I/O ........................................................................................................................ 72 Objective: ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 72 Adding ControlLogix I/O Manually .................................................................................................................................................. 73 Adding ControlLogix I/O Using Module Discovery........................................................................................................................ 77 Viewing the ControlLogix I/O Tags ................................................................................................................................................. 81 Assigning Alias Tags....................................................................................................................................................................... 84 Section 5: Testing Your Logic Program ................................................................................................. 89 Objective: ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 89 Switching the Controller into Run Mode and Testing the Program ................................................................................................. 89 Section 6: Adding Logic and Tags Online ............................................................................................. 92 Objective: ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 92 Adding a MOV Instruction to the Logic ........................................................................................................................................... 92 Adding the Timer to the Logic ......................................................................................................................................................... 94 Testing Your Logic ........................................................................................................................................................................ 100 Forcing I/O and Toggling Bits in RSLogix 5000 Software .................................................................. 101 Force Functions ............................................................................................................................................................................ 101 State of Forces.............................................................................................................................................................................. 102 Troubleshooting Logix5000 Controller Problems ............................................................................... 104 Controller LEDs............................................................................................................................................................................. 104 Identifying Fault Types .................................................................................................................................................................. 104 Non-Recoverable Major Fault ....................................................................................................................................................... 104 Recoverable Major Fault ............................................................................................................................................................... 105 Fault Routine................................................................................................................................................................................. 105 Common Major Faults................................................................................................................................................................... 106 Minor Fault .................................................................................................................................................................................... 106 Finding and Clearing a Recoverable Major or Minor Fault ........................................................................................................... 107 Section 7: (Optional) Using RSLogix 5000 Help ................................................................................. 108 Objective: ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 108 Instruction Help ............................................................................................................................................................................. 108 Viewing I/O Module Wiring Diagrams ........................................................................................................................................... 110 Using Start Pages ......................................................................................................................................................................... 112 Learning Center Tab ..................................................................................................................................................................... 113 Resource Center ........................................................................................................................................................................... 114 Section 8: (Optional) Assigning IP Addresses Communication module with BOOTP/DHCP ....... 115

Before you begin


About This Lab
This session provides you with an opportunity to explore the ControlLogix or CompactLogix platforms, depending on the station at which you find yourself seated. The following sections explain what youll be doing in this lab session, and what you will need to do to complete the hands-on exercises.

What You Will Accomplish In This Lab


As you complete the exercises in this hands-on session, you will: Learn the primary advantages of Logix based controllers Design, create and download programs to a Logix controller Examine a controller executing a program

Who Should Complete This Lab


This hands-on lab is intended for: Controller users who want to become familiar and comfortable with the basics of RSLogix 5000 programming software.

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Lab Materials
For this Hands-On lab, we have provided you with the following materials that will allow you to complete the labs in this workbook.

Software
This hands-on lab uses the following software: RSLogix 5000 programming software RSLinx Classic software

Files
There are no starting project files for this lab; you will be creating your own file as you go.

Document Conventions
Throughout this workbook, we have used the following conventions to help guide you through the lab materials.

This style or symbol: Words shown in bold italics (e.g., RSLogix 5000 or OK) Words shown in Courier text, enclosed in single quotes (e.g., 'Controller1')

FYI

Indicates: Any item or button that you must click on, or a menu name from which you must choose an option or command. This will be an actual name of an item that you see on your screen or in an example. An item that you must type in the specified field. This is information that you must supply based on your application (e.g., a variable). Note: When you type the text in the field, remember that you do not need to type the quotes; simply type the words that are contained within them (e.g., Controller1). The text that follows this symbol is supplemental information regarding the lab materials, but not information that is required reading in order for you to complete the lab exercises. The text that follows this symbol may provide you with helpful hints that can make it easier for you to use this product.

Note: If the mouse button is not specified in the text, you should click on the left mouse button.

About Logix Controllers


ControlLogix: Perfect for high-speed, high-performance, multidiscipline control
ControlLogix brings together the benefits of the Logix platform common programming environment, common networks, common control engine to provide the high-performance your application requires in an easy-to-use environment. Tight integration between the programming software, controller and I/O reduces development time and cost at commissioning and during normal operation. ControlLogix offers the following benefits: Premier high-speed, high-performance control platform for multidiscipline control (sequential, process, drive, and motion). Fully-redundant controller architecture provides bumpless switchover and high availability. Widest range of communication options and analog, digital and specialty I/O. Select ControlLogix products are TUV-certified for use in SIL 2 applications With memory options ranging up to 32MB, ControlLogix controllers support intensive process applications and provide fast processing of motion instructions in a single integrated solution. ControlLogix provides modular network communications that let you purchase only what you need. Interface using ControlLogix communication modules via a ControlLogix gateway, without the need for a processor in the gateway chassis, or interface directly to a ControlLogix controller. The ControlLogix solution also provides time synchronization capabilities, which is particularly useful in first fault and process sequencing applications.

ControlLogix Platform and Components


The ControlLogix platform is a high-performance, multi-controller system in a modular chassis format. ControlLogix systems have the following capabilities: Enable easy integration with any existing systems (i.e., PLC-5, SLC) Are capable of high-speed communications and data transfers Allow multiple controllers, I/O modules, and communications modules in any order and location within the chassis The main components of a ControlLogix system are shown in the following graphic:

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ControlLogix Chassis
Chassis: A hardware assembly that houses devices such a controllers, I/O, and communications modules:

The following ControlLogix chassis sizes are available: 4-slot 7-slot 10-slot 13-slot 17-slot Slots are numbered from left to right starting with 0:

ControlLogix Backplane
The ControlLogix backplane, or ControlBust backplane, is a printed circuit board at the back of the chassis that provides electrical interconnection between modules:

ControlLogix Communications Modules


Communications Modules: Modules used for creating communications between a controller and a network: Network Required Communication Module Ethernet/IP 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR, 1756-EN3TR, 1756-EN2F Controlnet 1756-CNB,1756-CNBR,1756-CN2, 1756-CN2R Devicenet 1756-DNB Data Highway Plus 1756-DHRIO

ControlLogix Platform Modularity


The modular format of the ControlLogix platform allows users to design, build, and modify flexible systems by performing the following tasks: Select the number of controllers and appropriate memory size Select the number and type of I/O modules Select the number and type of communications modules

A ControlLogix system can range in complexity: A simple stand-alone controller and I/O modules in a single chassis A complex system with multiple controllers, chassis, and networks in different locations

Example: Platform Modularity


The following system uses three different networks to communicate with various devices, including another chassis:

CompactLogix: Perfect for smaller, machine-level control applications CompactLogix brings together the benefits of the Logix platform common programming environment, common networks,
common control engine in a small footprint with high performance. Combined with Compact I/O, the CompactLogix platform is perfect for tackling smaller, machine-level control applications, with or without integrated motion, with unprecedented power and scalability. CompactLogix is ideal for systems that require standalone and system-connected control over EtherNet/IP, ControlNet, or DeviceNet. Think CompactLogix when you need economical, reliable control. CompactLogix offers the following benefits: Rackless I/O for flexible installation High functionality in an economical platform Analog, digital and specialty modules cover a wide range of applications Advanced system connectivity to EtherNet/IP, ControlNet, and DeviceNet Networks Truly integrated motion control capability With a user memory ranging from 284K to 3Mb, CompactLogix controllers offer integrated serial (integrated RS-232-C ports for SCADA, ASCII, or peer-to-peer communication), EtherNet/IP or ControlNet channels, modular DeviceNet communications and local I/O capacity that can range from 8 to 30 I/O modules.

CompactLogix Controller
The main components of a CompactLogix controller are shown in the following graphic: Diagnostic led SD Card behind the cover USB Port

Supports these NetLinx networks: EtherNet/IP ControlNet DeviceNet CompactLogix I/O Modules CompactLogix I/O modules contain a set I/O count for simple, stand-alone processes: Supports up to 3 banks of local I/O (up to 30 CompactLogix I/O modules) Supports up to 256 Controller connections

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CompactLogix I/O modules have the following features: Removeable terminal blocks and module-ready cables Status indicators CompactLogix Communications Modules/Converters CompactLogix communications modules let users configure a system for information exchange between a range of devices and platforms: Network Ethernet/IP Device net Communication Module/Card Embeded in L1y, L2y, L3y. 1768-ENBT 1769-SDN or 1769-AND

SoftLogix Platform and Components


The SoftLogix platform combines control, information, and visualization on an open-control system (e.g., the control engine is housed in a computer or HMI (Human Machine Interface) terminal. It provides a software interface where modules can be created, configured, and controlled through images in a virtual chassis: The SoftLogix platform provides the following benefits: Is compatible with a range of Rockwell Automation and Microsoftr products Communicates with existing I/O Supports the NetLinx networks: o o o DeviceNet ControlNet EtherNet/IP

Identifying RSLogix 5000 Software Components


The following are the main sections in the default configuration of the RSLogix 5000 main window:

Toolbars The following toolbars are available: Standard toolbar Online toolbar Path toolbar Language Element toolbar Standard Toolbar: An optional toolbar with standard Microsoft options such as new, save, cut, copy, paste, and more.

Online Toolbar: A toolbar that provides controller status. Tab/drop-down lists are available for viewing related information:

Path Toolbar: A toolbar specifically used for communicating with the controller and viewing communication status:

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Language Element Toolbar: A toolbar containing programming elements, grouped by tabs, for entry into an active routine. Each language has its own element toolbar:

Tooltips and Status bar messages are easy ways of identifying components, such as buttons in the New Components toolbar:

Controller Organizer The Controller Organizer is a tree structure that is used to organize an entire project.

The Controller Organizer is used in the same manner as Windows Explorer:

Routine Editor/TagsWindow: A window that displays the open routine or tags collection opened through the Controller Organizer:

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There is a routine editor to view or edit each type of routine: Ladder Diagram (LD) Function Block Diagram (FBD) Structured Text (ST) Sequential Function Chart (SFC) Results Window: A window at the bottom of the main window that contains the following tabs: Errors Tab: Results of a verification for errors in the project. Search Results Tab: Results of a search for a project component. Watch Tab: Window for viewing data in an open routine.

Help System The Help menu contains the following options: Contents, with the following tabs: o o o Contents (to browse by category) Index Find (to search for phrases or words)

Instruction help grouped by instruction types or alphabetically Release notes Online books in Adobet Acrobatt format Sample RSLogix 5000 projects from Rockwell Automation and other vendors Quick Start interactive tutorial for new RSLogix 5000 users:

Learning Center that provides interactive access to the following topics: o o o Information about new Logix5000 hardware, software, and features Animated tutorials on performing common tasks A listing of Did You Know? hints, tips, and tricks:

Resource Center, which provides links to online books, available downloads, and helpful web sites:

Configuring the RSLogix 5000 Software Display The RSLogix 5000 software display can be configured to suit a users work preference, improving performance and efficiency:

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To make the best use of screen space and functionality, the following actions can be performed with toolbars: Display/hide toolbars Move toolbars on the screen Customize buttons

Creating and Modifying an RSLogix 5000 Project


After completing this lesson, you should be able to create and modify an RSLogix 5000 project by performing the following tasks: Identify tasks, programs, and routines Create a new RSLogix 5000 project file Modify the default task, program, and routine Create a task, program, and routine

RSLogix 5000 Project Files


Project/Project File: An RSLogix 5000 software file that stores all programming and configuration information for a Logix5000 controller.

Project Components
The following three components are used to organize a project and direct the execution of code: Task: A scheduling mechanism for executing programs. Program: A set of related routines and tags. Routine: A set or sequence of programming code executed as a block.

Tasks
A task triggers the execution of its scheduled programs. The following types of tasks can be created in a project:

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For any controller, only one task can be configured as continuous:

Programs
A program is the second level of scheduling within a project: Each ControlLogix or SoftLogix task can contain (schedule) up to 100 programs. Each CompactLogix or FlexLogix task can contain (schedule) up to 32 programs. When a task is triggered, its programs execute in sequence from the first scheduled to the last scheduled. Unscheduled Programs: Programs within a project that are not scheduled by any task; they do not execute. Programs may be left unscheduled until needed (to add future functionality or for troubleshooting).

Special programs are available to handle various functions: Controller Fault Handler: A program that executes when a fault occurs. These programs are stored in the Controller Fault Handler folder. Power Up Handler: A program that executes when a power cycle occurs. These programs are stored in the Power Up Handler folder.

Routines
A routine provides the executable code, or decision-making instructions, for a project. Each routine contains a set of elements for a specific programming language: Ladder Logic Function Block Diagram Structured Text Sequential Function Chart

A routine can be assigned as one of the following types: Main Routine: A routine configured to execute first when the program runs. There is always one main routine in each program. Subroutine: A routine that is called by another routine. Subroutines are used for large or complex programs or programs that require more than one programming language. o A JSR (Jump to Subroutine) instruction must be programmed in the code in another routine to call, or scan, a subroutine. A JSR may be conditioned or unconditioned (always active).

Fault Routine: A routine that executes if the controller finds a recoverable major fault within the executing program.

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Creating Tags and Monitoring Data in an RSLogix 5000 Project


After completing this lesson, you should be able to create tags and monitor data in an RSLogix 5000 project by performing the following tasks: Create tags in the Edit Tags list Define an alias tag Monitor and edit data in a Logix5000t controller

Tags
Memory: A group of circuit elements in a controller where programs and data are stored. The following are common memory sizes: Bit: The smallest unit of data represented by the digits 0 and 1 Byte: A string of 8 bits operated on as one unit. Word: A unit of memory in a controller composed of 16 individual bits (or two bytes) that are treated as one unit. Tag: An area of controller memory where data from devices, calculations, faults, etc. is stored. Each area is given a unique name: Programmers can perform the following tasks using tags: Organize data to mirror the process/machine Document, through tag names and descriptions, the application as a project is developed

Data Types
Data Type: The definition of how many bits, bytes, or words of data a tag will use. The data type is based on the source of the information. Pre-Defined Data Types: Commonly used memory sizes that are already defined in the software. Atomic Data Type: A simple data type made of one piece of data:

Structure: A more complex data type that is made up of several pieces of data. For example, a TIMER data type is made up of a combination of DINTs and BOOLs. The following table lists commonly used structures:

Data Type Counter Timer

Definition Increasing and Decreasing total Increasing time total (ms)

Module Defined Data Types: Data types used for hardware data, such as I/O tags.

Alias Tags
Alias Tag: An additional name for a tag (or other alias tag): The tags refer to the same area of memory. The tags, therefore, reflect the same values and changes.

Scope
Scope: The definition of where a controller can access a tag or set of tags. A tag must be designated as one of the following scopes: Controller-Scoped Tag: A tag that can be used by all tasks, programs, and routines within a project and is accessible to other devices. Program-Scoped Tag: A tag that can be referenced only by the routines within a specific program of a project. Therefore, the tag name may be reused in different programs. Within a project, tags are located in different collections depending upon their scope:

Monitor Tags Tab


The Monitor Tags tab is a direct view of a controllers memory. It allows users to perform the following tasks: Monitor tag values in an active controller (online) Assign values to specific tags Set operand (tag) descriptions Define tag style

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Tags and Members


Tags of the same data type are not automatically displayed together in the Monitor Tags tab: Tags can be displayed alphabetically (default mode). Tags can be sorted and filtered (e.g., show DINT tags only) Tags that are structures (TIMER, etc.) can be expanded to display members.

Display Style
The Style parameter controls how data is displayed for certain tags. Example: DINT Display Style The default style for a tag of the DINT data type is decimal. This can be changed to binary, octal, decimal, or hexadecimal. The Show drop-down menu is available for changing the Tags window display. It lets the user filter tags out of the window viewing area. Edit Tags Tab The Edit Tags list lets users perform the following tasks: Create and delete tags Create tag aliases Define tag data types Define tag style Set operand (tag) descriptions

The following parameters can be modified in the Edit Tags tab:

Tag Names: A name a user supplies to reference a tag instance. Data Type: A definition of the size and layout of memory that will be allocated when a tag of the data type is created. Style: The format in which number system values for data type members are displayed within RSLogix 5000 software. Descriptions: A string of characters that defines the purpose or function of a tag. Monitoring and Editing Tag Values through a Routine Tag values can be monitored and sometimes edited online through instructions in routines:

Array
Array: A numerically indexed sequence of elements of the same data type. An array tag occupies a contiguous section of memory in the controller with each element in sequence. Arrays can have one, two, or three dimensions. Element: A single position within an array.

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Example: Array A controller needs to store a piece of data for six different parts. This data can be stored in an array of 6 INTs:

Array Addressing An instruction might examine or write to one element of an array:

Certain data types can support one-, two-, or three-dimensional arrays:

Advanced Array Addressing The following table contains more advanced array formats and examples:

User-Defined Data Types


Structure: A data type that combines other data types. E.g., a TIMER data type is made up of DINTs and BOOLs. User-Defined Data Type: A structure created by a programmer to group related data in an application. Member: One data type within the structure. Example: User-Defined Data Type There are several identical tanks in an application. Each tank has data that needs to be stored:

To store this data, a programmer creates a user-defined data type. This data type is then available for new tags:

User-Defined Data Type Addressing Just as TIMER members are addressed (Total_Timer.EN or Total_Timer.TT), you can address members of a user-defined: Tag.Member Examples: User-Defined Data Type Addressing Specific data can be addressed in a tag of a user-defined data type: Input_Load.Height Input_Location.Load_Info.Weight Tanks.Level Arrays and tags of user-defined data types can be mixed, providing extreme programming flexibility.

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Example: Arrays and User-Defined Data Types If there are 25 tanks (5 rows of 5), a programmer can make an array of tags that uses a user-defined data type:

Example: Addressing To observe the temperature value for the tank in position [1,3], the following tag would be addressed in the ladder logic: Tank[1,3].Temperature To observe the preset of the timer for the tank in position [1,3], the following tag would be addressed in the ladder logic: Tank[1,3].Time_Over_Temp.PRE

Section 1: Creating a Project


This lab section should take roughly 20 minutes to complete.

Objective:
Create a new project Write ladder logic Use symbolic tag names Use the tag monitor/editor

Launching RSLogix 5000 Configuration Software


In this section of the lab, you will launch the RSLogix 5000 software, which will allow you to configure and program a controller.

1. Follow the instructions in the Before You Begin section of this document before proceeding. 2. Double-click on the RSLogix 5000 icon on the Desktop to launch RSLogix 5000 software.

The RSLogix 5000 Splash Screen appears.

FYI
At the bottom of the RSLogix 5000 splash screen you will see all the different versions of RSLogix 5000 software that are currently installed on the computer.

Next, the RSLogix 5000 screen appears. Maximize the window.

3. Click the arrow on the Start Pages label to hide the start pages we will discuss these later in the lab.

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Creating a New Controller Project


In this portion of the lab, you will create an offline project using a ControlLogix 1756-L7x controller.

1. From the File menu, choose New.


The New Controller dialog Box will appear. Fill it in as shown below.

Select the controller Type at your demo station - 1756-L7x ControlLogix 5575 Controller. Select Revision 20. Name the controller Controller1. Select Slot 1. Click OK.

Important Note! All the Logix controllers use RSLogix 5000 software. Be sure to choose the correct controller type that matches the equipment at your lab station. If you are unsure of the equipment at your station, refer to the pictures at the beginning of the lab to verify your hardware. The Controllers have revision 20 firmware.

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FYI
New Controller From the New Controller window you are defining the project. Type: This is the type of Logix controller you will use. This could be a ControlLogix, CompactLogix, DriveLogix, or SoftLogix controller. Only one programming software package is needed for all Logix Controllers. Revision: Here you are selecting the firmware revision of the project that will be created. Lab computers include revision 20. Name: The name of the controller and project. Chassis Type: Select the size of the chassis you will use. This is not applicable for all controller types. Slot: The slot number where the controller will reside. Some controller types will not require a slot number. For example, CompactLogix is fixed at slot zero.

The Controller Organizer appears on the left side of the RSLogix5000 window, with a folder called Controller Controller1. At this time, there is no I/O, tag database, or logic associated with the controller.

Controller Faceplate

Instructions toolbar

Controller Organizer

I/O Configuration

Programming window

You have now created your first controller project!

FYI
The Controller Organizer is a graphical representation of the contents of your controller file. This display consists of a tree of folders and files that contain all of the information about the programs and data in the current controller file. The default main folders in this tree are: -Controller File Name -Tasks -Motion Groups -Add-On Instructions -Data Types -Trends -I/O Configuration: The square containing a + or - indicates whether a folder is open or closed. Click on it to expand the tree display and display the files in the folder. The - sign indicates that the folder is already open and its contents are visible. By default, the Add-On instructions folder is empty as none are installed.

Adding Ladder Logic to the Main Routine


In this section of the lab you will add code for a simple motor start/stop seal-in circuit. You will experience the ease of programming with RSLogix 5000 software. During the labs we will only utilize ladder logic programming, but Logix controllers also can be programmed using Function Block, Sequential Function Charts, and Structured Text. This allows you to select the program language that best fits an application. You will continue to use the project already opened.

1. In the Controller Organizer expand the MainProgram folder by clicking on the + .

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Once expanded, the MainProgram will appear as shown below:

2. Double-click the MainRoutine icon.


This will open the routine editor. An empty rung will be added for you as shown below:

3. From the instruction toolbar, left click and hold on the Examine On (XIC) instruction.

4. Drag the XIC onto rung 0 until the green dot appears as shown above. Release the mouse button at the location you wish to place your instruction.

5. Verify your rung appears like the figure below:

6. From the instruction toolbar left click and hold on the Examine Off (XIO) instruction.

7. Drag the XIO onto rung 0 to the right of the XIC instruction as shown above. Again a green dot will appear to the right of the XIC instruction indicating where your new instruction will be inserted. Release the mouse button at the location you wish to place your instruction. 8. Verify your rung appears like the figure below:

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FYI
If you place an instruction in the wrong location on a rung, simply click and hold on the instruction and drag it to the correct location.

9. From the instruction toolbar, left click and hold on the Output Energize (OTE)

instruction.

10. Drag the OTE onto rung 0 to the right of the XIO instruction as shown above. Again a green dot will appear to the right of the XIO instruction indicating where the OTE instruction will be inserted. Release the mouse button at the location you wish insert the instruction.

11. Verify your rung appears as shown below:

We will now add a branch around the XIC instruction.

12. Click on the XIC instruction to select it as shown below:

13. From the instruction toolbar click on the Branch instruction.


A branch will be inserted on the rung.

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14. Left-click and hold on the blue highlighted part of the branch and drag your selected leg of the branch to the left side of the XIC instruction. 15. Place the branch over the green dot and release the mouse button.

16. From the instruction toolbar, left click and hold on the XIC

instruction.

17. Drag the XIC onto your newly created branch until the green dot appears.
The rung should now appear as shown below.

18. Verify that the entire rung appears like the figure below.

19. Save the program by clicking on the Save icon on the toolbar. This will save the program in the default program directory, which is C:\RSLogix 5000\Projects\.

As you can see the free form editing in RSLogix 5000 can help speed development. You no longer have to place an instruction and tie an address to it before you add the next instruction.

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Creating Tags for the Ladder Code


In this section of the lab you will create the tags needed for the program. In traditional PLCs, a physical memory address identifies each item of data, for example N7:0. In Logix controllers, there is no fixed numeric format. We use tags. You will continue to use the project already opened.

FYI
What is a tag and why are they better? A tag is a text-based name for an area of memory. By using a text-based system you can use the name of the tag to document your ladder code and organize your data to mirror your machinery. For example you could create a tag named North_Tank_Pressure. This helps to speed code generation and debugging. All tag names are stored in the controller.

We will create 3 tags for the program: Motor_Start, Motor_Stop, and Motor_Run.

1. First you will create the tag Motor_Start. Right click on the ? of the first XIC instruction. It will be highlighted blue. Select New Tag.

FYI
Creating a Tag When you create a tag there are several attributes for a tag. The main attributes we are interested in for this lab are as follows: Type: Defines how the tag operates within the project Base: Stores a value or values for use by logic within a project Alias: A tag that represents another tag Produced: Send data to another controller Consumed: Receive data from another controller Alias For: Only applies when the tag type is Alias. Defines the tag which the alias tag will reference. Data Type: Defines the type of data that the tag stores. Example: Boolean, Integer, Real, String, etc. Scope: Defines how the data is accessed in the project. It is either controller scoped, global data accessible throughout the controller or program scoped, data accessible for a specific program. External Access: Defines the access external applications (HMIs) will have with the tag. Read/Write: External application can read and write to the tag. Read Only: External application can only read the tag. None: External application cannot read the tag or write to the tag Constant: If checked, that tag cannot be changed programmatically. Open Configuration: Opens the configuration wizard for complex tags (MSGs, PIDs, etc)

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2. Enter the parameters as shown below.


Make sure the scope of the tag is MainProgram.

3. Click Create to accept and create the tag.


The rung will now look like the figure below.

Next you will create the tag Motor_Stop.

4.

Right click on the ? of the XIO instruction and select New Tag.

Again, the New Tag window will appear:

5. Enter the parameters as shown below:

6. Click Create to accept and create the tag. 7. Verify the rung appears like the figure below:

You will now create the tag Motor_Run.

8. Right click on the ? of the OTE instruction and select New Tag.

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The New Tag window will appear.

9. Enter the parameters as shown below:

10. Click Create to accept and create the tag.


Your rung should now appear as shown below:

For the XIC instruction in the branch we do not have to create a tag. You will use the tag Motor_Run.

11. Left click and hold the mouse button over the tag Motor_Run on the OTE instruction.

12. Drag the tag Motor_Run tag over to the XIC instruction until a green dot appears next to the ?. Then release the mouse button.

Your rung should now appear as shown below. Notice the es next to rung zero have disappeared. This indicates that the rung passes auto verification and no errors are present.

RSLogix 5000 software verifies each rung automatically when you click the mouse off of it. This makes programming easier!

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13. Prior to verifying the project, open the error window by going to the View menu and choosing Errors.

14. Verify the program by clicking on the Verify Controller icon


You will see if there are any errors in the status window.

on the toolbar.

15. Close the MainRoutine by pressing the X located at the top right corner of the screen.

16. Save the program by clicking on the Save icon

on the toolbar.

The tag database of Logix versus a traditional PLCs fixed memory addresses help you create self-documenting code. This means you do not have to use address descriptions or symbols to make code easy to read.

Monitoring/Editing Tags
In this section of the lab, we will review the Tag Monitor/Editor in RSLogix 5000. We will also discuss the concept of Controller versus Program scoped tags. You will continue to use the project already opened.

1. From the Controller Organizer double-click on Controller Tags.

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The tag Monitor/Editor window appears. You notice in the lower left corner of the window two tabs labeled Monitor Tags and Edit Tags as shown below.

FYI
Monitor/Edit Tags Tabs When the Monitor Tags tab is selected the actual value(s) for the tags will be shown. For example, if you were to view an input button the software would show the button tag actively energized or de-energized. When the Edit Tags tab is selected, NEW tags may be created, and existing tag properties may be modified. If you are having difficulty creating or modifying tag parameters, verify that the Edit Tags tab is selected.

You notice first that there are no tags present, remember you just created three tags. These tags were created in Program Scope.

Notice a field in the upper left corner of the Tag Editor window labeled Scope. Earlier in the lab we talked briefly about Controller and Program scoped tags. Currently the selection is Controller1, which are controller scoped tags.

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FYI
Data Scoping When you create a tag, you define it either as a controller tag (global data) or a program tag for a specific program (local data).

Data at the program scope is isolated from other programs. Routines cannot access data that is at the program scope of another program. Thus you can re-use the tag name of a program-scoped tag in multiple programs.

2. Click on the down arrow for the Scope selection box. 3. Select Programs MainProgram

The Tag Editor now has switched views to the program level and you see the tags you created earlier.

4. Close the Tag Editor by pressing the X located at the top right corner of the tag editor.

5. Save the program by clicking on the Save icon

on the toolbar.

6. Minimize the RSLogix 5000 software.

Congratulations! You have Completed Section 1.

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Transferring a Project File to a Logix5000 Controller


After completing this lesson, you should be able to transfer a project file to a Logix5000 controller by performing the following tasks: Upload, download, and go online to a Logix5000 controller Select and change a Logix5000 controllers operating mode

Uploading, Downloading, and Going Online to a Logix5000 Controller

Going online to a controller allows you to perform the following tasks: Monitor or modify a program in a project loaded in a controller Monitor data while it is being collected Modify data stored in a controller

Offline: Viewing or editing a copy of a project file that is in the computer only. Working offline allows you to perform the following tasks: Repair a system or equipment Develop or update project components

RSLinx Classic Software


RSLinx Classic software creates a connection between an RSLogix 5000 project and other system components. RSLinx Classic software is used for a variety of communications tasks: Uploading, downloading, and going online to a controller Maintaining a connection between plant floor devices and other software applications while monitoring or editing a project online

The RSWho window is the network browser interface for RSLinx Classic software. It allows a user to view all the active network connections from two panels on a single screen: The Tree Control shows networks and devices. The List Control shows all the members of networks and devices that are bridges. Communications Path Communication can be initiated using several options: Who Active dialog box Current Path toolbar Recent Path dialog box

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Using the Who Active dialog box is the safest route:

The addresses (locations) of devices and networks through which data is sent are listed in the current communications path:

Correlation Errors Various error messages may be displayed when a computer attempts to communicate with a controller. Several errors relate to matching project files. Matching Project File: A computer project file that matches the project file in a controller: The file was downloaded to or uploaded from the controller. The file is a copy. If a matching file is not found in the default directory when attempting to communicate, the following options are available: Browse to and Select the File: Browse to a matching file. Create a New File: Create a new project file without documentation. Upload: Upload from controller to update non-matching project file.

Selecting and Changing a Controllers Operating Mode


Logix5000 controllers have three keyswitch positions: Run Program Remote

Remotely Changing Controller Operating Mode With the controller keyswitch in Remote (REM) position, Remote modes can be selected using the Online toolbar:

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Section 2: Connecting Your Computer to the Controller


This lab section should take roughly 5 minutes to complete.

Objective:
In this lab, we will introduce you to the online operations that you will complete with the RSLogix5000 software. In this lab, you will: Launch RSLinx communications software Configure your communications driver

Launching RSLinx Software


In this section of the lab, you will launch the RSLinx software, which will enable you to configure the driver you will use to communicate with the Logix processor in the Demo Box.

1. Double click on the RSLinx icon on the Desktop to launch RSLinx software.

2. Click the RSWho icon

in the toolbar.

The Rockwell Software RSLinx Gateway - [RSWho - 1] screen appears.

FYI
RSWho The RSWho screen is actually RSLinx's network browser interface, which allows you to view all of your active network connections. The left pane of this display is the Tree Control, which shows networks and devices in a hierarchical view. When a network or device is collapsed, as indicated by the + sign, you can click on the + sign or double click on the network or device icon to expand the view and begin browsing. When a network or device is expanded, as indicated by the - sign, you can click on the - sign or double click on the network or device icon to collapse the view. The right pane of the RSWho display is the List Control, which is a graphical representation of all of the devices present on the network.

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Adding the AB_ETHIP-1 (Ethernet/IP) Driver


In this section of the lab, you will add the Ethernet/IP driver that you will use to communicate with your Logix processor.

1. From the Communications menu, choose Configure Drivers.


The Configure Drivers dialog appears.

2. From the Available Driver Types pull-down menu, choose EtherNet/IP Driver then click on the Add New button.
In RSLinx you will notice two different Ethernet drivers listed: EtherNet/IP Driver and Ethernet devices. In general, you should use the new EtherNet/IP driver... it will automatically scan for and find any EtherNet/IP compatible devices on the network. A few older Rockwell Ethernet products cannot be found using this driver. The older Ethernet devices driver works with all Rockwell Ethernet products, but it will only scan for IP address that you manually tell it to search for. You can have both types of drivers and/or multiple instances of each type active in RSLinx at the same time if needed.

3. Click on OK to accept the default name (AB_ETHIP-1).

4. Ensure that the Browse Local Subnet radio button is enabled, click the VMWare address (this is the address of your VMWare image) and then click OK.

5. Exit the Configure Driver Dialog by clicking on Close.

Congratulations! You have Completed Section 2.

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Section 3: Downloading the Project from the Computer to the Controller


This lab section should take roughly 10 minutes to complete.

Objective:
In this lab you will open a controller project based on the lab station at which you are seated. You will: Determine the type of controller you are using Open the project that corresponds to the controller you are using Download the program to the controller You will be using the program that was created from the steps performed in Lab 1. Look over the images below if you are unsure of the hardware associated with your lab station demo.

ControlLogix L7x Controller Analog Input Card

Analog Output

Digital Output Card

Digital Input Card

Downloading the Project to the Controller


In this section of the lab you will download the project.

1. Maximize RSLogix 5000 and your Controller1.ACD project.


2.

From the Communications menu, choose Who Active.

The Who Active Screen appears.

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3. Expand the view by clicking on the + s until you see your controller.

The Logix family of controllers all use RSLogix 5000 software to configure the system. But each controller is set up slightly differently.

4. Click Download. You will be asked to verify the download.


The project will then begin to download to your controller.

If your controller was in the RUN mode prior to the download, you may be prompted to return to the RUN mode. If asked select YES.

5. When the following prompt appears, click Yes to change the controller mode to Remote Run.

At this point you will be online with the controller and the status LEDs in your project will mimic the LEDs on your controller.

Congratulations! You have Completed Section 3.

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Configuring Local 1756-I/O Modules


After completing this lesson, you should be able to perform the following tasks: Add a local 1756-I/O module to an I/O configuration Identify a local I/O tag

1756-I/O Module Components


1756-I/O modules consist of two main components, the module body and the RTB (removable terminal block):

Removable Terminal Block (RTB): A field wiring connector for I/O modules. Field wiring is connected to an RTB rather than directly to a module terminal block. Interface Module (IFM): A field wiring arm that uses prewired/factory-wired cable to connect to an I/O module. ControlBus Connector: The backplane connector interface for the ControlLogix system that connects the module to the ControlBus backplane. Connector Pins: Pins that create input/output, power and grounding connections to the module through an RTB or IFM. Locking Tab: Anchors the RTB or IFM cable on the module, maintaining wiring connections. Slots for Keying: Mechanically keys the RTB to prevent inadvertently making the wrong wire connections to the module. Status Indicators: Display the status of communications, module health, and input/output devices. Use these indicators to help troubleshooting errors or system faults. Top and Bottom Guides: Provide assistance in seating the RTB or IFM cable into the module.

RIUP (Removal and Insertion Under Power)


RIUP: A ControlLogix feature that allows 1756 modules to be removed and inserted into a chassis while the backplane power is applied.

LED Status Information


LED indicators are located on the front of all I/O modules to show if all connections and communications are functioning properly:

I/O Status: The yellow status indicator shows the ON/OFF state of the field device. Module Status: This green status indicator shows the modules communication status. Fault Status: This display, found on some modules, indicates the presence or absence of various field-side faults. Fuse Status: This display, found on electronically fused modules, indicates the state of the modules fuse.

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Digital and Analog I/O Modules


1756-I/O modules process two types of data: Digital: Information represented by a discrete value (i.e., 1 or 0). Analog: Numeric values that represent measurable quantities, such as temperature, weight, and pressure. Digital 1756-I/O modules provide on/off detection and control for items that utilize digital data. They have the following properties: RIUP (Removal and Insertion Under Power) 8-, 16-, and 32-point varieties Electronic keying Isolated, non-isolated, and diagnostic varieties: o Module-level fault reporting and field-side diagnostics

Electronic fusing Analog 1756-I/O modules convert analog signals to digital values for inputs and convert digital values to analog signals for outputs. They have the following properties: RIUP Scaling to engineering units calculated in the module 32-bit floating or 16-bit input and 13-16 bit output integer data format depending on the module Alarming Rolling time stamp of data Diagnostic choices

Local and Remote I/O Modules


Local and remote I/O modules can be configured in a Logix5000 system based on the needs of the application. Local I/O Modules Local I/O modules communicate with a controller across a backplane, thus limiting their distance from the controller. Remote I/O Modules Remote I/O modules are not located in the same chassis as the controller that configures them. This allows I/O to be located in a closer proximity to the process:

1756-I/O Module Identification


To identify a local device tag, the module type must be identified first by referring to the part number on one of the following items: RSLogix 5000 software I/O configuration Plant drawings Hardware label (inside the module door) Factory sticker on the side of the module RSWho network interface in RSLinxr software

I/O Configuration
All devices that communicate with a Logix5000 controller must be added to the I/O configuration of the controller project, as shown in the following graphic:

Every I/O module that sends process/machine data to a controller must be configured by a controller. When you add a new I/O module to a project, you are first prompted to enter general module properties in the New Module dialog box:

Once data has been entered in the New Module dialog box, you can then continue module configuration from the Module Properties dialog box.

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Parameters for configuring a digital 1756-I/O module are entered on the following tabs in the Module Properties dialog box: General Connection Configuration

General Tab
The following graphic shows the General tab parameters:

Electronic Keying To avoid installation or replacement errors, keying prevents controller from communicating with the wrong module: Exact Match: All I/O module information must match (i.e., module type, major revision, and minor revision). Compatible Keying: All I/O module information except minor revision must match. Disable Keying: Minimum information must match (i.e., module type only). Communications Format (Ownership) The communications format parameter defines how an I/O module communicates with a controller. The following options are available: Full Diagnostics: I/O connection where the module is owned by the controller, receiving configuration data from it: o The I/O module returns diagnostic data (e.g., Fuse Blown, No Load) along with a timestamp of when the diagnostic data changes state.

Listen-Only Connection: I/O connection where another controller owns/provides the configuration data for the I/O module. The I/O module does not write configuration data.

Connection Tab
The following graphic shows the Connection tab parameters:

Requested Packet Interval (RPI): Also referred to as the multicasting rate, this is the rate at which data is simultaneously transmitted to all nodes or modules: The RPI specifies the time that elapses before the module multicasts the current data in the on-board memory The RPI can vary from 200 microseconds (.2 ms) to 750 ms Inhibit Module Connection Option: An option that allows configuration data for a module to be written but prevents the module from communicating with the owner controller. Major Fault Option: An option that causes a major fault on the controller if the connection to the module fails.

Configuration Tab
The following graphic shows an example of the Configuration tab parameters:

Depending on the module, 1756 digital and analog diagnostic I/O modules can have the following diagnostic features: Open Wire Detection: Senses removed or disconnected field wiring on an input module: A leakage resistor must be placed across the contacts of an input device. The modules must detect minimum leakage current or a point-level fault is sent to the controller.

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Field Power Loss Detection: When field power to a module is lost, a point-level fault is sent to the controller. No Load Detection: Senses the absence of field wiring or a missing load from each output point in the off state only. Field-Side Output Verification: Indicates that the ladder logic changes are accurately represented on the power side of a switching device (i.e., the output is on when it is commanded to be on). Point-Level Electronic Fusing: Internal electronic fusing that prevents too much current from flowing through a module. This feature clears fuses when an instruction in RSLogix 5000 software resets the fuse or a power cycle resets the fuse. Diagnostic Latching: Sets and retains a faulted state (bit) upon detection of any diagnostic faults: The fault data is multicast to all controllers. The I/O module LED displays a fault. A fault bit is latched and can be examined in the tags list.

Asynchronous Updates
Asynchronous: Actions that occur independently of each other and lack a regular pattern. In Logix5000 controllers, I/O values update asynchronously with the execution of code: Input modules multicast their data to the backplane at the RPI rate set in the modules. The code is scanned and the output tags are updated immediately after the execution of each output instruction. Values are sent to the output modules at the RPI rate and at the end of each task.

Identifying an I/O Module Tag


Module-Defined Data Type: A data type assigned to a tag that is automatically generated when a communications or I/O module is added to an RSLogix 5000 project. I/O base tags use the following format:

Section 4: Configuring I/O


We will now look at configuring I/O for our project. To communicate with I/O modules you must add modules to the I/O Configuration folder. This lab section should take roughly 20 minutes to complete.

Objective:
During this off-line lab we will show adding 1756 I/O using the equipment at your lab station using several methods, including the new module discovery feature. You will continue to use the project already opened. For this lab we will add the following I/O modules. Please note the I/O that relates to the equipment at your lab station. Isolated DC Input Module Isolated DC Output Module Isolated Analog Input Module Isolated Analog Voltage Output Module

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Adding ControlLogix I/O Manually 1. In the I/O Configuration Folder, right click on 1756 Backplane, 1756-A10 and select New Module.

2. The Select Module Type window appears. Type IB in the search box.

Items that are grayed out are modules that cannot be added while online with the controller. You must be offline to add these modules to your I/O configuration. 3. Locate the Digital Input Module.

4. Select the Digital Input module and click Create

5. Click OK on the Select Major Revision window.

FYI
Module Configuration Wizard Whenever you add an I/O module, to the system you will go through the Module Configuration Wizard. The Wizard allows you to step through the entire configuration needed for a module. You can access this information later by double clicking on a module in the I/O Configuration folder or through the tag monitor/editor. In Logix there are no more dip switches or jumpers needed to configure I/O modules. I/O modules are software configured. This saves time when setting up a system. The configuration for all modules is part of the controllers program and is downloaded to the module from the controller; this allows for ease of replacement if an I/O module fails.

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6. Enter the Name and Slot parameters as shown below. Leave all other fields set to their default values. Click OK.

The Module Configuration Wizard will appear for the 1756-IB16D.

FYI
Comm Format Determines the data structure for the tags that are associated with the module. Many I/O modules support different formats. Each format uses a different data structure. Electronic Keying When you insert a module into a slot of a chassis, the controller compares the information read from the newly inserted module with what the user configured that particular slot to be in their project. The following data is read and compared: Vendor, Product Type, Catalog Number, Major Revision, Minor Revision. The user may select one of the following module keying options during the initial module configuration: Exact Match all of the parameters described above must match or the inserted module will reject the connection. Compatible Module The following criteria must be met, or else the inserted module will reject the connection: Module Types, Catalog Number, and Major Revision must match and the Minor Revision of the physical module must be equal to or greater than the one specified in the software Disable Keying No keying used at all.

7. Select Yes when the Online Module Creation box appears.

8. Click on the Connection tab to view the Requested Packet Interval data.

FYI
Requested Packet Interval (RPI) The Requested Packet Interval specifies the period at which data is updated to and from the module. RPIs are configured in milliseconds. The range is .2ms to 750ms. ControlLogix and 1768-L43 processors allow individual RPI values to be configured whereas 1769-L35E CompactLogix processors treat I/O module connections as if they were rack optimized meaning all 1769 I/O modules must share the same RPI.

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9. Click on OK to close the wizard.


In the Controller Organizer, the I/O Configuration folder will show the digital input module in Slot 2:

10. Highlight the 1756-IB16D module in the I/O Configuration and press delete. Click Yes when prompted to confirm.

Adding ControlLogix I/O Using Module Discovery 11. In the I/O Configuration Folder, right click on 1756 Backplane, 1756-A10 and select Discover Modules.

Module Discovery automatically searches the local backplane and will determine each module type and firmware revision. This simplifies the module creation process. Modules that cannot be created online will be grayed out, as shown above with the 1756-M08SE module. Note: The firmware revisions for the I/O modules in your lab may be different from the above screen shot. This will not affect the execution of the lab since the module discovery feature will automatically set the correct firmware.

12. On the Select Module Type window, select the Create button next to the Digital Output module.

13. Enter the Name parameter as shown below. Leave all other fields set to their default values. Click OK.

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14. Select Yes when the Online Module Creation box appears.

15. Click OK on the Module Properties Report to close the window

16. The I/O Configuration should look like the following:

17. Using the Module Discovery feature, add the Digital Input module to the I/O Configuration. Name the module Digital_IN. 18. Using the Module Discovery feature, add the Analog Output module to the I/O Configuration. Name the module Analog_OUT. 19. Using the Module Discovery feature, add the Analog Input module to the I/O Configuration. Name the module Analog_IN. 20. When you are finished, your I/O Configuration should look like the following:

21. Once you have added all of the modules listed above, click Remote Run from the controller faceplate.

22. Select Go Offline.

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Viewing the ControlLogix I/O Tags


Now that we have configured I/O modules in the project, lets take a look how that information is presented in RSLogix 5000. You will continue to use the project already opened.

1. From the Controller Organizer double click on Controller Tags.

The tag editor window will appear.

If necessary, drag to the right to increase the size of the Tag Name field. This will allow you to view the entire Tag Name.

FYI
I/O Address Format

You notice by looking in the upper left corner of the tag editor that you are in the Controller Scope. All I/O module tags are created in the Controller Scope.

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2. Switch to Monitor Tags by Clicking on the Monitor Tags Tab.

The above entries are tag structures for the modules you added. They contain more tags than are actually displayed. Note the + sign next to the tag name, this indicates that you can expand the tag structure to see more information.

Tag Properties Pane: This pane displays the attributes of the selected tag in the Tag editor or data monitor dialog.

3. Expand and explore the tags for the I/O modules by clicking the + .
What you will find under the Configuration tags, for each module, is all the data, you entered and selected from the Module Configuration Wizard.

4. Save the program by clicking on the Save icon

on the toolbar.

Assigning Alias Tags


In this section of the lab you will learn about Alias Tags. You will continue to use the project already opened.

FYI
Aliasing An Alias tag lets you create one tag that represents another tag. Both tags share the same value When the value of one of the tags changes, the other tag reflects the change Use Aliases in the following situations: -Program logic in advance of wiring diagrams -Assign a descriptive name to an I/O device -Provide a simpler name for a complex tag -Use a descriptive name for an element of an array

1. From the Controller Organizer double click on MainRoutine.

The ladder editor appears as shown below:

In the last part of the lab we added I/O modules to the project. Now its time to Alias the tags in the program to the I/O Modules. Motor_Start will be Aliased to input point zero of the 1756-IB16D in slot two. Motor_Stop will be Aliased to input point one of the 1756-IB16D in slot two. Motor_Run will be Aliased to output point zero of the 1756-OB16D in slot zero.

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2. Right click on the tag Motor_Start and select Edit Motor_Start Properties.

The Tags Properties window for Motor_Start will appear. Currently the tag is defined as a Base tag.

3. Select Alias as a type and notice that the Tag Properties window changed.

4. Click on the down arrow for Alias For. The tag browser appears. The browser shows both Controller and Program Scope Tags. You will need to select your address from controller scoped tags.

5. Click on the Program button to deselect Program Scope Tags.


The view on the screen will change to view only your Controller Scoped Tags

6. Expand Local:2:I by clicking on the + sign and select Local:2:I.Data.

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7. Click the down arrow for Local:2:I.Data as shown below.


This will open the table of data points for the 1756-IB16D module.

8. Select 0 from the table.


When you select 0 from the tag browser the window will close. Tag Properties will now appear as follows:

Motor_Start will now be aliased to Local:2:I.Data.0. This is the 1756-IB16D in Slot 2.

9. Click OK to close and apply the changes to the tag Motor_Start.


Motor_Start has been Aliased to Local:2:I.Data.0. This means that the tags are equivalent to one another in code. It is much easier to use Motor_Start than Local:2:I.Data.0.

10. Using the previous steps, alias the remaining two tags.
Motor_Stop = Local:2:I.Data.1 Motor_Run = Local:0:O.Data.0

11. When you are finished the ladder code should appear as follows:

12. Save the program by clicking on the Save icon 13. Click Download on the Controller Faceplate.

on the toolbar.

14. When prompted to confirm the download, press Download. 15. Click Yes when prompted to change the controller mode to Remote Run.

Congratulations! You have Completed Section 4.


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Section 5: Testing Your Logic Program


This lab section should take roughly 5 minutes to complete.

Objective:
In this lab you will verify the operation of your program.

FYI
I/O Mapping For the lab there are a group of push buttons on the Demo Box. The push buttons are mapped as follows: Motor_Start = DI0 Motor_Stop = DI1 Motor_Run = DO0

Switching the Controller into Run Mode and Testing the Program 1. If not already in run mode, click the Controller Faceplate and select Run Mode.

The controller will go into run mode. This can be verified by looking at the Run LED on the controller. It should now illuminate green. It can also be verified through RSLogix 5000 by viewing the controller faceplate.

You notice that this is a replica of your controllers faceplate.

2. From the Controller Organizer expand the MainProgram by clicking on the + .

3. Double-click on the MainRoutine to open the ladder editor.

You will now see the ladder logic. Notice the green power rails on both sides of the ladder. This indicates you are online and the routine is executing.

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You notice that the XIO instruction Motor_Stop is green. This means that this instruction is in the true or on state. This is because the Motor_Stop Pushbutton is not pressed.

4. Press button DI1 button on the ControlLogix pushbutton panel.


This correlates to the XIO instruction for Motor_Stop. Notice its no longer be green. This is because the instruction is no longer true.

5. Press button DI0 (Motor_Start).


The XIC instruction will become true and turn green. Motor_Run will energize (turn green). And the pilot light DO0 on your lab station will illuminate.

6. Verify that output DO0 (Motor_Run) stays illuminated when you release pushbutton DI0 (Motor_Start).
The ladder logic you have just written is a simple 3-wire control or motor start/stop seal-in circuit.

7. Press pushbutton DI1 (Motor_Stop) and verify that output DO0 (Motor_Run) turns off.

Congratulations! You have Completed Section 5.

Section 6: Adding Logic and Tags Online


This lab section should take roughly 15 minutes to complete.

Objective:
In this lab we will explore online editing. You will: Add a MOV instruction Add a timer to the logic and its execution will be based on the motor running Add ladder logic to reset the timer when the motor is stopped. You will continue to use the project already opened.

Adding a MOV Instruction to the Logic 1. In the MainRoutine, add a rung by clicking the rung button on the toolbar.

2.

Using the toolbar, under the Move/Logical category tab, click and drag an MOV instruction to the new rung.

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3. Double click the ? by the source. Select Local:8:I.Ch0Data. You will have to scroll down to find the Channel data tags.

4. Double click the ? by the destination. Select Local:7:O.Ch0Data. You will have to scroll down to find the Channel data tags.

5. The rung should look like the following.

Adding the Timer to the Logic 1. Select rung 0. Right click in the blue highlighted area to the left of rung zero and select Start Pending Rung Edits.

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2. The ladder editor will now look similar to the following:

The rung with the Is on the power rails is the rung you will perform the edits on.

3. Click the OTE instruction so it becomes highlighted.

4. From the Instruction Toolbar click on the Timer/Counter tab, click the Timer On (TON) icon.

A timer is inserted into the code to the right of the OTE instruction.

In RSLogix 5000 you can string output instructions together. You do not have to create branches.

5. On the timer instruction right click in the blue area next to the word Timer and select New Tag.

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The New Tag window appears. You notice that the Data Type is already set to TIMER. This is because you are creating a tag in a timer instruction.

6. In the Name field enter Timer then click Create

7. Verify that the tag has been created in the timer instruction as shown below:

8. Double-click on the 0, in the timer instruction, next to the word Preset.

9. Enter a value of 32767.

In Logix the Timer Preset is a 32-bit DINT which means the maximum value for your timers can be: 2,147,483,647

10. Press Enter. Your TON instruction should now appear as shown below.

Your Preset value is now 32767 milliseconds. Leave the accumulated value set to zero. You are now ready to verify the edits you made.

11. Click on the Finalize All Edits icon

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12. When asked to finalize all edits click on YES.

The ladder editor will now appear as follows:

Testing Your Logic 1. Press the DI0 (Motor_Start) pushbutton. 2. Verify that DO0 (Motor_Run) illuminates and the Timer instruction starts incrementing. 3. Now, press push button DI1 (Motor_Stop). 4. Verify that DO0 turns off and the Timer resets. 5. Turn the AI0 potentiometer to 5. 6. Verify that the AO0 meter reads 5 Volts. 7. Turn the AI0 potentiometer to MAX. 8. Verify that the AO0 meter reads 10 Volts.

Congratulations! You have Completed Section 6.

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Forcing I/O and Toggling Bits in RSLogix 5000 Software


After completing this lesson, you should be able to troubleshoot 1756 I/O module problems by performing the following tasks: Force digital and analog I/O values Toggle bits

Force Functions
Forcing: A software function that allows a user to enable or disable an input or output independent of the executable programming language. Forcing an I/O value can be used for any of the following troubleshooting situations: Checking field wiring Checking the functionality of field output devices Testing a portion of executable programming language Simulating inputs that have not been wired Temporarily correcting mis-wired field devices Force-On Function: Allows a user to enable an input module data point, regardless of the state of the input circuit, or an output circuit, regardless of the state of the output module data point. Force-Off Function: Allows a user to disable an input module data point, regardless of the state of the input circuit, or an output circuit, regardless of the state of the output module data point. Analog Force Function: Allows a user to set an analog I/O value regardless of the state of the input or output modules channel data value. Rules for Forcing Follow these rules when forcing any I/O values: Always check for forced values in the program before enabling forces. Apply forces only to real inputs and outputs. Understand the following points when using forcing functions: Enabling or disabling forces acts on all installed forces. Uploading the program uploads the forces. If forces are enabled, all forced values will take effect immediately. Forces are saved and downloaded with a project. Safety Precautions All force functions can result in sudden machine movement. Consider these factors before forcing I/O values: Potential danger to personnel Machine response to forced I/O Possible effects on other portions of the machine/process Company policy concerning forcing I/O (e.g., is authorization required?)

State of Forces
The state of forces in the controller is displayed in the RSLogix 5000 Online toolbar:

Interpretation of the state of forces is shown in the following table:

Forces can also be installed and displayed through editors, such as the Ladder editor:

A forced input or output is also installed and/or displayed in the tags collection:

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Depending on the controller, the state of forces may also be displayed on a Force LED: The LED status can be interpreted using the following table:

If the Status is Off Amber Flashing Amber

Then the state of forces is.. No forces are installed Forces are enabled Forces are installed but not enabled

Toggling Bits Toggling an internal bit changes the binary value of that bit. For example, if a bit with a value of 0 is toggled, it will have a new value of 1.

Troubleshooting Logix5000 Controller Problems

After completing this lesson, you should be able to troubleshoot Logix5000 controller problems by performing the following tasks: Identify fault types Resolve a non-recoverable major fault Find and clear a recoverable major or minor fault

Controller LEDs
Changes to the controller status indicators anytime after startup mayindicate a change or a problem. When a failure in a system occurs, view the LEDs in this order:

Identifying Fault Types


The controller detects three main categories of faults: Non-recoverable major fault Recoverable major fault Minor fault

Non-Recoverable Major Fault


Non-Recoverable Major Fault: A fault within the controller that is severe enough to shut it down. Hardware failure causes such a fault. With a non-recoverable major fault, the following changes take place in the system: Outputs change to the Fault Mode state set in the I/O configuration: o o o On Off Hold

The controller OK LED turns solid red. The word Faulted is displayed in the Online toolbar.

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Recoverable Major Fault


Recoverable Major Fault: A fault that is severe enough to shut down the controller if the condition is not cleared. A recoverable major fault can be of two categories: Instruction execution Other errors: o o o Power loss Loss of critical I/O Array subscript errors

Recoverable Major Fault Processing: Level 1 When a recoverable major fault first occurs, the following changes take place in the system: A major fault bit is set in the controller. Any user-programmed fault routines are executed: o o Program-level fault routine Controller-fault handler

Fault Routine
Each program can have its own fault routine: The controller executes the programs fault routine when an instruction-related fault occurs. If a fault is cleared, the routine continues executing at the instruction immediately after the one that caused the fault: o The controller does not enter Fault mode. A fault routine normally contains logic to identify a fault and sometimes clear it: Controller Fault Handler Each project contains a Controller Fault Handler folder. A programmer may add one optional program to it. A controller fault handler executes in the following situations: When a recoverable major fault is not related to an instruction When a program fault routine does not exist or could not clear an instruction-related fault At minimum, a main routine must be created and assigned:

Recoverable Major Fault Processing: Level 2 If the controller fault handler does not exist or cannot clear the recoverable major fault, the controller enters Fault mode and shuts down: Outputs change to the configured output state for Program mode. The controller OK LED flashes red. o The word Faulted is displayed in the Online toolbar:

Multiple Recoverable Major Faults With multitasking capabilities, a controller can handle as many as 32 simultaneous recoverable major faults. If multiple recoverable major faults are reported, the following actions take place: The controller processes the faults in the order that they occur. If any of the faults are not cleared by the controller fault handler, the controller goes into Fault mode: o o The fault that was not cleared and up to two additional faults are logged. This information can be viewed via the Major Faults tab in the controller properties.

If over 32 major faults occur at the same time, the controller goes into Fault mode: o The first three major faults are logged into the controller fault log.

If a watchdog fault occurs a second time in the same logic scan, the controller enters Fault mode, whether or not the controller fault handler clears the fault.

Common Major Faults


The Major Fault Types and Codes appendix in the Troubleshooting Guide identifies some common faults and their corrective actions: Required I/O connection has failed Array subscript is too big A timer has a negative preset or accumulated value Task watchdog timer has expired Others

Minor Fault
Minor Fault: A fault that is not severe enough to shut down the controller: Low battery Serial port problems With a minor fault, the following changes take place in the system: The program scan and normal I/O control continues. The controller OK LED remains solid green. A minor fault bit is set.

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Finding and Clearing a Recoverable Major or Minor Fault


To properly address a recoverable major or minor fault, you must perform the following steps in this order: 1. Identify the cause of fault using the software. 2. Fix or remove the actual cause of the fault (e.g., correct the programming, adjust the watchdog timer value, etc.) 3. Clear the fault indication in the software.

Section 7: (Optional) Using RSLogix 5000 Help


This lab section should take roughly 15 minutes to complete.

Objective:
In this lab we will explore the extensive online Help system in RSLogix 5000. In this lab you will be viewing: Instruction help Module wiring diagrams On-line reference materials 3rd party vendor sample projects The Start Page Quick Start

Instruction Help 1. From the Help pull down menu select Instruction Help.

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The following window will appear.

2. Click on an instruction to locate its description, details about its parameters, and related instructions along with examples on how to use the instruction.

Viewing I/O Module Wiring Diagrams 1. From the Help pull down menu select Contents. 2. Select the Search tab if it is not already selected. 3. Type in 1756-IA16 as the keyword to find then click on List Topics. 4. Select a topic to display from the list such as, Wiring Diagram.

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5. Click Display to view the wiring diagram for this module. Note you may need to maximize your screen.

6. When you are finished viewing the wiring diagram close the display window.

Using Start Pages 1. From the Help pull down menu select Quick Start Start Page. which is one of the three tabs available from the

Organizes various resources intended to accelerate the customers ability to use the software and to locate relevant information Provides Getting Started and My First Project media clips and tutorials to assist new users Provides easy navigation to RSLogix 5000 sample projects Rockwell Automation specific and those involving other vendors

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Learning Center Tab


Targets customers wanting to learn or explore how to use the software beyond just getting started reduces learning curve and helps increase productivity.

Whats New media clips or tutorials previewing new features How Do I media clips or tutorials organized under various topics to show the user how to use the software to complete common tasks Did You Know tips / tricks for using the software, e.g. Keyboard Shortcuts

Resource Center
Targets a customer looking for additional information or support Provides links to Download sites for software, firmware, EDS files, etc Provides links to Support sites Knowledgebase, Technical Bulletins, Sample Code Provides links to Online books installed to the PC with RSLogix 5000.

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Section 8: (Optional) Assigning IP Addresses Communication module with BOOTP/DHCP


The BOOTP/DHCP Server utility is used to assign IP addresses to Compact Logix Ethernet Module. The BOOTP/DHCP utility is installed during the RSLogix 5000 programming software installation. Launch BOOTP/DHCP Server utility. If running this utility for the first time, you will get a Network Setup Error message. Click OK. You are then asked to enter the subnet mask in step 3.

Otherwise, select Tools>Network Settings.

Enter the Subnet Mask recorded in Appendix A for your computer.

Click OK. The Request History displays all devices in your network that need IP addresses. The Ethernet (MAC) addresses correspond to the addresses entered in your notes. Double-click a request from one of the devices. Enter the IP address that you recorded in your notes and click OK. If you are not on an isolated network, obtain IP addresses from your network administrator. Repeat steps 5 - 6 for each device. If a device is power cycled, it will not retain its IP address unless you disable BOOTP/DHCP. Select the first device in the Relation List and click Disable BOOTP/DHCP.

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