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Annotated Bibliography Media Sources

Brook, Allen. U.S. Marines in Operation. N.d. Wikipedia. Vietnam War. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. This is an image of American soldiers fighting in the Vietnam war. Cannabis Sativa Plant. N.d. Wikipedia. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. This is an image of a marijuana leaf that we used on our homepage and for our banner. La Drogue Confisquer Lundi a Tijuana. N.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. This is an image of a large drug seizure which took place on the United States-Mexico border. Mallorca. DEA Operation. 2005. Wikipedia. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. This is an image of a man being arrested by DEA agents that we used on our Consequences II Nixon Campaigns. N.d. Wikipedia. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/21/NIXONcampaigns.jpg>. This photo of president Nixon was used in our Introduction page. N.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. <http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/druzifer/14665821/964397/964397_original.jpg>. This is an image of an African-American man getting arrested, which we used on our Consequences I page. Stop N Frisk. N.d. Black Agenda Report. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. This is an image that we used on our consequences II page, of an African-American man getting arrested after a stop and frisk. U.S. Incarceration Rates 1925, Onwards. N.d. Wikipedia. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. This is a graph which shows the increase of the U.S. prison population, we used it on our Prisons page.

Primary Sources Belenko, Steven R. Drugs and Drug Policy in America: A Documentary History. Westport, CT:

Greenwood, 2000. Print. This book is a collection of primary documents related to drugs and drug policy in the United States. It contains a total of 271 primary sources documents which range from newspaper articles to government acts. This source is credible because its editor is easy to identify and it was published. It is also credible because all of its primary sources are cited and can be easily traced back to their original publication. We used this source to gather historical perspective on the War on Drugs. The newspaper articles were helpful to understand public opinion towards the war on drugs and also provided us with background info in the early stages of our research. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Unintentional Drug Poisoning in the United States." July 2010. Web. This source contains a number of statistics regarding drug related deaths in the United States. It is credible because it was published by the CDC which is a government agency and it contains publishing information. We used this source to gather information about drug related deaths in America over the past 30 years. Drug Enforcement Administration. "DEA.gov / History." DEA.gov. Web. This source provided more information about the DEA and its history in addition to the DEA's published print source which we cited earlier. This source was more easy to navigate and allowed us to learn about the historical context related to the War On Drugs and the early years of the DEA. This source is credible because it was published and edited by a government agency. We primarily used this source to gather information about the Drug Enforcement Agency's strategies so that we could formulate our argument for Roman numeral III. Drug Enforcement Administration. Drug Enforcement Administration, A Tradition of Excellence 1973-2008. Print. United States Depository, 2008. This source, which was published and written by the Drug Enforcement Administration, provides in depth information about the background, operations, and objective of the DEA. It also includes information about different drug cartels such as the Medellin and Cali cartels. This source is credible because it was published by a government administration meaning that it would have been edited to ensure accuracy. This source helped me to better understand the War On Drugs from the government's point of view, because I learned what their strategies were and how they expected them to limit the flow of drugs into the United States. Overall, this source was used primarily for background research and formulating the thesis. "A Former U.S. Police Chief Stirs the Pot on Drug Laws." Crime and Punishment: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 7881. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 29 Jan 2014.

This source gave us information on a police officer's opinion on the legalization of drugs, which helps us better understand the legalization aspect of the War on Drugs. This source is credible because it was published and it is easy to find the author. Nixon, Richard. "Special Message to the Congress on Drug Abuse Prevention and Control." National Archives and Records Administration.17 June 1971. This speech, which was given by President Richard Nixon in 1971, marks the beginning of the War On Drugs. This source is credible because it was delivered by a U.S. President meaning that it would have been fact checked by speech writers, prior to being delivered. Our group used this source to gather background information that we could use in our introduction about why the War on a Drugs was initiated. Office of National Drug Control Policy. "About ONDCP | The White House." Web. This source documents the history of the Office of National Drug Control Policy which was established by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. This source is credible because it was published and edited by a government agency. We used this source when writing Roman numeral III, because it helped us better understand United States' drug policy during the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Office of National Drug Control Policy. "The Price of Illicit Drugs: 1981 Through the Second Quarter of 2001." Web. October 2001. This source provides in depth statistics related to prices of illicit drugs in the United States including heroin, marijuana, methamphetamine, and cocaine. It is credible because it was published by a government agency and received the Seal of the Executive Office of the President of the United States of America. Our group used this source to provide statistical evidence regarding drugs prices when we were typing up roman numeral II of our outline. "Prisoners In Custody Of State Or Federal Correctional Authorities, 1977-98." Publications and Products: Prisoners. 1 Sept. 2000. Web This source provides statistics related the the number of prisoners in the U.S. prison system. This source is credible because it was published by a government agency and contains information about when it was published. We used this source to find information about the U.S. prison population over time, so that we had evidence to support our argument in Roman numeral IV. The White House. National Drug Control Strategy. Web. January 1990. This source details drug control strategy specifically for the year 1990. It provides a number of in depth statistics about the success of past strategies and explains the

purpose of the new strategies. It is highly detailed and informative. It also provides historical context for the War On Drugs during that time period. The source is credible because it was published by the White House meaning that it is thoroughly fact checked and intended to provide accurate information. Secondary Sources Abadinsky, Howard. "Drug Trafficking." Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Grolier Online, 2014. Web. 7 Mar. 2014. This source helped us find out who the drug distributors are. Also where most of the drugs that are found in the US come from. We used this in our project to help us understand how the administration for drug control handled this. It is credible because it was published in an encyclopedia and it is easy to find the author. "A Brief History of the Drug War." Drug Policy Alliance. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Feb.2014. This website gives an overall summary of the drug war and includes many main points and important people who were involved with the topic. The way I used this source was to gain basic background knowledge on the drug war and gain a very basic understanding. I believe this source is credible because it is a .org website with a copy right date and the website includes an "about us" for the authors and creators of the website. "Criminal Justice Fact Sheet." NAACP. Web. This website included a number of specific fact about America's criminal justice system. This source is credible because it is a .org website and has an "about" page which provides information about the organization. The NAACP is also a nationally recognized civil rights group. We used this source to provide evidence for our Roman Numeral III. "Drug Enforcement Administration." Encyclopedia Americana. Growlier Online, 2014. Web. 6 Mar. 2014. This source gave us information on what the government did to prevent drugs from entering the U.S. and also what acts were made to reduce the amount of drug use. This source is credible because it was published in an encyclopedia meaning that it was edited and reviewed before being put online. Duke, Brent. "Race and the War on Drugs." Poverty & Prejudice: Paradoxes of U.S. Drug Policies. Stanford University, 04 June 1999. This source details the relationship between United States drug policy and race. It provides evidence to support the notion that the War on Drugs has unfairly targeted black communities. The source is credible because it includes citations, it is part of a

lecture given at Stanford University, and there is information about the author and the publishing date. We used this source primarily to gather evidence to support our argument for Roman numeral IV. Duke, Steven B., and Albert C. Gross. "The Drug War Cannot Succeed." America's Longest War: Rethinking Our Tragic Crusade against Drugs. New York: Putnam's Sons, 1993. 200-27. Print. This source described the failures of the War on Drugs and detailed why the efforts to reduce supply were ineffectual. This source is credible because it was formally published, contains extensive citations, and it is easy to find information about the author and publishing company. We used this source to formulate our arguments for Roman numerals II, III, and IV. It helped is to understand exactly why the War on a Drugs wasn't succeeding, which allowed us to improve our argument. Fisher, Gary. Rethinking Our War On Drugs: Candid Talk About Controversial Issues. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 2006. Print. This source, while slightly biased against the War on Drugs, provided useful statistics which detailed how it had failed to accomplish its objective. We used these statistics to formulate and support our argument that the War on Drugs was a failure. The source is credible because it uses extensive citations and was nationally published. It also includes extensive information about the author. Goode, Erich. "Drug Abuse." Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Grolier Online, 2014. Web. 3 Feb. 2014 Grolier offers information on many different topics, and is a school database that is used to find credible sources. This is how I know this source is credible, and it also has the authors name at the bottom of the information. I used this source to gain more information on the topic. Goode, Erich, and Nachman Ben-yehuda. "The American Drug Panic of the 1980s." The American Drug Panic of the 1980s. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Feb. 2014. This website has a time specific topic of the drug war. It includes a lot of instances during the time period that contributed to the significance of the drug war. This website was mainly used to gather specific references to occasions during this time period. The site is credible because it is a .org website, includes authors, publishers, and a copyright date. The House I Live In. Dir. Eugene Jarecki. 2012. The House I Live In is a documentary about people's experiences with drugs, and the

shortcomings of the War on Drugs. This website was used to help us gain understanding and basic knowledge of the policies that the United States has when it comes to drug possession and use. It also helped when we were developing our argument for Roman numeral III. This documentary is credible because it is easy to find information about who made it and it includes first hand accounts from a wide array of people who are affected by or involved with the War on Drugs. It also cited the statistics it used in the film. Kass, Dorean; Telesmanich, Jim; and Wright, Matt "The United States War on Drugs." Poverty & Prejudice. Stanford University. Spring 1999. This source is on overall detail of the War on Durgs and gives statistics related to drug arrests, drug captures, and drug use. This source is credible because it is apart of a lecture given at Stanford University, contains author information, and it has many citations. We used this source to provide evidence for our Roman numeral I. Lloyd, Jennifer. "Drug Use Trends." Drug Use Trends. White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, Oct. 2002. Web. This source contains a number of facts related to drug use in America since the 1970s. It is credible because it is easy to find author information, it contains citations for all facts, and it was published by the ONDCP which is a government agency. We used this source to prove our argument for Roman numeral I. Marque Sole, Jason. "The War on Drugs." Council on Crime and Justice. Web. This source describes the effect that the War on Drugs has had on the American prison population as well as the African-American communities in the U.S. This source is credible because it is a .org website, has easy to find author information, and includes citations. We used this source to provide evidence for our argument in Roman numerals I and IV regarding the impact that the War on Drugs has had on minority communities and prisons. Musto, David. The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control. 3rd edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. Print. This source details the events leading up to the War on Drugs as well as the history of drug control. This source is credible because it contains an extensive list of citations, it provides ample information about the author, and it was formally published. We used this source specifically for gaining historical perspective regarding the War on Drugs. It helped us to better understand the social changes which took place in the 1960s and the significance of the Vietnam War, both in relation to the war on drugs. National Public Radio. "Timeline: America's War on Drugs." NPR, 2 Apr. 2007.

This source provides a detailed timeline of the events leading up to and during the War on Drugs. It mentions the important figures in the War On Drugs as well as the most significant dates. This source is credible because it contains a number of citations and links to primary sources and it was apart of a published television series. This was our most helpful source in terms of background research. It helped us to understand the what, when, and who in regards to the War on Drugs. PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 02 Feb. 2014. This website was a brief timeline of events that happened during the war on drugs. It included many things before the war was declared and after the war was declared. I used this website to gain a basic understanding of when things happened and what year major events happened during this time period. This website is credible because it is featured on popular and well known website and it includes a copyright date. President Nixon Declares 'War' on Drugs." Medicine, Health, and Bioethics: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 297-300. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 28 Jan. 2014. This source was very helpful with our project. It provided us with background information on how the "War on Drugs" came to be. Also the information from the article provided us with details on who was affected by drug addiction and what treatment was provided for drug addiction. This source is credible because it was published in an online database and the author is easy to find. Stimmel, Barry. Drug Abuse and Social Policy in America: The War That Must Be Won. New York: Haworth Medical, 1996. 93-127 Print. This source provided information as to why the war on drugs wasn't as successful as it should have been and it contained a number of drug usage statistics. This source is credible because it contains an extensive list of citations, it was formally published, and it is easy to find information about the author. We used this source to help formulate our thesis and our argument for Roman numeral III. Suddath, Claire. "The War on Drugs." Time Incorporated, 25 March 2009. Web. This source provides a broad summary of the effects of the War on Drugs. It details its overall cost as well as the significance of the Colombian drug cartels with relation to the Drug Enforcement Administration. This source is credible because it was published in a national magazine and it is easy to find the author and her credentials. The source was used primarily for background research. We didn't draw any evidence from it, but it helped us understand the overall significance of our topic. "The War on Drugs." American Decades. Ed. Judith S. Baughman, et al. Vol. 9: 1980-1989. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 20 Dec. 2013

This source gave us information on the success and failures that the government had when they first had started the war on drugs. This source is credible because it was published in an online database and it is easy to figure out who the author is.