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1) When you take a compass across the equator, it does NOT turn around to point in the opposite direction.

T

2) Can an electron at rest in a magnetic field be set into motion by the magnetic field?

No

What if it were in an electric field?

Yes

3) Did you watch the video lecture from the Mechanical Universe on Electromagnetic Induction? Yes

4) A magnetic dipole when placed not aligned in a non-uniform magnetic field will experience a both rotation & translation.

5) Two current loops are shown to the right. One of the loops is in a stable position, so it will return to this position if it is rotated slightly. The other loop is unstable, like an upside-down pendulum. Which loop which? Give a careful explanation, including force diagrams and magnetic moments.

The magnetic moment of Loop 2 is parallel to the magnetic field where as loop 1 is anti-parallel so its inclination is to be aligned like loop1. Using net torque and magnetic force, F = ILbsin !, will show this instability. Recall from lecture 35,

! , will show this instability. Recall from lecture 35, B • Loop 1 • Loop
! , will show this instability. Recall from lecture 35, B • Loop 1 • Loop

B

! , will show this instability. Recall from lecture 35, B • Loop 1 • Loop
! , will show this instability. Recall from lecture 35, B • Loop 1 • Loop
•
Loop 1
Loop 1
•

Loop 2

! ! τ = µ ! × B
!
!
τ
= µ ! ×
B

! =IA

35, B • Loop 1 • Loop 2 ! ! τ = µ ! × B
35, B • Loop 1 • Loop 2 ! ! τ = µ ! × B

is

6)

Each figure below shows two long straight wires carrying equal currents into and out of the page. At each of the dots, draw and label the magnetic field vector B 1 and B 2 of each wire. Then, using a double arrow (or a different color) draw and label the net magnetic field B net .

Magnetic fields “circle” around the current in the direction given by RHR1. The magnetic field at a given location is in the direction that is tangent to the circle around the current, perpendicular to the radial line from the current to the location. Note that this problem required you to draw the magnetic field vectors B 1 and B 2 as well as B net .

a) B net
a)
B net
Wire 1 b) B net •
Wire 1
b)
B net

Wire 2

Wire 1

 
•

 
•

Wire 2

7) A magnet and a current loop are drawn. The loop is perpendicular to the plane of the paper. The current loop exerts a repulsive force on the bar magnet. On the figure, show the direction of the current in the loop. Explain your answer. Recall from lecture 35 and your text, that loops of current act as magnets. Like magnetic poles repulse, thus the current in the loop should be out at the top and into at bottom. If the magnet were a loop of currnt what be its

orientation.

N S
N
S
magnet were a loop of currnt what be its orientation. N S 8) A uniform external
magnet were a loop of currnt what be its orientation. N S 8) A uniform external

8) A uniform external magnetic field points upward, in the plane of the paper. A wire is perpendicular to the paper. When the wire carries a current, the magnetic field at point 2 is zero.

B net 1
B
net
1

B

2
2

1 cm

the magnetic field at point 2 is zero. B net 1 B 2 1 cm B
B net 3
B
net
3

B wire

at point 2 is zero. B net 1 B 2 1 cm B net 3 B

a) What is the direction of the current?

To produce the magnetic field in the opposite direction at position 2, the current must be going into the page.

b) Point 1 is the same distance from the wire as point 2. What is the direction of the net magnetic

field at point 1? The external magnetic field is uniform everywhere meaning that the same size vector is still present at point 1, even if not drawn there. Because of the current in the wire there is a component of the net magnetic field pointing to the right. Since both components must be the same magnitude (1 is the same distance from the wire as is 2), thus net B-field is 45 degrees from the horizontal.

c) Point 3 is twice as far from the wire as point 2. Draw and clearly label the net magnetic field

vector at point 3. The B-field vector from the wire points down with half the magnitude as at 2 (why?), B external is uniform pointing up with the same magnitude as at 2, therefore the net B-field vector is parallel and half the size as the external field vector at that location.

9) Before the turn of the century a young English physicist named J.J. Thompson experimented with cathode ray tubes similar to those you used in DL to make the first significant discoveries of the electron. In these tubes mysterious cathode rays would be observed. Thompson suspected these “rays” to be charged particles. The following are experiments he made to test this hypothesis.

a)

If this negatively charged particle initially moving only to the right enters a uniform magnetic field of

10 -3 Tesla, as shown below, draw and explain the path it will take through the magnetic field. [Note:

assume the particle has o n l y been influenced by the magnetic field and that it does not hit the plates.]

Plate A - B
Plate A
-
B

Plate B

Note that the velocity of the charged particle points to the right, as drawn. There is a constant B field which points out of the page. Right Hand Rule #2 thus tells us that if the moving charge were positive, there would be a force on the particle initially pointing toward the bottom of the page. However, since

the charge is negative, the direction of the force is reversed. Therefore, the

charge will experience a force that initially points toward the top of the page. This force will always be perpendicular to the particles direction of travel. This will result in the path of the particle being a circle with a counter-clockwise rotation.

Does the charge move faster as it approaches the plate?

b)

In order for this particle to continue to move in a straight path to the right with no deflection a uniform E-field of strength 40,000 N/C is established from plate A to plate B. In order to do this, the net charge on plate A must be negative and on plate

B positive. Draw, on the right, the particle’s complete force diagram that satisfies

these conditions. You should neglect gravity for now.

F B on charge.

For the particle to continue with no deflection, the sum of the forces acting on the

F elec. on charge

particle must be zero (Newton’s First Law). Thus the electric force on the particle caused by the charged plates must be equal and opposite to the magnetic force found in part a (of course, both vectors should be the same length). To cause an electric force pointing toward the bottom of the page, Plate A must be negative and Plate B must be positive (like charges repel,

opposite charges attract).

c) Calculate the velocity of the particle (Note: Tesla = kg C -1 s -1 )

The magnitude electric force is given by F = qE. The magnitude of the magnetic force is given by F = qvBsinθθθθ. The magnitudes of the forces are equal as given in part b, thus qvBsinθθθθ = qE. Therefore, v = E/B = (40,000 N/C)/(10 -3 T) = 4.0 X 10 7 m/s, which is more than 13% c.

Plate A

-
-

E

Plate B

F E on charge.

F Earth on charge

d) In a separate situation, if this negative particle is measured to have a mass

of 9.11 x 10 -31 kg, then an E-field of 5.5729 x 10 -11 N/C between the two plates, as shown below, in combination with gravity can prevent the particle from accelerating. Draw a force diagram for the particle and determine what must be its charge. Since the particle is not accelerating, the force due to gravity must be equal and opposite to the electric force produced by the charged plates. For balanced forces, mg = qE, therefore q = (9.11x 10 -31 kg)(9.8m/s 2 )/(5.5729 x 10 -11 N/C) = 1.602 x 10 -19 C. Since the charge is given to be negative, q = -1.602 x 10 -19 (it’s an electron)

10) All three long wires drawn below weigh 50 g/m and have the same amount of current passing through them. The bottom two wires are laid down on a table. First, draw and label each B field vector on wire 3, including the net B field vector, created by wires 1 and 2. Second, draw the direction that the current must be flowing in wire 3, the upper wire, so that it will “float” or “hover” above the bottom two wires forming an equilateral triangle? Lastly, what must be the value of this current I (Hint: this problem will be impossible unless you do all your algebra in variable form first)? The first part is very similar to problem 6 and the second part to problem 8. Equating the forces and substituting I for B, will yield a solvable expression for I. F B = IlB net =mg=F Earth

B net =B 1 sin30 + B 2 sin30 = " Isin30/ # r

[30 degrees form the vertical]

F B on wire B 2 B net B 1 F Earth on wire 2
F B on wire
B
2
B
net
B
1
F Earth on wire
2

I 2 = (# rg/ " sin30)(m/l)

1 F Earth on wire 2 I 2 = ( # rg/ " sin30)(m/l) 1 4

1

4 cm

11) A long hollow conducting cylindrical shell has conducting material between a and b, i.e. for a < r <b carries a uniform current density J circularly around

!

J

ˆ

= J θ .

0

region between a < r < b, as shown where

B-field for r > b is approximately zero. The positive z-direction is along the axis of the cylinder as

shown (Your hint: this has the same geometry as a solenoid). Apply Ampere's law to find the magnitude direction of the B-field for a < r < b.

magnitude direction of the B-field for a < r < b. a n d t h

and

this

The

and

We have the same geometry as a solenoid, so choose an amperian path that is similar. The cylinder is shown in cross section. For r < a:

The only contribution is for the lower side. B is approximately zero along the top. B is perpendicular to the vertical sides !!!! !B · dl = BL. Applying Ampere's law, the amount of current flowing through the surface bounded by the path is:

JA ! = J(b - a)L !!!! BL = ! 0 J(b-a)L!!!! B = ! 0 J(b - a).

the surface bounded by the path is: JA ! = J(b - a)L ! ! !

12) A conducting bar of mass m and length L slides over horizontal that are connected to a current source which maintains a constant I through the bar. There is a constant magnetic field B pointing filling the region between the rails.

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x x x x x x rails x x x x x x current
x
x x
x x
x
x rails
x
x
x
x
x
x
current
x
x
x
!"
x
x
x
straight through and
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
!!"
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

a) Find the magnitude and direction of the net force on the conducting bar. Ignore friction, air resistance,

electrical resistance, or any other complications you can surmise.

F

= ILB and using your right hand it is pointing to the left.

b)

If the bar starts from rest, find the distance d along the rails that the bar must move to attain a speed v.

v 2 = v i 2 + 2ad = 0 + 2IlBd/m

d = mv 2 /(2IlB)

this is the same result as d = $ KE/W/d

13) A closed loop of wire carrying a current I is comprised of a semicircular arc and a straight wire as shown. A uniform external magnetic field B points into the page. Find the magnitude and direction of the force on only the semicircular part of the loop.

I R I
I
R
I

Method 1:

The net force on the closed loop must be zero, so the force on the bottom line, which is 2RIB pointing up is opposite in direction of the force on the top arc.

Method 2:

Integrate along the semicircle, F = Idl X B = IBsin !dl. Use dl = rd ! and integrate from o to # and get the same result as above. Note this is for the vertical components, since the horizontal components cancel by symmetry.