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C o n t e n t s
C a me r a
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D i g i t a l S e r v i c e s
L i g h t i n g
S e r v i c e s
D - 20 at t he Met aVi si on User Tr i al s 04
A R R I F L E X 435 Xt r eme 08
Andr ew Lesni e Lect ur es at Ber l i nal e 10
A Quest i on of t he Lens 13
A R R I MOT I ON Dol l y Wor l d Pr emi er e 20
A R R I MOT I ON Lapt op Sof t war e 22
Updat ed A R R I C A M D o c u me n t a t i o n 23
A R R I L D S f or Al l Appl i cat i ons 24
Updat ed Wi r el ess Lens Cont r ol Syst em 26
Di gi t al I nt er medi at e on t he Move
Fot oKem 14
Li pSyncPost 16
Wor l dwi de 18
A R R I S C A N Mi cr o- scanni ng
and Appl i cat i on Mat ched Par amet er s 28
C o l o r Ma n a g e me n t a Sneak Pr evi ew 30
Need a Pi t St op? 31
G R A ND E F R AT E L L O Bi g Br ot her i n I t al y 32
SKY PANE L Lat est Pr oduct I nf or mat i on 33
A R R I s S K Y PA NE L Recei ves Honorabl e Menti on from L D I 34
A R R I X 5 Adds HMI Fl oodl i ght t o t he Event Range 34
I SO 9001: 2000 A Smal l Si gn wi t h a Bi g Si gni f i cance 35
On - Set wi t h C UR S E D 36
A R R I F L E X 16S R 3 Spr i nt s Ef f or t l essl y f or Ni ke 38
Super Bowl & Wi nt er X- Games 40
CSC New Yor k Cel ebr at es i t s 50T H Anni ver sar y 42
D I RT Y D A NC I NG : HAVA NA NI G HT S 43
Who i s Shoot i ng i n Canada? 44
Z A PATA Revol ut i onar y Dr eams i n Mexi co 46
Pai nt i ng wi t h Li ght 48
What s i t Al l About , Ashl ey? 50
A R R I C A Ms i n Denmar k 52
The Futur e Looks Br i ght for South Afr i ca 52
Vi ve l a Fr ance Vi ve l A R R I C A M 53
L A K S HYA Fi l mi ng i n I ndi a on Hi gher Gr ound 56
Di gi t al I nt er medi at e at ARRI Di gi t al Fi l m 60
T R I X X E R 62
Di gi t al Fr ui t Show 65
Ger man Fi l ms Shot Abr oad 66
Tur ki sh Success Fi l m V I OZ E NT E L E 2
at A R R I Fi l m & TV i n Muni ch 67
Wi t h A R R I on t he Fast Lane 68
VAN HELSI NG 69
A R R I Rent al Li ght i ng and Gr i p on New Locat i on 70
A R R I Mi l estones at bvk Conventi on 71
A R R I Li ght i ng Sol ut i ons Ber l i n 72
Bei j i ng Fi l m Academy, Chi na 73
Congr at ul at i on t o t he Wi nner s 74
I nsi ght i nt o a Fi l m Geni us Br ai n 75
BSC Oper at or s Ni ght 75
Ret ur n of t he A R R I - Team . . . 76
A Sel ect i on of Cur r ent l y Ser vi ced Pr oduct i ons 77
ARRI Rental Germany ARRI Media Camera Service Center (CSC)
ARRI Lighting Rental ARRI Visual Effects ARRI Commercials
ARRI Sound ARRI Lab TV Drama
Wo r l d wi d e
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Dear Fr i ends of Fi l m
I am delighted to present to you our NAB 2004 edition of the ARRI News. As in
the past, you will find articles on our product innovations and reports from film
productions around the world. A special section is devoted to Digital Intermediate.
DI is probably the most innovative technology in film production since computer
generated imaging. The technical building blocks for the DI process have signifi-
cantly improved and matured in the past two years. Today, film scanners, IT-based
storage systems, conforming and color grading packages along with film recor-
ders offer highest image quality and reasonable throughput at affordable costs.
Based on this technology, the success of DI will quickly spread across the globe.
We are proud to be a driving factor in this innovation with the market introduction
of the ARRISCAN.
This NAB there will be together with the ARRILASER and the color management
software a commercial film-to-film solution available to the film industry for the
first time ever that can form the backbone of the DI process.
As 35 mm negative film capture is the undebated quality source of the DI process,
ARRI is continuously designing and improving products for film capture. This NAB
we will be presenting the 435 Xtreme.
Based on the proven 435 platform, the 435X will incorporate the latest innova-
tions such as the Lens Data System LDS along with a wide range of enhancements
in one package. The enhancements will address new functionalities and ease of
operation as well as speed issues.
Despite film still being the undisputed quality capture media, digital acquisition is
making inroads. ARRIs approach to digital capture was first shown as a functional
prototype called the D-20 at the last IBC. Since then, various improvements have
been implemented and a short-form film was shot. We attended several events in
Europe and the USA where we presented the D-20 concept and the prototype
camera. The response from cinematographers, rental and production was so encou-
raging that we are pushing the project and expect to have several prototype
cameras ready for pilot applications by the summer of this year.
But regardless of all the positive response we received for the good-looking images
from our first film shoot we are clearly aware of the inherent technical limitations of
digital capture and storage, today and in the foreseeable future. For this reason we
continue to invest in R &D projects for film-based products.
Please enjoy reading our magazine. For those of you who will be coming to NAB
this year: the international ARRI staff and myself are looking forward to meeting
you at the ARRI booth.
Sincerely
Franz Kraus
D-20
04 C a me r a
Since the first appearance of the D-20 at IBC2003 in Amsterdam there has been great
interest in the project and an enthusiastic response from the production community.
The D-20 functional demonstrator is based on a single, custom-made 6 million pixel
CMOS sensor, with an image area equal to that of a 35 mm full aperture film negative.
This novel approach allows the use of all conventional 35 mm format cine lenses.
Reflecting its ancestry and the wishes of the potential users, the D-20 is equipped with
a mirror reflex shutter and an optical viewfinder.
D-20 at the MetaVi si on
The next step in the development process was
to put the D-20 on a set to gain practical
experience and gather user feedback. The first
of many such tests took place during the
MetaVision user trials, a culmination of ARRIs
involvement in this European research pro-
ject. The D-20 itself was developed as an
integral part of the MetaVision project and
represents the image capture front-end of the
system, providing the required digital data
format while at the same time supporting the
needs of a professional camera team. To verify
the concepts developed in the project, the
user trials were designed as a complete test
production that put the MetaVision chain
through its paces and investigated its capa-
bilities in detail, including such aspects as
contrast handling, depth keying and slow
motion capabilities.
The shoot was arranged at the UK head-
quarters of MetaVision project leader Snell &
Wilcox across a day and a half of mixed
weather in November 2003. Director Tony
Salmon had created the concept of a clas-
sical music promo involving the talented
young violinist Nicola Benedetti, playing a
short piece by Henri Wieniawski.
The test gave the assembled high-tech gear
a good work out, including the D-20 func-
Director Tony Salmon (l.) and
DoP Greg Minassian
tional demonstrator, the equipment for depth
mapping from the BBC in the UK and the so-
phisticated disk-based recording technology
from Snell &Wilcox. Because of the D-20s
design, the production was able to use con-
ventional camera accessories and grip equip-
ment, which were provided by ARRI Media.
This was essential, as it allowed the equip-
ment to be brought out of the lab and onto a
professional outdoor set (albeit with some
very long cables!).
During the preparation day, Tony Salmon
together with DoP Graham Minassian asses-
sed the shots and decided that they needed
additional lenses. Since the D-20 utilizes
standard 35mm format lenses, ARRI Media
was readily able to supply the lenses from
its vast inventory. ARRI Lighting Rental sup-
plied all the required lighting equipment.
To support the unique features that had been
developed in the MetaVision project, the
camera was configured to run in a special
MetaVision mode that allowed images to be
captured at a rate of 72fps. While the full
28802160 pixel count of the D-20s image
sensor would have been beyond the data
handling capabilities of the test equipment
at this frame rate, the read-out flexibility pro-
vided by the CMOS-sensor made it possible
to downscale the frame size to 19201080
pixel to fit the available bandwidth.
To further lessen the data load, only every
third image was stored with its full informa-
tion content, representing a standard frame
rate of 24fps. The intermediate frames, on
the other hand, were significantly compress-
ed thus effectively reducing the required data
storage capacity.
In combination with the high quality stream
of 24fps frames, this special form of image
data provided the basis for adding motion
effects in post-production. Using the motion
05 C a me r a
Star violinist Nicola Benedetti features
in the MetaVision test production
User Tri al s
06 C a me r a
information contained in the intermediate
frames, it was possible to create a slow-
motion effect at greater than 72fps or add
motion blur to specific frames.
One of the sequences also utilised a novel
method of depth mapping, pioneered by BBC
Research &Development (another project
partner), using standard definition cameras
mounted to the left and right of the D-20 to
provide depth information. This additional
data was used in post-production as the ba-
sis for generating keys, providing the ability
to create composites without having to re-
sort to blue or green screen techniques while
shooting. This technology promises to be
especially useful for outdoor scenes.
Due to the experimental nature of the test set-
up the captured images required a substan-
tial amount of post-processing before it was
possible to view them in their final quality.
At the time of the test production, the came-
ra was not yet fitted with the live-HD output
that was developed to provide high quality
monitoring. During the shoot, the only live
image the crew could view was a black and
white respresentation of the raw MetaVision
data. Of course, as with any conventional
film camera they could rely on the optical
viewfinder for an accurate representation of
framing and composition. After confirming
the quality of some exposure tests that had
been processed offline, the crew was sure
that they got what they saw.
After extensive data-processing, editing and
grading, the opus finally had its premiere as
a digital projection on the big screen. As
part of a presentation of the MetaVision Pro-
ject by Snell &Wilcox, it was shown to pro-
fessionals from the production and post-pro-
duction industries at the Hollywood Post Alli-
ance Technology Retreat that was held in Palm
Springs, California in February of this year.
Nicola Benedetti at Snell & Wilcox
Two additional cameras provide depth
information for post production
The D-20 CMOS sensor provides
capture format flexibility within the
18 x 24 mm image area: 2880 x
2160, 2880 x 1620 or as in
MetaVision 1920 x 1080 pixels Slow motion sequence captured at 72 fps
07 C a me r a
The overall reaction was very positive. The
images show none of the typical artefacts
associated with video and the cine-lenses
create an excellent impression of depth.
DoP Graham Minassian was very enthusias-
tic about this experimental camera: I have
been shooting with ARRI cameras for more
than 30 years, but I have used standard-
resolution DigiBetas and HD-cameras as well.
For the first time while shooting (digital)
video, I could use an optical viewfinder, cine
lenses and other accessories without any
restrictions! The D-20 seems to be a real
ARRI as far as I can judge from this test.
Of course, the test production also uncovered
a number of areas where improvement will
be necessary before this innovative techno-
logy can be used efficiently in a professional
environment. Still, the tests proved that the
D-20 points in the right direction in combin-
ing the best of both worlds: Film-style opera-
tion and high quality digital image acquisition.
Bi l l Lovel l ,
Andreas Berkl ,
Mi chael Koppet z
The MetaVision Partners
Snell &Wilcox
ARRI
BBC R &D
INESC Porto
France 2
University of Padua
Film-style depth-of-field thanks to
the large format sensor
Crew for the test shoot
Director: Tony Salmon
DoP: Graham Minassian
Focus Puller: Alex Howe
Grip : John Rake
Gaffer: Bill Bulpitt
Technical
Advisors ARRI: Bill Lovell,
Andreas Berkl
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08 C a me r a
11 1995 08 1996 07 1997 02 1998 11 1998 05 2000
ARRIFLEX 435&435ES, 4 perforation
FEM-1
Anamorphic Viewfinder
Steadicam Magazine IVS 300m/1000 Magazine Single Frame System WRC-1
Available with either 4 or 3 perforation move-
ments, the 435Extreme combines the fea-
tures of the 435ES, 435Advanced and the
Functional Expansion Module 2 (FEM-2) in
one package, resulting in the most flexible
camera for MOS work. Still as small and
robust as its first iteration, the 435Extreme
is ideal for features, commercials, music vid-
eos, Steadicam, special effects or motion
control work alike.
Feedback from the market over the last ten
years has resulted in a multitude of new
functions and options for the 435Extreme:
A super bright high quality viewfinder,
available for either spherical or anamor-
phic viewing.
An extensive speed range from 0.1 to
150fps.
The latest generation of the ARRI Integrated
Video System, the IVS-2, not only shows a
brilliant, bright video image, but can
also superimpose camera status information
and frame lines, allows for automatic or
manual color balancing of the image and
can preview motion blur effects.
A new ramp generator improves ramping
capabilities with faster and smoother
ramps. An even wider ramping speed
range from 0.1 straight to 150fps is
possible.
With the Single Frame System the 435
Extreme transforms into a single frame/time
lapse camera. The unique Integrated
Capping Shutter (also available in 4 or 3
perforation) allows viewing of the view-
finder and video assist image even when
the shutter is closed.
With the Motion Control Interface (MCI)
the movement, mirror shutter and Internal
Capping Shutter can be independently
and frame accurately controlled by a
motion control computer.
Tight integration with the ARRIMOTION
system makes for a powerful set up that
includes frame accurate go motion, stop
motion and ramping capabilities.
From the ARRICAM the 435Extreme inher-
ited the built in Lens Data System (LDS
Ultra), which saves time and allows the assis-
tant to work more efficiently on the set.
Since the ARRI FLEX 435 camera
first saw the light of day in 1995,
it has become the workhorse of the
film industry, the golden standard
for MOS camera work. Over 1,200
cameras were sold worldwide,
and 435 cameras can be seen in
use in LA, Toronto, London and
Berlin, from the deserts of Dubai to
the wide Chinese landscapes, from
Africa to Australia. Based on the
original 435 design, ARRI has con-
tinuously updated the camera to
add versatility and features, culmi-
nating now in the 435 Extreme.
X
t r e m e
A R R I F L E X 435
09 C a me r a
07 2000 11 2000 07 2001 10 2001 05 2003
ARRIFLEX 435&435ES,
3- Perforation
IVS II Motion Control Interface ARRIFLEX 435 Advanced FEM-2
ARRIFLEX 435 Extreme
04 2004
The 435Extreme can be outfitted with an
extensive range of accessories for any
shooting situation. These include 120m/
400" magazine, a 300m/1000" maga-
zine, a Steadicam magazine, a 100%
Video Top, Single Frame System, Motion
Control Interface, Universal Radio Module,
Lens Data Displays, and ARRIMOTION.
The 435Extreme is of course also tightly
integrated into the existing ARRI acces-
sories, of which it shares many with the
ARRICAM, from the small and modular
Wireless Lens Control System, the Wire-
less Remote Control (WRC-1) to the range
of follow focuses and matte boxes.
The electronics for lens motors have been
integrated, and the camera side radio
modem (URM) for wireless lens and cam-
era control has its own place reserved,
giving the camera the smallest envelope
possible.
ARRI F L E X 435 Model Compar i son
Feature 435 435ES 435Advanced 435Extreme
Faster &smoother ramps
Ramps from 0.1 to 150fps
Lens Data System
Integrated lens motor electronics
Integrated modular wireless radio
(no cables)
ARRIMOTION frame accurate ramps
ARRIMOTION stop&go motion
Speed Range 0.1 to 150fps
Motion Control Interface
Slow ramp up for Steadicam&cranes
Electronic mirror shutter
Spherical or anamorphic viewfinder
Integrated Video System
4 or 3-Perforation movement
Compatible with Single Frame System
Single Frame System
I VS II
Motion Control
Interface
LDS Contacts
FEM-2
Las Vegas Shot Zuma Beach Shoot Meguiars Shoot
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10 C a me r a
Andr ew
Lesni e
Lectur es at Ber l i nal e
Wednesday, February 11 was cinematographers day at the Berlinale, Berlins big film festival. ARRI had invited
Andrew Lesnie, cinematographer of THE LORD OF THE RI NGS trilogy, to share some of his experiences during
two events. In the morning Andrew Lesnie appeared at the Hollywood Lectures, which were organized by Media
Business Academy. He talked about some of the organizational challenges of THE LORD OF THE RI NGS in front
of an audience of producers and cameramen, and showed and commented a tape of behind the scenes foota-
ge. The tape included most of the elements he had been asked about in the past, including the Massive pro-
gram, the horse chase, the issue of scale doubles, the creation of a digital Gollum and forced perspective.
In the afternoon he gave a lecture at the for-
mer convention hall known to Berliners as
the pregnant oyster (House of Word Cultures
now), as part of the Talent Campus series in
an auditorium filled with aspiring cinema-
tographers, directors and script writers. He
showed some earlier work, including scenes
from BABE and a documentary on weight lift-
ing with the now governor of California. While
discussing the specific techniques he used
in previous projects to translate scripts to the
screen, Andrew Lesnie explained how all
those lessons were applied in T HE L ORD OF
T HE RI NGS, and gave this advice: Twenty
years from now you draw on lessons from
when you were never thinking that you would
be at the helm of such a huge project. I guess
the lesson here is whatever you do, do it well,
since you never know when it will come in
handy. Below are some of the questions and
his answers compiled from those two events.
?: Is THE L ORD OF THE RI NGS now finished?
Andrew Lesnie: No, we are still working on
the third film. This is the first film I have ever
worked on where we are still shooting while
the film has actually been released to the
theatres. We are still filming miniatures, and
Weta Digital is still doing effects shots, and
I will go back to New Zealand in March to
time the extra footage for the extended DVD.
On top of the theatrical release there is going
to be an extra 49 minutes; the film is cur-
rently running 3 hours and 20 minutes, so it
will be 4 hours and 10 minutes for the ex-
tended DVD. So in fact Ive got several more
weeks work to get the third film done, and
that will be finished sometime in April, and
that will formally be the end of the project
for me.
?: Since there were a lot of units shooting
simultaneously, how did you manage that?
Andrew Lesnie: First I talked with Peter Jack-
son extensively about the film and defined
the look I wanted. Then we decided with the
separate departments on what equipment
and methods to use. During shooting I tried
to make their job as easy as possible while
still keeping the look constant. Every night I
watched the rushes from all units. Since at
times we had up to nine units going, that was
quiet a bit of film. Sometimes it was five hours
of rushes after a twelve hour day, and at the
end I would look around and the few people
that were still there would be snoring. That
evening or the next day I would call the other
DPs and let them know what I liked or dis-
liked.
?: Did you consider shooting T HE L ORD OF
THE RI NGS digitally?
Andrew Lesnie: I have looked at some HD
cameras but did not feel they were adequate.
Film is still by far the best capture medium,
11 C a me r a
and film cameras are much more practical
and versatile than digital cameras. Eventu-
ally the digital systems will get there, but the
truth is that film has taken a while to get
there also. I am not a film dinosaur, but I am
not a digital junkie either. I just try to pull
the appropriate resources together for the
project I work on. But I am also realistic
about the fact that films go through the digi-
tal intermediate process now.
?: How did the decision to use the digital
intermediate process (DI ) come about?
Andrew Lesnie: Peter Jackson and I decided
right from the beginning that we would
digitally grade the project. When I first met
Peter Jackson, the only film that had been
completely digitally timed was the Coen
brothers film OH BROT HER, WHERE ART
T HOU. Peter and I talked about the nature
of shooting our project, and my concerns
were that New Zealand has very turbulent
weather. I have often said that you can have
six seasons in one day; you can have every-
thing from a beautiful blue sunny sky to hail-
ing and then snow and then back to warm
weather. And that is the nature of why the
country has such beautiful landscapes and
looks so rich, because it has such melodra-
matic weather. So if you are filming and you
have to maintain continuity over several days
and you know there is not much likelihood of
that going to happen, then you have to start
investigating what you can put in place to
make it happen. For me, back in 1999, di-
gitally timing sequences was an opportunity
to allow us to keep shooting in weather that
wasnt so terrific. On a completely practical
level it allowed us to keep the momentum on
set, knowing that I had more facilities to do
something about it later. So that was a hard,
practical consideration, but there were others
also.
?: How did you determine if a shot in bad
weather could be saved by the digital inter-
mediate process?
Andrew Lesnie: I did extensive tests during
pre-production to see what it would take to
match two scenes shot in different weather,
to see how much the film would hold and
what could be restored in DI. From that I knew
how far we could go on the set. So if the
weather changed and it remained within
those parameters, we could just keep shoot-
ing. We could shoot longer and grade our
way out of it.
?: What other considerations were there in
regards to the digital intermediate process?
Andrew Lesnie: We knew that we would be
filming sequences that would include minia-
tures, aerials, life action plates, blue screen
elements and digital animation, and all these
things had to come together, even though
they were shot by several units shooting
right across New Zealand. So, lets say you
wanted to shoot an elvish sequence, and
you had the philosophical approach that it
was going to be cool pastel blues and dif-
fused, the problem would be that if you had
all these people applying different kinds of
diffusion or different levels of diffusion based
on the weather pattern or apply none based
on the fact that if it was blue screen, once all
that stuff came together it would be a real
mess. The digital intermediate allowed us to
seamlessly integrate all those elements. We
even color graded individual elements before
they were composited, and then graded the
finished effects shot again. This double grad-
ing was able to compensate for slight differ-
ences in the elements and is one of the rea-
sons the effects integrate so well with the
rest of the footage. With the DI process I had
complete control over the different looks
used in the films, and I was able to come up
with looks that we could not have been get-
ting during principal photography.
So the major reasons for digital intermediate
were the weather, the ability to control the
look with all those different elements and that
we had complete control over the entire pro-
ject after the fact and that we were not rely-
ing on the limited tools at the lab to do it.
?: So all three films used the digital interme-
diate process throughout?
Andrew Lesnie: The first film was not a com-
plete digital intermediate originally, maybe
70%. The problem with DI at the moment is
that all the live action stuff is scanned at 2K.
As much as there are claims that when you
scan in at 2K and output at 2K you are
going to get the same looking film in all res-
pects like your work print, well, it is not true.
I think probably closer to 4K will give you
what you get from your work print. I was
Franz Kraus (left) hosted the Talent Campus
lecture with Andrew Lesnie (right)
Andrew Lesnie checks out the ARRI CAM
LI TE at ARRI Rental Munich
12 C a me r a
disappointed by the digital intermediate stuff
from the first film, and so we talked to the
production about scanning at 4K, and it was
prohibitively expensive for the amount of
footage and the amount of work we had to
have done. For the second film, Peter Doyle,
who put together our color grading facility
and did all the color grading, and I inves-
tigated relentlessly what can be done, and
Peter eventually solved it. He found a way
of increasing the contrast and the resolution
without bringing up the grain. So the second
and the third film benefited from being shar-
pened but still maintained a reasonable
grain structure. Before we started timing the
third film, at Peter Jacksons request we went
back to film one, scanned in the 30% that
had not been scanned previously and output
the first film as a digital intermediate. So now
all three films have been completely digitally
timed.
?: How important is the technology you use?
Andrew Lesnie: I approached this film like
every other film I have ever tackled. The
actual issue of technology in film is a secon-
dary consideration. For me script and per-
formance are always the two overwhelming
priorities on a film. However, when you like
the script and the script is visually suggestive
and you discuss that with the director, you
start to come up with visual concepts. From
that point on it becomes a technical issue of
what gear, what cameras, what stock and
what technology is going to make that vision
into reality. In general, I always look for the
simplest way to solve a problem, and if some-
thing can be done with a piece of chewing
gum or a rubber band, that is fine.
Now on the set, there are times when I make
technical sacrifices for the benefit of the cast.
As a cinematographer I am fierce about pro-
tecting the authorship of an image, but when
you are on a working set and you become
aware that something technical is getting in
the way of a cast member getting a perform-
ance, then I would trade down the techno-
logy to get the performance.
?: What can the DoP do to ensure a good
performance?
Andrew Lesnie: We were constantly trying
to adjust our methods to ensure the best
performance. One example is the issue of the
different scales. We were cheating perspec-
tive and size all the time and in the beginning
the actors were performing to the scale dou-
bles and not to the other actor, so conse-
quently they were not giving the kind of per-
formance they were hoping to deliver. Very
early on the actors said that is something they
missed, so as the shoot wore on we tried to
design the coverage so that the actors could
perform to each other. Probably the most
successful example of that is in the end of the
first film with Sean Bean and Elijah Wood in
the forest just before the Uruks arrive. Based
on the topography of the landscape we were
able to film an entire master of the two of them
walking and talking around each other with
one shot on a Steadicam. That was one of the
high points of the entire shoot for us because
we had pulled of a forced perspective using
the two actors and we made it believable
enough that Elijah is almost half Seans size.
?: Can you talk a little more about forced
perspective?
Andrew Lesnie: In the past forced perspective
has always been done with a locked off
camera. We tried to figure out a way to have
forced perspective with a moving camera.
In the scene where Gandalf talks to Frodo at
Bagend, the table was actually two tables.
Ian was actually sitting at a scaled down half
and Elijah was sitting at a scaled up half. We
were on a dolly that was linked to the tables
to maintain the forced perspective. We used
art direction to hide where the crack is, like
putting the milk jug and other items over it.
?: How do you view the relationship between
effects created completely digitally and
effects done in camera?
Andrew Lesnie: The beauty of this project was
that in spite of the large number of digital
effects an enormous amount of the art direc-
tion was actually built, and an enormous
amount of material was actually filmed. Peter
Jackson is very big on trying to deliver to
animators and compositors something that is
real rather than asking them to manufacture
a huge amount of stuff from scratch. Some-
times it is not fair to ask digital compositors
or animators to suddenly become experts in
art direction, photography and performance.
For instance, I think the success of Gollum was
because Gollum was completely acted. Andy
Serkis came on set to just do the voice and
then started performing the part. I think within
the first hour everybody, including the ani-
mation team, was suddenly doing a huge
rethink on how Gollum was going to be ap-
proached. The bonus of Andy Serkis was
that not only is he an actor, but he is physic-
ally extremely dexterous, he is very acroba-
tic. He was able to perform a lot of that stuff
that Gollum does. So on the second day that
Andy was on the set the animators arrived
again but this time they had all their DV
cameras and they were filming Andy from
different sides, and two of those cameras
were chasing his facial expression. I think the
success of this character is because he was
performed. Despite all the visual effects in
THE LORD OF THE RI NGS, it really is a cha-
racter driven film.
Andrew Lesnie and Manfred Jahn
at ARRI Rental Germany in Munich
13 C a me r a
A Questi on of the Lens
For 14 months Andrew Lesnie supervised the cinematography of up to 9 units that were
simultaneously shooting the three THE LORD OF THE RI NGS movies in New Zealand. We
caught up with him during the Berlinale film festival in Berlin to talk more into detail about
some of the technical aspects of the THE LORD OF THE RI NG's cinematography.
Andrew Lesnie: Definitely the Ultra Prime
40mm. Ironically, it was the last to arrive, but
it quickly became the close up lens of choice.
Peters idea of a close up is essentially just
the eyes and the nose, and the 40 was per-
fect for those shots. We often ended up tak-
ing the matte box off since it was cutting the
light from the actors, we were so close. These
films are a testament to the fantastic close
focus performance of the Ultra Primes. The
problem, of course, when shooting so close
is that your depth of field is very small, so I
would try to build up the stop to give my
focus puller a fighting chance. Another prob-
lem was that during hand held shots we kept
bumping into the actors with the support rods.
So the assistants made rubber bumpers out
of hard foam for the rods to protect the actors.
?: Did you use any kind of filters?
Andrew Lesnie: Almost none. One of the
problems was that we had so many units
shooting at the same time that keeping a fil-
ter based look consistent would have been
hell. Once I had defined the basic look of the
film, I told the other units to keep it as simple
as possible and to not use filters unless I spe-
cifically ask for them. I also gave them a
basic rating; we shot 200ASA film at 160
ASA, and the 500 stock at 320. For color
correction we used 85B and 81EF filters. For
the beauty shots on Liv Tyler and Kate Blan-
chet I used a black net.
?: That was attached to the back of the lens?
Andrew Lesnie: No, I had done some tests
previously and found that it does not make any
difference if you have the stocking in front or
behind the lens, except it is a lot easier to put
it in front of the lens. I like to use good silk
stocking, and pull it really, really tight over the
lens and then fasten it with a rubber band.
The effect is very subtle and people are not
really consciously aware of it. It is better than
putting a piece of glass or acrylic in front
of the lens, since those are prone to flaring.
Obviously you have to keep an eye on the
ambient light and use a matte box to keep
stray light out, otherwise that can light up
the stocking, and you should watch out for
halation when you have a candle or other
light sources in the shot.
?: Was that also used for blue screen shots?
Andrew Lesnie: We started out not using it
for blue screen, but then we did some tests,
and the special effects supervisors told me
that they prefer the net on the lens. Even
though the net makes it harder for them to
get a clean matte, it is ten times harder to
replicate the nets effect. Subtle diffusion
effects have not been successfully replicated
digitally. So we ended up shooting life ac-
tion as well as blue screen beauty shots with
the net on.
?: How important is the lens choice these
days when you can do so much in post?
Andrew Lesnie: It is the most important choice
you make in the whole camera system. First,
different lenses give you a different feel, a
different style. And second, some lenses are
more user friendly, more practical, and thus
allow you to work more efficiently.
Andrew Lesnie on the set of
T HE L ORD OF T HE RI NGS
?: Lets start with the lenses you used on T HE
L ORD OF T HE RI NGS.
Andrew Lesnie: I used Zeiss Standard Speeds
and Zeiss Ultra Primes, plus Cooke and An-
genieux zooms. In addition we had a couple
of Canon 150600 zooms and some Canon
telephoto primes. We started with the Zeiss
Standards and some Ultra Primes, but I knew
that there were more Ultra Primes coming, and
ARRI was nice enough to provide us with
prototypes of the new lenses, so we had a full
set. I like to shoot with new lenses, as the
coatings are better and I knew that we would
put the gear through some hard times, so I
wanted to start at the best possible point
with brand new lenses.
?: Why did you choose the Ultra Primes?
Andrew Lesnie: I had early on decided that
I wanted a soft look to the T HE L OR D OF
THE RI NGS, but I did not want to compromse
resolution. The Ultra Primes have great reso-
lution and very little distortion on the wider
lenses. Plus, I knew that Peter Jackson had
planned all kinds of photographically chal-
lenging setups, so I needed a lens that can
handle that. I shot extensive tests with various
lenses, and decided to use the Ultra Primes.
Unfortunately they were so new that a full set
did not exist, so we supplemented with the
Standard Speeds, but swapped the Standard
Speeds for Ultra Primes as soon as more
Ultra Prime focal lengths became available.
?: Was your lens choice influenced at all by
the fact that you had planned to put a large
portion of the trilogy through the digital inter-
mediate process?
Andrew Lesnie: No, not at all. I did of course
a lot of testing, and I knew that it was crucial
to deliver a healthy and sharp negative to the
process, but otherwise I just used the lenses
I thought appropriate for the project.
?: Did you end up with a favorite lens?
>>> >
14 D i g i t a l I n t e r me d i a t e Wo r l d wi d e o n t h e Mo v e
Filmmakers interested in creating a digital
intermediate, with all the advantages the
method affords secondary color correction,
repositioning and resizing of shots, flips, flops,
blow-ups and speed changes are taking
their projects to FotoKem. And, unlike many
facilities offering such services, FotoKems
lab is only yards away from the digital suite.
We do the processing right here, says Bill
Schultz, Senior VP and General Manager
of the digital services department. We can
do color corrections in the DI suite and look
at a film test four hours later. If somebody
wants to compare the digital output with a
filmed out version, we can A/B it right here
in the DI suite, with film projection on one
side of the screen and digital projection on
the other.
FotoKem relies on two constantly running
ARRILASER systems to shoot the digital work
out to film. The facility chose ARRILASER,
Schultz says, because of its speed and effi-
ciency. They both have the speed package
that allows them to record even faster. We
can record a full-aperture 35mm color pic-
ture at full density at 2.1 seconds a frame.
For material that started out as High Defini-
tion, its more like 1.7 seconds. One of them
has a module that allows us to record out to
5245 (Kodaks low-speed camera negative)
because some clients who didn't shoot film
originally want to introduce a little bit of that
natural film grain in their picture at this stage.
Weve been offering film-recording services
for several years now and we continue to
do that in addition to using the ARRILASER
on shows that come here for DI work where
the image are recorded to 5242 or 2242,
Kodaks intermediate duplication stocks.
We evaluated ARRI against everybody in
this market, he adds. Arri has the best mar-
ket penetration and the best market accept-
ance. And, in virtually every objective test we
put the ARRILASER through, it met or exceed-
ed our expectations.
We knew that FotoKem has looked at other
film recording technology, says Richard
Antley, ARRIs domestic Product Manager for
the ARRILASER, so we were delighted to
have the opportunity to prove the advantages
of the ARRILASER system.
Of course, before the project gets to the ARRI-
LASER, it must be brought into the digital
domain. Most feature films still originate on
film, so a key link in any DI chain happens
at the scanning stage. It is essential to cap-
ture as much of the information from the ori-
ginal negative, to take full advantage of the
incredible range of todays motion picture
film stocks, in order to get maximum benefit
out of the digital manipulation. FotoKem
uses an Imagica XE CCD scanner, most
frequently translating the film frames into 2K
10-bit-log files in the DPX format. Schultz
stresses the importance of capturing so much
information.
The biggest advantage [of our scanner]
over a telecine type device, he says, is
maintaining the full latitude of exposure.
Sometimes the original film might not have
been exposed in the best possible way. If
you lose the information during the scan you
cant get it back. If you capture the whole
latitude of the negative, then we can get it
back.
After scanning, the images go through a
digital dust-busting and clean-up phase so
that negative dirt, scratches and tears and
other defects in the original negative can
be repaired.
Often, shots are scanned from original
camera rolls rather than cut negative. When
this is the case, they must then be conform-
ed to match the edit decision list.
FotoKem utilizes its own proprietary soft-
ware during the scanning process to encode
the DPX files with metadata including time
code information, which facilitates a speedy
auto-conform of shots once they are scanned
into data format.
Now in its fortieth year as a major Hollywood-area film lab, Burbank-based FotoKem
continues to grow its menu of services to reflect the needs of today's productions.
Naturally, FotoKem continues to maintain the top-notch film lab, its core business since
1964, but cinematographers and directors looking to take advantage of the latest
digital tools know they can also find what they need at FotoKem.
FotoKem
Di gi tal I nter medi ate on the Move
P
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S
:

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15 D i g i t a l I n t e r me d i a t e Wo r l d wi d e o n t h e Mo v e
Quantels iQ plays a key role in what hap-
pens next. This versatile machine can take
in an EDL and the shots in data form and
automatically conform the entire show in a
matter of hours. FotoKem also uses the iQs
internal color package-Q-Color--to make the
coloring adjustments. Schultz is impressed
with the iQs versatility as well as its ability
to handle the picture information as log data,
without ever having to convert it to linear
form. We maintain the entire 10-bits of DPX
information, he says. That means we can
retain ten stops of latitude through the whole
process, which is a huge benefit when com-
pared with devices that require conversion
to linear space. The way we work, all the
information that was on the original negative
can be put back onto a negative.
iQ, he adds, has enhanced ability beyond
the traditional windows [used in some other
coloring grading consoles] which allows you
to draw a basic shape -- an ellipsoid, a circle
or a square around an object and then cre-
ate roto splines. That gives you a great deal
of flexibility. You can change the shape of
the object frame by frame and affect the
things inside, or just isolate a particular
color inside. The iQ also has editing functions
within it so I can cut /paste a change at the
touch of a button. I dont have to go out of
the coloring package and into an editing
package to edit something.
The decisions made by skilled colorists and
filmmakers in the digital suite, must naturally
be visible during the session. Decisions
based on a monitor or even a poorly cali-
brated projector will not appear on film as
they do in the session. FotoKem uses a 2K
digital projector from Digital Projections,
which is based on Texas Instruments newest
DMD engine. The digital images are also
processed using proprietary lookup tables to
ensure that what you see projected digitally
is what you will get back on film.
Often filmmakers take full advantage of hav-
ing their film already in the digital realm and
add effects or fixes that might not have other-
wise fit into their budgets. Those working at
FotoKem can take this work down the street
to the well respected effects house Keep Me
Posted, which FotoKem recently acquired.
FotoKem therefore can offer extremely com-
petitive pricing by packaging DI and effects
work together.
FotoKem has begun by offering DI service
with a single room and is networked in such
a way that a possible expansion to two, or
even three, DI rooms would be a relatively
simple expansion from a data standpoint.
But even if the company expands, Schultz
declares, it still isn't looking to do this kind
of work in a high-volume, factory style. Our
mandate, he says, is to provide best client
service and best quality. We dont have a
mandate for being the biggest or having
the most business, just the best quality and
the happiest clients.
J on Si l berg
There seem to be as many applications for the ARRI
LOCPRO35 projector as there are units in use.
This compact projector has been used in production
to watch film dailies at remote locations through-
out the world and has been adopted by postpro-
duction departments for use in print inspection and
color timing. FotoKems LOCPRO gets the most use
from the companys film timers.
We keep our LOCPRO in the Digital Film Services
department, says Schultz, but the timers like it
so much they use it more than we do. It has such a
stable color temperature that they can put up a
check print, and adjust the color using filters
maybe it needs a point of this or a point of that
and they know that theyre seeing an accurate
representation of the image.
And, he adds, they can do this without tying up
a projection room. One of the really nice features
is the still frame capability, he adds. They can
pick one frame out of a scene and hold it as long
as they need to and then move onto the next scene.
Its very efficient in that way. The LOCPRO can also
project 3-Perforation 35. Projecting 3-Perforation is
still a challenge for most places, Schultz explains.
We can do it with a couple of menu changes
and that can be very helpful for the filmmaker who
originates material in that format. Schultz sums up:
Its just a great little machine.
Bill Schultz, Senior Vice President and
General Manager of Digital Ser vices
Walter Volpatto, IQ colorist
LOCPRO 35
>>> >
16 D i g i t a l I n t e r me d i a t e Wo r l d wi d e o n t h e Mo v e
Located in the heart of Londons Soho, Lip Sync Post is the post-production arm of the
Lip Sync Group of companies, one of the capitals most successful independent
media groups. In February of this year, the Group celebrated its eighteenth birthday.
Lip Sync Post has always recognised the
importance of wise investments in both staff
and new technology and in 2001, respond-
ing to increasing client demand, made the
decision to create a digital lab.
Lip Sync Director Peter Hampden, who co-
founded the company with MD Jon Diamond
explains, Increasingly, were seeing mate-
rial created in a wide variety of digital for-
mats for eventual theatrical release on film.
Its an area in which we have particular
expertise. Our significant investment in the digi-
tal lab means that we are now able to pro-
duce top quality digital intermediates for
grading and compositing in-house, offer high-
end bureau scanning, and output to film via
our benchmark ARRILASER recorders.
As the foundation of its digital intermediate
(DI) process, Lip Sync Post took delivery of
its first ARRILASER system for 35mm film out-
put in October 2001, followed by a second
system the following year. Subsequently the
company has completed its DI chain and
installed a multi-resolution grading and com-
positing suite featuring Quantels iQ. For
increased productivity, high speed versions
for both ARRILASERS have also now been
ordered.
The facility offers both major studio and in-
dependent clients the advantages of an all-
encompassing post-production service with
audio mixing, on-line editing, and graphics
and animation services, available in-house
if needed. Such an umbrella offers specific
client benefits, both in terms of creative con-
trol and cost-effectiveness.
One of the first film projects output on ARRI-
LASER was THE DAY I WI LL NEVER FORGET,
a compassionate examination of the custom
T ROL L YWOOD
Director Madeleine Farley
Cinematographer Rob Bennett
Editor Helen Lindley
Li p Sync Post
Di gi tal I nter medi ate on the Move
17 D i g i t a l I n t e r me d i a t e Wo r l d wi d e o n t h e Mo v e
of female genital mutilation in Kenyan
society, directed by Kim Longinotto. Shot on
Super16mm film, the 90 minute documen-
tary went on to win considerable recognition
at many international film festivals including
awards at Amsterdam (Amnesty International
Award,) Hong Kong, (Humanitarian Award,)
Emden (Award of the German Unions Asso-
ciation,) and Gent (Canvas Prize).
Less than nine months after installing its first
ARRILASER, Lip Sync Post output its millionth
frame on a last-minute shot for the most
recent Bond movie DI E ANOT HE R DAY
from Eon Productions.
Toronto 2003 saw Lip Sync Post, now with
its second ARRILASER, making significant
contributions to four entries in this prestig-
ious international festival: T OUCHI NG T HE
VOI D (dir. Kevin Macdonald) with cinema-
tography by Mike Eley is a highly acclaimed
documentary/drama based on the book by
mountaineer Joe Simpson. The film recreates
the harrowing true story of Simpson and
climbing partner Simon Yates 1985 ascent
of the sheer face of an Andean mountain.
Originally shot on 35mm and HD CAM, with
lightweight 16mm equipment used for the
high-altitude climbing sequences, TOUCHING
THE VOI D was output to HD for editing be-
fore the final output to 35mm at Lip Sync Post.
Macdonald was delighted with the result,
describing it as Seamless youd be very
hard pushed to identify individual formats.
The title sequences for the film were also de-
signed in-house by the Graphics department.
T OUCHI NG T HE VOI D has now become
the most successful UK documentary film of
all time and is enjoying considerable box
office success throughout the world. Winner
of the London Evening Standard Best British
Film of 2004, the movie also recently picked
up the Alexander Korda Award for Best Brit-
ish Film at the 2004 BAFTA Awards.
Also at Toronto 2003, director Penny Wool-
cock showed PRI NCI PL ES OF L UST where
Lip Sync Post contributed the 5.1 surround
mix and designed the title graphics. Subse-
quently, Woolcock returned to the facility for
her film of John Adams opera T HE DEAT H
OF KL I NGHOFFER, based on a true story of
the murder by terrorists of wheelchair-bound
Leon Klinghoffer. For this project, originally
shot on Super16mm and transferred to HD,
Lip Sync Post was responsible for designing
the titles and graphics sequences. As Howard
Watkins, Head of Graphics explains, Graph-
ics are used throughout the film to highlight
key events during the two-day hijacking. Theyre
designed to give a newsy and contemporary
feel to complement the drama which has even
more significance today than when it was
originally staged. Following output to 35mm,
the film debuted at Sundance, was subse-
quently screened on UK television, and won
The Prix Italia 2003 for Best Arts Film.
I NT ERMI SSI ON (dir. John Crowley,) a gritty
Irish urban love story starring Colin Farrell,
not only caught the imagination of audien-
ces in Toronto but went on to win Best First
Film at the Galway Film Fleadh and scoop a
tranche of prizes at the 2003 Irish Film and
Television Awards. Best Irish Film, Best Script
(Mark ORowe) and Best Supporting Actor
(David Wilmot) were awarded to the film
which has become the Irish Film Boards big-
gest grossing movie in its ten years of ope-
ration. Shot on Super16mm and transferred
to HD, the final 35mm output was courtesy
of Lip Sync Post which also contributed ten
FX shots to the movie.
TROLLYWOOD, (dir. Madeleine Farley) which
made its debut at the Berlin Film Festival ear-
lier this year, is a powerful and poignant
documentary feature examining the lives of
the homeless in Los Angeles. Many keep all
their worldly possessions in supermarket shop-
ping trolleys or use the carts to earn a liv-
ing by recycling trash. Shot on Super 8mm,
Super16mm and DV, T R OL LY WOOD was
fully post produced at Lip Sync which provid-
ed the film editing, sound mixing, titles de-
sign and final 35mm film output.
FAKE R S (dir. Richard Janes) was shot on
anamorphic Super16mm and transferred to
HD. Set in present day London and 1911
Italy, the film is a pacy tale of blackmail and
forgery in the international art world. Lip
Sync Post designed the 2D and 3D animated
title sequence, and provided the output to
35mm film.
In addition its work on full length features
Lip Sync Post, in association with its agency
sister company Lip Sync Creative, has estab-
lished a considerable reputation for the pro-
duction and reversioning of 35mm theatri-
cal trailers and opening titles for major
LIP SYNC POST Gets lit up
to celebrate 18th birthday
CANT ERBURY TAL ES ( T I T L E SEQUENCE)
Series Producer BBC, Kate Bartlett
FAKERS
Director Richard Janes
Cinematographer Balazs Bolygo
Editor Adam Green
T OUCHI NG T HE VOI D
Director Kevin Macdonald
Cinematographer Mike Eley
Editor Justine Wright
>>> >
18
studios. This area of activity usually involves
a good deal of departmental cooperation
across the fields of graphic design, sound,
editing and film.
While ST UART L I T T L E 2 (Columbia Tristar)
required no less than 99 separate versions,
with extensive 2D and 3D compositing and
5.1 sound mixing, most productions are rath-
er less demanding! Over the past 18 months
Lip Sync Post has provided such a service
for a host of features including S TAR T R E K:
NEMESI S (UIP International,) PANI C ROOM,
P E T E R PAN (Columbia Tristar,) and, most
recently, T HE PASSI ON OF CHRI ST (Icon/
Cineserve).
Head of Post Production Kevin Phelan con-
cludes, In todays demanding and competi-
tive environment its important to invest equal-
ly in technology and in people to provide a
creative and competent response. Quality is
the key, irrespective of budget. Our existing
clients are already reaping the benefits of
this approach and prospective clients are
finding our proposition extremely compel-
ling.
Davi d Wat son
on behal f of Li p Si nc Post
T HE PASSI ON OF T HE CHRI ST ( F RENCH T I T L E)
Director Mel Gibson
D i g i t a l I n t e r me d i a t e Wo r l d wi d e o n t h e Mo v e
Ani mal Logi c / Austr al i a
who also had The Matrix-Reloaded as one of their projects.
The mainstay of daily work is to record visual effects sequences that
are created by Animal Logic for feature films, but as a film bureau
service, we also have to meet the needs of our external clients. So
we cater for commercials (video to film transfers, or kines) from PAL
through to HD (as data), short films shot on a variety of formats, digital
opticals for features that we handle ourselves in the Bureau, through
to entire features as digital intermediates. Recording a full 20 minute
spool of negative for a feature is a relatively easy task on the ARRI-
LASER.
Chri s Swi nbanks, Super vi sor, Ani mal Logi c
Weta Di gi tal / New Zeal and
During the post produc-
tion of THE LORD OF THE
RI NGS Trilogy, Weta
Digitals I /O dept. has
recorded over 10000000
frames, utilizing their two
ARRILASER film recorders. They
have become an integral part in
the whole movie making process.
Their speed, functionality and re-
liability has enabled us to deliver
unparalleled images every day, every week for the last three years.
Pet e Wi l l i ams, Head of Di gi t al I magi ng, Wet a Di gi t al Lt d.
Movi ng Pi ctur es Company / London
The ARRILASER recorders
at MPC are essential for our
Digital Intermediate work.
They provide the fast through-
put required when shooting
out a complete feature film.
The recorder calibrations are
extremely stable guarantee-
ing the output digital negative
accurately represents the
images graded within the Digi-
tal Lab.
Mar t i n Parsons
COUNT RY OF MY SKUL L
Courtesy of the International Distributor,
The Works.
The MPC Laserteam
ARRILASER Team at Weta from left:
Roman Gadner, Mohan Ramachandran,
Pete Williams, Nick Booth
19 D i g i t a l I n t e r me d i a t e Wo r l d wi d e o n t h e Mo v e
Techni col or / Los Angel es
SCOOBY DOO 2 has a
vibrant and colorful produc-
tion design. The ARRI film
recorder faithfully captured
every nuance and kept the
look crisp and clean.
Trent J ohnson, di gi t al col or
t i mer Techni col or
Hual ong / Chi na Bei j i ng
As the largest digital film production
in China, Hualong Film Digital Produc-
tion Co., Ltd (China Film Group), pur-
chased the first ARRILASER in 2001.
Over the past 3 years, ARRI LASER
No.98 had been involved in many jobs
including HD transfer and Special Ef-
fects record out on film. Besides one of
the best production crews, ARRI film
cameras and the ARRILASER made up
a major tribute to the recent success of
the special effects in WAR R I OR S OF
HEAVEN AND EARTH finished and re-
corded out via ARRILASER at Hualong.
Hual ong
Pr asad / I ndi a
The first and so far only in-
stallation of the ARRILASER
in India is at Prasad EFXs
state-of-the-art Digital Film
Lab in Mumbai. It was used
with great efficiency and
success for the first complete
Digital Intermediate film
from Prasad EFX called
KHAKEE. The ARRILASER was preferred for this project because of
the excellent quality of output and the outstanding speed of recording.
Rajkumar Santoshi, Director of KHAKE E , said at a press conference
in Mumbai: The fast turnaround, excellent quality of output and the
dedication of the team has convinced me to take the Digital Interme-
diate route again in future.Cinematographer K.V. Anand was equally
thrilled with the results and said The final output was simply outstand-
ing. Currently the film L AKSHYA
is taking the digital intermediate
route at Prasad..
Prasad EFX currently uses the
ARRILASER for various other
film transfers including films
shot on HD Format.
ARRI L ASER Operator at
Hualong: Mr. Wang Jupeng
Tokyo Lab / Japan AKAI TSUKI ( RED MOON)
The story of a Japanese woman who lived
aggressively during World War 2 for her
family and at its best for herself. The first
full-length feature film in Japan that took
the digital intermediate process over the
entire footage using ARRI equipment. Prin-
cipal photography was done mostly in
China using ARRI cameras and lighting
equipment.
The original negative was scanned on a
Telecine (not a film scanner) in 10bit and
processed in post production for composit-
ing and color control. First all data were
stored on large volumes. But subsequently
the film had to be transferred to HD tapes
for a long term storage because of a of de-
lay in the production schedule due to the
SARS disease outbreak in China.
The final film-look was created digitally to
better control its special tonality, which was
as essential as its subject. Unlike other
countries the digital intermediate process was rarely used before for
an entire film in Japan. However, more than 10 features a year were
acquired here using HD cameras and are finally recorded onto film
with the ARRILASER for theatrical release. Now AKAI TSUKI widely
impressed Japanese film producers with its new approach.
Kazuhi ko Endo on behal f of Tokyo Lab
Sal amandr a / Russi a
Since July 2003, the date of ARRILASER installation, we already
made three movies in the Digital Intermediate process. ANTI KI LLER 2,
recorded out on film in September and October 2003, is a sequel
of the first action gangster movie by the same name. It was made by
Egor Konchalovsky, the son of the well-known Russian director
Andron Konchalovsky
(Tango&Cash, 1989), who pre-
viously made a lot of jobs in
the film and TV field.
This movie was released in Russia
on the 174 screens an A-rated
movie in Russia. It will be shown
on TV in a serial version in the
next two months and is already
sold to the US-market for a release
in a customized theatrical version.
The film features the largest implementation of stuntmens works in
Russian movies and contains extensive visual FX like 3D-dissolves,
explosions, compositions and particle generation.
Following this, we finished the movie THE GODDESS using the DI
path and we are currently working on the next DI production called
FAT HER.
Vadi m Yashuvov, Tech Exper t , Sal amandra creat i ve l ab
Filming AKAI TSUKI with
the ARRIFLEX 535B
Salamandra Laser team:
Maxim and Olga Razmyslova
Prasad Laser Team
20 C a me r a
ARRI MOTI ON
Dol l y Wor l d Pr emi er e
The ARRIMOTION dolly, now available from ARRI rental houses and from NAC in Japan, has made
its maiden voyage in Berlin this spring. Q~bus, a communication and media production
company, used the ARRIMOTION dolly for one shoot in a series of spots for a trade show exhibit.
Cinematographer Francisco
Domingues and motion control
operator Franz Wittmann
discuss the next move
One of the spots required motion control,
showing a business traveler in a hotel work-
ing on various telecommunication devices in
a two hour period that had to be compressed
into 45 seconds. To make the shoot finan-
cially feasible Q~bus decided to shoot on
their own blue screen stage, but bringing in
and shooting with a traditional motion con-
trol system would have been too time con-
suming. ARRI Rental in Berlin offered the
ARRIMOTION system with the brand new
dolly option, since it is small and quickly
set up.
On the day of shooting the move was first
recorded piece by piece. The dolly travel
had to take exactly 45 seconds, which was
easily done with the ARRIMOTION Jogbox.
Then the dolly move was played back, while
the operator performed the pan. Then dolly
move and pan were played back while the
dolly column lift was added, followed by the
tilt. This ability to record each axis separa-
tely while others are playing back is called
multi tracking, and with it moves can be
created that no operator could ever hope to
perform live. Unique to the ARRIMOTION
21 C a me r a
Setting dolly speed is simply done with the Jogbox
system is that each playback axis can play
back at a different speed, making it for
instance possible to play pan and tilt back
at a quarter speed while carefully opera-
ting and recording focus.
Cameras operator Robert Cllen commented:
The systems ability to learn moves that I
perform gave us more spontaneity and flexi-
bility than on a traditional keyframe based
motion control system. Using the ARRIHEAD
with the motors attached feels just like using
it without motors. In fact, it is better since I
can set the gear ratio more precisely and
with a wider range. This was very useful
since I had to lay on top of the dolly to oper-
ate, and I set my gear ratios to be just per-
fect for each axis.
After the move was recorded, first the hotel
room set including hotel furniture and blue
screen walls was shot in one clean pass with-
out the actor, and then the actor was shot in
the set working in various parts of the room.
Since each action performed by the actor
only happens during a small part of the move,
22 C a me r a
Camera operator Robert Cllen dials in the move
ARRI MOTI ON
Laptop Softwar e
Since the ARRI MOTI ON system has been introduced its capabilities have
been continuously enhanced. First there was the basic ARRI MOTI ON
system, a small and portable motion control system for location work that
utilizes a regular ARRI HEAD and ARRI cameras.
It allows the operator to work with all the
familiar tools to record and play back a move
with absolute precision. Then the ability to
control the ARRIMOTION system from a
fluid head was added, an option that was
welcomed especially in Europe where fluid
heads are used more frequently. This was
followed by the modification option for a
Panther Evolution dolly, which opened up a
whole new dimension for the ARRIMOTION
system.
Until now the method for creating a move
was based on recording the actions of a
human operator, storing those and then play-
ing them back. Record /playback is the
preferred method for a lot of location work
since it is very fast and easy, and the ARRI-
MOTION system provides some tools for
refining this process. It is possible, for instance,
to record one axis at a time (with the option
of playing another back at a diminished
speed) to created a layered move, or to play
moves back at different speeds. With the
ARRIMOTION Laptop Software, though, a
different method of move creation and editing
is available now, called keyframe editing.
Creating a move through keyframe editing
consists essentially of moving the rig (camera
+lens +dolly) to a position and storing
the rigs position. Then the rig is moved to
the next position, and that is recorded, and
so on. All those positions are keyframes, and
the ARRIMOTION Laptop Software will inter-
polate the in-between positions. Even though
keyframe editing is
slower than the
record /playback
method, it allows
for more precision,
and all individual
parts (axis) of a move
can be edited at any
time later down to
each individual frame
to refine or modify
the move. Keyframe
editing is the preferred method for miniature
and table top work.
In addition to the ability to create and edit
moves based on keyframes, the ARRI -
MOTION Laptop Software has all the fea-
tures of the ARRIMOTION Jogbox acces-
sible in a simple to use graphical user inter-
face. It can perform keyframe editing on
moves created by the record /playback
method, thus combining the ease of record/
playback with the precision editing ability
of keyframe editing.
And since the ARRIMOTION system is tightly
integrated with ARRI cameras, the creation
of any imaginable type of ramp is now pos-
sible. A speed/shutter, speed/iris or shutter/
iris (depth of field) ramp can be combined
with a slowing down or speeding up of any
other axis, like pan, tilt, dolly forward or re-
verse or dolly up or down. This opens up
completely new possibilities for commercials,
where any time based special effect can now
be created very easily. The ARRIMOTION
Laptop Software offer the option to automatic-
ally keep the exposure constant during any
such ramps, eliminating the need for complex
calculations.
Moves can be created and edited in an on-
line mode, while connected to the rig, or in
an offline mode which allows the preparation
of move data in pre-production or when not
on the set. The ARRIMOTION Laptop Soft-
ware also allows for easy move data man-
agement, as moves
can be stored, re-
called, renamed and
backed-up.
only that part of the move was played back,
a film and time saving ARRIMOTION
feature called part move.
Julia Peters, the assistant director, adds:
I was concerned at first since motion
control always takes so long and is an
arduous, very technical process. But the
ARRIMOTION system was up and running
in no time, and when we were shooting it
went a lot faster than I expected. While
shooting it is a lot less technical, and we
could concentrate more on the actors per-
formance and the script. I want to shoot
now only with ARRIMOTION!
Interestingly, the cinematographer Francisco
Domingues had investigated shooting on
HD, but found that for his planned shoot-
ing ratio on this project (between 1:8 and
1:20) it was actually cheaper to shoot
16mm. All that extra footage people tend
to shoot when they have a video camera
is costly in post production, and film gives
the whole shoot more focus. he explained.
I also needed the ability to go high speed,
and the 16SR3HS Advanced we used
goes up to 150fps.
We were very pleased, since the ARRI-
MOTION dolly made this shoot possible
said executive producer Sven Haas and
we certainly will use the dolly for similar
projects in the future.
ARRIMOTION Laptop
Software LSW-1
K2.52137.0
23 C a me r a
Updated ARRI CAM Documentati on
Since its introduction in 1999, the ARRICAM system has quickly become the premium choice for cinematographers
worldwide. Since then we have listened carefully to feedback from the field and analyzed the camera's
performance on a multitude of sets. As a result we have introduced numerous additions and improvements.
To increase the systems breadth and flexibil-
ity we have added parts like the Universal
Viewfinders, extra magazine adapters or the
Remote Control Station. Based on popular
demand we have introduced improved cam-
era displays and wireless camera remote
control. And we have further extended revo-
lutionary tools like the Lens Data System,
adding lens information to the video assist
image and creating a smaller Lens Data
Display.
In the past months we have updated the
ARRICAM documentation accordingly, so
anyone can easily navigate the extensive
list of ARRICAM components.
A short description of each ARRI CAM
component, plus various useful overview
graphics and tables can be found in the
ARRICAM System Guide, which also has a
brief description of the major technologies
like Lens Data System and In-camera Slate
System and a list of ARRICAM cables.
The ARRICAM Studio and Lite Quick Guides
outline the most important operations like
loading magazines, threading film, chang-
ing fps and shutter angle and operating the
video assist, while the Accessory Quick Guide
provides short descriptions on how to oper-
ate the most important ARRICAM accessories.
Last but not least, an exhaustive description
of every ARRICAM feature can be found
in the updated Users Guide, which is the
ultimate ARRICAM reference.
All those documents can be downloaded
from the ARRI web site at
http://www.arri.com/entry/products.htm,
then click on the DOWNLOADS link.
Ident Number:
ARRICAM System Guide K5.58314.0
ARRICAM Quick Guide Studio K5.58311.0
ARRICAM Quick Guide Lite K5.58312.0
ARRICAM Quick Guide K5.58313.0
Accessories
ARRICAM Users Guide K5.58508.0
24 C a me r a
The ARRI Lens Data System (LDS) expands with two new entry level options that make the ARRI LDS the most
complete system on the market, providing time and money saving lens support no matter what the camera
or lens. The ARRI LDS now consist of three scalable and compatible variations: the new LDS Archive and LDS
Datamount allow the use of the vast inventory of existing lenses and cameras, while the top of the line LDS
Ultra continues to deliver more features and faster, simpler operation than any other system.
ARRI L DS
for Al l Appl i cati ons
What is the Lens Data System?
The ARRI Lens Data System (LDS) collects
essential lens and camera information and
displays it to the camera assistant either on
a dedicated remote display or on the video
assist. This information includes focus, iris,
zoom, depth of field, hyperfocal distance,
close focus, fps, shutter, battery voltage, foot-
age, film reserve, take length, etc. The LDS
can speed up work and assist the camera
crew in the following situations:
When the camera is in a remote situation
(like a crane, Steadicam, car rig, etc) all lens
and camera information can be relayed to
the camera assistant either via cable or wire-
lessly. This is much more reliable, precise
and convenient than witness cameras, plus
provides more information.
The Lens Data Display shows depth of field
as a graphic and numerically. This is helpful
when planning a shot and gives confidence
that youve got the take, even if an actor
overshot a mark. Having the precise depth
of field information is particularly useful on
zooms for which depth of field tables are not
available. Because the small Lens Data Dis-
play fits neatly on the back of the matte box
hood, it is naturally in the Focus Pullers eye
line.
Setting up speed/iris ramps is quicker
because the LDS automatically recognizes
the lens iris stops, saving the time normally
spent teaching stops or loading lens tables.
The film set becomes calmer. The Director,
Producer, Continuity and others can see and
record relevant information from the video
assist without the need to interrupt the
camera department.
The lens information that is recorded on
the video assist tape becomes an accurate
log which can be used for second unit work,
re-shoots and pick-ups.
By integrating the Cinematography Elec-
tronics Cine Tape Measure, the LDS can show
a readout of the measured distance in addi-
tion to the focus setting. The unique Focus
Tracking feature zips the lens to the measured
distance simply with the push of a button.
This is particularly useful in situations where
focus is hard to judge by conventional means.
To summarize, using the ARRI LDS allows the
whole crew to work faster, more confidently
and therefore more efficiently. Originally avail-
able only with the ARRICAM system, the Lens
Data System has been continually expanded
to include other cameras (the 435Extreme
was added recently), and now two variations
have been added that expand the system to
any camera and any lens.
LDS for Any Camera with Any Lens
The LDS Archive
Lens information is selected from a pre-pro-
grammed list of lenses in the Lens Data Dis-
play. Utilizing up to three ARRI lens motors,
the Lens Data Display and a Lens Data Box
(ARRICAM), 435Extreme or the new UMC-3
25 C a me r a
*LDS Archive functionality is a free software update to LDD-FP, FEM-2, Studio and Lite Lens Data Boxes
(LDB and LDB-2)
Lens Motor
Wireless
Lens Control
System
UMC-3
Any Camera
Wireless
Lens Control
System
Ident Number: LDS Datamount Standard K5.52254.0
Overview of LDS Variations
Feature LDS Archive LDS Datamount LDS Ultra
Works with any camera +
Works with any lens + +
Depth of field display + + +
Wireless Lens Data Display + + +
Focus tracking + + +
Simplified speed/iris ramps + + +
Rapid lens change /auto lens recognition + +
Lens &camera info on video assist + +
Camera status displayed + +
Works without lens motors +
Manual follow focus supported +
Price FREE* LOW REASONABLE
LDS Archive wirelessly with any camera LDS Archive wirelessly with ARRICAM or 435
Any Lens
ARRICAM Studio
ARRICAM Lite
435Extreme
Lens Motor
(works with any camera), all lens information
is displayed. The great advantage of the LDS
Archive is that it works with any camera and
any lens, wired or wirelessly, as long as lens
motors are used. However, in contrast to LDS
Ultra it does not support manual follow focus,
camera status information and video insertion.
Some time saving is lost through having to
load the lens data after each lens change and
having to calibrate the lens motors.
LDS for LDS Cameras with any Lens
The LDS Datamount
The LDS Datamount allows any lens, includ-
ing most zoom lenses, to work with LDS
cameras. The basic setup is very simple: the PL
mount of the lens is exchanged for the LDS
Datamount which has an embedded minia-
ture chip and LDS contacts. This gives any
lens LDS functionality, including the capabi-
lity to insert LDS information in the video assist,
but does not permit the use of a manual
follow focus as with the LDS Archive, lens
motors must be used (and time spent to cali-
brate them). However, using an LDS Data-
mount does preserves the ability to change
lenses relatively quickly, as the camera recog-
nizes the lens automatically.
LDS for LDS Cameras with LDS Lenses
LDS Ultra
True LDS lenses have built-in encoders which
automatically provide the rest of the system
with full lens information through contacts fitted
in the lens mount. This means that as soon
as the lens is attached to the camera the sys-
tem is ready to go. There are no cables to
connect and no motors to fit and calibrate
LDS Ultra is plug and play. LDS Ultra is avail-
able when using LDS Ultra Prime lenses, LDS
Cooke S4 lenses or LDS zooms on an LDS
camera (ARRICAM Studio, ARRICAM Lite or
435Extreme). LDS Ultra also supports the
Cooke S4i lenses with complete plug and play
functionality.
26 C a me r a
And since we are not satisfied with just mak-
ing the system smaller, lighter and increasing
the battery life substantially, we have added
features that have been requested by many
customers, including the ability to see the
Lens Data Display (LDD-FP) now wirelessly,
the option of using two hand units mounted
to the same main unit, improved radio trans-
mission and, if used wired with the Lens
Data System and an external distance
measurement device, automated focus
tracking.
Haydn Parnell, Senior Electronics
Engineer at ARRI MEDIA in Lon-
don, who has been beta testing
the new radio modems since
Summer of 2003, reports that:
In my opinion this new
WLCS system is far superior
to the existing system. Our
new systems have been exten-
sively used on large feature films,
for example T ROY, AL EXANDER
and WI MB L E DON. I have talked
to Focus Pullers who have worked
on these productions, and they have
found that these new radio modems
have a lot less RF break-up and seem
to have a greater reliable distance of
operation. Many of these Focus Pullers
now demand that they use this new sys-
tem on all future jobs.
Here is a short run down of what is new:
The heart of the system is the new Wireless
Main Unit WMU-3. It accepts the hand con-
trollers for focus and iris (WFU-1, WFU-3),
Taking advantage of advances in radio, battery and circuit board
technology, the ARRI Wireless Lens Control System (WLCS) has
been completely overhauled. The result are a number of new
components that make the ARRI WLCS into the smallest and most
flexible wireless lens and camera control system on the market,
while at the same time maintaining backwards compatibility with
most of the existing components.
Updated Wi r el ess
Lens Contr ol System
The Wireless Lens Control System
fully configured with LDD-FP
27 C a me r a
installed, is slightly thinner and has a differ-
ent shape, so it conforms to the camera out-
line when attached to the 435Extreme. But
it can of course as easily attach to the Uni-
versal Motor Controller UMC-1.
Prototype attached to the FEM-2 on a 435
Advanced
Please note that the WMU-3 and URM-3 are
equipped with a new type of radio modem
that is also used in the Studio and Lite Lens
Data Box2 (LDB-2). Unfortunately, this modem
is not compatible with the old radio modem
in WMU-1, URM-1 and the original Studio
and Lite Lens Data Boxes. It is possible, how-
ever, to install the new radio modem into
those units. More information can be found
in ARRI Technical Note P-1030 New Wire-
less Radio Modem in the download area
of the ARRI web site or from your local
ARRI service center.
Ident Numbers:
Wireless Main Unit (WMU-3) K2.52240.0
Wireless Battery Unit (WBU-3) K2.52238.0
Wireless Accumulator Charger K2.52266.0
(WAC-3)
Wireless Expansion Bracket (WEB-3) K2.52241.0
Wireless Zoom Unit (WZU-3) K2.52267.0
Wireless Focus Unit (WFU-3) K2.52268.0
Universal Radio Module (URM-3) K2.52262.0
Wired Handgrip Attachment (WHA-3) K2.52264.0
zoom (WZU-1, WZU-3), camera remote
control (WRC-1), the Lens Data Display for
Focus Puller (LDD-FP) and it communicates
with the camera and other Wireless Main
Units. Up to three Wireless Main Units can
talk to one camera at the same time, a use-
ful feature when the assistant needs to pull
focus, the director wants to zoom and the sec-
ond assistant needs to control a speed ramp.
To ensure that the contact between camera
and assistant does not get interrupted, the
new radio modem has a more robust trans-
mission. In addition, the WMU-3 is half the
size and half the weight of the WMU-1, mak-
ing it much easier to hold for long periods of
time. If used just with a Wireless Focus Unit,
it is tiny and very comfortable in the hand,
helped also by the ergonomic hand strap. In
this configuration the new, higher capacity
battery (WBU-3) will last up to 16 hours.
Unique to the WMU-3 is the ability to accept
the Lens Data Display for Focus Puller (LDD-
FP) and to accept two control units at once
using the Wireless Expansion Bracket (WEB-3).
It is possible, for instance, to use the Lens
Data Display for Focus Puller (LDD-FP) together
with a Wireless Focus Unit (WFU-1 or WFU-
3). Another possible combination is the
Wireless Remote Control (WRC-1) with a
Wireless Focus Unit (WFU-1 or WFU-3).
The Wireless Zoom Unit 3 WZU-3 is used to
control zoom. Zoom speed can be adjusted
and zoom limits can be easily set. The WZU-3
is similar to the older WZU-1 except that it
is lighter than the WZU-1 and the position of
zoom knob and the LENS limit controls are
reversed. The reversed zoom knob is in the
perfect ergonomic position for the assistants
thumb when the WZU-3 is used on WMU-3,
WHA-2 or WHA-3. The WZU-1, on the other
hand, has the zoom knob in the best position
for use with the larger WMU-1 or WMU-2.
The Wireless Focus Unit WFU-3 is used to
control focus and/or iris. Focus and iris can
be assigned freely to hand wheel and slider,
and electronic lens and knob limits can be
easily set. In addition it is possible to set
mechanical knob limits. The WFU-3 is similar
to the WFU-1 except that the WFU-3 is lighter
than the WFU-1 and the index marker of
the WFU-3 can be rotated 180 for better
viewing. This movable index marker is espe-
cially useful when the WFU-3 is mounted on
the WMU-3, WHA-2 or WHA-3, since the
resulting remote control is so small that it
can easily be swapped between the left and
the right hand and it can be held at many dif-
ferent angles.
The Wired Handgrip Attachment WHA-3,
just like the WHA-2, allows all hand con-
trollers except the LDD-FP to be connected
with a cable to a 435Extreme or to an ARRI-
CAM Lens Data Box.
In addition the WHA-3 has a button on the
left side for focus tracking. Focus tracking
based on measured distances is available
when using an ARRICAM with the Lens Data
Display for Focus Puller (LDD-FP) and a com-
patible distance measuring device (currently
the Cinematography Electronics Cine Tape
Measure).
Last but not least the Universal Radio Module
URM-3 is a radio modem that allows the
camera to communicate with the WMU-2 or
WMU-3. The URM-3 is similar to the URM-1,
except that it has the new radio modem
WEB-3 WBU-3 WZU-3 WFU-3 WMU-3
WMU-3, WBU-3, WZU- 3, WFU-3 WMU-3, WBU-3, WRC-1-2 WEB-3, WFU-3
28 D i g i t a l S y s t e ms
New technologies in the ARRI SCAN
Mi cr o- scanni ng and Appl i cati on
Matched Par ameter s
The new ARRISCAN comes with some brand new technologies and methods, one of them we call Micro-scannig.
The ARRISCAN uses a custom designed CMOS area sensor, which is optimised for speed and quality.
The sensor has a basic resolution of 3K 2K pixels. With our new technique the resolution is actually, and most
of all correctly and not virtually doubled to 6K 4K pixels. Even though one could be tempted to think
that this is a blow-up process, it is NOT.
Micro-scanning
The 6K files grab the maximum resolution
out of a film frame and from this format any
kind of output format can be downsampled
in highest quality. To achieve the max reso-
the productivity of 1fps @3K, and 2K down
sampled from 3K.
Image examples of the various resolutions in
native 3K mode and micro-scanning mode
are available for download on our website.
Application Matched Parameters
One size fits all this might be true for some
fashion articles, but in real postproduction
life the calculation is a lot different. In order
to adapt the ARRISCAN exactly to your work-
flow and production needs application
matched parameters can be selected accord-
ingly. You are able to define the resolution
in which will be scanned and the quality that
is needed for a certain job: A2K resolution
generated from a 6K file will offer best
lution, the sensor is shifted in sub pixel units
by means of piezo actuators, and additional
sub-images are grabbed at intermediate
positions. This process is highly sophisticated
and absolutely accurate and reliable, any
time, any material.
A set of special digital image filters was
designed to scale down to the conventional
2K or 4K image formats. These digital filter
kernels have been optimised for excellent
sharpness and alias suppression at the same
time.
This high quality scannig gives a produc-
tivity of 0.25fps @6K, 4K down sampled
from 6K and 2K down sampled from 6K.
In native sensor mode the ARRISCAN offers
How to make a 6 K Image with a 3 K Sensor >>>
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29 D i g i t a l S y s t e ms
quality but will trade off some speed (0.25fps),
whereas a 2K file generated from a 3K
native sensor resolution gives you good
image quality in a higher productivity (1fps).
Time saving potentials are even greater. Not
only the resolution can be chosen but also
the density range needed: If the film material
shows densities up to 1.6 above base den-
sity a single exposure with the LED illumina-
tion might be fully sufficient. Very dense film
stock (densities of 2 and more above base
density) can also be handled by using a
multiple exposure with the LED illumination
(please also see ARRINEWS article in ARRI-
NEWS issue 09/03).
Another big advantage of the ARRISCAN
concept is the CMOS sensor itself. Every
pixel could be addressed independently,
meaning that only a portion of the sensor can
be read out for a quick view. Reading only
parts of the sensor is of course much faster
than reading the whole 3K by 2K native sen-
sor resolution and results in a higher pro-
ductivity.
Reliable Calibration
Calibration should be reliable but at the same
time intuitive and very easy to use this is
an integral part of the ARRISCAN philosophy.
Starting from a base calibration the scanner
lights (LED illumination) are calculated. The
operator just needs to indicate and define
where the base is by using a marquee. This
method also ensures that the light levels
even on a per color basis are set to the
optimum value for the film stock in use.
If a facility is used to do a line up frame
calibration (for example 18% grey) the
operator just needs to set the marquee to
the line up frame and can then decide
where the code value for this area should
be (for example 445).
All calibrations can be done in advance for
certain film stocks and their characteristic.
By saving these calibrations the operator is
able to reload the calibration settings when-
ever there is the need to scan this certain kind
of film stock. The result of the calibration
settings is a reproducible image scan, which
is crucial for digital intermediate applications.
Reliable results strongly depend on reliable
components and the ARRISCAN compo-
nents have been selected exactly to this re-
quirement:
LEDs will always be electronically levelled
in the way the calibration setting demands
it. The illumination is constantly monitored
to preserve a long term stability in light
quality.
The CMOS sensor is brought to working
mode by an initial machine calibration.
During this procedure all components are
checked for functionality, and the CMOS
sensor is brought to an ideal temperature.
The micro scanning device positions the
sensor precisely to the demanded position.
This position is kept rock-solid for a split
second then repositioned again.
All information (including focus and base
information) is saved in a history database.
The ARRISCAN concept and technologies
supports the digital intermediate workflow
in an unparalleled and efficient way.
ARRISCAN will be available for your
production starting in June 2004.
El f i Bernt
Please take a look at the new Digital Systems
Website: www.arri.de
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30 D i g i t a l S e r v i c e s
Col or Management
A Sneak Pr evi ew
The already well known ARRI CMS (Color Management System) available
for the ARRILASER since 2002 is now moving straight into the field of color
grading systems. Together with our partners Barco, DaVinci, Discreet,
Iridas, Nucoda, Pandora and Quantel the out of gamut LUTs have
been shown since IBC 2003 and are part of these grading systems already.
The next step is obvious: pre-visualization Lookup Tables.
Out of gamut LUT
in HD-Suite
Preview Lookup Tables in
production environment
Logarithmic Workflow
When working in a logarithmic color space
files need to be displayed correctly on a
grading monitor. Without a powerful lookup
table grading with these files is nearly
impossible.
Using the ARRI preview 3D Lookup tables
eliminates this problem: What you see on
the grading monitor is, how logarithmic files
will appear when printed on film by the
ARRILASER. The monitor can either be cali-
brated to D55 or D65 whitepoint.
31 D i g i t a l S e r v i c e s
Preview 3D LUTs work in close combination
with the correct settings on the ARRILASER
and laboratory side:
A Recorder Aim File, Negative film stock
and print film stock must be set, as well as
a correct print process on Vision material
(LAD 1.09, 1.06 and 1.03)
Four preview LUTs are now available
Kodak Intermed 5242 Kodak Vision
2383 (LAD print)
for HD monitor preview
or Sony GVM monitor
Fuji Intermed Filmstock 8502 Kodak
Vision 2383 (LAD print)
for HD monitor preview
or Sony GVM monitor
These new preview Lookup Tables will be
shown at NAB 2004 together with our
partners.
Linear Workflow
When working in a linear color space you
dont need a preview 3D LUT on the grading
monitor. The out-of-gamut LUT is still of great
importance, because it indicates non repro-
ducible colors on film.
However, this workflow needs the correct
recorder and grading monitor profile on the
ARRILASER side:
Recorder profile:
ARRILASER calibrated, Negative Film Stock
(for example: Kodak 5242)
and print film stock (for example: Kodak
Vision 2383)
The corresponding grading monitor profile
needs to be taken for the ARRILASER
(Sony HD Monitor or Sony GDM FW900)
ARRI ALICE &CMS software
a correct print process on Vision material
(LAD 1.09, 1.06 and 1.03)
Out-of-Gamut LUT what does it mean
The ARRI Out-of-Gamut (OOG) 3D LUTs
mark all those colors that cannot be repro-
duced correctly on print film due to the
different color gamuts. All In-Gamut colors,
which are reproducable on film, are shown
as grey on your grading monitor, whereas
all Out-of-Gamut pixels are shown as
colored areas. The saturation of the marking
color increases with the distance of the under-
laying image pixel to the gamut boundary.
Consequently a just Out-of-Gamut pixel
will appear pale, a clearly out of gamut pixel
will be highly saturated in its original color.
So the result is a convenient and easily recog-
nizeable gamut warning.
El f i Bernt
Need a Pi t Stop?
ARRI has started to offer a
worldwide application support for
the Digital Intermediate chain.
As digital workflows are getting
more and more complicated,
they need to be monitored and
controlled accordingly.
ARRI has taken its responsibility to offer a
new and unique service on a worldwide
basis to support, enhance and improve the
hybrid production pipeline.
The ARRI specialists have all worked in
production for a long time and will help to
improve the existing pipelines for Film to
Digital and Digital to Film. This service also
contains a close monitoring of film labs
using the already well known ARRI Aquamat.
Thilo Gottschling
has gathered experience in
postproduction at ARRI Film&TV
services as a scan and record-
ing operator before he joined
the ARRI digital Systems department to ana-
lyse and refine methods for calibration and
operation of the ARRILASER. Today he is one
of our prime contacts for application support
around our postproduction products.
Roman Gadner
Roman is currently working
for Weta and is available for
ARRI on a freelance basis. He
has been working on LORD OF
THE RI NGS as scanning and recording super-
viser for the past two years. Before he was a
service technician for the ARRILASER and
is very knowledgeable about both operation
and functionality of the ARRILASER and
quality assurance tools.
El f i Bernt
Starting in January 2004 the first clients
have already made use of ARRIs expertise
and knowledge, the latest very successful
application support has just finished in China
at Hualong:
Suggested by ARRI Digital System Dept.,
Roman Gadner had visited Hualong recently
to give a training course on CMS and to
assist them to make their workflow more
perfect. Due to Romans excellent job at
Hualong, Mr. Huang Yaozu/CEO and Mr.
Wang Jianxiong/CTO are all very satis-
fied with the image quality of ARRILASER
with the CMS, and many thanks for Romans
suggestion on the quality control of the
laboratory workflow, which was also very
helpful.
Hual ong
ARRI Application Support worldwide
32 L i g h t i n g
GRANDE FRATELLO, produced at the Cinecitt
studios in Rome, is, with the special
requirements of a reality TV show, a fascin-
ating application for the SKY PANEL. Due
to the good relationship between Stefano di
Martino (ARRI Italia, Rome) and the DoP of
Grande Fratello, Marco Incagnoli, it was
possible to visit the location and have a con-
versation with Mr. Incagnoli and the sceno-
grapher Emanuela Trixie Zitkowsky.
?: On behalf of ARRI Lighting, I want o
say how pleased we are to have this op-
portunity to meet with you and Emanuela
to get an inside view to your work. First of
all I think our readers are very courious
about your and Emanuelas background.
Marco Icagnoli: After my education at the
Scuola Nazionale del Cinema in Rome I
started in the movie business as a camera
assistant. As a freelancer I worked for several
productions until my start at RAI, the public
Italian TV and Radio station. At RAI I also
started working with digital equipment. In
1986 I became a Director of Photography
for a RAI entertainment show called MI XER.
I gathered experience during a wide varia-
tion of applications, such as live transmissions,
TV events like concerts and entertainment
shows, as well as in the field of Reality TV
shows in which I currently work.
I am also teaching at the Accademia Cine-
matografica DellImmagine in LAquila and
I am the Vice President of Associazione Itali-
ana Autori della Fotografia Cinematografica,
the Italian association of Cinematographers.
Emanuela Trixie Zitkowsky: The movie busi-
ness has a long tradition in our family, my
father is also a scenographer, so I followed
in his foot steps. I studied at the Accademia di
Belle Arti in Milano. At the moment I am work-
ing as a freelancer for several productions.
?: It is the 4th season of GRANDE FRATELLO
at Cinecitt. A reality production has some
very special requirements to your work can
you give us details?
Marco Icagnoli: Its very different from other
shows because we are working with non
professionals and very spontaneous situa-
tions, so the lighting must have a very for-
giving character. The whole facility consist
of different rooms and locations indoor is
involved as well as outdoor. And if one of our
characters is moving from an indoor to an
outdoor area or vice versa, it must be possible
to follow him or her with the same camera.
One of our biggest problems in the beginning
was also to find the right two-way-mirror for
shooting through. From the Spanish Big
Brother production we knew that this was a
problem, but finally weve found the right
mirror in Italy with only 2 stops light reduction.
?: This indoor-outdoor-situation presents a
problem for the lighting?
Marco Icagnoli: Indeed, our target was to
create the same lighting atmosphere through-
out the whole facility. Because of the changing
situation between indoor and outdoor areas,
we decided to illuminate the whole house
with daylight. This makes it easier to do the
transition between the different areas without
adjusting the white balance of the cameras.
?: What kind of lampheads do you use and
what requirements do they have to fulfill?
Marco Icagnoli: Because GRANDE FRATELLO
is home for the inhabitants 24hours a day
and altogether for 110 days, it is very impor-
tant to avoid heating up the facility with the
lampheads. We decided to use fluorescent
fixtures in combination with the SKY PANELS
to achieve our desired forgiving light.
Another advantage of the Sky Panel is that it
works absolutely noise free which is very
important for a reality TV show. And also it
was a question of the available space.
Admittedly we first had a problem with the
softness of the fixtures, so we use additional
architectural tungsten lights to create the
desired depth to make the picture more
intersting.
?: Where do you use the SKY PANELS?
Emanuela Trixie Zitkowsky: We use the
SKY PANELS in the Space Suite. The whole
house has a very modern interior design
with a special suite which is designed in a
kind of a space look. With such an installa-
tion you always have the problem that the
fixtures are visible in the image. So they al-
so have to match to the surrounding interior
design. The SKY PANEL fits perfectly to
the design in the space suite. For all the
GRANDE F RAT E L L O Bi g Br other
i n I tal y
The ARRI SKY PANEL lights up Italian TV Show
Since ARRI Italia S.R.L. is one of
the biggest resellers of the ARRI SKY
PANEL we were highly interested
to learn more about the applications
and the customers for the SKY PANEL
in Italy. One of those customers is the
Italian Big Brother Show GRANDE
FRATELLO.
Stefano Di Martino, Marco Incagnoli,
Emanuela Trixie Zitkowsky,
Antonio Cazzaniga, Timo Mller (f. l. t. r.)
An Interview with Marco Incagnoli DoP of GRANDE
F RAT E L L O and Scenographer Emanuela Trixie Zitkowsky
33 L i g h t i n g
fluorescent light sources we had to design
own housings to match our room-design.
?: How many of the SKY PANELS do you
use in the house?
Emanuela Trixie Zitkowsky: We are currently
using 8 SKY PANELS which are visible in
the images we are shooting for GRANDE
FRATEL L O.
?: Apart from the space-age design of the
SKY PANEL, what is your experience in
working with them truly around the clock?
Marco Icagnoli: It is in every sense of the
word a cool light which doesnt heat up the
surrounding area. But we also love it for its
low maintenance, its stable color tempera-
ture, and its soft and glare free lighting
characteristic. As I mentioned before, we are
running this show 24hours per day and alto-
gether over 110 days. As a consequence,
it is very important for us to reduce mainte-
nance wherever it is possible to keep the
conditions of isolation from the environment.
?: What other fixtures do you use for
GRANDE FRATEL L O?
Marco Icagnoli: Inside the house we are
only using fluorescent lighting, some tungsten
fixtures to accentuate and the SKY PANELS
for the space suite.
For the theatre where we do all the events
around GRANDE FRATEL L O we are using a
lot of ARRI tungsten lampheads, mainly the
ARRI 650, 1000, 2000 and the 5K versions.
We are very happy with the quality of ARRI
lighting products and are always looking for-
ward for new products to realize new shows.
Thanks a lot for your time!
Ti mo Ml l er
We have listened very carefully to all com-
ments and decided to do some redesign to
the SKY PANEL to make it even more flexible
and lightweight. Based on ARRIs experience
in extruded aluminum profiles, the new ver-
sion comes in an aluminum profile housing
which is even lighter in weight and more
sturdy at the same time. Also the cable man-
agement and the connectors have been im-
proved. With regard to the handling, a Baby
Plate slide in support, the adjustable stirrup,
and a more flexible accessory holder was
incorporated.
Sky Panel Tungsten
At NAB 2004, ARRI Lighting now introduces
the 3200K version of the SKY PANEL, which
was highly demanded by our customers
feedback. The 3200K version is again a
unique development between Osram and
ARRI, which is exclusively available from
ARRI Lighting. The tungsten version of the
SKY PANEL is identical to the daylight ver-
sion except for the color temperature and
features the same advantages in lighting
and design.
SKY PANEL
Latest Product
information
Since the SKY PANEL was first introduced at the CI NEC 2002,
ARRI got some very good feedback from its customers for this unique
and new fixture thanks for that to all of you.
Sky Panel at a glance:
Shadow-, reflex- and glare-free soft light
5600K/Ra>92
3200K/Ra>90
TL >10.000h
Light output not related to ambient temperature
Full intensity at all positions
Instant light no warm up required
Cool light
No mercury
Aluminum extrusion housing
Modular system
Wide variety of configurations
20 30V DC
Dimming 100% 50%
Flicker <1,5%
Operating frequency 60 70kHz
Protection class 1
I P 54
480mm (L) 395mm (W) 50mm (H)
Weight: 5,8kg
Optional DMX
34 L i g h t i n g
The ARRI X5 EVENT models, available in both
entirely silver or black, have been developed
for all kind of background, cyclorama and
floodlight purposes within the EVENT range.
Like all other models in the EVENT range, the
ARRI X5 EVENT features the unique EVENT
connector, built-in igniter and a decorative
single color finish including barndoors.
As the basic ARRI X5, the X5EVENT can
also be fitted with the entire range of acces-
sories, especially with the black reflector
and the frosted UV safety glass.
Utilizing HMI daylight lamps with 575 watts,
the ARRI X5 EVENT can be driven by the
6-channel 19 Electronic ballasts EB 575
EVENT SIX and as well with the latest in
ballast technology, the EB 200/575/1200
Multifunctional Electronic ballast.
Sven Beyer
ARRI X5 adds HMI fl oodl i ght
to the Event r ange
Technical Data:
Dimensions (mm): 208L 376W480H
Weight: 7.5kg
Lamp socket: G22
Lamp: HMI 575W/SE Single ended
ARRI s SKY PANEL r ecei ves Honorabl e Menti on from LDI
Ident-Nr. L1.82221.E silver
Ident-Nr. L1.82225.E black
For the first time, a flood daylight lamphead,
based on the ARRI X5 has been added to
the EVENT Lighting range.
For the debut of the new ARRI SKY PANEL
at the LDI Show in Orlando, USA, ARRI
has already received the Honorable Men-
tion Award from the LDI organizers in the
category of ETS-LDI 2003 Debuting
lighting products.
Considering that ARRIs SKY PANEL had
to compete with effect lighting and the
latest lighting controllers in this category,
the honourable mention of LDI proves the
respect afforded to the engineering and
development of this unique product.
Sven Beyer
35 L i g h t i n g
I SO 9001: 2000 A Smal l Si gn wi th a Bi g Si gni fi cance
Standards for ARRI Lighting products
Over the last couple of years ARRI has made
major investments into new production proces-
ses, facilities and the testing of the products.
As one consequence of this, a new labora-
tory was installed at the lighting products fac-
tory in Stephanskirchen featuring the most
elaborate testing equipment available. It is
used for research as well as for testing the
series manufacturing output. One of the more
obvious results has been included in the recent
redesign of our lighting webpage that now
features all important data together with a
vast resource of drawings and even an inter-
active lighting calculator.
By making best use of our testing facilities
lighting fixtures the factory in Stephanskir-
chen has now earned a special certificate
that ensures constant and superior quality
the ISO 9001:2000 and the TV plaque.
One of our partners on this path to quality
was the German TV, a highly - regarded
independent testing and assessment orga-
nization. They thoroughly inspected our manu-
facturing and testing procedures and finally
approved everything. So from January on
we are allowed to carry the indication TV-
auditieres Prflabor (approved testing labo-
ratory) and also the ISO 9001: 2000 sign on
all of our lighting products. In fact, the Ger-
man TV is so proud of us that they even
selected our facilities for the cover of the first
issue of their magazine this year. For you as
our customer this sign stands for our commit-
ment to enduring quality products.
J. Thieser
Rain Test Freeze Test (down to 22 F)
It may look like a small sign but it bears a big significance not only to us. It is a certificate of craftsmanship,
quality and - last but not least - of product safety: the ISO 9001: 2000 standard.
36 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
On- Set wi th CURSED
Director Wes Craven has re-teamed with screenwriter Kevin Williamson in the current production of CURSED.
The duo broke new ground in the slasher-film genre with SCREAM in 1996, and hopes to do the same with
CURSED, a werewolf-themed horror film starring Cristina Ricci, Portia de Rossi, Skeet Ulrich, Omar Epps,
Shannon Elizabeth and Scott Foley. The film is a modern take on the werewolf myth, framing up both a fight
for survival against the beast as well as the dangers of its curse. ARRI was able to visit DP Robert McLachlan
and 1st AC Michael Endler on set during principal photography to talk about this shoot.
?: Did Wes Craven have a specific film-look
in mind when he came to you to shoot this
project?
Robert McLachlan: This movie had actually
already been shot once by another DP last
spring but the studio decided to completely
rewrite it, and almost start from scratch when
I came on. They planned to save about 10
minutes from the first go around which was
little enough that we had carte blanche in
terms of the look. The only request from Wes
and the studio was to shoot a much darker,
scarier movie with the goal of less is more
for the werewolf sequences. Apart from that,
I just aimed to make it feel as natural as pos-
sible because I believe a movie is only as
scary as it is real. Other than checking your
disbelief in werewolves at the door, the rest
of the world that a movie like this takes place
in should feel as natural as possible in order
to engage the audience. The only constraint
we had was that the first shoot had been done
in Panavision anamorphic, because Wes
loves the format with the extra crispness and
clarity you get with it. I had never shot in ana-
morphic. It is conventional wisdom that Pana-
vision is the camera to use when shooting
anamorphic. But Im a big ARRI fan and knew
that I wanted to shoot this project using ARRI
cameras. I also wanted to keep my business
at Clairmont Camera, a company that has
always given me superior service over the
years. We had been testing the Hawk lenses
at Clairmont, and they are fantastic. Mike
[Endler, 1st AC] and I started some incredibly
in- depth tests to compare them to Primos
and the other lenses. Initially, we werent so
sure of the Hawks from a purely technical
standpoint, but when we actually shot with
them, we were very impressed. They dont
flare at all.
?: How does director Wes Craven feel about
the material that you have been shooting?
Robert McLachlan: Wes was really happy
with the look. This is his first ARRI picture.
Most of the shows Ive done have been on
ARRIFLEX 535s, this is my first ARRICAM
show. I think by having a Studio with an
ARRICAMLT and an ARRIFLEX 435 on
your camera package, you have everything
covered really well. Its the ideal scenario.
In the past, Ive used the new Zeiss series
and the new Cookes on some shows, depen-
ding on the project, and theyre both abso-
lutely stunning as well.
DP Rob McLachlan
37 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
?: Describe the different camera techniques
that have been used on the film, and some
of the more unique things that your crew has
brought to this picture.
Robert McLachlan: My favorite thing Ive done
on this film is to use the ARRI Lens Control
System and control the speed of the camera
by ramping down to 6 frames per second
and be able to compensate exposure with
the shutter instead of the iris. We ended up
getting a great image with that after we print-
ed it back to 24fps. From the part of the
picture lit with the Clairmont Strobes you get
a super sharp image due to the 50,000th
of a second exposure. From the side that's lit
conventionally and exposed at 6fps, which
is one 12th of a second exposure, you get a
slightly blurry image. So the combined result
worked very well for some of the werewolf
attack scenes, creating a very expressionis-
tic, violent, yet horribly beautiful image. The
effect is quite lovely, it almost looks like a
Francis Bacon painting if you do it right.
Michael Endler: This effect visually enriches
the werewolf sequences.
?: What camera gear and lighting equip-
ment are you using?
Michael Endler: An ARRICAMST (ACamera),
LT (BCamera), and occasionally an ARRI-
FLEX435 and an ARRIFLEX35-III, along with
all the bells and whistles. To make our pro-
cess more streamlined, we needed to make
sure the accessories worked from camera to
camera, and Clairmont has done some modi-
fications in some instances to make that hap-
pen. The maintenance has been a breeze,
prepping the cameras every morning at the
start of day. We keep on looking for some-
thing to go awry [laughs] but we havent
yet, theyre very dependable cameras, and
Im comfortable working with them. Were
shooting on 5218 Kodak film stock, and the
look is absolutely gorgeous.
Our first step was to find out what kind of
anamorphic lenses they offered in a PL mount
to fit them. So Clairmont set up a meeting
for me to come in and do some tests to deter-
mine which lenses would work best. Every
lens is different, and you really have to get
to know them. In that respect, we had to get
extra prep time. Production and Clairmont
gave us the invaluable hands-on time with
the equipment to complete our tests before
principle photography started. That
allowed us to gain the confidence to do a
good job.
Robert McLachlan: I think one of the reasons
Wes is so happy is that compared with all
of the other anamorphic shows hes done,
the focus on this film has been impeccable.
He tells me this after dailies every night. This
is a testament to Michael, the fact that weve
had no problems, its gone over really well
with him [Wes].
?: What has been the biggest advantage to
working with the ARRI cameras?
Michael Endler: The remote lens focus sys-
tem truly has given me the freedom to get
into a position where I can watch the actors
and their subtle movements, and maintain
focus on them when there is not enough room
for me to stand next to the camera. It is indis-
pensable with Steadicam, handheld or on
crane with a remote head. It is very reliable
and easy to use.
With the nature of the visual style Rob is imple-
menting, were putting the camera in all
sorts of configurations. Were giving it a run
for its money. Whether were going hand-
held with a Hawk Prime lens or the Cooke
18 100 zoom with a Kish Optics anamor-
phic adapter on the rear the Studio camera
is performing very well, its one of the quiet-
est cameras. This is one of the biggest aspects
for me, and the sound guys love it as well.
Technically, I'm getting to like the cameras
more and more, as well as the weight of
the LT for handheld and Steadicam work.
So being able to go from the studio mode
to a handheld configuration and then Steadi-
cam quickly and easily is a huge advantage
time-wise when youre on the set. The video
assist on the camera has been a lifesaver, we
can change the optics out to a 100% video
signal when we use the crane or the Steadi-
cam, its a very bright image, which is very
helpful for the director and department heads
watching the monitors. The camera operator,
Casey Hotchkiss has commented that the
viewfinder optics are very bright, which is a
plus, because hes able to see focus very
clearly. This film has been great; everything
is going smoothly in terms of equipment from
Clairmont Camera. The camera package has
performed very well.
CURSED is slated for release through Dimen-
sion Films in 2004.
Karen Raz
CAMERA CREW
A Camera:
DP: Rob McLachlan
Operator: Casey Hotchkiss
1st AC: Michael Endler
2nd AC: Jimmy Ferguson
B Camera
DP: Rob McLachlan
Operator: Allen Easton
1st AC: Bill Coss
2nd AC: Jennifer Tanksley
1st AC Michael Endler
38 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
ARRI FLEX 16 SR3 Spr i nts Effor tl essl y
Ridley and Tony Scotts LA-based production company Little Minx@RSA
recently utilized two flexible Super16 mm ARRI FLEX 16 SR3 camera bodies
to capture fast moving action for a new North American Nike commercial.
Directed by Matt Kirkby, the 30-second commercial follows the comedic
adventures of a 65-foot centipede a costume worn by 13 hired US
Olympic runners sprinting through the streets of downtown Los Angeles.
The commercial features Nikes top of the line Shox shoes, advertising
how the versatile footwear can adapt to the most stressful of situations and
keep on performing.
ARRI FL EX 16 SR3 with Canon Zoom
Centipede emerges from subway
to the shock of commuters
39 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
for Ni ke
We needed handheld cameras that could
stand up to a lot of punishment while run-
ning around shooting all day in the city, says
Kirkby on the ARRI equipment. When you
go into a production war zone like this you
need your equipment to work without a hitch.
The shoot commenced once Kirkby secured
permits to film on the streets of Los Angeles.
However, it proved impossible to lock off
streets for shooting in the active metropolis.
It was mayhem, explains Kirkby, filming
amid thousands of people on the busy streets.
We had to brainstorm each scene quickly
and shoot everything as fast as possible. ARRIs
16SR3 cameras were light plus the format
gave the commercial a more filmic look. We
wanted it to feel very real, very honest. Using
35mm cameras, hand held over the day would
have been too heavy for us. Cinematogra-
pher Max Malkin lensed the commercial, fix-
ing one of the SR3s onto a steadicam for
smooth movement when required. A long time
ARRI user, Malkin was prepared for a stress-
ful day of production: We were shooting
from the hip and adapting to the environment
on the fly, recalls Malkin, using two Canon
zooms attached to each camera body during
the shoot: a 7 63mm T2.6 plus the 11.5
138mm T2.5 for visual flexibility. I live and
swear by ARRIFLEX because they can take
a licking and keep on ticking. As a camera-
man you use equipment until it fails you and
this rarely, if ever, happens with an ARRI-
FLEX. They stood up to the test on this shoot.
Malkin loaded Kodak Vision Negative Film
7274 for the commercial, capturing rich
black shadows and clean white highlights
by shooting at its rated two-hundred speed.
We used no artificial light due to the time
constraints and the location of the shoot,
explains Malkin. Los Angeles is a sunny locale.
Silver reflector board bounced appropriate
light sources when we were out of direct
sunlight.
Ramping up to 150fps was an option for
the production team, but Kirkby and Malkin
decided to stay at 24fps to keep the energy
and movement alive. We had an extra stop
to ramp faster but we realized the spot needed
energy, explains the cinematographer.
We didnt want slow motion because the
commercial would have been less effective.
The finished commercial is testament to the
effective ability of ARRIs 16mm cameras:
These cameras are sturdy, insists Malkin,
recently shooting another Nike commercial
using an ARRIFLEX16SR3 alongside director
Jake Scott, son of Ridley. You can run with
these cameras, knock them around and never
worry about them falling apart on a large
commercial shoot. That confidence means
youre more apt to capture quality footage
when the pressures on, especially when
clients are there watching your every move.
Si mon Wakel i n
Cinematographer Max Malkin
Centipede races downtown with Nike runner Centipede sprints through crowds of unsuspecting people to
demonstrate the ef fectiveness of Nike's Shox shoes
P
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40 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
Super Bowl
The host city for the Super Bowl changes
each year and 2004 belonged to Houston,
Texas. The American passion for football
is renowned, but the championship game
always takes the excitement to a new level.
Television networks begin broadcasting
from the site days in advance covering not
only the upcoming game, but also the rela-
ted events, venues and personalities in town
for the festivities. ESPN created a special
Sports Center set for its Super Bowl coverage
with power and lighting for the entire broad-
cast compound supplied by ARRI Group Com-
pany Illumination Dynamics.
As large as the Super Bowl was in Houston,
Illumination Dynamics (ID) faced an even
greater challenge a few hundred miles away
high in the Rocky Mountains. Working in
below freezing temperatures for most of Jan-
uary, Illumination Dynamics crew (led by
Director of Broadcast Services, Bill Kanne)
spent hundreds of man-hours installing the
power and distribution system that would
transform the pristine Aspen, Colorado ski
slopes into the mecca for the worlds best
winter extreme sportsmen.
Winter X-Games are the ultimate competi-
tion for winter action sports worldwide, fea-
turing more than 250 athletes from across
the globe competing for medals and prize
money. 2004 marked the first time an X- Games
event featured live telecasts of the competi-
tions including the first ever night time events.
X- Games aired on ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC
Sports, while ESPN International distribu-
ted the Games to more than 110 million
homes in more than 145 countries and terri-
tories around the world.
For both the safety of the athletes and the
unforgiving nature of live broadcast, the reli-
ability of the power supply was a critical
concern. The experience of the ID technicians
as well as the state of the art generators and
distribution systems ID provided, delivered
five flawless days and nights of uninterrup-
ted power.
For the Aspen ESPN facilities, Illumination
Dynamics powered fifteen mobile television
trucks, four satellite uplink trucks, eleven
office trailers, supplemental power to hotel
SUPER EXTREME two superlatives often over-used by broad-
cast promoters hoping to attract a larger television audience
share. But for the National Football Leagues SUPER BOWL
the annual championship game between Americas two rival
football conferences watched by more than 100 million
viewers, and for ESPNs WINTER X-GAMES (X for Extreme)
SUPER and EXTREME are not exaggerations.
& Wi nter
41 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
rooms setup as production offices, catering
tents, concessions, media tents, press tents,
athlete lounge tents, interactive village, awards
stage, and the ESPN host set and Sports
Center set (including the lighting packages.)
On the mountain itself, ID supplied power
to the repeater control towers, warming tents,
photo finish, start gates, spectator lighting,
video walls, Musco towers and Fly Cam equip-
ment. A total of 12,000 gallons of fuel was
consumed by power generation over the
course of the Games.
A veteran of many Summer and Winter
X- Games throughout the United States, Bill
Kanne has the experience to put 2004 into
perspective. The events we do with ESPN
are always exciting, but the Winter X- Games
are especially challenging due to the terrain,
the temperature and the pressure of live tele-
vision. Our crew and equipment worked espe-
cially hard to insure the entire event went
smoothly.
X

Illumination Dynamics (ID) was established in Los


Angeles, California and Charlotte, North Caro-
lina, in 2001 by industry veterans Carly Barber and
Jeff Pentek. Its acquisition by Camera Service Cen-
ter in 2002 made it the newest member of the ARRI
Group. In a very short time, Illumination Dynamics
has become an innovative industry leader in provi-
ding lighting, grip, power distribution and gene-
rators to the motion picture, live broadcast and spe-
cial event industries.
Illumination Dynamics carries a full line of ARRI
HMI and tungsten lighting, American grip stands
and hardware, UL-listed outdoor power distribu-
tion systems, Peterson cable ramps, theatrical lighting,
truss, grip trucks of all sizes, and movie-silent gene-
rators ranging in output from 200amp to 3000
amp both towable and drivable. Illumination
Dynamics specializes in paralleling technology and
offers 1400 to 3000 amp redundant Twin Pack
power systems.
Games
Bill Kanne
42 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
CSC New Yor k Cel ebr ates i ts
50th Anni ver sar y
In 1954 the Clapp family opened Camera Service Center on West 52nd Street in midtown Manhattan.
50 years on, with the headquarters two blocks away on West 54th Street, CSC is now a member of
the ARRI Group. As well as in New York the company now has facilities in Florida, Los Angeles and
North Carolina. It is one of the largest full service motion picture equipment rental groups in the world,
able to supply cameras, lighting equipment, cranes, dollies, motion control, remote camera heads,
location trucks and generators as well as expendable stores items.
Hardwrick Johnson, who started at CSC 42
years ago. Hardwrick is joined by Camera
Department Manager Charlie Tammaro (28
years service), lighting and grip rental agent
George Harris (38 years service) and last but
not least camera rental agent Tibor Sands
who was one of New Yorks most famous ca-
mera assistants for 30 years before joining
the team at CSC. In addition to this venerable
line up, Bruce Sam Halton and Lou Peter-
son have been the mainstays of the lighting
and grip warehouse for 37 and 25 years
respectively.
Reflecting on his years at Camera Service
Center and all that he and his colleagues,
past and present have experienced in that
time, Hardwrick said If I had been told,
when I joined the company in 1962, that it
would grow to the size it is now theres no
way that I would have believed it. Its amaz-
ing. Truly amazing.
Si mon Broad
It is unusual for a rental company to be in
business for 50years. It is even more unusual
that many of the key personnel have worked
in the company for almost as many years.
The Clapp family is still represented at CSC
in New York by camera rental agent John
Clapp. In the rental department, or War
Room he is the youngest member of an
amazing team whose combined experience
in the film industry exceeds 140 years! They
are lead by Vice President of Operations
1970
2004
George Harris, Hardwrick Johnson,
Reggie Lake, Bruce Sam Halton,
Greg Clapp, Waverley Taliaferro
(f. l. t. r.)
Hardwrick Johnson, George Harris,
Tibor Sands, Lou Peterson (standing),
Charlie Tammaro (sitting), John Clapp,
Bruce Sam Halton, (f. l. t. r.)
43 Wo r l d wi d e _ U S A
DI RTY DANCI NG: HAVANA NI GHTS
Chooses ARRI Camer a Package fr om
Camer a Ser vi ce Cent er (CSC) Fl or i da
Inspired by the 1987 smash hit DI RTY DANC-
I NG, DI RTY DANCI NG: HAVANA NI GHTS,
chronicles the burgeoning and taboo
romance between two young dancers in
1950s Cuba Katey Miller, a wealthy Ame-
rican transplant played by newcomer Romo-
la Garai, and Xavier Perez, a Cuban waiter
played by Y Tu Mama Tambiens Diego
Luna. As the pair unites on the dance floor,
the streets of Havana buzz with political un-
rest, soon to erupt in revolutionary violence
that will sweep the nation and the world.
The compressed 45-day shooting schedule
paltry compared to many film productions
was a major hurdle for the HAVANA NI GHTS
crew. The films location with Old San Juan,
Puerto Rico standing-in as Havana, Cuba
also posed a challenge. The narrow, wind-
ing streets were completely inaccessible by
truck, requiring the crew to transport every-
thing by dolly or foot, and the capricious sun
cast only one hour of usable light each day.
In addition, all production equipment had to
be shuttled from the U.S.. Fortunately, CSC
Florida was on hand to deliver the goods. To
help capture the films steamy Latin dance
scenes as well as the beautiful tropical set-
ting, DoP Tony Richmond enlisted the help of
CSC Florida to provide the film crew with an
ARRI camera package consisting of two
ARRICAM Studio cameras, an ARRICAM
Lite all with Speed Boxes, ARRIFLEX435ES
Advanced cameras, a slate of Cooke LDS
S4 Prime Lenses, Cooke Zoom lenses and
Optimo Angenieux Zoom lenses, as well as
three Lens Data Systems.
The lightweight ARRI CAM on Steadicam
and Technocrane proved invaluable when
filming the high-energy dance sequences,
and was small enough and quiet enough to
be able to maneuver itself discreetly into the
more intimate scenes without distracting the
actors and actresses. Richmond also made
good use of the ARRI Wireless Lens Control
System, which enabled him to control all
lens functions remotely while viewing given
sequences from optimal vantage points.
DI RTY DANCI NG: HAVANA NI GHTS, which
wrapped at the end of 2003, was a great
way to close out our first year, said CSC
General Manager Ed Stamm. We really
appreciate the way the Florida film commu-
nity has embraced our being here, and look
forward to serving this region of the United
States as well as the burgeoning Latin Ame-
rican film market in 2004 and beyond.
Karen Raz
Since opening its doors just one year ago, Ft. Lauderdales Camera Service
Center (CSC), an ARRI Group company, has been busy with a slate of
feature film projects, including the adventure /crime drama HAVEN, the
action/adventure film I NTO THE BLUE, the HBO movie KI NG SOLOMONS
MI NES, and most notably, the Guy Ferland-directed DI RTY DANCI NG:
HAVANA NIGHTS, shot by DoP Tony Richmond (LEGALLY BLONDE, THE
KI DS ARE ALRI GHT), which opens in theaters February 28.
DoP Tony Richmond
44 Wo r l d wi d e _ C a n a d a
Who i s Shooti ng i n Canada?
Director Raja Gosnell looks at the on-board monitor
as Steadicam/camera operator Jim Van Dyjk rolls
camera for a take. Script Super visor Portia Belmont
looks on.
ALASKA
A recent show to make use of the scenery of
the chilly north was ALASKA, shot by Glen
MacPherson CSC. The ARRICAMS proved
to be a versatile tool used handheld or on
Steadicam, running through the forest or
wading through streams. Larry Portmann
(1st AC) became quickly familiar with all
aspects of the cameras functions and ope-
rations as well as the programming of the
Wireless Remote Control system that was
carried for the show.
A chase scene across a stream was one of
the first scenes shot, using a Steadicam in
low-mode with the LT camera a few inches
from the rushing water below. A spray deflec-
tor was mounted to the front of the lens to
remove any splashes. They also used an ST
in the same configuration later on when the
need to run 60fps came up. We used the
same bracketry for mounting both cameras
to the rig, which was very convenientsaid
Larry. For this type of shooting, the ARRICAM
LT was used mainly for its quick transitions
between handheld and Steadicam mode.
Greg Beaton (1st AC) says: The ARRICAMS
were such a time saver, not only going from
handheld to studio or Steadicam. Downtime
was also minimized by having all the infor-
mation the visual fx guys needed right there
on the monitor from data display line of the
IVS. They would just take a picture right
from the monitor for all the circle takes said
Larry. Both the ST and the LT provided an
easy flexibility between vari-ous configurati-
ons, both being used for Steadicam work and
handheld as well.
SCOOBY DOO TOO
Larry Portmann just wrapped SCOOBY DOO
TOO with Oliver Wood. ARRICAM ST and
LT systems were used as well as the WRC
system, all new to the DP. The WRC-1 came
in handy for several shots that couldnt have
been accomplished without. In one scene,
shot in downtown Vancouver, the ghost
pterodactyl is seen lurking in an alley-way
and then takes flight across a busy street
(Georgia) into an art museum (the Vancou-
ver Art Gallery). They needed to get the
POV of the ghost pterodactyl as it took off
and flew. The ARRICAM LT was hung from
a cable that lifted it from the street level up
to 80 feet in the air and was then flown
towards the museum. The WRC-1 was used
to ramp the frame-rate of the camera and
correct for exposure simultaneously during
the shot and this was accomplished wireless,
from the ground. They got the shot they nee-
ded in four or five takes. They also did a
similar shot where a mechanical pterodactyl
flies over a bridge and lands on the top of
an armored truck. Again, a POV was nee-
ded with a speed ramp and exposure com-
pensation during the shot. The WRC-1 did
the trick. We couldnt have done it any
other way, said Greg Beaton, who also
worked on SCOOBY DOO TOO. Oliver
Wood is currently finishing photography of
THE BOURNE I DENTI TY 2 in Munich, also
using the ARRICAM system.
10. 5
The movie of the week 10.5, about the pre-
dicted big quake to hit California, was
filmed in the dusty desert-like region south-
east of Vancouver, B.C. They took advanta-
ge of the terrain that closely resembles the
deserts east of Los Angeles where many flee
after the big one hits. A base camp set was
built surrounded by the tent city where the
refugees were looked after. The camera
truck was even part of the set, camouflaged
to look like a military vehicle. 10.5 was pho-
tographed by the Australian DoP, David Fore-
man. ARRIFLEX535Bs and 435s were the
cameras of choice. The Clairmont Image Sha-
ker was used to simulate tremors and earth-
quakes. This device simulates all the move-
ments of a quake without moving the camera.
Patrick Stepien (1st AC) first used the ARRI-
CAM system on PERFECT SCORE, shot by
Clark Mathis, and is currently using both the
ARRICAM ST/ LT on WHITE CHICKS,
Cameras are set up at the Old Mining Town.
Operator Gar y Viola and 1st AC Greg Beaton
man the LT.
The ST lined up on a VXF shot where Scooby and
Shaggy rummage through bottles a fridge.
With its wide variety of land-
scapes and climates, Canada
provides a versatile backdrop
to film makers from around the
globe. For many years, the
Clairmont Camera Rental com-
pany has had track record of
providing continued customer
satisfaction using the ARRI tech-
nology across North America.
Weve asked Jon Johnson,
General Manager of Clairmont
Camera Vancouver, to give us a
glance at the type of shows they
service, and how they overcome
the challenging climate.
Operator Keith Thompson and 1st AC John
Seale Jr. set up the LT with a Variable Prime for
a shot chasing the Mystery Machine down the
street with our heroes hanging out the back.
1st AC Larr y Portmann swings on board monitor
around for the Director to see the shot.
directed by Keenan Ivory Wayans and photo-
graphed by Steven Bernstein in Vancouver,
B.C.
Saint Sinner
1st assistant Jessica Moskall used the ARRI-
CAM system on the feature film SAINT SIN-
NER, Directed by Josh Butler with DP Barry
Donlevy. In this movie, a 17th century monk
must travel through time to the present day
and stop two female demons he may have
accidentally released.
Jessica describes how the scene was shot
where the monk travels through time and is
disoriented on arrival: The ARRICAM ST
was on a Steadicam and the director, Josh
Butler, wanted the camera to circle around
the monk several times while a speed ramp
slowed the action. We used the LDS system
to compensate for the frame-rate change
with an automatic iris adjustment. Josh had
a specific moment when he wanted to trig-
ger the ramp, and only he knew when to
trigger. Jessica remembers asking the direc-
tor if he wanted the power to control the
speed change. The SCB was connected via
cable to the ARRICAM ST and attached to
the back of the Steadicam operator. All Josh
had to do was follow closely behind the
Steadicam operator and when the time was
right to push the grey button. Jessica remem-
bers how thrilled the director was to have
such precise control. He really was exci-
ted,
almost giddy to have the power. Jessica
has since worked with ARRICAMS on the
feature STEALING CHRISTMAS with DP Gor-
don Lonsdale, and is currently prepping a
test package with an ARRICAM LT for an
upcoming movie.
Car commercials, lots of car commercials
In the rainy seasons, the toughest chal-
lenge for the assistants is to keep the gear
dry while filming torrential downpours. In
Vancouver, we have become experts at this.
As an assistant it is always cool to see the
equipment pushed to its fullest not only tech-
nically but also creatively. I find that is when
our input is requested. DPs will consult us as
to which gear will give them the most ad-
vantages and most often, it is the ARRIFLEX
435 that is the camera of choice for com-
mercials. Andrew Lavigne 1st Assistant
Camera. Jorma Kantola (1st AC) just retur-
ned from a two-week car commercial shoot
in minus 40 Celsius temperature in Dawson
City, Yukon, 1800km north of Vancouver.
The whole scenario for the commercial is a
guy ice fishing, and then the ice starts to
break up and he has to jump in his car and
run for it before the car goes in the water.
We had a 435 on the nose mount of the
helicopter, shooting in minus 40 C weather,
the chopper couldnt shut its props off. Col-
der than minus 32 C, the fuel starts to gel,
and that cant happen. We had to keep the
engine running. Its minus 40 C to begin
with, add the wind chill from the blades and
factor in the chill at the nose mount, the
camera was probably shooting at minus 50
or 60 up there and it ran like a charm. We
ran the camera with the RCU from inside
the chopper. It was amazing how those
things held, I thought the little readout would
freeze, because light meters do, but it didnt.
We ran the whole 10-hour plus day on one
of those Clairmont 30V batteries, kept in a
battery bag and that was it. With the 435,
when you punch 120fps, boom you get
120.
The hardest part is just battling that cold.
The film would get so fragile. I snapped the
film twice, just loading the 435. You just
have to be so careful; we probably held the
mag outside for too long. Walking twenty
feet from the camera truck to the camera and
the mag would freeze. We kept the mag
case right next to the camera to minimize the
films exposure to the cold. Once it was in
the camera, there was no problem at all.
Clairmont Camera Rental supplies an entire
range of film and digital cameras through-
out North America. They have offices in Los
Angeles, Vancouver and Toronto.
Sebastien Laffoux
45 Wo r l d wi d e _ C a n a d a
46 Wo r l d wi d e _ M e x i c o
Zapata
ZAPATA, EL SUEO DEL HEROE (Zapata, the heroes dream) was shot on
locations in the state of Morelos, southern Mexico, mostly on the Hacienda
Coahuixtla, an abandoned and decaying sugar mill.
Revolutionary Dreams in Mexico
Vittorio Storaro (DP),
Wilma Gomez (first camera assistant)
Geronimo Denti
(second camera operator)
47 Wo r l d wi d e _ Me x i c o
The movie tells the story of Emiliano Zapa-
tas life, a peasant who became the leader
of the southern revolutionary army which
fought for tierra y libertad (land and free-
dom) and during the Mexican Revolution
(1910 1917) together with other revolution-
ary forces (most notably Pancho Villas)
overthrew the dictator Porfirio Daz. After
the formal end of the revolution Zapata con-
tinued his fight against oppression remain-
ing true to his ideals it is better to die on
your feet than to live on your knees and
was gunned down in an ambush in 1919.
After his death Zapatas ghost was seen
riding the hills of Morelos.
The productions Mexican Director Alfonso
Arau, who also wrote the script and co-
produced the movie, gained international
recognition in 1992 with his film LI KE WATER
FOR CHOCOL ATE. The Director of Photo-
graphy of ZAPATA was no other than Mr.
Vittorio Storaro himself, who has won three
Oscars (AP OCALYP SE NOW, REDS and
THE LAST EMPEROR) and received the ASCs
Lifetime Achievement Award for his work in
2001. Other members of the crew were
Alfredo Betr, Storaros trusted longtime first
camera operator, first camera assistant
Wilma Gmez and Eugenio Zanetti, who
won an Oscar for Art Direction on the film
REST ORAT I ON. Gernimo Denti, a highly
talented and one of Mexicos best known
young Directors of Photography, whose cre-
dentials include various comercials, music
videos and the feature DE I DA Y VUELTA
(2000), was chosen by Vittorio Storaro to
handle second unit photography.
Geronimo Denti (second camera
operator), Alfredo Betro (first
camera operator)
Budgeted at 10 million US $, ZAPATA was
mainly shot with two ARRIFLEX 535A
cameras and a ARRIFLEX 435 ADVANCED
camera for some high speed and helicopter
takes.
The ARRIFLEX 535A cameras were equiped
with ARRIFLEX 535B viewfinders and Inte-
grated Video Systems (IVS). The IVS pro-
duces a bright and clear video image, which
helps me a lot to judge composition and
lighting on the video monitor says Vittorio
Storaro. Another accessory used on the
cameras was the Wireless Focus and Iris Unit
WFU-1, which according to Vittorio Storaro
is truly helpful and one of the best products
ARRI has developed in the last couple of
years. Alfredo Betr notes that Vittorio
always keeps the iris control close to his light
board allowing him to make instant adjust-
ments to the overall exposure. Both ARRI-
FLEX 535A cameras had a 3-perforation
movement and a Univisium film gate with its
2:1 aspect ratio, which in Storaros opinion
is the right balance between the new wide
screen television systems and cinema. It
allows television and cinema audiences to see
movies exactly the way they are composed
by the director and the cinematographer.
Apart from that, the Univisium format uses
the entire frame area what results in a won-
derful quality of the screened image. Ger-
nimo Denti also pointed out that the absence
of any other format marks and the totaly
blackened area outside the Univisium format
in the viewfinder helps the camera operator
to concentrate on the composition of the
shot. The 3-perforation movement saved
negative costs and in Storaros words gives
us an advantage in creativity because we
have 25 percent more time in every maga-
zine. Presently ARRI offers the ARRIFLEX
435ADVANCED camera in a 3-perforation
version and the ARRICAM cameras can be
converted by an ARRI Service Center from
4-perforation to 3-perforation and back.
Vittorio Storaro pointed out that when it
comes to motion picture cameras my first
choice are always ARRI cameras.
The two ARRIFLEX 535A cameras were
provided by Technovision (France-Italy). The
ARRIFLEX 435ADVANCED camera was
rented out by the Mexico City based rental
house CTT Exp. &Rentals.
The sets of ZAPATA were lit with only a few
tungsten fixtures which were put on dimmers
and controlled by Vittorio Storaro from a
single control board.
The film was shot with Kodak 5218, 5245,
5246 and 5274 film stock and was proces-
sed at Technicolor in the US. Postproduction
took place at Mexican and US facilites.
ZAPATA is scheduled for release in Mexico
in April 2004 and later on in other countries.
Thomas Brnger
Vittorio Storaro (DP)
Wilma Gomez (first camera assistant),
Vittorio Storaro (DP), Geronimo Denti (second
camera operator)
48 Wo r l d wi d e _ G B
The location, although cramped, provided
the perfect Victorian setting for an adapta-
tion of Edgar Allan Poes T HE T E L L - TAL E
HEART. An intriguing tale of a man who be-
comes obsessed with the stare of his elder-
ly neighbors vulture-like eye. The man be-
comes so disturbed that he kills the old man
and hides the body under the floorboards,
but when the police arrive he is convinced
he can hear the heart beat of his victim.
ARRI Lighting Rental agreed to supply all
of the lighting equipment for the production
when approached by Producer Brian Free-
ston and couldnt resist the opportunity to
visit the set. With the take complete we got
our chance to talk to Jack Cardiff and Chris
Pinnock, who has worked with Cardiff since
they met on the TV mini series FAR PAVI L I ONS
in 1984.
Jack Cardiff has worked with directors such
as Alfred Hitchcock, King Vidor, John Huston
and John Boulting on films with stars includ-
ing Ingrid Bergman, Vivien Leigh, Humphrey
Bogart, Errol Flynn, Marilyn Monroe, Frank
Sinatra and Kirk Douglas to name but a few.
Jack Cardiff OBE, BSC reflects on some of his
experiences while on location shooting a short film
with Operator Chris Pinnock.
But it was his work with Michael Powell
and Emeric Pressburger that earned him
the reputation as one of the great cinema-
tographers A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH
(1946), BL ACK NARCI SSUS (1947, which
earned Cardiff an Oscar) and T H E R E D
S H OE S (1948). With a career that has
spanned many decades of cinema he
has seen many advances. Cardiff admits
to being fascinated by the technology avai-
lable today. Today there are fewer pro-
blems. When I started film stock was much
slower. I had to get so much light on it, it
was very difficult to get any modelling. Tech-
nical things were much more difficult, they
had to be laboured through. Now its so
much easier. And how does he feel about
lighting styles today? I think lighting in the
main has got much better in the sense that
before it was very artificial, so much more
artificial than it should have been. They
used a lot of lights, which werent always
necessary. Now they photograph a film
so that it all looks perfectly natural. The
lighting is always very well disguised,thats
the big difference now. The standard is
much higher.
Pai nti ng wi th
A modest room above a
pub in Islington, London,
is probably the last place
you would expect to run
into a legendary cinema-
tographer but this is exacly
where the great Jack
Cardiff was to be found
while working on his
latest short film, not bad
for a Director of Photo-
graphy approaching 90
years of age. Cardiff,
Pinnock, and the Director
Stephanie Sinclaire, were
all in the small room
busily preparing for one
final take before break-
ing for lunch.
49 Wo r l d wi d e _ G B
Going back to the T HE T E L L - TAL E HE AR T
Cardiff and Pinnock talk about how they
decided to light the piece. Pinnock explains
Its a fairly straightforward shoot as it most-
ly involves night interiors. We decided in pre-
production that we should see one window
that would let in the moonlight. As its a Vic-
torian piece weve had to recreate the effect
of gaslights but generally the lighting is very
low key. The biggest lamp weve used is a
5K. ARRI Lighting Rental gave us a compre-
hensive range to choosefrom. And have
they had to overcome any problems? Pinock
continues, There was one scene where
a ray of light illuminates the eye of the old
man. We tried a couple of things, one was
a Light Flex which didnt actually do what we
wanted it to do, it didnt look right. In the
end we actually used a ladies compact mir-
ror. We broke the glass and just used a small
piece of the mirror, maybe an inch or so. Jack
came along with it and said Have a go
with this instead, I tried it over the weekend.
We put a light into the mirror and from the
mirror reflected the light back onto the old
mans eye. It gave us much more exposure
and worked very well.
Pinnock has carried out all the operating
using a Moviecam Compact and Zeiss len-
ses supplied by Movietech. Its a very tight
space which always makes things harder but
I enjoy any project that gets me behind a
camera. Jack has let me do a lot on this pro-
duction and others in the past, which is great
as its where Ive gained a vast majority of
my experience. Jack has been a true inspi-
ration throughout the years I have worked
with him.
Before they return to resume shooting we
enquire if Cardiff has any advice for aspiring
cinematographers. What I would say be-
fore anything and Ive said this so many
times, is study painting extensively. When
I was very, very young I was travelling with
my parents who were on stage. We were
going to a different town every week so
I was at a different school every week. On
one occasion the teacher took us to a pro-
vincial art gallery. I had never at that time
seen a painting in my life, never. I went inside
this gallery with the other children and
suddenly I was surrounded by paintings,
I couldnt believe it. I was bowled over to see
all this colour and I fell in love with them.
I made up my mind from then onwards that
every time we went to a new town the first
thing I would find out was where the local
gallery was. In the end, after some years, I
got to recognise certain painters, Rembrandt
and Caravaggio, and I fell so in love with
paintings that it was my life. I realised that
whatever the painting was, whether a land-
scape or portrait, it was light that was the
important thing. That set me off watching the
light and later, much later, I got into Turner and
realised that he would have been the best
cameraman. He used wonderful lighting.
I would say to young people to make a study
of light and analyse it, learn how the direc-
tion of light, the reflections from light and
shades affect everything. You can advance
your knowledge and advance your work
enormously, its terribly important. Painting
to me is the great teacher for young people.
Mi chel l e Smi t h
Actor Steven Lord, Jack Cardiff
OBE, BSC, Operator Chris
Pinnock & Director Stephanie
Sinclaire (f. l. t. r.)
Jack Cardiff
Although Cardiff is amazed by what can be
done today he reflects on how he use to like
solving problems himself. When I worked
on RED SHOES with Michael Powell I remem-
ber when Nijinsky use to jump he seemed
to hover in the air. I wanted to achieve that
on film so I suggested that when he was danc-
ing and he jumped, that he jumped as high
as he could. As he reached the peak of his
jump I speeded the camera up. I had a gadget
devised to change the camera speed during
a scene. I went from 24 fps to 48 fps, it looked
much better and it was great fun doing it.
PHOTO: COURTESY OF MARK TI L L I E & DRAGONFL Y FI L MS L TD
Li ght
50 Wo r l d wi d e _ G B
Few movies so completely captured the era
of the swinging sixties as Michael Caines
AL FI E. Now nearly forty years later, the film
returns newly minted for a new generation
with Jude Law in the starring role of the wom-
anizing Alfie.
The Paramount Pictures production, working
title Untitled Charles Shyer Project, is pro-
duced and directed by Charles Shyer, who
also wrote the screenplay with Elaine Pope.
He has described their version of Alfie as,
A different character for a different social
mindset. I feel Elaine Pope and I got inspired
by a great movie re-visited the original
source material, the play and the novel and
then sort of went off on our own.
The new film is set in New York and Alfie is
an Englishman who loves life in the Big Apple.
When he isnt riding around the city on his
vintage Vespa scooter Alfie works as a limou-
sine driver, but mostly he likes nothing better
than spending his time with the ladies.
We joined DoP Ashley Rowe on set to find
out about his approach to the project.
ARRI Media (AM): The production pays hom-
mage to the 1960s classic, do you feel that
this is an added pressure and therefore more
of a challenge?
Ashley Rowe: Its hard to remake a classic.
Although Judes character is similar to that
of Alfie played by Michael Caine this Alfie
is more likeable, he comes over as a softer,
more contemporary fellow. The original film
was shot using single shots, sometimes track-
ing for Alfies pieces to camera. With modern
film techniques close-ups are used more often,
sometimes too often, so we tried to cover
scenes in one shot and keep coverage to a
minimum.
AM: How did you go about making this work?
Ashley Rowe: Firstly, we did some tests with
Jude and found that it only seemed to work
really well when we shot the pieces to camera
in one single set-up, static or moving with him.
Normally when shooting a long scene you
would shoot from lots of different angles to
make the scene cut, but it looked odd when
we cut to another position and he turned to
that camera. It looked more like a multi-camera
studio set-up. The style felt more real with
one camera taking him from one place to
another, as if he was talking directly to you.
AM: Youre using a lot of Steadicam shots in
this production, hows that going?
Ashley Rowe: Normally we would hire Steadi-
cam on a daily basis but because of our
approach to this production we have hired
for the duration of the shoot as this enabled
us to do complex camera moves whenever
we wanted. Our Steadicam Operator Vince
McGann, who is also operating second
camera, moves his Steadicam as if on a dolly
rock solid. Having him here means we can
get all the complicated camera moves when
required.
AM: Although principal photography takes
place here at Pinewood and also in Man-
chester I believe you are leaving for New
York in a few days to complete the shoot
there?
Ashley Rowe: Yes thats correct, we are
shooting most of our exteriors in New York.
Although we have hired from ARRI Media
here in the UK, CSC will supply the camera
equipment in New York. However, we are
making sure that our lenses go with us. Weve
been shooting with Zeiss Ultra Primes; the
whole set, and doubled up for the second
camera. My Focus Puller Ian Clarke netted
all our lenses. In order to meet the schedule
he would of had one day to check the len-
ses if hired in the US, to net new lenses and
re-test would be impossible so were taking
them with us.
AM: Youre using the ARRIFLEX 535B and
MOVIECAMSL, why did you select these
particular cameras?
Ashley Rowe: I have been using two 535Bs,
one for A camera and the other for B camera,
plus a MOVIECAMSL for Steadicam and
hand-held work. Vince prefers the MOVIE-
CAM for Steadicam due to balance. Both Ian
Director of Photography Ashley Rowe BSC, talks about his most recent project.
Whats i t al l about,
Its not every day you get to interview one of the UKs leading Directors of Photo-
graphy in the truly opulent surroundings of a sophisticated uptown New York
apartment, but thats the magic of the movies! The DoP is Ashley Rowe, whose
credits include THE AFFAI R OF THE NECKLACE, THE GOVERNESS and most
recently CALENDAR GI RLS, and the place is a sound stage at Pinewood Studios.
51 Wo r l d wi d e _ G B
and myself love using ARRI gear from ARRI
Media as we find everythings compatible
and ARRI Media have given us such great
service over the years.
Ive been using the 535B for a long time now.
When Im shooting I like to light and operate.
In fact, I light and operate on everything I do.
I love the viewfinder system, it gives an excel-
lent clear image and I like the way the eye-
piece flips over to the other side and extends
for use in tight places. On this particular
shoot it has proved invaluable for the scenes
in the limousines and town cars.
AM: Youve chosen a contemporary look for
the lighting, what were your thoughts
behind this?
Ashley Rowe: The Director Charles Shyer
had a very strong vision for the film, months
before we started shooting he sent over lots
of images that he had researched and sourc-
ed because he liked the mood and atmos-
phere they conjured up. Judes character meets
and interacts with six different women, all
quite different from each other and all with
completely different lives. Sophie Bercher,
the Production Designer, came up with some
very strong, very stylistically different environ-
ments for each character and each of these
brings a different style and colour to reflect
their personalities. What I did was to light it
accordingly, to complement Sophies designs.
AM: Are you planning to use any other
camera techniques?
Ashley Rowe: Apart from finding interesting
ways to photograph Alfies pieces to camera,
Im using various equipment, including a
TechnoCrane, Libra mount, macro lenses,
shift & tilt lenses, and the Strada Crane Sys-
tem to achieve some shots.
We are using digital fx to transition between
scenes. I have 3-dimensional models for our
window backings for some of our studio
builds like Alfies interior apartment as we
are shooting so many different times of day
and seasons it is the only way to ring the
changes with lighting.
AM: How have you found your experience
working on this film?
Ashley Rowe: Because this film is different to
anything that Ive done before, actors talk-
ing to camera, the shooting style weve used
has been a new experience and its always
enjoyable to do something you havent done
before. It has been fantastic working with
Jude Law, who I think has brought something
new to this film. Charles Shyer never saw
this as a remake but more of a re-invention,
hopefully this will be reflected in the finished
film.
J udi t h Pet t y
DoP Ashley Rowe, BSC
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52 Wo r l d wi d e _ D e n m a r k _ S o u t h A f r i c a
Kameraudlejningen ApS is a camera rental
facility based in Copenhagen founded 12
years ago. Offering rental equipment service
together with its daugther company Lysudlejn-
ingen ApS it covers all types of film-equip-
ment from 35mm cameras to grip and light-
ing equipment and supports productions in
all of Scandinavia.
The first two ARRICAM cameras a ST and
a LT were delivered in the beginning of
2004. Both cameras have been in product-
ion from the moment they arrived. At pre-
sent they are on the set of YOUNG ANDERSEN,
a big feature about the life of the famous
danish poet Hans Christian Andersen, pro-
duced by Tina Dalhoff for Nordisk Film Pro-
duction A/S with DoP Nicolaj Brel and
Director Rumle Hammerich.
From the outset we where very focused on
the new in camera slate system and the pos-
sibilities this system offers. To date this system
has fullfilled our expectations. From all sides
A RRI C A Ms i n Denmar k
The Futur e Looks Br i ght for South Afr i ca
Due to the growth of the rental industry within South Africa, Media Film Service recently
invested in ARRI lighting equipment.
Media Film Service hasnt looked back
since it launched in 2000. Starting out as
an ARRI product driven rental facility that
was fully supported by ARRI Media London
their relationship has since gone from strength
to strength and has grown to include ARRI
Lighting Rental London, so that as well as
camera and grip products Media Film Ser-
vice can offer the latest lighting equipment.
Media Film Service has experienced rapid
growth, expanding to new premises in
Cape Town and establishing branches in
Johannesburg and, more recently, Durban.
In order to meet the growing demand of
business they recently invested heavily in ligh-
ting equipment, purchasing an extensive
selection of lights from ARRI (GB) Ltd, inclu-
ding the ARRI Compact 200W, 1.2kW
& 6kW, ARRISUN 12 Plus & 40/25 and
Pocket Par 125W. Jannie van Wyk, MD
of Media Film Service, explains why they
chose ARRI products ARRI is our only choi-
ce for the majority of our equipment. The
reasons are that ARRI lighting equipment
has just what it takes to survive in one of
the most diverse and harsh climates. ARRI
have given special detail to handling and
strength of equipment, their ballasts are
super reliable and back-up prompt.
Media Film Service has also invested heavi-
ly in new generators, distribution and trucks
as they are well aware that these items are
the backbone to any lighting company and
essential to support their product portfolio.
Corrie van Wyk, National Lighting Techni-
cal Manager, joined Media Film Service
recently to assist with the national growth
of the lighting department and is confident
in the service offered, Media Film Service
is committed to bringing customers the latest
in technology. We now have very capable,
well-trained personnel and a reliable depart-
ment. We can and will deliver. Jannie van
Wyk agrees, We can now offer our clients
the best equipment and unsurpassed service,
anywhere in the country. We can deploy our
resources from one, or all of our branches to
ensure a seamless supply and delivery of ser-
vices. Media Film Service believes in the in-
dustry and are committed to continued invest-
ment.
With branches in Cape Town, Johannesburg
and Durban, Media Film Service now offers
a national supply of the latest ARRI equip-
ment, backed-up by professional teams.
Mi chel l e Smi t h
Media Film Service
Cape Town +27 (0)21 5113300
Johannesburg +27 (0)11 262 5560
Durban +27 (0)31 579 2278
On location in Cape Town during production
of the feature film SLIPSTREAM
we have only recieved positive feedback,
remarks Thomas Kristensen, owner of both
rental companies. Camera department
commented: We love the modularity,
ergonomic shape and light weight, and
the sound department added "remarkable
lower noise level compared to former
blimped cameras!
The post department adds: The in camera
slate reader system is less sensitive to
over exposure, bleech bypass and scrat-
ches at the edge of the neg. All of which
could be a problem with the old timecode
system.
Thomas Kri st ensen
Producing Young Andersen with the In Camera Slate System
DOP Nicolaj Brel and actor Simon Thaulow
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Contact:
kameraudlejningen@kameraudlejningen.dk
phone + 45 7020 3400
Steadicam operator Jakob Bonfils
53 Wo r l d wi d e _ F r a n c e
Vi ve l a Fr ance Vi ve l ARRI CAM
For Technovision 2003 was the year of the ARRICAM:
the camera system was used on five major productions
and a total of six cameras have been in operation.
At each production Technovision was on location and
could experience the camera teams first impression.
First result: the crews were impressed by how quiet the
camera runs, since a lot of shooting in France is
done with original sound and here from now on the
ARRICAM sets the standard.
UN L ONG DI MANCHE DE F I ANAI L L E S
by Jean Pierre Jeunet
The first visit, to the set of Jean Pierre Jeunet
(also AML I E POUL AI N) leads to a military
training ground near Poitiers. UN L ONG
DI MANCHE DE FI ANAI L L ES is a six month
production between August 2003 and Feb-
ruary 2004. Fields have been dug up to
represent the trenches of World War I, the
fims main location.
Work conditions have been extreme: for one
month 37000 litres of water per hour were
pumped onto the set in order to impressive-
ly recreate the desired atmosphere. The
two ARRICAMS had fewer problems with
all this water than crew and actors: neither
the LT on a Technocrane nor the ST on
Valentin Monges Steadicam (1. AC: Eric
Vall) caused any trouble.
Alain Gauthier (Technovision) spoke to
DoP Bruno Delbonnel, Steadicam operator
Valentin Monge and his assistant cameraman
Eric Vall.
Alain Gauthier (A.G.): You have now been
shooting in mud and rain for already one
and a half months. What can you tell us about
working with the cameras under these con-
ditions?
Eric Vall: Before we started shooting we
didnt know much about the ARRICAM in
extreme conditions. We were worried because
of the torrential weather, there is quite a bit
of electronic in these cameras after all. But
during one and a half month of shoting in
these conditions there was not a single pro-
blem. Thats unbelievable!
A.G.: How did the new camera system work
out for you?
Eric Vall: Handling and the accessories are
very well thought out. When working with
Jean Pierre Jeunet you always have to react
very quickly. With the ARRICAM changing
the camera setup in a few seconds is really
not a problem anymore.
Bruno Delbonnel was already the Director
of Photography on AM L I E P OUL AI N.
A.G.: You have worked with the ARRIFLEX
535 and the Panaflex. You choose the
DoP Bruno Delbonnel
54 Wo r l d wi d e _ F r a n c e
ARRI CAM for UN L ONG DI MANCHE DE
FIANAILLES. Where do you see differences?
Bruno Delbonnel: I like the ARRICAM view-
finder a lot. It shows the colors as they are,
and its brightness is extraordinary even when
the iris is closed all the way. The viewfinder
of the Panaflex was rather disappointing, in
comparison. And the viewfinder extension
of the ARRICAM is very handy, because it
allows me to check te image and to control
magnification precisely at any time.
A.G.: What was the decisive factor when
selecting the camera system?
Bruno Delbonnel: Another factor was the
selection of lenses. I didnt want the image to
become as hard and contrasty as on AMLIE
POULAIN. After doing comparison tests with the
Primos I decided on the Cooke S4s. Besides
we needed very short focal lengths. And above
that all requirements for this shoot were best
met in the combination ARRICAMLT and ST.
A.G.: Did Jean Pierre Jeunets way of work-
ing change since AML I E POUL AI N?
Bruno Delbonnel: Not really, just that he works
even closer to the actors now. On AMLIE
POULAIN we mostly kept a distance of 50cm,
which already caused some problem for
the sound department. We frequently used
the 25mm lens. On UN LONG DIMANCHE DE
FIANAILLES we now use even shorter focal
lengths from 16mm to 21mm. The minimum
distance to the actor is barely 25cm. It is
generally true for Jean Pierre Jeunet that
he goes to the limits with the equiment. With-
out the ARRICAM ST it would have been
very difficult for the sound department.
A.G. to Valentin Monge: You use the
ARRICAMST on Steadicam and not the LT.
How come?
Valentin Monge: When we started shooting
we didnt have the LT. So I started out using
the ST and kept it the whole time. This shows
that the camera perfectly fits the Steadicam.
It is very well balanced, fast to re-configure
and the wireless Lens Control System makes
a Steadicam operators life easier because
of less cabling.
I L S SE MARI RENT
by Yvan Attal
It is still night at 7:30AM in November. There
is rain when we arrive. But here again the
rain is generated by three trucks and goes
on the whole day. Apart from the ARRICAM
LT, an ARRI FLEX 35 BL 4s is used. Alain
Gauthier spoke to DoP Rmy Chevrin and
Steadicam operator Loic Andrieux.
A.G.: What do you think of the ARRICAM
LT? You worked with the ST on commercials
already.
Rmy Chevrin: One word: outstanding. I do
a lot of handheld work from the shoulder on
this film, and I appreciate how compact and
handy it is, and the weight, of course.
A.G.: Was the small size of the camera help-
ful in confined sets?
Rmy Chevrin: Sure. Especially when shoot-
ing in a Mercedes Coup, I really got to
appreciate the small shoulder magazine. But
aside from that: the control panel works
very well, the built in contrast filter, the dim-
mer for the frameline illumination
A.G.: Why do you use the LT as your main
camera?
Rmy Chevrin: 70 percent of this film is shot
handheld or on Steadicam. I didnt even
consider another camera, particularly be-
cause of the scope lenses. In any case, 7 kg
on your shoulders the whole day is better
than 12kg. As far as sound is concerned the
LT was perfect, even in interiors. We used a
home built soft blimp for sequences where we
had to come very close to the actors.
A.G.: A question for Loic Andrieux: Steadi-
cam operators often have a precise idea of
what a perfect camera should look like. Does
the LT meet this idea?
DoP Rmi Cheverin Steadicam Operator Loic Andrieux
55 Wo r l d wi d e _ F r a n c e
well thought out, and I particularly apprecia-
te its brightness, which is excellent. I already
learned to like this on the film MOI C S AR
by Richard Berri. At that time I used the LT.
The shoulder set is done very well. And
because of the weight, the LT is perfect for Stea-
dicam, with very comfortable handling.
Vincent Gallo, 1. AC: The camera is unbe-
lievably reliable, we havent had one prob-
lem during 12 weeks of shooting. For me
this is really a blessing. Besides, the IVS is
very good. Our director Patrick Timsit used
the video monitor quite frequently and was
very impressed by it.
L E RET OUR DE J AMES BATAI L L E
by the Poiraud Brothers
A.G.: Why did you choose the ARRICAM LT?
Philippe Lesourd, DoP: The most important
reason: 80% of the film was shot with origi-
nal sound and handheld, this just cried out
for the ARRICAMLT. Our sound engineer Bri-
gitte Le Thaillandier conducted a merciless
test. And then we booked the LT. Also becau-
se for several weeks of handheld shooting
I didnt want to use a heavy camera at any
case.
RRRRRR. . . .
by Alain Chabat
Natascia Chrosciski, executive manager of
Technovision France spoke to DoP Laurent
Daillant.
N.C.: What were your reasons for choosing
the ARRICAMLT?
Laurent Daillant: 30 to 40 percent of the film
were planned to be shot on Steadicam.
Alessandro Brambilla, our Steadicam opera-
tor, wanted to have this camera at any case.
And as far as handling, weight etc. is con-
cerned it turned out to be this good that you
couldnt see a difference between Steadicam
shots and normal shots.
N.C.: Did you work with the camera also in
a traditional way?
Laurent Daillant: During shooting, I specific-
ally noticed the viewfinder, the high quality
of the video assist, and the fact that the ac-
cessories are very well thought out and easy
to use.
N.C.: In one word, you are convinced?
L.D.: Definitely. By the way, on my next pro-
ject with Stewart Howell I plan on using it
again.
N.C.: Thanks a lot, Laurent.
Al an Gaut hi er
Loic Andrieux: For me it was the first time
shooting with the ARRICAM. Previously I have
seen it on a film with Michael Ballhaus, there
were two STs. The ARRICAMLT really is
ingenious, thanks to its light weight it can
be easily balanced without any force. This
camera is fun to work with.
Rmy Chevrin: I personally think for the LT,
there should be a way to mount the maga-
zines in topload position. This would be
beneficial when shooting handheld in con-
fined locations.
A.G.: Thank you both and all the best for
your film!
L ' AMRI CAI N
by Patrick Timsit
A.G.: This film is a comedy, and as it
seems, it runs very smoothly.
Pierre Morel: It does but we changed
framing and jumped the line of action quite
a bit, often three or four times in one scene.
This way we got to appreciate how easy it
is to re-configure the ARRICAM. My ACs
were especially found of its easy handling
and its reliability. For my part, I like the view-
finder the best: the magnification ratio is
UN LONG DI MANCHE DE FI ANAI LLES
(A Long Sunday of Engagement) Director Jean
Pierre Jeunet, DoP Bruno Delbonnel, Produc-
tion Warner.
1 ARRICAM LT and 1 ARRICAMST
I LS SE MARI RENT... (They have Married)
Director Yvan Attal, DoP Rmy Chevrin,
Production Path.
1 ARRICAM LT
LAMRI CAI N (The American)
Director Patrick Timsit, DoP Pierre Morel,
Production Cipango Films.
1 ARRICAM ST
LE RETOUR DE JAMES BATAI LLE
(The Return of James Bataille)
Director: Poiraud Brothers, DoP Philippe le
Sourd, Production Entropie.
1 ARRICAM LT
RRRRRR...
Director Alain Chabat, DoP Laurent Dailland
f.l.t.r. DoP Pierre Morel,
1st assistant Vincent Gallo
56 Wo r l d wi d e _ I n d i a
L AKSHYA was shot entirely on location in
India in the Himalayas in and around Leh,
Ladakh at 11,500ft to 18,000ft (where the
highest crane shot ever done for a narrative
feature film at 17, 796ft above sea level was
carried out), New Delhi, at the IMA (Indian
Military Academy) in Deradhun and on sets
in Film City in Bombay. Los Angeles based
cinematorapher Christopher Popp remem-
bers the challenges of this partially extreme
shooting quite well:
L AKSHYA is done in the 35mm anamorphic
(2.40:1 aspect ratio) format, which is the
standard aspect ratio for all Bollywood films.
I love this aspect ratio since it allows you to
do complex compositions and capture inti-
mate moments with two characters in a tight
close-up in one frame. You can also control
layers of focus on different planes, and it
allows you to spread the action across the
frame and have wide vistas. Our main cam-
era, which for 85% of the film was a single
camera which I operated myself, was an
ARRI FLEX 535B with Hawk anamorphic
prime lenses, 35 mm to 135 mm, and an
Angenieux Zoom 50mm 500mm which
we got from Prasad Labs in Mumbai. When-
ever we needed matching coverage, we
brought in additional cameras usually 35IIIs
and 435s with Hawk lenses from Ravi Pra-
sad Unit in Chennai.
The typical mainstream Bollywood film has vibrant and saturated colors, night exteriors have a blue key
light and a yellow fill light. The characters are usually way over the top super heroes, back-up dancers
suddenly materialize and start singing, and every film has a happy end.
DIL CHAHTA HAI , director Farhan Akthars first film, was a milestone in India because it had its roots in
traditional Bollywood Cinema but was more reality based, which he wanted to continue in his second film
LAKSHYA. This films fictitious story follows the experiences and the coming of age of the main character
Karan Shergill (played by Hritik Roshan) and has the Kargil war of 1999 between India and Pakistan as
backdrop. The three-hours narrative feature was shot in Hindi with a budget of US$ 7,000,000 in 146
shooting days and is now going through the Digital Intermediate Process at Prasad Labs in Mumbai, India.
LAKSHYA Filming in India
57 Wo r l d wi d e _ I n d i a
Key Grip Sanjay Sami
A good portion of the film is supposed to
happen in Kargil and the Drass area in Jammu-
Kashmir close to the Line of Control (LoC),
a 450 mile line that is supposed to indicate
the boundary between the part of Kashmir
controlled by India and the part controlled
by Pakistan. Since there were still shelling
and terrorist attacks going on in that region,
the production decided to shoot that part of
the film in and around Leh at 11,500ft at the
eastern side of Jammu-Kashmir close to China.
The only way to get equipment in was by roads
and passes that lead through the Himalaya.
We spent 4month up there and had to shoot
major night exterior battle scenes as well
as a lot of day exterior and interior scenes.
Detailed pre-planning was essential to shoot
in a place like this, especially when trucks
with equipment and generators needed two
weeks to arrive from Bombay.
DoP Christopher Popp on Giraffe Crane
with ARRI FLEX 535B
Car done by Key Grip Sanjay Sami at 15,0000 ft.
In the background director Farhan Akthar (sitting)
with actor Hrithik Roshan (standing).
Crane shot at 17,796 ft, Key Grip
Sanjay Sami at base with grips and
DoP Christopher Popp on the crane
with the ARRI FLEX 535B
on Higher Ground
58 Wo r l d wi d e _ I n d i a
The cliff face built in Film City in Mumbai with the
two overhead silks in position and two construction
cranes with silks on the left
Sitting in the car is actor Sushant Singh,
standing in the car is actor Hritik Roshan,
to his right is key grip Sanjay Sami and
at the camera setting up a shot is DoP
Christopher Popp (f. l. t. r.)
10 F. Of course, just getting the equipment
up there was a challenge. Then sudden gusts
of wind came in and threatened to topple
the crane. We also had to be done by a
certain time, since we were losing the light.
An interesting fact about this shoot is that
we beat our own record which we had set
up in Warila by doing the possibly highest
crane shot ever done for a narrative feature
film at approx. 17,300ft. With this shot,
we broke our own record a week later by
almost 500feet.
Another important scene takes place at a
sheer cliff that our heroes have to climb to
surprise the intruders on the peak. The scene
was broken down into segments. One, where
our heroes arrive at the bottom of the cliff
and look up in awe, which we shot in Ladakh,
and some dramatic climbing action where
we had to see our heroes clearly on the wall.
It would have been impossible to shoot that
segment for real in Ladakh. A cliff face that
measured approximately 100 55 was
built on scaffolding and dressed with painted
fiberglass panels in Film City in Mumbai. The
cliff face had two side panels and a front
panel on the ground. All the panels were
painted blue to work as blue screens. The
cliff and a mountain range were added in
the CG realm.
Before shooting commenced, it was impor-
tant for me to find out what the different labs
results looked like. We decided to have the
negative, dailies and the release prints done
by Prasad Labs in Mumbai. During produc-
tion, an ARRILASER was installed at Prasad
Labs in Mumbai and the decision then was
made to do a DI (digital intermediate) for the
color correction and release prints in April
2004 a very important decision for the look
of the film.
For L AKSHYA, I used 4 different Kodak film
stocks: 5277, 5284, 5246 and 5218. Each
emulsion has a different inherent look, which
I used in combination with different lighting
styles to visually represent our heros journey.
The low contrast and desaturated look stands
I was trying to shoot the day exteriors in
backlight, 3/4 backlight or sidelight, to give
the mountains some texture. I used SunPATH
sun-tracking software, a compass and clino-
meter in order to calculate where the sun
would be at a certain time and we then broke
down sequences to shoot specific angles at
certain times of day. The idea of wide shots
and vistas was not only to show how beau-
tiful Ladakh was, but to also make it a char-
acter in the film and to put our characters
into the environment with a sense of scale.
During shooting we had everything that you
can imagine, ranging from temperatures of
115 F with extreme humidity and dust storms
back in Delhi to living and working at high
altitudes with thunderstorms, snow and hail
sometimes all in one day. Most of our loca-
tions in Ladakh were all windy and extremely
dusty. One of the bigger challenges though,
was to set up a 24 Giraffe crane, 1212
muslins, and several cameras to shoot one
of the most important scenes above the Tang-
langla Pass at 17,796ft above sea level at
59 Wo r l d wi d e _ I n d i a
CAST AND CREW
Production: Excel Entertainment Pvt. Ltd in co production with UTV India
Director: Farhan Akthar
Second Unit Director: Chris Anderson
DoP and Camera Operator: Christopher Popp
First AC: Anand Kumar
2nd AC/Loader: Ravi Kiran
Assistant to DoP: Ayananka Bose
Gaffers: Mulchand Dedia, Kamlesh Sadrani
Key Grip: Sanjay Sami
SPX Supervisor: Angelo Sahin from Australia
Visual FX supervisors: Craig Mumma, Marc Kolbe from LA, USA
The Adjutant Major welcomes the new
cadets at the Indian Military Academy
Karan Shergill (Hritik Roshan) at
Humayuns Tomb in New Delhi.
Camera set up in Warila
at approx. 17,300 ft
for our heros indecisiveness. Once he made
up his mind about life, I switched to 5284
which has a little bit more contrast and satu-
ration. When war breaks out, I switched
to 5246 rated at 250ASA for day exteriors
and interiors and 5218 rated at 500ASA
for night interiors and exteriors. The overall
quality of the imagery in the film goes from
a soft appearance to a little sharper, to really
sharp and snappy and then back to a softer
tone. So does the lighting, which progresses
from an extremely soft diffused lighting, over
a more directional lighting to a really con-
trasty, harsh lighting style and then back.
The three-hours narrative feature film will
be released in India, Asia, Europe and in
selected theaters in the US on June 18th.
A native of West Germany, became inter-
ested in photography at the age of eight
when he observed his father developing
a black and white picture in the lab of
the family photo store. After studying pho-
tography, he trained as a camera opera-
tor and 1st AC at German TVs (ZDF)
Department of Education. Christopher then
worked as an additional cinematographer
and operator on documentaries in Egypt,
Libya, Kenya, the Soviet Union, Great
Britain, Israel, Italy, Switzerland, France,
Canada and the United States. He has
also worked on features, TV features, and
TV series in Germany. He shot the Time
Lapse sequence for the Canadian-German
co-production THE MUSI C OF KURT WEI LL:
SEPTEMBER SONGS, which won an Inter-
national Emmy award for Best Performing
Arts Picture in 1996 and a Gemini award
for Best Photography in 1997. He was
also the additional cinematographer on
WAR SYMP HONI ES: SHOSTAKOVI CH
another Canadian-German co-production
which won an International Emmy award
for Best Arts Documentary in 1999 and
a Golden Prague for Best Photography
in 1998.
In 1996 came to Los Angeles to study
cinematography at UCLA. The following
year he was accepted into the cinemato-
graphy program at the renowned Center
for Advanced Film and Television Studies
at the American Film Institute (AFI ).
For the cinematography of his thesis film
Shadows he received the Gregg Toland
Heritage Award from the American Soci-
ety of Cinematographers (ASC) for Out-
standing Achievement in Cinematography
in February 2000.
Christopher Popp
DoP Christopher Popp takes
a reading at 14,000 ft
60 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Henning Rdlein, Head of ARRI Digital Film,
explains: Shooting is done with top of the
line cameras and lenses on 35mm film. After
that we leave film and enter the digital
domain. Here we have all the possibilities,
because in the digital world, creativity is
almost without limits.
The technical tools make it possible to selec-
tively correct the color of individual elements,
to create a continuous weather condition, to
match different film stocks and to seamlessly
add visual effects. Work is done in realtime,
is immediately viewable and is reversible.
The Route to Digital Intermediate
It is recommended to start out separating the
negative material and to splice it from
camera stop to camera stop, according to the
EDL coming from the AVID. This way the
color timer already gets the scenes in the right
order and a consistent lighting scheme can
be created while scanning the negative.
Zooming and framing is done during the
digitizing of the material. The scanned images
are saved uncompressed on a disc recorder.
Online editing is based on the AVID EDL.
Fades, motion events, freeze frames and
A2 RACER and POL LY BL UE EYES
Reports from the Field
Recently two German feature productions
went the digital route at ARRI: POLLY BLUE
EYES (Production: Equinox Film; Director:
Tomy Wigand; DoP: Gernot Roll) and A2
RACER (Production: Constantin Film; Direc-
tor: Michael Keusch; DoP: Hannes Hubach).
Each one of them is special in its own way:
P OL LY BL UE EYES because of its classic
narrative and a very sophisticated and subtle
color scheme. The other one, A2 RACER
(based on a computer game of the same
name) because of a very complicated shoo-
ting.
A2 RACER
As the title indicates, the film is about a high-
way chase, shot with two units and a total of
five cameras (1. Unit: 535 B, ARRICAM LT,
435; 2. Unit: 435, ARRIFLEX 35 III and
ARRIFLEX 35 IIIc) on numerous locations in
Luxembourg. Some of the scenes were film-
ed on a highway that had been closed down
for shooting. So we had to take them as we
shot them, without any consideration of the
weather. And we knew already on location
Di gi tal I nter medi ate
Digital technology is increasingly changing all areas of film postproduction worldwide. Thats why Digital
Intermediate (DI ), also known as Digital Lab, is a central topic. Based on numerous positive experiences among
cinematographers, directors and producers, DI is becoming the preferred standard for the postproduction of
feature films, says Franz Kraus, executive director of the ARRI AG. Its not only about the creative aspects and
the possibility to realize a uniform design concept, but also about the cost/ benefit ratio and the consistency for
postproduction and distribution.
Actress Susanne Bormann
Actor Matthias Schweighfer
insertion of visual effects can be done easily
and without loosing any resolution. Follow-
ing the online editing the creative color grad-
ing is done together with the Director of Pho-
tography. Selective color correction makes
it possible for the color grader to create an
individual look. The Noise Reducer allows
to even the modification of the structure of the
film grain afterwards. For the final recording
on the ARRILASER to 35mm Intermed Posi-
tive or Intermed Negative the ARRI Color
Management is employed to transfer the
color palette designed on a monitor back to
film, according to the principle What you
see is what you get.
ARRI Digital Film uses two ARRILASER to
record on 5242 Intermed (Positive or Nega-
tive), 5245 camera negative or 5231 black-
and-white negative in all formats (1:1,66,
1:1,85, 1:2,35, Super 35, Cinemascope).
Additional benefit: apart from the 35mm
Digital Intermediate film for release prints,
an HD master is created that can be used for
versioning and trailers, for release on DVD,
in TV or on videotape, in both PAL and NTSC.
at ARRI Di gi tal Fi l m
61 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
that the lighting had to be modified in post,
DoP Hannes Hubach explains. The weather
conditions were vastly different from scene to
scene because we worked with several units.
DI is perfectly suited to give the sequences a
continuous weather look and to modify the
lighting (which in Luxembourg on location is
always rather flat) making it warmer and
increasing contrast. In addition the cars in the
film are very important, they are treated almost
as main characters.Their presence had to be
emphazised by enhancing their color.
It soon became clear to Constantin Film that
Digital Intermediate would be the perfect way
to level out this difficult material. Apart from
that the producers didnt want A2 RACER to
look like a typical German comedy
Hannes Hubach adds.
Beyond that there is an enormous number of
motion events in the film. To recreate them in
traditional post in the lab would have meant
a tremendous effort in editing, which would
have been very difficult or not doable at all
by going the analog route.
ARRI Film & TV is the only company in Ger-
many which can supply Digital Intermediate
from start to end, with support from the film
lab and digital lab to test screenings in their
own theater. Everything is under one roof,
Hannes Hubach says.
Polly Blue Eyes
Like many of their colleagues, Hannes
Hubach as well as DoP Gernot Roll and
Tomy Wigand, director of POL LY BL UE EYES,
advise against cutting corners during shoot-
ing, inspite of the possibilities digital post has
to offer.
Right from the beginning I wanted to do
digital post, Tomy Wigand explains, and
Bernhard Kllisch, producer at Equinox,
agrees. The plan became more fleshed out
when Gernot Roll joined us. He said right
away that DI would be the perfect way to
realize his concept technically and creative-
ly. Thats why Gernot Roll deliberately plann-
ed the scenes on the set in a way that their
colors could be enhanced and refined in post
with DI, just because each part of the frame
can be manipulated separately, Tomy
Wigand continues. All this wouldnt have
been possible the traditional optical analog
way. This way the films color and lighting
style is now very distinguished and subli-
me and still has a very natural look to it.
Tomy Wigand wanted a film without seasons,
but because of financial and time constrains
was forced to work in winter. DI and the
ARRI Color Management made this possible
without problems, because we could mani-
pulate areas of an image and even change
the film grain.
Birgit Steffan, Senior Colorist at ARRI Film&
TV, did the color grading on P OL LY BL UE
EYES: It was ideal that the color scheme was
already in the negative, meaning implement-
ed on set, and we didnt have to create any-
thing artificially afterwards. Because we
cant conjure anything into the image which
isnt already there. However, with DI the
image can be formed and manipulated very
well, which isnt possible the optical route.
We didnt have to fix anything in post, we
just created a continuous weather situaton.
Gernot Roll kept pointing out to Tomy
Wigand and Birgit Steffan: We have to
increase the contrast as much as possible.
Already on location he set up his lighting
accordingly. He had production purchase
old streetlamps from the GDR, which then
were set up on exterior night shoots. Later, in
color grading, Birgit Steffan digitally chang-
ed the light to a warm shade of gold. Mean-
while Tomy Wigand completely swears by
DI: Visually the finished film has a much
more uniform look. I even think, the enhanced
colors of POL LY BL UE EYES couldnt have
been achieved with the traditional lab.
And why ARRI? Tomy Wigand and Gernot
Roll agree on that one: In Germany, ARRI
DoP Gernot Roll (left)
and Director
Tomy Wigand
is one of the few, if not the only, service pro-
viders that offers the complete chain and
does it well: shooting with 3- perforation
cameras, lighting and grip from ARRI, film
lab, scanning, digitizing and the complete
digital post including recording on film with
the ARRILASER everything from one hand.
J ochen Hhnel
Other Credits
WI E F EUER UND F L AMME
AL L T HE QUEEN S MEN
MONDSCHEI NTARI F
BOOKI ES
TAT T OO
T RUE
F RAGI L E
SAMS 2
T HE ST ORY OF T HE WEEPI NG CAMEL
POL LY BL UE EYES
A2 RACER
T RI XXER
7 DWARF S
T HE L AZARUS CHI L D
62 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Not much fun these days for the Monk with the Whip, the Frog with the
Mask and the Black Abbot: Londons underworld is shaken by mysterious
murder around venerable Blackwhite Castle. The rogue murderer is loose,
called TRI XXER! Scotland Yards puts its best men on the case: new inspector
Very Long and chief inspector Even Longer, whose old beloved colleague
Rather Short fell victim to the TRI XXER.
Long and Even Longer are on their way to
Blackwhite Castle, where they meet the Earl
of Cockwood who appears to be a perfectly
normal aristocrat dedicated to traditional
pug breeding. However, behind the facade
he operates an international girl trade, ex-
porting girl groups to the whole world. The
T RI XXER is after him, as he is after the rest
of Englands underworld, sending one rogue
after another to kingdom come. During their
investigations in Blackwhite Castle (which is
so venerable that everything inside the radius
of one mile is just black and white) chief
inspector Even Longers interest soon focuses
on attractive Miss Pennymarket, while the
T R I X X E R puts everything on stake to gain
power over the underworld
An amazing job for director Tobi Baumann
and his stars Oliver Kalkofe, Bastian Pastewka,
Thomas Fritsch, Olli Dittrich, Anke Engelke,
TRI XXER
Not based on a novel by Edgar Wallace
63 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Thomas Heinze and Wolfgang Vlz, among
many others, whose schedule on 43 shoot-
ing days in London, Munich and Prague was
filled with countless locations, stunts, quotes
from other films and musical numbers.
T RI XXER is our ultimate homage to Edgar
Wallace movies of the 60s, says Bastian
Pastewka. Oliver Kalkofe, Oliver Welke and
me, we worked together on the script for
T RI XXER. Of course we also cast ourselves,
just in case.
When writing the script I never expected
that somebody would ever turn all these
crazy ideas into reality, Kalkofe remembers,
but it actually happened! And even better
than we imagined.
Producer Christian Becker (BANG BOOM
BANG, WHAT DOESN T FI T- WE MAKE FI T,
THE J ESUS VI DEO), chief executive officer
of Munich based production company Rat-
Pack, and his team put two years intense
work into the realization of the writers phan-
tasies and ideas. From early on it became
clear that such an elaborate production with
numerous large setups and appropriate
building crews would be hard to do in Ger-
many, says Christian Becker. More than 100
workers where building ten sets on three
soundstages which, together with the Prague
harbour and a castle south of Prague, trans-
ferred the whole filmcrew into another world
for weeks.
Unquestionably a visual highlight is the
Blackwhite Castle and its interiors, designed
and crafted with much attention to detail:
secret passageways, a dungeon (a replica
of the prison from SI L ENCE OF THE L AMBS),
revolving bookshelves and fireplaces, hidden
stairs and drop pits. And over and over again
the Earl of Cockwoods trademark: pugs!
Only a competent service facility like ARRI
could be considered for this production. And
so the Munich company supplied lighting
and camera equipment (including the ARRI-
MOTION), sound and lab services, editing
facilities and of course services in the boom-
ing areas of Digital Intermediate and Digital
Visual Effects. Postproduction was done
exclusively uncompressed (10bit), from the
AVID high-resolution project to the design
of the visual effects, as well as in the Digital
Lab. There Birgit Steffan was in charge of
the specific look, like in the Blackwhite Castle
sequence, which had to live up to its name,
even though it was shot in color. Extraordnary
accuracy was necessary to prevent color shift-
ing in the image and to ensure the continuity
of this tinted black-and-white look. Visual
effects supervisor Dominik Trimborn was respon-
sible for the effects and supervised shooting
together with Michael Lanzensberger. It took
three months to shoot all 130 visual effects
shots, to the full satisfaction of the production
whose line producer Simon Happ was a com-
petent partner. Even the opening credits were
designed at ARRI, with lots of humor by title
designer Lutz Lemke. Computer animation artist
Markus Drayss animated the RatPack logo with
three-dimensional life which can now be seen
in TRI XXER for the first time.
Digital TRIXXER: Visual Effects
Virtual Sets:
Twenty scenes of a wild bicycle chase through
the dark maze in Blackwhite Castle were
created completely in digital. The only
real objects were the actors on bicycles in
front of a green screen. It was particularily
challenging to keep the continuity of each
of the scenes, which not only had to be photo-
realistic, but also had to match other real
scenes. So the huge virtual maze had to be
designed based on a small real set. We
started out with a small space and had to
64 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
invent the cellar of the castle around it, says
Michael Koch, computer animation artist.
And he adds after the digital set design we
paid particular attention to interesting light-
ing effects and the integration of green screen
elements. We did this with suitable virtual
objects in the foreground (crates, barrels etc.)
and with interaction: during the chase the
characters fire their pistols several times, with
bullets hitting the virtual three-dimensional
crates and causing virtual flying sparks and
breaking wood.
Postproduction started out with a layout of
the complete chase sequence, which already
contained a basic version of the three-dimen-
sional backgrounds. Changes like the merg-
ing of two originally separate scenes could
be quickly done with the help of a virtual fast
pan. Once the version was approved the
next step could follow, until the final image
was completed, which was enhanced drama-
tically by interactive lighting effects on the
characters and additional camera shaking.
The elaborate sequence was completed by
two multi-layered compositing shots with
characters driving all over.
Creature crawling
A tasty job quite literally was it to create
a cockroach which crawls over sleeping
Kalkofes face and disappears into his open
mouth where it finally gets swallowed.
After the camera move was determined,
an exact object match moving of Oliver
Kalkofes chin was calculated to have the
computer generated roach crawl along.
The model of the roach consisted of several
nurbs shapes and could be moved with a
so-called animation rig.
The actual animation of the insect with classic
key framing was relatively difficult, since six
legs and the antennas had to be controlled
separately with inverse kinematic. It was
obviously necessary to adapt the lighting
through Maya to match the real subject. Then
the beauty, specular and shadow passes
were rendered separately to maintain as
much flexibility as possible for compositing,
which was done on Shake.
T R I X X E R opens on May 20th 2004 in
German theatres.
J rgen Schopper /
Co- Aut hor: Nicol e Giesa
Credits ARRI Digital Film
VFX and DigiLab Supervisor Dominik Trimborn
VFX Producer Henning Rdlein
Creative Consultant Jrgen Schopper
Senior Compositing Artists Abraham Schneider, David Laubsch
Compositing Artists Marco Jacob, Ines Krger, Alexandra Kirchdrfer,
Christian Wieser
3DArtists Markus Drayss, Michael Koch, Alexander Nowotny
Title Design Lutz Lemke
Scanning Steven Stueart, Sascha Stiller
Digital Lab Colorist Birgit Steffan
HD Spirit Assistent Boris Link
Technical Supervisor Digital Lab Christian Grafwallner
HD Online Matthias Brauner, Marcus Schmidt, Ulrich Hochleitner
HD Assistent Michael Hackl
HD Retouching Marcus Schmidt
ARRI Laser Recording Alex Klippe, Sascha Stiller
65 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Di gi tal Fr ui t Show
Wherever you are, with Froop is always party time! Based
on this slogan the agency londonproject and filmcorps
production developed the scenario around a museum attend-
ant who compensates for his boring job by throwing a
wild party with Mller Froop yogurt, which brings his world
completely in disorder.
To bring these two lines of action together
visually, ARRI Digital Film had the task to
serve the juicy fun out of the cup digitally.
Digital artists from Grad3 created the com-
puter animated fruit elements and sent them
to the Inferno in separate layers. There Mich-
ael Lanzensberger and Stefan Tischner took
care of the compositing and the color match-
ing of computer generated images to the real
sequences. To ensure a perfect match bet-
ween the computer generated and real ele-
ments, the 3-D camera data of the anima-
tion was imported to the Inferno and opti-
mized afterwards. Further more it was ne-
cessary to touch up the eyes and teeth of the
actors digitally, and to generate a sequence
which wasnt even shot this way: a hand
opens the lid of the yogurt cup. The final
image was put together from separate ele-
ments: a hand, the digital lid of the cup, the
cup itself and the background. The fruity
look of their product was very important to
agency and customer. To emphasize fruitin-
ess it close attention was paid to the color
design of the cherries, the mist of cherry
scent and all other 3-D elements. After several
shifts on the Inferno and in 3-D everyone
was happy with the branding of the pro-
duct. A long party which was worthwhile!
J rgen Schopper
Credits
Production: filmcorps
Agency: londonproject
Director: ENNO
VFX Producer: Friederike Oberlin
Computer Animation: Grad3
Inferno Artists: Michael Lanzensberger,
Stefan Tischner
66 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Recently the features NA P OL A (Produc-
tion: Olga Film; Director: Dennis Gansel;
DoP: Torsten Breuer) and T HE NI NT H DAY
(Production: Provobis Film, Director: Volker
Schlndorff, DoP: Tomas Erhart) were shot
in Prague and Luxembourg respectively.
Lisa Film production shot the TV feature
THE RETURN OF THE DANCI NG MASTER
(Director: Urs Egger; DoP: Martin Kukula)
in Sweden and Austria, and new episodes
of the TV series HOTEL TO DREAM OF
(Director: Otto W. Retzer, DoP: Marc Prill).
in Thailand.
All productions have one thing in common:
the equipment was supplied by ARRI Rental
in Munich and postproduction was done
completely or in parts by ARRI Film&TV in
Munich.
We wanted to know the reasons for choos-
ing a location abroad.
Wolfgang Plehn, production manager at
Provobis (THE NI NTH DAY) explains it this
way: We used two locations abroad for
the film. Prague and its surrounding were cho-
sen because of the sets. It had logistical rea-
sons to build the concentration camp in Pra-
gue. The structure there, as far as building
and production design is concerned, had
additional financial benefits. And we could
fall back on Barrandov Studios huge col-
lection of historical costumes. Luxembourg,
on the other hand, just had to be a location
because after all the story is set in Luxem-
bourg.
ARRI Rental has branches in Prague and
in Luxembourg. From the producers point
of view this has several advantages. To use
ARRI for postproduction is the obvious thing
to do. It is beneficial to leave the complete
process under one roof, from negative develo-
ping to answer print. And besides, the film
is funded by the FilmFernsehFonds Bayern
(Bavarian funds for film and television) and
so the money should stay in Munich. But
here is the decisive factor: the quality is just
extraordinary. The rushes are perfect, from
a good film lab and a telecine which was
done very carefully.
Harry Kgler, managing director at Olga
Film (NAPOLA): In Germany we couldnt find
any original locations for our film, thats why
we decided to shoot in the Czech Republic.
In addition, there were some important
financial reasons: to build sets there is just
so much more inexpensive than in Germany.
Our partner for equipment rental and film
lab was ARRI, because they have world-
wide experience and ensure a high inter-
national standard. The collaboration went
very well.
Thomas Hroch, managing director of Lisa
Film productions explains: With our pro-
ductions HOTEL TO DREAM OF MAURI TI US
and HOT EL T O DREAM OF T HAI L AND
we followed a tradition which was started
successfully 40 years ago by Karl Spiehs,
the founder of our company: to bring for-
eign and exotic countries into German and
Austrian living rooms. The production
Ger man Fi l ms Shot Abr oad
An increasing number of German films is shot outside Germany, in part or
completely. There are several reasons for that: better locations, new
ways of financing projects, more reasonable shooting conditions or simply
because the script demands it. However, when it comes to choosing a
service provider for the project producers rely on well-tried relationships,
which is true for selecting a rental partner as well as a post production
facility. As a consequence, ARRI has serviced numerous German film and
television productions shooting abroad.
ARRI Rental has branches in Prague
and in Luxembourg. From the
producers point of view this has
several advantages. Wolfgang Plehn
THE RETURN OF THE DANCI NG MASTER, Director
Urs Egger (right) and DoP Martin Farkas
In Germany we couldnt find any
original locations for our film, thats
why we decided to shoot in the
Czech Republic. Harr y Kgler
THE NI NTH DAY, Director Volker Schlndorff,
Carsten Danch and DoP Tomas Erhart (f.l.t.r)
67 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
THE RETURN OF THE DANCI NG MASTER
was shot in Sweden and Austria, because
the story is based on the novel of the same
name by Henning Mankell. In this interna-
tionally cast, polished production we paid
particular attention to authenticity and rea-
lization close to the novel.
There has been a close collaboration with
ARRI ever since Lisa Film was founded. There
were other postproduction providers Lisa Film
had worked with, of course. But we like to
come back again and again. ARRI and its
staff simply takes good care of us. That s why
since recently, EVENT Film, a 100% subsi-
diary of Lisa Film, is located on the ARRI pre-
mises. The advantage is that all AVID and
editing facilities are under one roof and we
dont have to waste time with transportation.
For Lisa Film, ARRI is a reliable partner.
Angel a Reedwi sch
There has been a close
collaboration with
ARRI ever since Lisa Film
was founded. Thomas Hroch
Tur ki sh Success Fi l m
VI OZENTELE 2
at ARRI Fi l m & TV i n Muni ch
In Turkey, as everywhere, American mainstream production
dominates the theatres. But a local competition is also developing,
whose success has not limited to the local market.
With VI OZENTEL E 2 TUUBA the Turkish
production company BKM Films managed to
produce a sequel to a film which in 2001
was very successful also outside Turkey. Not
only was shooting done with ARRI cameras
and lighting, ARRI Film&TV in Munich sup-
plied film laboratory services, as well, in spite
of the location in eastern Turkey close to the
Iraqi border.
Cinematographer and codirector O. Faruk
Sorak swears by ARRI technology: I use
only ARRI camera and lighting equipment.
To me the ARRIFLEX is like an old reliable
friend. From early on I used ARRIFLEX II C
cameras on every production. Today we
work with the 35 III, 435 and 535.
For VI ZONTELE 2 the experienced DoP, who
successfully works in feature films and com-
mercials, chose HMI fresnels and ARRISUN
fixtures because of their reliability and effi-
ciency. Cooke S4 prime lenses as well as
Zeiss Ultra Primes were used on the job. As
rawstock he selected Fuji 64D for daylight
and Fuji 500 D for night and magic hour
shooting. Release prints were done on Kodak
Vision Color 2383.
Shooting took place in Van, in the far
eastern part of Turkey, close to the Iraqi bor-
der. To meet the high demands, production
directors and cinematographer had on the
quality of the film, the laboratory had to
comply with the international standards. ARRI
Film &TV in Munich was chosen. We are
very happy with the lab,says Faruk Sorak.
The rushes are beautiful and we were espe-
cially pleased by the AVID editing. Produc-
tion manager Birol Akhbaba was in charge
of communication between production and
ARRI the whole time, and during shooting
he personally brought the exposed negative
to Munich twice or three times a week.
The final color grading, done at ARRI Film
&TV by Mary-Ann Oteman, convinced not
only DoP and director completely but the
producers, as well.
VI OZENTELE 2 TUUBA has been released
in Turkey, Germany, England and The Nether-
lands. In Turkey it has already had more than
3 million visitors, thus promising to become
one of the most successful films in Turkey,
just like its predecessor.
Angel a Reedwi sch
HOTEL TO DREAM OF, Director Otto
W. Retzer (right), DoP Marc Prill (left),
and actor Ralf Bauer
68 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Wi th ARRI on the Fast Lane
What started out as a highway racing game for the computer screen can now be seen on the big screen.
A2 RACER, a German / Luxembourgian coproduction between Constantin Filmproduktion
and Delux Productions, brings the computer game of the same name to the screen, with plenty
of highspeed, car racing, collisions and cars tumbling through the air.
With this title its an easy guess that most of
production took place on a highway. As loca-
tion the newly built but not yet opened high-
way section between Luxembourg and Saar-
brcken could be used: 12kilometers of
empty highway, south of Luxembourg, ready
for car chases! An additional highway in
operation was locked off for night shoots.
But Luxembourg has not only excellent high-
ways to offer. Above all it became an ideal
shooting location because of the perfect con-
ditions for filmmakers it offers. DoP Hannes
Hubach can only recommend this location
and has praised it especially for the very
good shooting conditions and the very pro-
fessional teams.
The rest is done by the Film Funding Law
(Tax Shelter), modern sound stages and good
locations. Delux Productions for example
maintains a set Venice, spreading out 4000
square meters, which was built for the pro-
duction SECRET PASSAGE. BYE - BYE BLACKBIRD
( Samsa Film) and T HE ME R CHANT OF
VENI CE (Delux Productions/Spice Factory/
Shylock Films) are just two productions of
the recent past, besides A2 RACER shooting
with equipment from ARRI Rental. The increa-
sing production volume and the desire to
offer services close to the customer led to the
opening of the Luxembourgian branch of
ARRI Rental in July 2003.
A2 RACER couldnt have done without service
on location, because shooting wasnt easy,
neither on cars nor on cameras. Put the
pedal to the metal could have been the
slogan for the shoot, according to Hannes
Hubach. The ARRICAM LT, intended for
Steadicam and handheld shots, turned out
to be as robust as the 535B and the two
435 workhorses. A modular camera system
proved to be the best choice once again.
Since we were often shooting with three or
four cameras simultaneously it was possible to
interchange all components without problem.
The ARRI Ultra Primes matched the Ange-
nieux Optimo Zoom perfectly. However,
because of its inertia the Angenieux couldnt
be used on some of the extrem chase scenes.
In case of an abrupt stop the zoom would
have popped out of the PL-mount like a cork
of a champagne bottle.
Most of the around 50 cars didnt see the end
of shooting. Scenes like the one with five
police cars crashing into each other, or the
one with a car truck full of Audi TTs loosing
its freight in full speed, may explain some
of the damage.
The Audis in the sequence mentioned were
stolen on the go, meaning they drive back-
wards off the truck, make a 180 degree turn
and escape from their pursuers. To shoot
this sequence five cameras were used simul-
taneously: two cameras inside the Audi, one
looking forward, one looking back. The third
camera was mounted onto the top platform
of the truck. Camera four was following the
action parallel on a camera car, and camera
five was shooting from the opposite side of the
highway, rigged to a remote crane, which in
turn was mounted to a Dodge pickup truck.
The ramping of the 435 was perfect for
the in-camera effects. The camera speed
changes on the push of a button and the
resulting change in exposure is compensat-
ed invisibly with the mirror shutter: this
way cars could easily be sped up out of
the frame.
Hannes Hubach goes on raving: All came-
ras were modified to 3-perforation, that was
brilliant. Especially at car action sequences
where we frequently shot with rigged remote
cameras and small 400ft mags we gained
so much time, because we didnt have to re-
load so often (400ft in 3perforation at 24fps
last 5.6 minutes). Let alone the savings in
rawstock, which is 25%.
With the film speeding to the theatres, ARRI
in Luxembourg is now on the fast lane, as
confirmed by Steffen Ditters, head of branch:
ARRI Rentals Luxembourgian branch is not
only a flexible supplier of equipment and
provides facilities for camera tests. We also
can take care about logistics. For example if
customers want to use the ARRI film lab in
Munich, they just leave the negative with us.
We manage transportation, developing and
optionally Telecine at ARRI in Munich. The
rushes are then delivered back to Luxem-
bourg.
DoP Hannes Hubach concludes: Camera,
lighting, grip and lab work from ARRI for
me it is an invaluable advantage to get
everything from the same source.
Andrea Rosenwirth
69 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
lern continues. Production could have access
to all equipment needed, at any time, even
in the middle of the night. There was no waste
of time due to transportation.
Two third of VAN HELSING was shot on
sound stage, on set, location, and at night,
and only one third was shot at daylight,
dimmer board operator Mike Wchter of
ARRI Rental explains. It was crucial to DoP
Allen Daviau to work with light which comes
close to natural light sources. The light of
fire, candles and torches had to be created
as realistic as possible.
We achieved these specific effects with tungs-
ten light, controlled by dimmer racks. For
that purpose lighting fixtures consisting of
twelve E27 sockets on flexibles arms have
been custom built. We could control each
of these twelve circuits separately. Some-
times up to 60 of these units have been used,
and the technical limits of the ARRI boards
were pushed close to their ends.
The 250 watt light bulbs in use have been
painted with a specific varnish. This way
the color temperature of fire could be recre-
ated very accurately. With up to 500 diffe-
rent lighting settings that have been stored
for these medusa units, the flickering was
absolutely realistic.
When shooting began the ARRI team of
lighting technicians consisted of just one
person, but was joined very soon by three
more German and up to eight Czeck spe-
cialists. The complete VAN HELSING crew
consisted of 400 persons, with additional
up to 300 extras and about 50 stunt people;
in short, a major production which depends
on perfect planning and control.
Mike Wchter adds, All tungsten light, be it
on sound stage or on location, was hooked
up to dimmers. That way the entire lighting
could be controlled by computer, from the
smallest bulb to 300 watt fresnel fixtures to
Dinolights and tungsten 24Ks. On sound
stages there was a total of up to 500 circuits.
In the Transsylvanian village most of the
action scenes like the attack of Draculas
brides were shot. We had six motorized
ARRI 12 kW HMI Fresnels on a crane 105
meters high this way we were able to
light the entire village.
A real highlight in the true meaning of
the word have been the Lighting Strikes.
For the first time in Europe 500K power
have been employed for them. Up to four
Lighting Strikes could be perfectly controlled
with the dimmer boards.
No wonder that the American electricians,
as well, have been positively surprised by
the extraordinary lighting output of ARRI
lights. Originally the lighting planning called
for a higher number on lighting fixtures
than was necessary eventually.
Hubertus Prinz von Hohenzollern concludes,
VAN HELSING put huge demands on our team,
equipment and logistic. We are very happy
that we could meet these expectations.
Andrea Rosenwi r t h
Director of Photography Allen Daviau, who worked on such films as E.T. THE EXTRA
TERRESTRIAL, EMPIRE OF THE SUN, THE COLOUR PURPLE and BUGSY, nominated for an
Academy Award several times, is known as being very demanding when it comes to
creating particular moods in lighting. To the set of VAN HELSING, a Universal production
which was shot early 2003 in Prague, ARRI Rental delivered about 200 tons of lighting equipment. The complex action
adventure story is set at the end of the 19th century. Hugh Jackman stars as the vampire hunter Gabriel Van Helsing
who by order of the Vatican has to fight famous film monsters like Dracula, the Werewolf and Frankensteins monster.
Co-starring are among others Kate Beckinsale as Anna, Richard Roxburgh as Dracula, Shuler Hensley as
Frankensteins monster and David Wenham as Carl.
To depict Draculas ballroom as authentic
as possible a cathedral in downtown Prague
was converted into a filmset. The Czeck
ministry of culture gave permission to remove
or cover up crucifixes, Christ figures and
madonnas for filming. Shooting also took
place in a Czeck museum where some of
the exhibits even became part of the set.
Other locations have been the Barrandov
and the Prag Studios, as well as a transsyl-
vanian village which was built for this pro-
duction.
This production put huge demands on the
lighting department of ARRI Rental, says
Hubertus Prinz von Hohenzollern, head of
lighting rental in Munich. The set was lit
with up to 2 megawatts of lighting. More
than ten trucks full of lighting equipment
were in use. Furthermore our grip depart-
ment supplied three Chapman-dollies, one
Fisher dolly and a Foxy crane, among others.
In addition to the Czeck generators, ARRI
supplied up to four generators from 80K
up to 200K. Due to their good sound insul-
ation they could be used directly on location.
ARRIs lighting and grip rental warehouse
in Prague was on hand during the entire
production, Hubertus Prinz von Hohenzol-
VAN HELSI NG
ARRI Rent al l i ght s up Dr acul as dar kness
70 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
shop add to the features, as does a Budget
car rental office. Hubertus von Hohenzollern:
Now we can realize customer requests right
away, like special lights, special rigging or
a special truck setup. The new building
offers the space to load or unload seven trucks
Since September 2003 the lighting and grip departments of ARRI Rental
have found a new home in a 2600 square meter building in the AGROB
Media- and Businesspark in Ismaning, north of Munich.
ARRI Rental Li ghti ng and Gri p
Hubertus von Hohenzollern, head of lighting
rental, explains: The move was absolutely
necessary because the old building couldnt
keep up with our requirements. In addition,
there are a lot of benefits in favor of the Isma-
ning location. The Media- and Businesspark
is an attractive part of the media location
Munich. During the past five years, around
50 companies, most of them in the media
business, moved to the AGROB area. For
ARRI Rental, one fits to the other: From the
beginning the management of the AGROB
Media- and Businesspark was open to all
requests. With neighbours like Plazamedia,
Janus Film, DSF or Home Shopping Europe,
ARRI is in a perfect surrounding and even has
some of their clients right on the premises.
Further advantages: a good infrastructure and
the vicinity of the airport.
The warehouse was completely rebuilt
according to ARRI Rentals requirements. A
reconstruction that was worth the effort: clients
can now expect a bright space full of light.
And a warehouse of 2300 square meters
holds several hundred tons of lighting and
grip equipment. A carpenters workshop, an
electronic workshop and a metalworking
The ARRI Rental Team
at New Locati on
simultaneously, three of them in a loading
bay. The whole handling got easier and
thus saves the clients time, says Carl Chris-
tian von Hohenzollern, head of grip rental.
A change of location for the good, which
has drawn even wider circles: new rental
branches in Prague and Luxembourg have
been added, each of them perfectly placed
on its location. ARRI Rental Prague moved
into a building on the premises of Prague
Studios, and the Luxembourg branch is locat-
ed right next to Delux Filmstudio.
Carl Christian von Hohenzollern concludes:
With Ismaning we now have the perfect
location for our pool of lighting and grip
equipment, with the corresponding shops
for repair and service, as well as with our
centralized expendable purchase. This
allows us to supply to our branches quickly,
efficiently and economically. His brother,
Hubertus von Hohenzollern, adds: Thanks
to the relocation, ARRI Rental can further
increase its efficiency, which directly bene-
fits our clients.
Andrea Rosenwi r t h
71 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
70 directors of photography and camera assistants came together in Berlin on January 10. and 11. for
the annual general meeting of the German Association of Cinematographers (bvk). The annual reception
and the presentation of the ARRI D-20 technology project was the highlight of the weekend.
Michael Koppetz demonstrated the D-20
system and explained the further steps
in development. Particularly the optical
viewfinder, the spinning mirror shutter and
the compatibility with the whole range of
435 accessories created lively interest in
the study.
Falko Ahsendorf, the reelected bvk presi-
dent, mentioned a catalog of specifications
for a future electronic camera which was
compiled by bvk members already years
ago. Now they are very pleased to see
that all major specifications from this cata-
log are met by D-20. With D-20 the cine-
matographer will receive a tool with the
proven features of a film camera, for crea-
tive imaging and reliable production in
an electronic medium, he explained.
An exciting contrast was created by two
historic cameras by Helmut Ammon, who
showed two exhibits from his extensive
film technical collection an ARRI 16mm
camera from 1926 (the original!) and an
ARRIFLEX 35II from 1941 (the legendary
handheld camera). The other end of
technology in modern camera design was
impressively shown with the ARRICAMST.
Paul Ivan and Marc Shipman-Mueller
were on hand for specific questions and
technical explanations on the ARRICAM.
Lighting for the small exhibition was pro-
vided by ARRI Lighting Solutions Berlin.
Dr. Mi chael Neubauer ( bvk) and
Paul I van (ARRI )
ARRI Mi l estones at bvk Conventi on
DoP Falko Ahsendorf, Michael Koppetz
DoP Jost Vacano, Michael Koppetz,
DoP Rdiger Laske (f. l. t. r.)
DoP Wolfgang Treu and DoP Jost Vacano
Paul Ivan, Camera Operator Christian Klopp,
1st Assistant Markus Otto (f. l. t. r.)
Helmut Ammon between histor y and present
The new elected board of the bvk:
Falko Ahsendorf, President (Hamburg),
Rolf Coulanges (Stuttgart), Johannes Kirchlechner
(Munich), Viola Laske (Wiesbaden), Uli Schmidt
(Berlin), Markus Schott (Cologne) and
Gert Stallmann (Berlin).
The next general meeting will be held in
Munich in January 2005 for the 25th
anniversary of the bvk.
72 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
Among other projects, two new studios could
be equipped, about 600 and 1200 square
meters in size, on the premises of Mosfilm in
Moscow, the largest area for film production
in Russia. Lighting fixtures, lifting and rigging
equipment have been installed with instruc-
tion and under supervision of the ARRI pro-
ject office in Berlin. The new studios have
already been used for a television series in
120 episodes, produced by Russian World
Studios (AMedia) in cooperation with Sony
Pictures Studios. Last year another 300 square
meter studio for a Russian television station in
the Ostankino broadcast center in Moscow
was also supplied with ARRI Studio lights.
The visit of Klaus Wowereit, Governing
Mayor of Berlin, to the Baltic States was
an occasion for Sigrid Mller to meet with
Unolita, the local partner, in Vilnius, the
capital of Lithuania. The planning, installing
and handing over of a new studio for film,
television and commercials was agreed on.
As the first studio in the Baltic States it will
be set up according to international stand-
ards and will meet all corresponding require-
ments. The Governing Mayor of Berlin and
the Mayor of Vilnius, Mr. Zuokas, presented
the award Entrepreneur of the Day to ARRI
Lighting Solutions for an active commitment
to Lithuania.
Many Solutions
Under One Roof
In the shortest time Berlin has developed into a hub between East and West. One year after
establishing ARRI Lighting Solutions at Mediacity, the new location has turned out to be a huge
gain. From here, all services from project management up to the realization of complete lighting
solutions can be offered worldwide. For Sigrid Mller and her project and sales team, the first year was
extraordinarily successful, in spite of the overall economic situation. This way the extension to the East
can be felt not only politically but also lighting wise.
Sigrid Mller, Dr. Wolfram O. Martinsen, Berlin
mayor's Middle and Eastern Europe Coordinator,
Gintas Gaizauskas, Unolita Director
CAD blueprint, prepared by ALS (top left); Photograph of the object on location (top right) ;
3D model of the studio, modelled by ALS (bottom left) ; Photo realistic representation of the studios (bottom right)
ARRI Lighting Solutions
Berl i n
ARRI Lighting Solutions
office in the Mediacity Berlin
73 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y _ B e i j i n g
ARRIs first studio project in Romania will
be the installation of a studio for the State
University in Bucharest by the middle of this
year. Currently mostly customers from the
Near East, Vietnam, India, Russia, the Ukraine
and from Kazakhstan put in requests for new
studio projects.
However, ARRI Lighting Solution is also
successful in established centers for film and
TV. Such as with a studio of 150 square
meters for the University of London, and just
recently with four newscast studios for RTL in
Hamburg, which were equipped with ARRI
lighting, rigging and boards.
The setup of a larger television studio for the
WDR in Cologne, which is expected to be
put in operation late this summer, will be a
particular challenge. The turnkey solution is
not only about installing a fully automatic
studio with ARRI lighting, 100 telescope arms,
dimmers, track systems and boards, it is
also about subsequent service, consulting
and training.
ARRI Lighting Solutions project team, located
at Mediacity in Berlin, is ready to assist all
interested clients.
Norbert Wunderlich
Professor Zhang, Professor Mu Deyuan,
Dean of Cinematography, Alan Mordue,
Don Harris, Sales Manager - Film Equip-
ment, ARRI (GB), Guo Dong Mei. (f.l.t.r.)
Bei j i ng Fi l m Academy, Chi na
As Chinas exclusive higher educational
institution in film arts with a history spanning
over fifty years, the BFAs achievements
have earned it an international reputation
which has attracted aspiring filmmakers
worldwide.
The cooperation agreement initiated by
Franz Kraus, ARRIs Managing Director and
Professor Ji Zhi-wei, Chairman of the BFA,
offers support by supplying ARRI Lighting
equipment to the academy and was signed
by Professor Zhang, President of the BFA,
Alan Mordue, ARRIs International Sales
Manager- Lighting and Guo Dong Mei
(Pearl) of Jebsen, ARRIs Lighting Distributor
in China.
As commented by Alan Mordue, It is a
great privilege for ARRI to be involved with
the Beijing Film Academy. We hope that
the film-makers of tomorrow enjoy using the
latest ARRI technology and we look forward
to working closely together in the future.
Following the official signing there was
champagne toast and an exchange of gifts.
Contact: Tel.: +49 30 678233 0
Fax: +49 30 678233 99
e-mail: arri-solutions@arri.de
Shoot i ng of epi sodi c t el evi si on show Poor Nast j a Li ght i ng i nst al l at i on i n t he Russi an Worl d St udi os AMedi a, Moscow
ARRI is delighted to announce that in January an agreement
was signed with the largest film school in Asia, the Beijing Film Academy.
74 Wo r l d wi d e
Claus and Michael Rosenlv with Mogens
Gewecke (center), Bico Denmark
Daisaku Kimura
Congr atul ati on to the
Wi nner s
Alexander Korda Bafta Award
TOUCHING THE VOID, DoP Mike Eley,
for outstanding British film of the year
Michale Balcon Award
Working Title Films for outstanding British
contribution to cinema
Royal Television Society Award
DoP Chris Seager BSC, for Cinemato-
graphy for the television drama series
STATE OF PLAY
The Orange British Academy Film Award
Film: THE L ORD OF THE RI NGS: THE
RETURN OF THE KI NG, Barrie M. Osborne/
Frances Walsh /Peter Jackson
Screenplay (Adapted): Frances Walsh,
Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson
Cinematography: Andrew Lesnie
Achievement in Special Visual Effects:
Joe Letteri /Jim Rygiel /Randall
William Cook/Alex Funke
Orange Film of the Year (public vote): THE
LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING
Golden Globe Awards
THE L ORD OF THE RI NGS
Best Motion Picture Drama
Best Director Peter Jackson
Best Original Score Howard Shore
Best Original Song INTO THE WEST
by Annie Lennox, Howard Shore and
Frances Walsh.
ASC Award (TV Network)
DoP Pierre Gill for CBS miniseries
HITLER: THE RISE OF EVIL
OSCAR
THE L ORD OF THE RI NGS
Art Direction: Grant Major, Set Decoration:
Dan Hennah and Alan Lee
Best Picture: Barrie M. Osborne,
Peter Jackson and Frances Walsh
Costume Design: Ngila Dickson and
Richard Taylor
Directing: Peter Jackson
Film Editing: Jamie Selkirk
Make Up: Richard Taylor, Peter King
Music (Score): Howard Shore
Music (Song): INTO THE WEST , Music
and Lyric by Frances Walsh, Howard
Shore and Annie Lennox
Sound Mixing: Christopher Boyes,
Michael Semanick, Michael Hedges
and Hammond Peek
Visual effects: Jim Rygiel, Joe Letteri,
Randall William Cook and Alex Funke
Writing (Adapted Screenplay): Screenplay
by Frances Walsh, Philippa Boyens &
Peter Jackson
Medal with Purple Ribbon
Daisaku Kimura
Marburger Kamerapreis
Slawomir Idziak (PSC)
Bayerischer Filmpreis
Actor: Christian Ulmen for HERR L EHMANN
Actress: Johanna Wokalek for HI ERANKL
Childrens Feature: Ullrich Limmer for SAMS I N
GEFAHR
VGF: SAM Film (Ewa Karlstrm and Andreas
Ulmke-Smeaton for DI E WI L DEN KERL E
Audience Choice: GOOD- BYE L ENI N
Actress in a supporting role: Johanna Gastdorf
for DAS WUNDER VON BERN
Documentary feature: Byambasuren Davaa
and Luigi Falorni for DI E GESCHI CHT E VOM
WEI NENDEN KAMEL
Screenplay: Hans - Christian Schmid and
Michael Gutmann for L I CHT ER
Cinematography: Franz Rath for ROSENSTRASSE
Directing: Snke Wortmann for DAS WUNDER
VON BERN
Producers: Claussen &Wbke for L I CHT ER
Honorary Award: Sir Peter Ustinov
Klukpris (DFF)
Claus and Michael Rosenlv
Cameraimage
Golden Frog: Cesar Charlone for
CI TY OF GOD
Silver Frog: Piotr Kukla for T WI N SI ST ERS
Eduardo Serra for GI RL WI T H A
PEARL EARRI NG
Special Jury Award: Bajerski and Pael
Smietanka for SQUI NT YOUR EYES
Honorary Award: William Fraker
Special Award for Duo Cinematographer -
Director: Russel Boyd and Peter Weir
Frderpreis Michael Ballhaus
The Chao Ngo
Peter Jackson
75 Wo r l d wi d e
BSC Oper ator s Ni ght
Elstree Film &Television Studios
Known as one of the most prestigious and popular award ceremonies in
the UK calendar, the BSCs Operators Night was as usual a grand affair.
With over 240 cinematography professionals in attendance who enjoyed
the festivities and honoured those presented with awards.
President of the society, Director of Photo-
graphy, Phil Mheux BSC, made a very witty
speech welcoming everyone to the function.
Citations for the awards were read, including
an amusing speech by Danny Shelmerdine
culminating in the presentation of the 1st
Assistant Cameramans award to John Deaton.
The John Alcott award went to Horst Berg-
mann, former ARRI Camera Sales Director
who retired last year. This was in recognition
for his contribution to the film industry and
his support of the BSC. He was presented
with this by Renos Louka, Managing Direc-
tor of ARRI (GB).
Fritz-Gabriel Bauer received the Bert Easey
Technical Achievement Award for his
design of modern motion picture cameras.
J udi t h Pet t y
President of the BSC, Director of Photography,
Phil Mheux, Managing Director
ARRI (GB) Renos Louka, Winner of the John Alcott
Award 2003, Horst Bergmann (f. l. t. r.)
Other awards presented on the night were:
Guild of British Camera Technicians
Awards
Peter Taylor, Camera Operator
of the Year
Best Cinematography Award
Conrad Hall ASC, ROAD T O PERDI T I ON
Lifetime Achievement Award
Ossie Morris OBE, BSC
For the first time ever the German Film-
museum (Deutsches Filmmuseum) in Frank-
furt is presenting an exhibition about life
and work of the great film director Stanley
Kubrick. With the chronological display of
a huge selection of props, material, lenses,
photographs and ARRIFLEX cameras from
his estate, which was not accessible until
now, the show follows Kubricks creative
curriculum vitae, from his work as a young
photo journalist in New York (1945) to his
last film EYES WI DE SHUT (1999) which
was only released after he had passed away
at the age of 71.
The preparation of the collection from the
estate and the conception of the exhibition
was done in close collaboration with
Christiane Kubrick and Jan Harlan.
ARRI congratulates Hans-Peter Reichmann,
curator of the project, along with Bettina
Rudhof and Falk Horn, curators of the asso-
ciated German Architecture Museum (Deut-
sches Architektur Museum) and everybody
involved with the successful show. As a
sponsor, ARRI is proud to be a part of it.
I nsi ght
German Filmmuseum in Frankfurt
Stanley Kubrick
into the Brain of a Film Genius
76 Wo r l d wi d e _ G e r m a n y
This is probably every ambitioned digital
artistss dream: one day to work on a big
international feature film project, with plenty
of budget for visual effects.
One of them is Klaus Wuchta, film compo-
sitor and digital artist at ARRI Digital Film
since 1995. At ARRI he is specialized in com-
mercials, but outside ARRI he could already
gain experience on major feature film pro-
ductions which were heavy on the visual
effects side. ARRI offered him the opportunity
to take time out with the prospect of coming
back to the old job in Munich afterwards.
Like his fellow ARRI colleagues Alex Lemke
and Harald Brendel Klaus Wuchta was re-
cently working on THE LORD OF THE RI NGS,
PART I I I (Producer and Director: Peter Jackson)
in New Zealand. He was brought in by Alex
Retur n of the ARRI - Team ...
Lemke, an experienced ARRI visual effects
specialist himself, and in New Zealand from
the beginning. Harald Brendel, formerly the
technical supervisor at ARRI Digital Film, took
on the challenge and contributed his know-
ledge as software engineer to THE LORD OF
THE RI NGS. On behalf of ARRI he meanwhile
works at Warner Bros. in Los Angeles on a
software solution for Digital Intermediate.
Its hard to compare this experience with
the lonely work in commercials. Such a big
production is interesting and workwise so
different from work in Germany. Here the
team is much smaller and everyone has to
do much more. In New Zealand I was a little
wheel among 400 others. My job was com-
positing, meaning I worked mainly with
Shake, a 2D software: in THE L ORD OF THE
RI NGS, PART I I I I worked on the giant spi-
der Shelob and the Army of the Dead. On
these huge projects everything has to be
planned very accurately to make production
as effective as possible. There I could learn
how to realize and organize things, and I
could get a lot of good stuff out of it for my
work, Klaus Wuchta remembers.
With all this knowledge in his pack Klaus
Wuchta came back to Munich. Here he not
In mid-December the wait had an end: The long
expected 3rd part of THE LORD OF THE RI NGS was
presented to clients, friends and staff of ARRI in a
special screening in the ARRI Theater. Before the
screening began there was a particular highlight
expecting the audience: digital artists Alex Lemke,
Klaus Wuchta and Harald Brendel talked about
their contribution to the epos. With their stories they
gave a glance behind the scenes, which was
received with great interest. And many became even
more curious to see whats going on in Middle Earth.
only inspires his colleagues with his know
how, but also gives local projects and cus-
tomers the chance to participate in his exper-
ience. Right now at ARRI he is working on
the visual effects for the feature DI E SI EBEN
ZWERGE- THE SEVEN DWARFS (Production:
Zipfelmtzen Film, Director: Sven Unterwaldt,
DoP: Jo Heim), and on THE LAZERUS CHI LD
(Production: Illusions Entertainment, Director:
Graham Theakston, DoP: Lukas Strebel).
Both films will be released in October
2004.
J ochen Hhnel
Klaus Wuchta
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Title Production Company DoP Equipment
THE UPSIDE OF ANGER Upside of Anger Ltd Richard Greatrex BSC Moviecam Compact & SL
CREEP Creep Films Ltd Daniel Cohen ARRICAM ST / LT, 3 Perforation
PASSER BY BBC Television Tim Palmer 16SR3 Advanced
LADIES IN LAVANDER Ladies in Lavender Ltd Peter Biziou BSC ARRICAM ST / LT
DEAD FISH Dead Fish Ltd Fraser Taggart ARRICAM ST / LT
UNCLE ADOLF Lietuvos Kino Oliver Curtis BSC 16SR3 Advanced
MAN TO MAN Skyline (Man to Man) Ltd Laurent Dailland ARRICAM ST / LT, 3 Perforation
THE LIBERTINE Libertine Productions Ltd Alexander Melman 2 x ARRICAM LT
SILENT WITNESS 8 BBC Television Gordon Hickie 16SR3 Advanced
Title Production Company DoP Gaffer Equipment Ser viced by
ALFIE (NY SHOOTING) Paramount Ashley Rowe ARRICAM LT, 535B CSC NY
ED Viacom Productions Mike Slovis ARRICAM ST / LT,
3 Perforation CSC NY
HAVEN My World Ent. Michael Bernard Harold Skinner ARRICAM ST, 435 CSC Florida +
Illumination
Dynamics, NC
THE INTERPRETER Universal Darius Khondji ARRICAM ST, 435 CSC NY
INTO THE BLUE Mandalay Shane Hurlbut 535B, 3 Perforation,
435 CSC Florida
MRS HARRIS HBO Steven Poster David Lee Lighting Illumination
Dynamics, LA
SEX & THE CITY HBO John Thomas Mike Marzovilla ARRI 16SR3, Lighting CSC NY
Florian Ballhaus
THE SOPRANOS HBO Phil Abraham Kevin Janicelli Lighting, Grip CSC NY
Alik Sakharov
STAY 20th Century Fox Roberto Schaefer Mo Flam ARRICAM LT, 535B,
Lighting CSC NY
THIRD WATCH NBC Glen Kershaw Joe Sciretta Moviecam, Lighting,
Grip CSC NY
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A Sel ecti on of Cur r entl y Ser vi ced Pr oducti ons
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ALIEN VERSUS PREDATOR Lonlink Productions Paul W.S. Anderson David Johnson Lighting
BEYOND THE SEA Quality International Kevin Spacey Eduardo Serat ARRICAM ST / LT, 435, Grip
BOGINYA Slovo Filmproduction Renata Litvinova Vladislav Opeljanz 535A
DAS DUO DER BIGAMIST TV 60 Filmproduktion Peter Fratzscher Wolf Siegelmann 16SR3 Advanced, Lighting, Grip
DER NEUNTE TAG Provobis Volker Schlndorff Tomas Erhart ARRICAM LT, Lighting, Grip
DER UNTERGANG Constantin Filmproduktion Oliver Hirschbiegel Rainer Klausmann ARRICAM ST / LT, 435, 3 Perforation
Lighting, Grip
KINGDOM OF HEAVEN 20th Century Fox Ridley Scott John Mathieson ARRICAM ST / LT, 435, Lighting, Grip
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE Delux Productions Michael Radford Benoit Delhomme ARRICAM ST / LT, 435, Lighting, Grip
SAMT UND SEIDE NDF Sebastian Monk Sabine Mayr 16SR3, Lighting, Grip
SCHNEELAND Geiendrfer Film Hans W. Geiendrfer Hans-Gnther Bcking 535B, 435 Advanced
TRISTAN & ISOLDE Apollo Media / QI / Kevin Reynolds Arthur Reinhart ARRICAM ST / LT, 3 Perforation,
Stillking Films Lighting, Grip
UNTER VERDACHT IV Pro GmbH Friedemann Fromm Jo Heim 16SR3, Lighting, Grip
WILLENBROCK UFA Filmproduktion Andreas Dresen Michael Hammon ARRICAM LT, 3 Perforation
VERAS WELT Schiwago Film Joseph Vilsmaier Joseph Vilsmaier 16SR3, Lighting, Grip
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Title Director DoP Gaffer
KING ARTHUR Antoine Fuqua Slawomir Idziak James McGuire
FAT SLAGS Ed Bye John Sorapure Martin Healey/Andy Long
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE Michael Radford Benoit Delhomme David Smith
PROOF John Madden Alwin Kuchler BSC Reuben Garrett
LADIES IN LAVENDER Charles Dance Peter Biziou BSC Andrew Hamilton
SILENT WITNESS VIII Ashley Pearce Gordon Hickie Keith Woodward
THE LONG FIRM Billie Eltringham Sean Bobbitt Brian Beaumont
ROSE AND MALONEY Andrew Grieve Tim Palmer Andy Long/Dave Oldroyd
BAD GIRLS SERIES 6 Jim Loach John Record Darren Harvey
FAMILY BUSINESS Tom Shankland/ Simon Kossoff BSC Ian Barwick
Sahra Harding
MAY 33RD David Attwood Ulf Brantas Stewart King
THE WEB OF BELONGING Chris Menaul David Katznelson Otto Stenov
DEAD RINGERS Jonathan Gershfield John Sorapure Martin Healey
WHEN I'M SIXTY FOUR Jon Jones John Pardue Jim Bebe
THE ALLSTAR COMEDY SKETCH SHOW Matt Lipsey Francis De-Groote Brandon Evans
Project Production Company
PLAYMOBIL 2004 e+p commercial
PERSIL SENSITIVE GEL + PERSIL MEGAPERLS KURZWASCHFORMEL e+p commercial
SMINT SIEGERTREPPE GAP Films Commercial Prod.
HUG SOFA GAP Films Commercial Prod.
CORTAL CONSORS FONDSSPAREN GAP Films Commercial Prod.
RENAULT EINE KUNST FR SICH Palladium Commercial Productions
DIBA NATIONALMANNSCHAFT HelliVentures Filmprod.
PROVINZIAL FUSSBALL JBF Filmproduktion
MC DONALDS MC DEAL+ MC DONALDS NEU DELUXE Rapid Eye Movement Filmproduktion
Renault
Provinzial
Title Director Production Company Ser vice
THE LAZARUS CHILD Graham Theakston The Lazarus Child Production Digital VFX,
Digital Lab, Title Design
TRIXXER Tobi Baumann Rat Pack Filmproduktion Digital VFX,
Digital Lab, Title Design
7 DWARFS Sven Unterwaldt Jr. Zipfelmtzen Film Digital VFX,
Digital Lab, Title Design
SOMMERSTURM Marco Kreuzpaintner Claussen & Wbke Digital VFX, Title Design
NAPOLA Dennis Gansel Olga Film Digital VFX
SHADOWS OF TIME Florian Gallenberger Diana Film / Fanes Film Digital VFX
GERMAN CINEMA AT AFI FEST Jrgen Schopper Export Union des Deutschen
Films Trailer Design
C(R)OOK Pepe Danquart DOR Film West Digital VFX
AFI
Cortal Consors
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GERMANIKUS Constantin Filmproduktion
LATTENKNALLER Hager Moss Film
ABGEFAHREN Clasart Film
TRIXXER Rat Pack Filmproduktion
THE LAZARUS CHILD The Lazarus Child Production
SHADOWS OF TIME Diana Film/ Fanes Film
Feat ur ef i l ms f or Theat er Rel ease
Title Production Company
DAS DUO 7/ 8 TV 60 Filmproduktion
DIE KIRSCHENKNIGIN NDF
HOTEL TO DREAM OF 1/ 2 Post One / Lisa Film
HEIMAT III Edgar Reitz Filmproduktion
STAUFFENBERG teamWorx
SUGAR GRANNY GIB DER OMA ZUCKER Teamfilm Produktion
UNTER VERDACHT Pro GmbH
IM ZWEIFEL FR DIE LIEBE TV 60 Filmproduktion
DIE RCKKEHR DES TANZLEHRERS Post One / Lisa Film
Feat ur ef i l ms f or TV Rel ease
Title Director Production Company
DER UNTERGANG Oliver Hirschbiegel Constantin Filmproduktion
VOM SUCHEN UND FINDEN DER LIEBE Helmut Dietl Diana Film
MODIGLIANI Mick Davis Frame Werk
DIGITAL JESUS John Irvin Frame Werk
DREI TAGE LEBEN Oliver Schmitz Hager Moss Film
PRAGER BLTEN Johannes Grieser Hofmann & Voges
FASZINATION NATUR II Gogol Lobmayr Film Production Gogol Lobmayr
POLIZEIRUF 110 DER SCHARLACHROTE ENGEL Dominik Graf MTM
DALLAS Robert Pejo MTM
MARGA ENGEL III Karsten Wichniarz NDF
EIN ENGEL NAMENS HANS-DIETER Hajo Gies NDF
NAPOLA Dennis Gansel Olga Film
BERGKRISTALL Joseph Vilsmaier Perathon Film
WEISSBLAUE WINTERGESCHICHTEN Bettina Braun Post One / Event Film
HOTEL TO DREAM OF THAILAND Otto W. Retzer Post One / Lisa Film
UNTER VERDACHT IV Friedemann Fromm Pro GmbH
DER NEUNTE TAG Volker Schlndorff Provobis
EIN MANN GEHT UNTER Detlef Bothe Reich & Glcklich
DIE BEAUTY-QUEEN Jorgo Papavassiliou sanset Film
VERAS WELT Joseph Vilsmaier Schiwago Film
ATHINA UND HERAKLES Sebastian Harrer SLM Filmproduktion
NIKOLA Michi Riebl / Christoph Schnee Sony Pictures FFP
OHNE WORTE Joseph Orr / Mobi Baumann Sony Pictures FFP
DER VERFHRER Christoph Stark teamWorx
GRSSE AUS KASCHMIR Miguel Alexandre TV 60 Filmproduktion
DAS DUO VERPASSTE CHANCE Thomas Jauch TV 60 Filmproduktion
ZUCKER Dani Levy X Filme
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Expo Calendar 2004
These are the most important exhibitions where you can find out about
ARRI products and services
2004
April 19 22 NAB Las Vegas
May 19 23 Koba Seoul
May_June 31 03 CALM Beijing
June 02 04 Japan SMPTE Tokyo
June 06 08 TV &Film Festival Shanghai Shanghai
June 11 12 Cine Gear Los Angeles
June 25 27 Crashtest / Testing Expo Stuttgart
June 15 18 Broadcast Asia Singapore
June 15 18 Expo Cine Video Mexico City
June 17 19 BTT Mainz
June 24 26 World Lighting Fair Tokyo
August 10 12 Siggraph San Diego
August 25 28 BIRTV Beijing
September 10 14 IBC Amsterdam
September 12 15 Plasa London
September 18 20 cinec Munich
October 22 24 LDI Las Vegas
November 02 05 TRBE Moscow
November 03 05 Satis Paris
Nov_Dec 17 04 Interbee Tokyo
November 27 04 Camerimage Lodz
December 08 10 DV Expo West Los Angeles
Key Contacts
Sales Camera: Thomas Popp
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1289
tpopp@arri.de
Sales Lighting: Sven Beyer
+49- (0) 8036- 3009- 80
sbeyer@arri.de
Sales ARRILASER: Stefan Kramper
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 2234
skramper@arri.de
ARRI Rental Deutschland
Thomas Loher
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1440
tloher@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Key Account: Angela Reedwisch
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1574
areedwisch@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
International Sales:
Thomas Nickel
+1- (0) 323- 650- 3967
thomasnickel@online.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
National Sales: Walter Brus
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1772
wbrus@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Feature & TV Drama:
Josef Reidinger
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1339
jreidinger@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Digital Film:
Henning Rdlein
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1970
hraedlein@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Sound:
Thomas Till
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1292
ttill@arri.de
ARRI Lighting Solutions
Sigrid Mller
+49- (0) 30- 6782330
smueller@arri.de
ARRI GB Ltd.
Renos Louka
+44- (0) 1 89 54 57 000
rlouka@arri-gb.com
ARRI Media
Philip Cooper
+44- (0) 1 89 54 57 100
pcooper@arrimedia.com
ARRI Lighting Rental
Tommy Moran
+44- (0) 1 89 54 57 200
tmoran@arrirental.com
ARRI Inc.
Franz Wieser
+1- (0) 845- 3531400
fwieser@arri.com
CSC Camera Service Center
Simon Broad, Hardwrick Johnson
+1- (0) 212- 7570906
sbroad@cameraservice.com
hjohnson@cameraservice.com
ARRI Canada
David Rosengarten
+1- (0) 416- 2553335
david@arrican.com
ARRI Italia
Antonio Cazzaniga
+39- 02- 26227175
acazzaniga@arri.it
http://www.arri.com
Arnold & Richter Cine Technik
Trkenstrae 89
D-80799 Mnchen
phone +49- (0) 89- 3809- 0
fax +49- (0) 89- 3809- 1791
Published by: Arnold & Richter Cine Technik, Trkenstr. 89, D-80799 Mnchen
Editor, editorial office, text: Jochen Thieser (Executive Editor), Marita Mller
With additional text by: Andreas Berkl, Elfi Bernt, Sven Beyer, Simon Broad, Thomas Brunger, Alan Gauthier, Nicole Giesa,
Jochen Hhnel, Paul Ivan, Hualong Kazuhiko,Thomas Kristensen, Michael Koppetz, Sebastian Laffoux, Bill Lovel, Timo Mller,
Dr. Michael Neubauer, Judith Petty, Karen Raz, Angela Reedwisch, Andrea Rosenwirth, Prof. Jrgen Schopper, John Silberg,
Michelle Smith, Chris Swinbanks, Simon Wakelin, David Watson, Pete Williams, Norbert Wunderlich, Vadim Yashuvov
Artwork: uwe heilig werbeagentur, Mnchen
Printed by: rapp-druck GmbH, Flintsbach
Litho: EDTZ, Ottobrunn
Technical data are subject to change without notice