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5.

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Learning outcomes of session The session will cover: The purpose of knowledge management Knowledge management strategies Knowledge management systems Knowledge management issues The contribution HR can make to knowledge management

Knowledge management

Session outline
Introduction: the purpose and significance of knowledge management
Knowledge management is about getting knowledge from those who have it to those who need it in order to improve organi#ational effectiveness. $t is as much if not more concerned with people and how they ac%uire! e&change and disseminate knowledge as it is about information technology. $t is significant because as 'lrich ()**+, points out: -Knowledge has become a direct competitive advantage for companies selling ideas and relationships.. $t is linked to the concepts of: / the resource0based view / the concept that it is the range of resources in an organi#ation! including its human resources! that produces its uni%ue character and creates competitive advantage1 / / intellectual capital / the stocks and flows of knowledge available to an organi#ation! ie the intangible resources associated with people1 the learning organi#ation / defined by 2arvin! dmonson and 2ino (344+, as a place where employees e&cel at creating! ac%uiring and transferring knowledge.

Knowledge management strategies


The codification strategy / knowledge is carefully codified and stored in databases where it can be accessed and used easily by anyone in the organi#ation. Knowledge is e&plicit and is codified using a -people0to0document. approach. The personali#ation strategy knowledge is closely tied to the person who has developed it and is shared mainly through direct person0to0person contacts. This is a -person0to0person. approach that involves ensuring that tacit knowledge is passed on.

Knowledge management s stems


5perating an intranet. 6reating -data warehouses..

This resource is part of a range offered free to academics and/or students using Armstrongs Essential Human Resource Management Practice as part of their course. For more academic resources and other FR material! please visit www.koganpage.com/resources and then click on "cademic Resources.

Knowledge management

'sing decision support systems. 'sing -groupware.! ie information communication technologies such as e0mail or 7ocus 8otes discussion bases. 6reating networks or communities of practice of knowledge workers.

Knowledge management issues


The pace of change. Relating knowledge management strategy to business strategy. $T is best used in a supportive role. "ttention must be paid to the processes (social! technological and organi#ational, through which knowledge combines and interacts in different ways. The significance of knowledge workers must be appreciated.

!he contri"ution HR can make to knowledge management


Knowledge management is an important area for HR practitioners! who are in a strong position to e&ert influence in this aspect of people management. 9carborough et al ()***, believe that practitioners should have -the ability to analyse the different types of knowledge deployed by the organi#ation: ;and< to relate such knowledge to issues of organi#ational design! career patterns and employment security.. HR practitioners should: Help to develop an open culture that emphasi#es the importance of sharing knowledge. =romote a climate of commitment and trust. "dvise on the design and development of organi#ations that facilitate knowledge sharing. nsure that valued employees who can contribute to knowledge creation and sharing are attracted and retained. "dvise on methods of motivating people to share. Help in the development of performance management processes that focus on the development and sharing of knowledge. >evelop processes of organi#ational and individual learning that will generate and assist in disseminating knowledge.

This resource is part of a range offered free to academics and/or students using Armstrongs Essential Human Resource Management Practice as part of their course. For more academic resources and other FR material! please visit www.koganpage.com/resources and then click on "cademic Resources.

Knowledge management

9et up and organi#e workshops! conferences and communities of practice and symposia that enable knowledge to be shared on a person0to0person basis. $n con@unction with $T! develop systems for capturing and! as far as possible! codifying e&plicit and tacit knowledge. 2enerally! promote the cause of knowledge management with senior managers.

References
2arvin! > "! dmonson! " 6 and 2ino! F (344+, $s yours a learning organi#ationA Har#ard $usiness Re#iew! Barch! pp ))4/)C 9carborough! H! 9wan! D and =reston! D ()***, Knowledge Management: A literature re#iew! $nstitute of =ersonnel and >evelopment! 7ondon 'lrich! > ()**+, " new mandate for human resources! Har#ard $usiness Re#iew! Danuary/February! pp )3E/?E

This resource is part of a range offered free to academics and/or students using Armstrongs Essential Human Resource Management Practice as part of their course. For more academic resources and other FR material! please visit www.koganpage.com/resources and then click on "cademic Resources.