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Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced

or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


DRAWI NG GLASS
Jeanette Jobson
Drawing glass can look challenging, but once it
is broken down into small steps, it becomes
understandable and easily achievable.
Drawing any reflective surface requires the
same degrees of observation skills, careful
drawing and patience to get realistic results.
Glass is an ancient substance and was
manufactured in open pits, ca. 3000 B.C. until
the invention of the blowpipe in ca. 250 B.C.
Silica sand is the main ingredient used in
making glass, along with other elements to
give it properties of stability and transparency.
LEARNING SECTIONS
Learn how to see the values and
reflections in glass
Learn the importance of line drawing
when drawing glass
Learn how to shade with varying
degrees of pressure
Learn to define details with shading
SUPPLY LIST
Pencils: H, 2B, 4B
Kneaded eraser
Smooth drawing paper (off white mat board was used for this demonstration)
Piece of paper to use as a hand guard
Drafting brush or large paint brush (optional)



Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


OBSERVATION SKILLS
One of the most common problems in drawing glass or any other reflective objects
is not studying the shapes of shadow and light carefully enough and, instead,
drawing what you think should be there, not what is actually before your eyes.
Look at the glass in this reference photo. I mean really look at it. Enlarge it on your
computer screen so that you can see the separation of values that make up shadow
and light. Can you see the subtle variations in value throughout the glass and on the
edges of the broken sections? These are the areas that bring realism to your
drawing and accurately drawing them is one of the keys to success. Do you see the
shapes that the reflected light makes on the glass surface and how the shadows form
curves and lines in differing levels of values?
Can I teach you to observe? Yes and no. I can tell
you what you should be looking for, but it takes
time and lots of practice to train your
brain/eye/hand to really see the shape of an
object and to trust that what you see is what needs
to be represented on your paper.
We often glance at an object but never really see it.
We see, for example, a glass. Its clear, hard and
holds our drink. But we need to train ourselves to
really understand the objects physical
characteristics. Its hardness, reflections of light
on the surface and distortion if it holds a liquid or
object, areas of light and shade, and so on. We
need to take time to examine how the areas of
light and shade which make up the form and how
they make the glass curve; where they intersect
and how they relate to each other in forming the
whole.
LINE DRAWING
A line drawing is the drawing you produce that provides outlines of the object and
the shapes of areas of shadow and light within an object. This is also called the
master drawing because it can be used to reproduce the lines onto any other
surface over and over again.


Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


As with all drawings, a line drawing starts with
blocking in the overall shape of the subject.
This should be done with an H pencil and light
pressure as these lines will be erased later. Do
not try to get any detail into your drawing at
this point. You are aiming for basic shape only,
nothing more.
Now youre ready to add detail and lots of it!
This is where your observation skills come in.
Its a bit like putting together a jigsaw
puzzle. Each line indicates the edge of
the glass or a shape of shade or light
within or on the surface of the glass.
Using your H pencil and carefully
looking at your reference photo, draw
the shapes that you see which are
made by the areas of shadow and light.
Take your time, use minimum pencil
pressure and remember to draw
exactly what you see in the reference.
Your final line drawing should resemble
the one on the left side of this page.
At this point you can decide if you
want to continue with the drawing on
the paper you are currently using or if
you want to transfer the drawing to a
new sheet of paper.
When creating a master line drawing,
there are often erasures and changes
in lines, smudges, etc., so that the final
piece may not be as crisp and clear as
youd like it to be.
DRAWING TIP

A trick to retaining
symmetry when drawing an
object is to draw a faint line
down the centre of your
object. This provides a
visual guide to ensure that
both sides of the object are
equal in width.


Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


You can solve this by transferring your line drawing to a new sheet of paper using
transfer paper, a light box or a brightly lit window. All these methods of transfer
have been provided in my
previous lesson Reflections on
Water. If you do transfer your
drawing, I suggest that you have
another look at that lesson to
brush up on transferring your
piece.
SHADING
Ok, you have your line drawing
ready to go. Lines enclose the
form of an object but in real life
there arent any lines. Look
around you and find an object. Its
form is outlined by its
environment , consisting of light
and shade without any hard lines.
In drawing, as in life, form is
created by using light and shade.
The degree of darkness or light
indicates the shape and volume of
the object and distinction
between values is created by
shading, not by hard lines.
The line drawing that you have
created is simply the skeleton on
which you will create the form. It
will not be seen in your final
drawing as lines. All you will see are values that create form.
You may think that because glass is transparent that it should not have a layer of
graphite on it. Wrong! The only areas that will not have a layer of graphite are the
brightest highlights of reflected light. In this case, there are vertical stripes of light
going down the glass at varying intervals as well as smaller shards of light on the


Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


sides and bottom of the glass. These are the only areas of pure white that will be
preserved in your drawing.
Use your H pencil and a light touch, start to create a layer of graphite over the main
areas of the glass. These areas will
receive additional layer but this first
layer acts as a wash of pigment to
define the shape of the object.
It is important to maintain a light
pressure, barely touching the paper
with your pencil and to create an even
layer of graphite. You should not be
able to see your pencil lines between
strokes. Take your time. This first
layer is important, as the smoothness
of this layer will affect how the rest of
your layers will look.
Hold your pencil at the far end, this will
ensure that you dont press to hard.
You can use an almost swinging motion
to apply graphite to a large area or use
a small circular motion to get an even
layer in tight areas. Make sure that
you preserve the highlights of the glass
and dont outline them. Use your
pencil to shade up to the line, making
the difference in values create the
shape of the highlight or shaded areas.
Create the edges of the broken glass
the same way. Use your values to
define the shape and carefully observe the reference to see the shapes of light and
dark that create the edge.


Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


Work your way through the glass, adding the initial layer of graphite to shaded
areas to define the shapes. Youll go back over these sections to add layers and
create subtle changes in values and
darker areas as your drawing
progresses.
DEFINING DETAIL
By adding layers of graphite, you
start to really indicate the curves
and form of the glass, making it
more realistic.
Use your 2B pencil to lightly add
layers. Use the shapes that you
have created to indicate where you
should add shading.
Graduate shading in areas of the
glass near the sides to show subtle
changes in value. Remember, dont
rush it. This will take time so you
need to be patient if you want to
create realism in your glass.
The amount of pressure that you
use will create darker values but
dont press too hard, you dont
want to eliminate the tooth of the
paper and not be able to add
additional layers. Use your layers
of graphite to build your values, not
heavy pressure.
Some areas of the glass have very
dark values. These are created by
the surface the glass is sitting on
showing through or the
surrounding environment being reflected in the glass or surface. Use your 2B
pencil to build your layers and add the very dark areas with your 4B pencil. Dont


Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


use the 4B for other sections of the glass. You want to keep the overall illusion of
transparency, not create darkness or heaviness in your drawing.
Add dark values to the broken edge of the glass with your 2B or 4B pencil,. Observe
your subject carefully and use the darks only where indicated. They are not visible
on all the broken surfaces.
Within the glass there are very subtle areas of shading that need to be accurately
drawn for your piece to look real. Study the areas carefully and use your master
line drawing to show you where to shade and to what value level. Use your 2B
pencil and light layers of graphite to build the value. Remember to go gradually
from light to darker values so that there is no distinct line between them.
Continue tweaking your drawing and layers of graphite until you are satisfied with
the final image. Remove any smudges around the edges or on the paper with your
kneaded eraser, give the piece a light spray of workable fixative, then youre done!
Youve created glass!















Copyright of all images and instructions belong to Jeanette Jobson unless otherwise indicated and may not be reproduced
or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of the artist.
Email jeanettejobson@gmail.com Website: www.jeanettejobson.com


CHALLENGE
Choose another piece of
glass to draw. Try half
filling a drinking glass
with water and draw
that. The reflections that
are present in water,
glass or metal are all
drawn using the same
techniques to achieve
realism.
Remember to be patient.
Never rush your drawing
as it will show in the
final result. How long
does it take to draw
glass? As much time as
it takes.