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LOCAL NONPROFITS CLAMOR FOR LIMITED CITY FUNDING/PAGE 3

Friday, May 16, 2014 u One dollar


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Claremont
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/ PAGE 7
CALENDAR/ PAGE 20
Cant stand the heat? Stay inside and
visit claremont-courier.com
POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
SPORTS/ PAGE 17
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t
Tips on outdoor fun/
Redux reception
Some local seniors caught
Olympic-fever/
PAGE 28
PAGE 27
CUSDs Teacher of the Year
goes above and beyond/
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
A cyclist passes the pocket park at Indian Hill Boulevard and Harrison Avenue where the sculpture Redux
by Claremont artist Jim Mitchell was recently installed. The artwork was commissioned through the Clare-
mont Community Foundation and the city of Claremonts public art program. An installation reception, which
is open to the public, will be held at the park tomorrow, Saturday, May 17, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
PAGE 5
Photo courtesy of Drew Ready
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This guy just kept barreling along/PAGE 3
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 2
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one hundred and sixth year, number 19
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ven as the publishing industry continues
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 3
CITY NEWS
T
he Claremont City
Council meeting became
a lively event Tuesday
night. Two particular items on
the agenda, funding for the
2014-15 Community-Based Or-
ganization (CBO) General Serv-
ices and Homeless Services
Program and the sanitation rate
increase, incited emotional reac-
tions from the public as well as
members of the council.
Kathleen Trepa, director of commu-
nity and human services, fielded numer-
ous council questions about the grant
allocation policy guidelines serving the
CBO program. Raising red flags from
the council was the 20 percent fund allo-
cation dedicated to new and emerging
CBO programs, which addresses a
newly identified community need or a
quantifiable increase in the level of an
existing service directed towards provid-
ing essential social services to Claremont
residents or students.
This year, four of the 28 programs seek-
ing a CBO grant, including the Claremont
Homeless Advocacy Program (CHAP),
were first-time applicants and considered
pilot programs in the Claremont commu-
nity.
In all, these groups requested a total of
32 percent of the available funding. The
commission, however, only allocated 3
percent of its resources to these new and
emerging programs, citing financial limi-
tations.
The commissions recommendation did
not sit well with CHAP representative Karl
Hilgert, who addressed the council and
stated that the $1000 allotted to his organ-
ization felt like a slap in the face after he
was encouraged to apply and was led to
believe the group would receive sufficient
funding.
Mayor Joe Lyons, apologizing for the
tone in his voice, concurred with Mr.
Hilgert, pointing out that CHAP had in-
deed been before the
council on numerous oc-
casions with more or less
a promise thatgiven a track record of
demonstrating the ability to meet a par-
ticular groups needsthey might expect
support.
It is a slap in the face because if
[CHAPs] own home city doesnt sup-
port their activities to the extent that the
community has, I agree with the speaker.
In my mind, its unacceptable, Mr.
Lyons asserted.
One program that was not recom-
mended for any funding was the Clare-
mont Museum of Arts Project
ARTstART program. Ms. Trepa told the
council that as the commission started al-
locating funds, $1000 was recommended
for the ARTstART program. The com-
missioners , however, ultimately decided
not to recommend any funding for the
year because the program had been self-
sustaining the year prior and the CMA
had been successful in securing larger
grants from other sources.
Several paid interns and impassioned
student volunteers, as well as CMA Board
President Sandy Baldonado, addressed the
council, voicing concerns about the elim-
ination of funds from the program and
stressing the need to expose the citys
youth to creative outlets.
Mayor Lyons later addressed to the
audience, saying, The community has
to know there arent any art programs.
That our schools are not being funded
sufficiently so that perhaps in their vot-
ing, they will take that into account and
hold people accountable to those pro-
grams and to those they elect to do some-
thing about that.
The nonprofit Claremont Educational
Foundation (CEF) provides ongoing fi-
nancial support to schools for art and
music instruction. Last year, CEF donated
upwards of $200,000 to the Claremont
Unified School District to fund art and
music instruction in schools.
The original Claremont Museum of
Art, which opened in the Packing House
in 2006, has received financial support
from the city in the past. In September of
2009, while under financial stress, the
CMA requested and received $4500 and
another $5700 in funding from the city
to keep its doors open. Then again in No-
vember 2009, city council approved
$18,879 from the public art fund to as-
sist the CMA in continuing and develop-
ing community art programs. Despite the
close to $30,000 in city funding, the
CMA museum space closed the follow-
ing month.
At Tuesdays meeting, as the council
continued to question Ms. Trepa about
CBO funding, City Manager Tony Ramos
suggested that the council work directly
with the community and human services
commission to fine tune this amazing
program.
Now with a new Human Services di-
rector on board, we can really analyze the
ambiguities in the [CBO] program and
how it actually works, Mr. Ramos told
the council.
The city managers additional recom-
mendation of adding a workshop in Sep-
tember, enabling council to address the
Human Services Commissions concerns
about new and emerging programs, was
well-received by all council members.
Following discussion, the council unan-
imously agreed with the city managers
recommendation to the council that they
refer the item back to the commission and
reconsider the commissions allocations at
their second meeting in June.
The commission will re-examine the
funding allocations on June 4, particularly
the 20 percent for new and emerging pro-
grams, and report back to council on June
24.
Following the Community Based Or-
ganization Grant Program debate, council
unanimously approved a one percent in-
crease in sanitation fees beginning July 1.
According to city staff and the current
budget projections for the Sanitation Fund,
the Consumer Price Index (CPI) increase
is necessary to sustain operations. Coun-
cilman Opanyi Nasiali admitted he doesnt
like rate increases but wanted residents to
know, in this case, he feels its a necessity.
This is a self-supporting service and if
we dont maintain it, the delivery center
and the company that provides the service
will run into problems, he said. As much
as I dont like increases, this is one that we
have to do.
Additional fee changes recommended
by the Ad Hoc Committee in March are
also moving forward. For the 365 cus-
tomers currently receiving off-street
service that means fees will be increasing
to $22.14 per month for the first three
containers.
Existing alley customers who receive
off-street service free of charge will con-
tinue to do so for a period of 10 years or
until the property changes hands. After
that, the property owners would then be
responsible for paying the $22.14 monthly
charge for service.
Bin off-street fees are also increasing to
$13.70 per pickup and bin rate rentals rates
will rise to $115 per week/pickup.
For low-income and disabled customers
receiving off-street service, rates will re-
main unchanged
The one percent CPI increase is pro-
jected to bring an additional $48,670 to the
citys sanitation fund.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
CBO to reboot recommendations; sanitation increase a reality
Furry visitor causes stir in north Claremont neighborhood
Photo courtesy of Drew Ready
This California black bear took a rest in a backyard tree at a home off Radcliffe
Drive last Saturday. The bear was tranquilized by Department of Fish and
Wildlife authorities and was safely returned to the Angeles National Forest.
A California black bear spent some time
hanging around a Claremont neighborhood
last weekend, providing photo opportunities
and quite a stir among residents.
Claremont police received a call at 9:06
a.m. on Saturday, May 10 from a resident on
the 300 block of Radcliffe Drive stating
there was a bear in the neighborhood. Ac-
cording to Claremont Police Lieutenant
Mike Ciszek, California Department of Fish
and Wildlife (CDFW) was quickly dis-
patched and wildlife officers tranquilized the
bear by dart. Once the tranquilizer took ef-
fect, the bear was transported and re-released
without incident.
Don Nelson, Claremont warden with the
CDFW, was the responding officer and says
the 3-year-old male bear was darted once
while up 30 feet in a tree. Most likely startled
by the dart, the nearly 200-pound animal
came down the first tree, jumped several
neighborhood fences before climbing an-
other tree.
Thats when the tranquilizer took effect,
sending the bear crashing to the ground 50
feet below with an incredible impact, says
Mr. Nelson.
We were able to monitor him and he
seemed fine so we ear-tagged him and suc-
cessfully transferred the bear back into the
Angeles National Forest.
Bear sightings are becoming more com-
monplace in the City of Trees. In the past
two weeks, Claremont police have received
several calls regarding sightings at The
Webb Schools, where a bear was seen wan-
dering on campus but left unassisted.
Just this past week, hikers on the Clare-
mont wilderness trail reported a bear sight-
ing at the halfway mark on the Claremont
Loop. Its unknown if the captured bear is
the same bear from previous sightings.
Drought conditions has likely made it dif-
ficult for bears and other wildlife to find
water and vegetation in the Angeles National
Forest, forcing them to foothill communi-
ties, like Claremont, in search of sustenance.
Foothill neighborhoods are especially apt
to have bear visitors during summer and fall
during years when it is hot with not a lot of
rainfall. The Los Angeles County Sheriff ad-
vises residents who encounter a bear to give
it space, leave the area and call 9-1-1.
--Angela Bailey
CITY
COUNCIL
C
alifornia communities are reminded
often of the importance of disaster
preparedness, and Claremont is no
exception.
With the ever-present threat of earthquakes and wild-
fires in our foothill community, residents and city staff
know the importance of having a centralized location that
allows first responders to communicate with those af-
fected by the crisis.
The recent delivery of Claremonts new state-of-the-art
mobile communications center will provide just that.
In 2012, the Claremont Police Department commis-
sioned Frontline Communications to build a 53-foot mo-
bile communication center to better serve the community.
Captain Jon Traber worked directly with the Florida-
based company and served as the departments project
manager, overseeing the design and production of the
unit from its conception through delivery in February
2014.
A project of this size has heavy customer involve-
ment, says Andy Callaway, General Manager of Front-
line Communications. We had three in-process
inspections by the customer including a critical design
review. Once we were all in agreement, the building
began.
Construction of the mobile command center com-
menced in March 2013 and required 8,000-plus man-
hours to complete. Custom-built by the departments
Wednesday, May 7
Some call it graffiti, others call it art,
but safety officers at Harvey Mudd Col-
lege just call it plain ol vandalism. An
unknown number of suspects took ad-
vantage of an opportunity to deface a 50-
foot-by-16-foot section of Linde Athletic
Field with graphic symbols depicting
breasts and a penis. A report of the crime
was taken by campus safety at HMC on
May 4 and forwarded to Claremont po-
lice. The vandals have yet to be identi-
fied.
* * * *
Staff at Bon Appetits discovered they
were the victims of petty theft after sev-
eral of their personal items had vanished
from the cafe. The alleged crime oc-
curred between 11 p.m. on May 1 and
12:15 a.m. on May 2 at Pitzer Colleges
McConnell Dining Hall. Among the
items listed as missing include an em-
ployees purse, boxed wine, a two-way
radio, a black mesh bag and five galva-
nized steel tubs. There are no suspects at
this time.
* * * *
A student at Claremont High School
lost more than his lunch money when
someone stole a Kindle Fire right out of
his backpack. The tablet was allegedly
lifted from the students bag while he
was on campus between 10 a.m. and 11
a.m. and has not been recovered.
Thursday, May 8
A Covina man looking to make some
easy money was arrested when he tried
to cash a fraudulent check at Aloe Pay-
day in Claremont. Officers received a
call regarding a fraud in progress at the
check-cashing business located on the
400 block of Auto Center Drive. Jesse
Dominguez, 35, allegedly tried to cash a
check that was flagged as fraudulent and,
when confronted, admitted to the crime.
Mr. Dominguez was arrested on posses-
sion of a fictitious bill as well as posses-
sion of a controlled substance.
* * * *
A former Stater Bros. employee
caused quite a stir at the companys
Foothill Boulevard location when he vi-
olated a restraining order simply by
walking into the market. Around 3:45
p.m., the unnamed suspect entered the
store, purchased items and allgedly en-
gaged a current employee with criminal
threats. According to Lt. Mike Ciszek,
the suspect violated an existing restrain-
ing order that prevents him from enter-
ing any Stater Bros. property.
* * * *
A Claremont resident learned the hard
way that even your own driveway isnt
safe from thieves if they see something
they want. Two bicycles and a power
generator worth a total of $2100 were
taken between 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
from a home on the 1300 block of Base
Line Road. A report was taken and the
suspects are unknown at this time.
Friday, May 9
Arturo Maya would probably be the
first to tell you that lying to a police offi-
cer brings nothing but more trouble.
Around 1 p.m., Claremont police re-
sponded to a call of a man in a blue shirt
and black jeans chasing a woman near
Bonita and Mountain Avenues. Officers
caught up with the pair and discovered
the Glendora man was intoxicated. The
19-year-old was transported to the sta-
tion where he provided his name, how-
ever, when his fingerprints came back
under a different name, the suspect apol-
ogized to the officer stating, Im sorry I
lied, I lie about stupid sh*t all the time.
Mr. Maya was arrested and booked for
giving false information to an officer and
being drunk in public.
* * * *
An underage Claremont man put his
life in danger when he had too much to
drink and wandered onto the path of the
Metrolink rail system. Around 9:30 p.m.,
officers responded to a call of an intoxi-
cated person walking on the train tracks
near the Village at College Avenue. An-
drew Perez, 18, was arrested and booked
for being drunk and disorderly.
Saturday, May 10
A Los Angeles resident got a lucky
brake when he was arrested for driv-
ing under the influence after passing out
behind the wheel of his vehicle. Officers
were called to Base Line Road and
Mountain Avenue for a welfare check
around 10:30 p.m. where they encoun-
tered Erick Rosales slumped over the
steering wheel of his car. Officers tapped
on the drivers window, however, Mr.
Rosales was unresponsive. Upon further
inspection, officers could see that the
cars gearshift was in the drive position
and the driver had his foot pressed on the
brake. Responding officers positioned
their vehicle in front of the suspects car
to prevent it from moving forward.
Thinking that perhaps Mr. Rosales suf-
fered a medical condition, officers broke
the side window, put the car in park and
attempted to shake the 31-year-old man
awake, but he remained unresponsive.
When officers confirmed the suspect was
intoxicated, Mr. Rosales was arrested
and booked for driving on a suspended
license and driving under the influence.
Preliminary results indicate his blood al-
cohol level was three times over the legal
limit.
Sunday, May 11
An initial call to Claremont police of
an assault with a deadly weapon resulted
in the arrest of a 40-year-old man for an-
imal cruelty. Officers responded to the
2000 block of New Haven Avenue where
a woman indicated her husband at-
tempted to hit her with a car and then
witnessed him kicking two kittens.
Phillip Hagen, a Claremont resident, was
arrested and released with a citation for
animal cruelty. Lt. Ciszek says the kit-
tens were inspected following the inci-
dent and appeared to be okay. They were
later released to the Humane Society.
* * * *
Police and fire responded to a
Mothers Day multi-car traffic collision
that resulted in injuries, sending three
people to the hospital. The accident oc-
curred around 5:15 p.m. at the intersec-
tion of Padua Avenue and Base Line
Road. A driver traveling southbound on
Padua Avenue attempted to turn left onto
Base Line Road and failed to yield to an-
other driver heading northbound on
Padua that caused the vehicles to collide.
Upon impact, both vehicles skidded
though the intersection and struck a third
car. All involved, including the driver of
the vehicle at fault, were transported to
Pomona Valley Hospital complaining of
shoulder, back, neck and chest pain.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 4
POLICE BLOTTER
CITY NEWS
MOBILE CENTER/continues on next page
Mobile center meets police needs in changing world
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Claremont Police Captain Jon Traber shows off the interior of the departments new mobile emergency oper-
ations center recently at the police station. The 53-foot-long trailer has four slide-out sections, which expand
the useable area to 770 square feet. The EOC will be used in the case of a disaster in Claremont or can be
loaned to nearby communities if the need arises.
EDUCATION
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 5
specifications, the new mobile center re-
places the citys previous 11-year-old unit
that was sold to the Calexico Police De-
partment in 2012.
The new 53-foot, four-slide trailer
houses a fully operational emergency op-
eration unit, complete with a dispatch cen-
ter that allows interoperability with other
local, state and county agencies when
staffed.
The impressive mobile unit is also out-
fitted with two pneumatic masts; one for
lights and one for radio frequency equip-
ment and is equipped with a conference
room complete with television monitors,
touch screen computers as well as an
audio/video system that permits the user
to play any display on the monitors inside
or outside the command post.
Its state-of-the-art, Captain Traber
says. Technology will always evolve and
develop, but weve got the systems that
will meet our needs. Even during the
course of the build, there were improve-
ments in technology so we were able to
make upgrades.
At nearly 19 feet, the largest of the four
slides accommodates a management area
with seats for the school district, college
staff, fire department, Red Cross, or any-
one else that may be needed as part of an
Emergency Operation Center activation.
This designated area, in addition to the
conference room, will provide plenty of
workspace for emergency personnel.
It will seat 33 people with lots of room
to comfortably move around. I think 40-
50 people could operate in here rather
comfortably, says Captain Traber.
Keeping it all running without inter-
ruption is a 56 Kilowatt generator that
powers the air conditioning and heating
units as well as the communications and
electronics systems with additional power
to spare for other applications.
Without the air conditioner on, the
generator will last one week or longer.
During hot weather, with the air set on
maximum, about 5 to 7 days, says Cap-
tain Traber.
As you may imagine, a mobile com-
munications center of this caliber doesnt
come cheap. The 53-foot trailer and the
truck used to transport it cost nearly $2
million. Funding was made possible by a
combination of state and federal grants,
some in-house money as well as dona-
tions from the Claremont Unified School
District and the Claremont Colleges.
The new communications center is
meant to take the place of the police de-
partments previous Emergency Opera-
tion Center (EOC) located in the Citrus
Room above city hall. According to Cap-
tain Traber, public safety standards dictate
that central services buildings need to be
rated one and a half times code. Clare-
mont City Hall does not fulfill that re-
quirement.
In the event an earthquake, if it chal-
lenged or compromised any part of city
hall and they had to close it down, we
wouldnt have a functional EOC.
Deployment of the mobile center in an
emergency would be evaluated independ-
ently based on the location of the event
and severity of the damage. If the event
were citywide, the unit would most likely
remain at the police station or pre-deploy
to Claremont High School, which served
as an EOC headquarters during the 2003
Grand Prix fire.
The Metrolink station, with its ample
parking, is also another possibility.
In the event of a large-scale crisis out-
side of Claremonts city limits, police
would make the mobile communications
center available to those cities and serv-
ices in need.
Part of the grant money stipulated that
we make it available to local, regional or
even statewide agencies if they needed it.
The reason why we have a day cab on the
truck is so we could send our trained staff
(probably a driver and an IT guy) to go
where the trailer is needed to help set
those systems up, Captain Traber ex-
plained. Once set up, they can retreat to
the day cab and be around to help if those
inside needed technical assistance, but not
get in the way of the people actually run-
ning the EOC.
Captain Traber plans on training as
many of the departments existing per-
sonnel as possible, which would provide
some flexibility in who operates the trailer
in the event of an emergency. Two offi-
cers with Class A licenses have already
been designated to drive the unit and they
are also familiar with erecting the floors
and the slide-outs.
Setting up the mobile centers redun-
dant communications systems has been
time consuming but the captain is opti-
mistic that the entire unit will be up and
running by June 1.
Were still working on the technical
systems. We have a couple guys on our
staff working on that and when thats
done, well be training additional staff to
get the technical system set up, says Cap-
tain Traber.
Once established, wed like those to
function as a second police station if we
needed it to.
Overall, Claremont residents and city
staff should be pleased with the addition
of the departments new mobile commu-
nications center, despite its imposing pres-
ence and hefty price tag.
I think given the fact that we got fund-
ing from federal grants, state grants and
cooperative money from the school dis-
trict and the colleges, there was minimal
impact on the citys budget, says Lieu-
tenant Mike Ciszek. For the amount of
money that the city put in, to get what we
got is definitely a return on their invest-
ment.
City residents and visitors interested in
touring the mobile communications cen-
ter will be presented with that opportunity
during Claremonts 66th Annual Fourth
of July Celebration and Festival where it
is scheduled to make its debut as the lead
vehicle in the Independence Day parade.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Sumner educator takes Teacher of the Year honors
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Third grade teacher Debbie Plumley helps Katelyn
Miller with her project during an art class on Wednes-
day at Sumner Elementary School. During last weeks
CUSD Board of Education meeting Ms. Plumley was
named the 2013-2014 Teacher of the Year.
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
The Claremont Police Departments new mobile emergency command center is 53
feet long and is towed by a full-size semi truck cab. Because of its size, a class A
drivers license is required to move the center. Two police staff members have ob-
tained the correct license, according to Captain Jon Traber.
MOBILE CENTER/
continued from previous page
A
t the Thursday, May 1 gathering of
the Claremont Unified School Dis-
trict Board of Education, local edu-
cator Debbie Plumley received some
much-deserved recognition.
Ms. Plumley, who teaches third grade at Sumner Ele-
mentary School, was recognized as the districts 2014
Teacher of the Year.
There is a longstanding tradition of colleagues pulling
the wool over the winners eyes when it comes to the pres-
entation of this coveted award. Ms. Plumley, who was told
another Sumner teacher had earned the accolade, attended
the meeting expecting to cheer for a colleague.
The longtime Claremont teacher, who admits, This is
not my forte, to be in the spotlight, said she was surprised
and a bit abashed to learn that the kudos were actually
hers.
TEACHER OF THE YEAR/page 18
I
t wasnt therethe building. It wasnt
there anymore. The building had been
there a few days earlier or was it the
day before? Now, suddenly, there was
only a wall or two and a huge pile of rub-
ble. It looked like there had been a cata-
strophic earthquake right at that spot. Or
an instant, if messy, Greco-Roman ruin.
There had been a fence around Ducey Gymor
what used to be called Ducey Gymat Claremont
McKenna College for quite some time. But it was still
a shock a few weeks ago when, turning onto Sixth
Street, I saw that the large gymnasium that had been
there for decades was gone. Poof!
No more.
History. A memory. A picture.
I knew that the lovely swimming pool at Scripps
College where I spent hundreds of happy summer af-
ternoons was also a memory and had been for many
years. But it was still weird, if not a shock, when, not
long before Ducey Gym disappeared, I ventured onto
the northeast portion of the Scripps campus to where
the pool used to be and found myself surrounded by at-
tractive residential units. There was a small waterfall,
lending to a nice, resort-like vibe, but there was defi-
nitely no swimming pool there.
Not only did I know that the pool was long gone, I
knew that another swimming pool had been built not
far from the site, as part of an impressive athletic facil-
ity, with well-groomed fields and a handsome building.
Still, it was a jolt seeing this all up close and realizing
that the old pool really wasnt there.
It was even more of a jolt a few years ago when I
saw that the pool at Harvey Mudd College, where I
also spent a fair amount of time, especially after the old
Scripps pool was closed, was replaced by a large build-
ing. Im not even sure when it was goneit seemed to
happen overnightand I still have a hard time not pic-
turing the pool, rather than the building, standing out
along Twelfth (now Platt) Street. Maybe this is because
I grew up hearing my father talk about swimming there
every day at noon, rain or shine, when he taught there.
Now the really remarkable thing is that when I was a
very young child, before going to the Harvey Mudd
and old Scripps pools, my family would go swimming
at a pool at CMC, which used to be where Ducey Gym
(now) was.
On the same visitwhen I saw what was where the
Scripps pool used to beit was nice to see that the
garden with the wall on which departing graduates
have painted messages over the years still exists on an-
other part of campus. Some of the messages date back
to the 1920s and 1930s.
And it is nice to see that, even with the old pool not
there and with the new housing units and the new ath-
letic facilities, Scripps is still arguably the loveliest of
the colleges in Claremont, with its gardens and court-
yards and Mediterranean architecture. This isnt to say
that there arent plenty of very pleasant spots on the
other campuses.
The wall at Scripps with the class messages from the
last 80 or so years is a reminder that the colleges are
still here, still carrying out their noble mission, still a
vital and integral part of Claremont. This weekend,
with all the commencement exercises and speeches and
proud parents and friends, and with another group of
students writing on the wall after spending a critical,
enriching part of their lives here in Claremont, is like-
wise a reminder of this.
As the wall and the graduations show quite elo-
quently, this is the case even as Ducey Gym has been
torn down, even as a major new science building (or
complex?) is going up at Pomona College, even as
much of the Harvey Mudd College campus is different.
Even as dorms change, even as swimming pools and
buildings disappear, even as there are areas of the cam-
puses that are unrecognizable or are becoming unrec-
ognizable (whether eventually or over a weekend), stu-
dents keep coming and students keep going with their
lives shaped and forever changed by their years here.
These changes tend to be for the better, as with nicer
housing or with improved laboratories. No doubt they
are a big part of why the students keep coming. No
doubt they are a critical factor in the colleges mission
and renown.
Whether or not they are for the best, these changes
are sometimes not easy. I still miss the old Scripps pool
with its cozy garden-like setting and mosaics and, as I
said, cant quite believe that the Harvey Mudd pool
where my dad swam for decades is gone.
Another uneasy change at The Colleges is the retire-
ment of Leonard Pronko after teaching for an incredi-
ble 57 yearslonger than my lifemostly in the
theater department at Pomona College. This surely
isnt a change for the better but, as was noted at an
event two weeks ago, there is great gratitude that he
will still be in Claremont and still with an interest in the
theater program at The Colleges.
I wrote here in the fall that Mr. Pronko is all but a
legend at Pomona College, if not in Claremont. He is
best-known for his expertise in and direction of Kabuki
productions. For most of my life in Claremont, I have
been aware of his work in the theater department,
which began a few years after his arrival at Pomona,
and also included many works by European play-
wrights like Ibsen and Faydeau. That he will no longer
be doing this is something of a jolt. I find it strange and
sad.
But the celebration earlier this month was entirely
appropriate. Mr. Pronko was elegant and eloquent even
as he said that demonstrating Kabuki is too hard on
my knees, in joyful conversation with Thomas Leab-
hart, another longtime faculty member of the theater
department, and Sam Gold, a 2011 Pomona College
graduate who was taught and directed by Mr. Pronko
and Mr. Leabhart and who has gone on to do theater
work all over the world. It was another reminder of the
comings and goings that are very much a part of The
Colleges ongoing, vital work.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 6
observer
observer
Changing as hey stay the same
By John Pixley
DEMYSTIFYING SUSTAINABILITYpage 9
Make it good, Helen. Were on prime time.
Wilderness park master plan
Dear Editor:
This year, the city of Claremont has
embarked on a study to develop a mas-
ter-plan that will guide the management
of the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park.
Over the past months during public
meetings on the master plan, several
voices from the city council, the Techni-
cal Advisory Committee and neighbors
have repeatedly claimed that the purpose
of the park is preservation.
While actively supporting preserva-
tion, we, the members of the board of
Claremont Wildlands Conservancy, re-
spectfully disagree that this is the sole
purpose of the park. By doing some
homework, we have verified that the of-
ficial purpose is to combine preservation
with recreation. As we work together to
develop the master plan, it is critically
important to start with historically accu-
rate facts and to make sure that all stake-
holders are aware of these facts.
Understanding the historical intent for
the use of our hillsides is the starting
point, so we would like to call your at-
tention to the following sources:
The city ordinance of 1981 that de-
termined the hillsides land-use policy;
The city ordinance of 1996 that es-
tablished the initial Claremont Hills
Wilderness Park of 1125 acres, which
were transferred to the city from Pomona
College;
Articles of Incorporation of the
Claremont Hills Conservation Corpora-
tion, 1996. (The corporation was formed
to oversee the citys management of the
park and assure its future as open space.)
The current Claremont General
Plan.
All of these documents explicitly as-
sert that the purpose of the Claremont
Hills Wilderness Park is to blend low-in-
tensity recreational use (traditionally de-
fined as hiking, mountain biking,
horseback riding, picnicking and run-
ning) with preservation of open space
and natural habitat, free from develop-
ment.
We believe that establishing the best
balance through an open, informed and
fair-minded process with an eye to the
long-term future is the purpose of the
master plan.
At our website, www.claremontwild
lands.org, you will find a more detailed
version of this letter with excerpts from
the documents that support our con-
tention. You will also find ways to par-
ticipate in the master-planning process
that will help assure a successful and
well-balanced final plan.
Lissa Petersen
President, Claremont
Wildlands Conservancy
Make a friendly Foothill
[Editors note: The following letter was
addressed to Chris Veirs, senior planner,
with a copy forwarded to the COURIER
for publication. A sketch was included
with the letter, which is not reprinted
here. KD]
Dear Editor:
We own a house near the intersection
of Foothill and Mills and, like numerous
other residents, students and business
folks, we often have to cross Foothill on
foot to get to the Colleges, the Village,
etc. As you know, this is a busy intersec-
tion with lots of traffic. The auto traffic
goes way too fast here, and there is al-
most no regard for pedestrians and bikes
(all who drive are guilty). Bikes are con-
stantly driving down the middle of Mills
and confusing everything. We have three
kids aged 3, 8 and 17, so we are always
worried, particularly crossing Foothill at
the Mills intersection on the east side
from north to south.
I would like to see a master plan im-
plemented that gives pedestrians and
bikes a clear right of way. Id love to see
traffic diverted around the intersection
completely, which some would say is a
difficult thing at such a busy intersection.
I think it is possible.
Isuggest constructing a tunnel to con-
vey auto traffic under the current Foothill
and Mills intersection.Id like to see the
existing elevation used as a crossing ac-
cessible to bikes and pedestrians only.
The signal at Foothill and Mills would
come out, and new ones would be re-
configured, so that cars could still access
both thoroughfares from all directions.
The dentists office and hair salon
would be accessed through the Foothill
frontage (along the north), and Harvey
Mudds entrance (currently at the light
on the south) would have to be diverted
to the east.These access points are al-
ready there, they just need traffic signals.
Easy, right?!
Also, the tunnel would probably re-
quire the entrance to Morelia from Mills
to be closed to traffic, and business and
residential traffic from Cuernevaca,
Guadalajara and Morelia to exit via the
Foothill frontage road to the east.
The attached very rough sketch shows
the tunnel plan for the Foothill and Mills
intersection. Please consider this as part
of the Foothill Master Plan. I have faith
in the city of Claremont to fix this horri-
ble and outdated intersection. Feet on
Foothill: the Foothill and Mills Tunnel
Solution (Yes, you have my permission
to use this slogan)will be an innovative
design, will elevate home values and will
provide a jewel in the Foothill Master
Plan that could be a crowning legacy for
this planning department. Lets make it
happen, and lets make it beautiful.
Also, please keep in mind that Millard
Sheets designed the apartment complex,
his adjacent art studio (now a doctors
office) and the Guadalajara and Cuer-
navaca neighborhoods, which likely
makes them all eligible as a district for
the California Register of Historical Re-
sources, the National Register of Historic
Places and, as such, significant resources
under CEQA.
David Brunzell
Claremont
Campaign finance limits
Dear Editor:
The much-anticipated US Supreme
Court decision in the pivotal campaign
finance case, McCutcheon v. FEC, was
issued earlier this month, and once again
the court ruled on the side of big money
in knocking down aggregate campaign
contribution limits.
The case challenged the limits on the
total contributions from an individual
donor to candidates and political com-
mittees that were designed to prevent
corruption and the appearance of cor-
ruption.
The importance of this decision can-
not be overstated. While McCutcheon
dealt with a technical and arcane matter
of campaign finance law, in the end it is
all about more money and more influ-
ence.
As a result of this decision, another
loophole in campaign finance laws has
opened allowing political parties and
PACs to become huge funnels for cor-
rupting elected officials across the coun-
try.
The court has used the McCutcheon
decision to continue dismantling the wall
of protection against big money domi-
nance in our political systemcase by
case, brick by brick.
As in previous decisions by the
Roberts Court, Chief Justice ignores the
corruption he is turning loose in Amer-
icas election system.
Simply put: The McCutcheon deci-
sion means more power for big money
and more corruption for the rest of us.
Now more than ever, we need to fight to
make every vote count and give every el-
igible voter free and fair access to the
polls. In the end, the only reliable re-
sponse to a flood of money in our elec-
tions is a flood of voters at the polls.
Ellen Taylor
VP for Advocacy
LWV of the Claremont Area
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 7
READERS COMMENTS
Send readers comments via email to edi-
tor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or
hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd.
Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The dead-
line for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. Let-
ters are the opinion of the writer, not a
reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the
right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed
250 words. We cannot guarantee publication
of every letter. Letters and viewpoints will be
published at the discretion of the editor.
READERS COMMENTS
Agendas for city meetings are avail-
able at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Monday, May 19
Wilderness Master Plan TAC
Hughes Center, 6 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 20
Planning Commission
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
Youth Sports Committee
Hughes Center, 7 p.m.
ADVENTURES
I N HAI KU
June Blooms
Her lavender shawl
Senora Jacaranda
Spreads across the lawn
Karen Hanna-Towne
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 8
C
laremont Manor residents gath-
ered last Friday to listen as Mayor
Joe Lyons addressed residents on
the top issues facing Claremont today.
Mr. Lyons, who is serving his final year of his first
term on the Claremont City Council, spent a few min-
utes prior to his speech getting to know a few of the
residents and sharing some background about himself
and how he came to be the mayor of Claremont.
The top three issues presented by the mayor were
public safety, local water issues and sustainability.
Public safety is always a priority in the city and the
police department has hired new officers and a part-
time detective to address an increase in residential and
vehicle burglaries. In addition, the city has hired a
consultant to study site feasibility for a new police
station.
For well over a decade, a new station has been a
priority for reasons relating to the structural integrity
of the current facility and the adequacy of that build-
ing to conduct police business, he said.
One of the most important issues the city council
discussed this year is the acquisition of Claremonts
water system, Mr. Lyons noted. He was quick to point
out that the potential water system acquisition from
Golden State Water Company will not be resolved
quickly and the timeline is dependent on the outcome
of pending litigation. Adding to that uncertainty is the
question of whether or not the water company will ac-
cept or challenge an Environmental Impact Report
discussed at length at the city council's last meeting in
March and approved by the council on April 8.
While Claremonts legal team asserted the water
system purchase would have no significant environ-
mental impact, Golden State argued the report is inad-
equate and incomplete and was conducted out of
order.
G
oing forward, the mayor is
pleased with the citys sustainabil-
ity plan and spoke briefly about
the need for funding to build or rent a site
for a Sustainability Resource Center and
the implementation of CoolCalifornia, a
program designed to raise awareness
about energy use and find ways to record
and get financial incentives with the citys
conservation efforts.
Mr. Lyons also discussed several new housing de-
velopments including Denley Investments 74 apart-
ment unitsthe live-work and retail space project at
the old Rich Products buildingand Citrus Glen at
Pitzer Ranch, the townhome development at the
southwest corner of Padua and Base Line Road.
The mayor was careful to note the historic signifi-
cance of some of these buildings and highlighted the
efforts made in incorporating and preserving them in
the process of developing these properties.
At the conclusion of his speech, the mayor wel-
comed questions from the audience, all of which re-
volved around one topic that has weighed heavily on
the minds of Claremont residents for yearswater.
The mayor dissected each question and thought-
fully replied with best- and worse-case scenarios on
subjects such as eminent domain, a possible water ra-
tion and the structure of water rates.
Equally as impressive as the mayors speech was
the newly renovated Manor Hall where the event
commenced. With its open-beam ceiling and state-of-
the-art audio/visual system, residents and the mayor
alike were impressed with the update.
Mr. Lyons indicated he would return to the Manor
soon to discuss a recent study relating to senior living
and services in Claremont.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Mayor highlights city priorities at Manor meet-and-greet
COURIER photo/Angela Bailey
Mayor Joe Lyons speaks with Emily Starr prior to his
speech last week at Claremont Manor.
E-waste collection this
Saturday at city yard
Tomorrow, Saturday, May 17, the city
of Claremont and Greenway Solid Waste
& Recycling will host an electronic
waste collection event at the city yard,
located at 1616 Monte Vista Ave., from 8
a.m. to noon.
Acceptable items include computers
and monitors, televisions, cameras, print-
ers, scanners, car batteries, cell phones,
etc. Dry cell batteries and fluorescent
light bulbs will not be accepted.
For questions regarding the collection
event or to schedule a curbside electronic
waste pickup, contact Greenway Solid
Waste & Recycling at (909) 518-7943.
Ophelias Jump kicks
off season at Pomona
College
The Pomona College Department of
Theatre and Dance and Claremont-based
professional theatre company Ophelias
Jump will start the summer play season
with Eurydice, Sarah Ruhls retelling of
the Orpheus myth. Performances will be
held Friday through Sunday, May 23-25,
and Friday through Sunday, May 30 to
June 1, in Seaver Theatre.
In this play, the Orpheus story is told
from the perspective of Eurydice, his
wife. Under the affectionate tutelage of
her father, Eurydice regains her memo-
ries of earthly lovebut has to choose
between her husband and her father, with
both choices involving loss. Doug
Oliphant is the director.
The New York Times wrote, Eurydice
is ultimately about the painful choice that
comes with the passing of joys and
pleasures: whether to remember, in sad-
ness, or to forget, and achieve a calm but
emptier equilibrium.
Tickets are $25 for general admission
and $22 for students and seniors, and
may be purchased online at www.ophe-
liasjump.org. Performances are Fridays
at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.,
and Sundays at 4 p.m. Pomona Colleges
Seaver Theatre is located at 300 E.
Bonita Ave., Claremont.
Eurydice is the first of four plays
jointly produced by Pomona College and
Ophelias Jump. In this partnership,
Ophelias Jump provides internships,
with students participating as performers
and technicians, as well as master classes
and workshops for Claremont Colleges
students and area residents. Actor, direc-
tor and teacher Beatrice Casagran and
actor and improv comedian Caitlin
Lopez founded Ophelias Jump.
Other plays to be performed this sea-
son include A Midsummer Elizabethan
Festival: Shakespeares The Merry
Wives of Windsor (July 17-27, Sontag
Greek Theatre); Macbeth (July 18-26,
Sontag Greek Theatre); and Moises
Kaufmans33 Variations(September 5-
14, Allen Theatre).
CEF celebrates local
business with mixer
The Claremont Educational Founda-
tion will host a mixer on Thursday, May
29 to celebrate local businesses that have
helped the Claremont schools through
giving. The event, which runs from 5:30
to 7 p.m. and is co-hosted by the Clare-
mont Chamber, will take place at
Pomona Colleges Seaver House, 305 N.
College Ave., Claremont.
Guests can enjoy appetizers compli-
ments of The Custom Butcher in Upland,
and beer and wine from Dale Bros.
Brewery, Claremont Craft Ales and the
Packing House Wine Merchants.
There is no charge for admission,
however, RSVP is requested by May 22
to info@claremonteducationalfounda-
tion.org or by calling (909) 399-1709.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 9
Who Is CEQA, and why do so many people hate her?
by Jennifer Scheetz
I
n order to understand the environ-
mental issues of California, you must
have intimate knowledge of CEQA.
The first time I heard this, I wondered
who she was.
But shes not a she. Shes the highly-maligned Cali-
fornia Environmental Quality Act of 1970, signed into
law by Governor Ronald Reagan. (Whose next envi-
ronmental foray was to immediately dismantle the
White House solar panels upon moving in with
Nancy.)
If youve ever been to a dinner party and heard
someone complaining about those awful tree-huggers
who obstruct California progress, youve heard of
CEQA. Most complaints focus on its costly, impeding
regulations. But what does CEQA actually do? CEQA
requires state and local agencies to study the potential
environmental impact of all new projects, public and
private, then explain how to prevent it. Thats it.
So, to complain about CEQA is like complaining
that a bank asks for a business plan before lending
you money.
Still, CEQA angers many people. To them, its just
another way government is getting in the way.
But what CEQA-naysayers are really complaining
about is man. We are our own worst enemy, are we
not? Timeliness in all things is possible. But when
one person doesnt like another persons project, the
law offers infinite road blocks.
One tactic is called document dumping, the fili-
buster-like tactic of submitting what is hopefully
damaging evidence at the last minute. Golden State
Water Company did it to Claremont when the city
considered the environmental impacts of going to
local control of its water. For this time-waster, how-
ever, hope may be on the horizon. Senate Bill 1451,
authored by seven Democrats (Richard Roth of River-
side, among them) seems to demand true reform by
specifically addressing this ploy.
But, SB 1451 wont solve all of CEQAs issues. One
of the biggest wastes of time and money is all the court
time spent fighting for CEQA-exemption. If this is you,
and youre building a stadium to house a professional
sports team in California, have no fear. Youll get an
exemption quicker than an eyelash-fluttering motorist
gets out of a traffic ticket (though I cant speak from
experience, as its never worked for me). Everyone
else, however, will rack up the legal fees.
I get it. Of course, the mice want the cat to go away
so they can play, and California happens to have a lot
of mice. But at some point, the mice are going to real-
ize theyve grown a fifth leg because theyve been
playing in toxic sludge. Then whos to blame?
Demystifying Sustainability is a project of Sustainable
Claremont (sustainableclaremont.org), email
info@sustainableclaremont.org. Follow them on
Facebook and on Twitter #GreenClaremont.
Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
OUR TOWN
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 10
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healthcare
Alabelle Allie Hueter died at home
in Claremont on May 12, 2014.
She was born in Omaha, Nebraska in
1924 to Zena and Alexander Hunter.
Mrs. Hueter began piano lessons at the
age of four, and also took singing and
tap dancing as a young girl. She was a
lifelong pianist and supporter of the
arts.
Mrs. Hueter came to California by
steam train in 1942 to study at Scripps
College. She met her future husband,
Pomona College student James Hueter,
at a freshman introductory dance at
Scripps. Neither of them danced and
they became acquainted.
World War II took James away from
Claremont from 1943 to 1947 and Allie
also left after her freshman year, earn-
ing her bachelors degree from the Uni-
versity of Nebraska, Omaha. She
returned to Claremont for graduate
studies in the fall of 1947 at the same
time James had returned to finish at
Pomona College. A mutual acquain-
tance put them back in touch and they
were married in March 1948, establish-
ing their home in Claremont. Daughters
Barbara and Elizabeth were born in the
early 1950s.
Mrs. Hueters life in Claremont cen-
tered around friends, community in-
volvement and her daughters school,
Foothill Country Day School. She and
her husband (on drums) played jazz
with Paul Darrow (on saxophone and
clarinet) on Friday nights in the 1950s
and early 1960s. Both daughters re-
member listening through the wall
heater vent.
During the 1960s, she was a member
of the Claremont Motion Picture Coun-
cil (with Martin Weinberger), the Fam-
ily Service Agency and the Claremont
Coordinating Council. She promoted
the Saturday childrens film series at
the Village Theater, which ran in the
1960s. Mrs. Hueter was involved with
Foothill Country Day School for over
50 years and played the piano for
dozens of school plays, Christmas pro-
grams and commencements. After her
daughters graduated in the late 1960s,
she continued to teach generations of
Foothill students the music for those
events and was well known for her
masterful accompaniment.
Mrs. Hueter loved classical and jazz
music, foreign movies and attending
the Los Angeles Philharmonic. She and
her husband were longtime patrons of
the summer Cabrillo Festival of Con-
temporary Music in Santa Cruz. She
was also a particular fan of pianist
Dave Brubeck, singer Mel Torme, Mel
Brooks movies and comedian Sid Cae-
sar. Her favorite movie was Stanley
Kubricks Dr. Strangelove or: How I
Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the
Bomb. Mrs. Hueter played jazz piano
at home and loved to perform and listen
to music with her grandsons as they
were growing up. In her last year, she
enjoyed re-watching Fawlty Towers
and listening to political histories.
She is survived by her husband of 66
years, James Hueter; by her daughters,
Barbara Schenck (Steve) of Claremont
and Elizabeth Hueter of Davis, Califor-
nia; and by her grandsons, Alexander
and James Schenck.
In lieu of flowers, contributions can
be made to the Cabrillo Festival of
Contemporary Music, 147 S. River St.
#232, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, or the
Glaucoma Institute of Beverly Hills
Research Foundation, 8733 Beverly
Blvd. Suite 301, Los Angeles, CA
90048-1800. There will be no services.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 11
Alabelle Hueter
Longtime Claremonter, arts supporter
OBITUARIES
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 12
Michael John McAndrew died on Friday,
May 9, 2014 at his home in Alta Loma. He
was 70.
The son of John Daniel McAndrew and
Ruth Lenore (Bray) McAndrew, he was
born in Dearborn, Michigan on January 16,
1944. He was the oldest of nine children.
Mr. McAndrew was an avid golfer and a
full-time Claremont High School sports fan
for his grandchildren.
He is survived by his wife of 48 years,
Carol Ann (Newsome) McAndrew, and by
the couples three children and their
spouses: Lisa and Kelly Arft of Upland,
Kelly and John Renken of Claremont and
Randy and Tracy McAndrew of Long
Beach. He is also survived by his eight
grandchildren.
A Vigil Rite for Mr. McAndrew will be
held on Monday, May 19 from 5 to 8 p.m.
at Todd Memorial Chapel, 325 N. Indian
Hill Blvd. in Claremont. A Funeral Mass
will be held Tuesday, May 20 at 10 a.m. at
St. Anthonys Church, 2110 N. San Antonio
Ave. in Upland.
In lieu of flowers, the family asks that
you make a donation in Michaels honor to
the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
Michael John McAndrew
Loving father and grandfather, avid golfer
OBITUARIES
Margaret M. Boggess died peacefully in her sleep
on May 1, 2014. She was 100 years old.
She was born Margaret Elmira Miller on September
11, 1913 at her grandparents house in Pomona. Her
parents, Nellie and Charles, lived on a five-acre dairy
on Kingsley and Monte Vista in Pomona. She and her
two brothers, Harold and Alfred, grew up roaming the
surrounding groves and enjoying trips to the beach.
Life wasnt all play. Young Margaret made at least a
dozen pies a week to help feed the many men who
worked in the dairy. Expert baking was a talent she
would be known for throughout her life.
Margaret graduated from Chaffey College with an
Associate of Arts degree in 1933. Soon after, she met
Iowa native Clayton Boggess through a friend of a
friend when he was out visiting southern California.
The couple was married in 1934. They resided in the
Hawkeye State for two years before coming back to
the Inland Valley, where Mrs. Boggess would live for
the rest of her life.
She and her husband lived in a few different places
in Pomona before settling in 1946 at their final home,
located on nearly an acre in north Claremont. The land
was in a lemon grove so the yard was packed with
lemon trees, but she longed for a garden she could
make her own. Mr. Boggess knew a thing or two
about trees, having co-founded B & R Tree Service a
few years earlier. He landscaped the yard for his wife,
allowing her to plant a variety of fruit trees. Margaret
also created an expansive garden, featuring masses of
roses and tulips, as well as a sizeable vegetable patch.
She loved to see gardens and gardeners the world
over and would marvel at the similarities and differ-
ences and just revel in the sheer beauty of nature, her
granddaughter Margaret ONeill shared. When talk-
ing about the differences in gardening styles, she
would always remark, Thats why they make choco-
late and vanilla ice cream. Everybody likes something
different.
Having lived through the Depression, Mrs. Boggess
let nothing go to waste. She canned tomatoes, made
her own applesauce and was famous for her jams and
jellies, featuring homegrown ingredients like apricots,
pomegranates and blackberries.
Anything that grew on the property got canned, so
to speak, her grandson Steven Felschundneff said.
And anyone who ventured on the property at the
right time of year left with a jar of jam and maybe a jar
of pickles.
Mr. Felschundneff fondly recalls her bread and but-
ter pickles as well as her wicked stuffing and baked
goods.
She would bake bread every week, he said. That
warm bread with butter was the best thing in the
world.
Mrs. Boggess had an uncanny way of remembering
the favorite pies of her friends and relatives. On their
birthdays, Mr. Felschundneff and his sister Theresa
knew they could count on their grandmother preparing
a fresh-from-scratch pie, coconut cream and cherry,
respectively.
Mrs. Boggess, who insisted handwork is a
womans sanity, also spent a great deal of time knit-
ting and sewing. She made handmade clothes for her
children and grandchildren and continued to knit pro-
lifically into her late 90s. Over the years, she turned
out dozens of knitted washcloths to sell at the Pilgrim
Place Festival and countless beanies to help warm the
premature babies at a local hospital.
While she enjoyed many traditionally feminine pur-
suits, Mrs. Boggess had a bit of snap to her.
She was a very poised woman but, as she used to
say, she loved a beer straight from the can now and
then, Ms. ONeill shared. And she was a stubborn
woman. Grandma was a sweetheart, but she always
stood up for what was right.
With her quick wit, striking blue eyes, beautiful
smile and vivacious personality, Mrs. Boggess left a
lasting impression on everyone who met her.
Mrs. Boggess zest for life was especially remark-
able because she endured so many losses over the
years. The first of the Boggesses children, David, died
as an infant. They had a son, Johnny and a daughter,
Janice, who passed away in their teens in the 1950s.
Mrs. Boggess was widowed in 1965 and eventually
outlived her daughters Joan and Jane, as well as her
teenaged granddaughter Gretchen.
She just soldiered on. That was part of her charac-
ter, Ms. ONeill said.
Joan, a longtime Claremont resident, was a well-
loved and respected science teacher whose service at
Claremont schools earned her a Teacher of the Year
award. Jane spent many years traveling and had a dis-
tinguished career in the family planning field. Both
were known for having inherited their mothers fierce
independence.
They were called The Damn Boggess Women,
and it wasnt always meant as a compliment, Ms.
ONeill laughed. But they always took it as a compli-
ment. They were a force to be reckoned withmovers
and shakers in their own way.
Mrs. Boggess also passed on her love of all things
culinary, and enjoyed nothing so much as cooking
with her daughters. Joan died in 1999 and Jane died in
2004.
B & R Tree Service came to thrive, servicing many
of the street trees in Claremont as well as doing much
of the tree work for the Claremont Colleges. They also
worked to help clear the trees for the Mt. Baldy ski
lift. Mrs. Boggess served on the city of Claremonts
tree committee for many years, putting her arboreal
expertise to good use.
After Clayton died in 1965, the homemaker turned
businesswoman. Margaret ran the tree service until
she retired in 1979. Her leadership in a male-domi-
nated field was an unusual feat for the time.
She spent her retirement traveling, gardening, bak-
ing, cooking, knitting and sewing. She continued can-
ning the many fruits that she grew in her groves and
made homemade jam and pies until the last few years
of her life. Mrs. Boggess, who had a recurring dream
of flying with the birds, was also an amateur bird-
watcher. She loved hearing the mourning doves and
always waited eagerly for the mockingbirds to begin
calling in the spring.
She was a woman of the earth, Ms. ONeill said.
She was a dedicated grandmother, always interested
in the lives of the young people around her.
She lit up when talking about her grandchildren
and great-grandchildren and their many activities and
accomplishments, Ms. ONeill said.
Mrs. Boggess home provided an idyllic refuge for
her grand- and great-grandchildren. It was a small
farm, surrounded by citrus groves, and home to rab-
bits, goats, chickens and peafowl. She also found
room to house various relatives horses and ponies.
There was space to wander and a blackberry vine beg-
ging to be harvested.
Mrs. Boggess was a woman of many interests, her
grandchildren shared. She was very involved in all of
the doings of the Claremont United Church of Christ,
serving on the flower committee among other groups
and volunteering for Meals on Wheels. In her younger
years, she was a Girl Scout troop leader. She enjoyed
listening to classical music, pored through the newspa-
per every day and tuned into informative TV programs
like the MacNeil News Hour and Huell Howsers
California Gold! She was especially interested in
news about agriculture and farmers the world over.
In 1987, Mrs. Boggess became seriously ill. Mr.
Felschundneff remembers his mom connecting with
the entire family via telephone, telling them to prepare
for the worst.
She said, Grandmas in the hospital and shes not
going to make it, Mr. Felschundneff remembered.
As it turned out, she outlived all the people making
those calls.
In her last days, Mrs. Boggess, who celebrated her
100th birthday at the Los Angeles County Fair, de-
rived great pleasure from being around her grandchil-
dren, great-grandchildren and many friends. She was a
constant inspiration, according to family.
I was always amazed at the number of people that
would call or drop by her home of 68 years and tell
about times when Margaret helped them when they
were in need, either with a meal on the table, a listen-
ing ear or advice that was genuine and from the heart,
Ms. ONeill said. She is a woman who made an im-
pression on so many livesa mother and mentor to
many in her own family and beyond. She will be
dearly missed.
Mrs. Boggess is survived by three grandchildren,
Theresa Darrass and her husband David, Margaret
ONeill and Steven Felschundneff and his wife Grace
as well as by his nephew and his wife, Richard and
Barbara Miller. She also leaves four great-grandchil-
dren: Niko, Hannah, Josh and Jasmine.
A memorial service for Mrs. Boggess will be held
on Saturday, May 24 at 2 p.m. at the Kingman Chapel
of the Claremont United Church of Christ, located at
233 Harrison Ave. in Claremont. A reception will fol-
low at the house of her grandson Steven. All are wel-
come to attend.
Margaret Boggess
Loving matriarch and friend, passionate gardener
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 13
OBITUARIES
Once a week in print. Every day online.
www.claremont-courier.com
Of course, we cover Claremont news 24/7
C
our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Summer Opportunities 2014 14
One-on-one One-on-one ART LESSONS ART LESSONS
for junior high and high school for junior high and high school
students students! ! Call Call 626-224-7915, 626-224-7915,
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THE COLONY AT LOFT 204 THE COLONY AT LOFT 204, ,
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the Claremont Packing House. the Claremont Packing House.
SPORTS EDUCATION ART COOKING SWIMMING THEATER CAMP
Claremont COURIER/Summer Opportunities 2014 15
Claremont COURIER/Summer Opportunities 2014 16
C
laremont High School pitcher Tyler
Witt was determined to avoid a
Charter Oak comeback Tuesday.
With the final out called at the bottom of the seventh
inning, the Wolfpack broke their 8-game losing streak
and defeated the Chargers, 5-4 at Charter Oak High. De-
spite five errors, they ripped 11 hits with a batting aver-
age was .393.
(During the game) I was thinking, Lets end this sea-
son strong. Lets change the thought of this season, Witt
said.
Witts ERA was 2.00 and had five strikeouts.
After an early blow in the second inning when a Char-
ter Oak batter had a successful hit to center field, 2-0, it
was an uphill battle for the Wolfpack to make an impact.
Sophomore outfielder Cameron Dyar-Place led the
charge in the fifth inning with a successful bunt.
After the Chargers were confused over a miscommu-
nication, Dyar-Place stole second with the Wolfpack tak-
ing the lead, 3-2.
Dyar-Place was close to putting scores on the board in
the third inninghe stole third to have freshman infielder
Jake Gentry hit him homebut the Pack showed hesita-
tion both on base and the in the box. But Dyar-Place was-
nt going let this opportunity slip the second time.
At the fifth inning, I was thinking, Im not going to
mess this up, Dyar-Place said. Then the momentum
was building and the hits were contagious.
The Chargers remained active as Ian Evans scored
from second base, making it 3-3. While remaining vigi-
lant, senior shortstop Jonathan Vance said the Wolfpacks
infield play was not the best during the game.
However, the Wolfpack still made key defensive plays,
from Vances bounce catch to Witts quick throw to first
when the ball was bunted toward third base. Witt said it
was instinct to turn sharp and get the out.
The outfield received much of the action, including
junior outfielder Jeremiah Maldonados big catch in the
third inning.
With the score still tied in the sixth, Vance belted a hit
to right field and made it to third base. Fans were cheer-
ing again as Dyar-Place took his turn in the batters box.
After hitting a blooper to left field, Dyar-Place brought
Vance home for a 4-3 edge. Vance said this season has
been rough, but after ending it on a high note, there is
hope that they can make a stronger impact next year.
We had to show them (Chargers) that were good
enough to be in this league. We are good enough to com-
pete, Vance said.
Alex Forbess
sports@claremont-courier.com
SPORTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 17
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
ABOVE: Claremont High School pitcher Tyler Witt delivers during the first inning of the Packs away game
against Charter Oak in Covina. Witt earned a win, 5-4, thanks to some good hitting and some good luck late
in the game.
BELOWLEFT: TheCHS varsity baseball team celebrates their narrow victory over Charter Oak. The victory
brings their record to 3-11 in league and 4-21 overall.
BELOW RIGHT: CHS sophomore Jack Pavlisin fields a pop fly late in the game. Though Pavlisin caught this
fly, fielding errors plagued the Wolfpack during Tuesdays outing.
CHS baseball holds on to end season on high note
I
ts the highlight of a
34-year career, she
said. I couldnt be
more humbled or honored.
For Ms. Plumley, excelling as a teacher
starts with loving what you do. Third
graders, whom she has taught for 20 years,
are among her favorite pupils.
Theyre eager to learn, Ms. Plumley
explained. They generally enter third
grade knowing how to read already, so
they are reading to learn. I can provide a
rich curriculum they can reach through
reading and experiments and hands-on ac-
tivities that they enjoy.
Ms. Plumley has been so passionate
about teaching elementary school that the
vocation has become a family affair. Her
daughter Alisha Plumley is now teaching
second grade at Sumner Elementary
School.
Ms. Plumley began her teaching career
at Vista Elementary School in Claremont
in 1980, while earning her teaching cre-
dential at Cal Poly Pomona. At the time,
the college offered an internship program
where a developing teacher could spend
an entire year in a classroom and be paid
minimum wage.
The following October, a Mountain
View teacher retired and Ms. Plumley
stepped into the second grade class for the
rest of the year. The next school year, then
Vista Principal Duane Jackman asked her
to return to the school site, where she re-
mained for 10 years.
Because Ms. Plumley was a job-share
teacher, collaborating with another in-
structor, she had time to juggle work and
the raising of Alisha and her brother
Nathan.
My children went to Chino schools.
And I got to be a room mom for them,
Ms. Plumley shared.
After her tenure at Vista was over, she
found a home at Sumner Elementary
School. One of the reasons she appreciates
Sumner is because of its unique relation-
ship with the adjoining Danbury campus.
Danbury is the home school for some 75
students from preschool through sixth
grade who have physical disabilities or
health impairments.
Our students are exposed to a diverse
group of children, and they learn to be em-
pathetic and understanding of one an-
other, Ms. Plumley said. They dont just
accept differences, they embrace them.
Asked what Sumner event she looks
forward to year after year, Ms. Plumley
didnt hesitate to cite the schools Pioneer
Day, held each March.
Its a pet thing I enjoy coming back to,
she explained. Its about helping students
understand what life was like long ago.
Children get to experience candle-dipping,
cross-stitching, square dancingall kinds
of activities. We end with a chuck wagon
lunch, and then the kids wash the tin pans
and dishes themselves.
Like all teachers in the CUSD, Ms.
Plumley is in the midst of transitioning her
curriculum to reflect the new Common
Core standards. Three teachers trained in
the use of iPads and are helping mentor
Ms. Plumleys students, who will be soon
taking their annual assessments online.
Change is always a little tough, and Ms.
Plumley admits that she and her fellow ed-
ucators are learning as we go. Making
the new system work will take a collabo-
rative effort. She does, however, see posi-
tive potential in the new standards.
Im very excited to embrace the Com-
mon Core in that I believe it hands the cur-
riculum planning and the creative aspect
of how you want to go about teaching back
to the teachers, Ms. Plumley said.
Common Core covers less standards
and expects students to delve deeper
and be more critical thinkersto be able
to demonstrate what they know in multi-
ple ways, she continued. Itll be a
whole new approach as opposed to
filling in bubbles.
Ms. Plumley emphasized that she has
no complaints about her career of choice.
She does say, however, that there are
enormous demands on teachers in terms
of accountability and expectations, both
from district personnel and parents. Stu-
dents, too, are facing a sea change.
Kids havent changed all that much,
but they are certainly expected to do that
much more, Ms. Plumley said.
She marvels at the way kids adapt to the
new challenges of school.
They are willing to kind of go with the
flow, to follow where were going and
what direction were headed in, Ms.
Plumley said. Theyre going to be taking
a brand-new test on an iPad on a curricu-
lum thats new to them. Im just amazed
at their courage and resilience.
Patti Colinco, who has taught third
grade at Sumner with Ms. Plumley for
about six years, is the one who nominated
her for the Teacher of the Year honor.
Theres nobody more deserving of this
honor, and its probably quite overdue for
what shes done for our school and our dis-
trict, Ms. Colinco said. She has shown
exceptional dedication throughout her ca-
reer and she is the first to volunteer for
committees, whether its at the school or
district-wide.
Ms. Colinco said she also greatly ad-
mires her colleagues dedication to whole
child development.
Academically, her bar is set so high as
far as making sure children are prepared,
she said. But shes also the type of teacher
that goes to a childs baseball game or
dance recital. She gets to know children
and their families.
After her years of experience, Ms.
Plumley has some sage advice to offer to
aspiring teachers.
Find someone to connect with that re-
ally understands teaching and understands
children at the age you are teaching, she
said. Find a good person who helps you
feel good about what youre doing.
And teachers, Ms. Plumley empha-
sized, do a lot of good.
I think its a demanding job and if you
love what you do, it becomes your life
its never-ending, she said.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 18
TEACHER OF THE YEAR
continued from page 5
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
A banner in third grade teacher Patti Colincos classroom congratulates fellow third
grade teacher Debbie Plumley on her Teacher of the Year award. The teachers ro-
tate among the classrooms to impart their specialty fields, so Ms. Plumley was
teaching art to Ms. Colincos students.
I
n a world where everyone seems to be
striving for polished perfection, Ellen
and Ben Harper offer an engaging al-
ternative.
The mother-son duos collaborative album Child-
hood Home, released earlier this month, delivers a dose
of downhome reality, wrapped like a present in evoca-
tive Americana music.
The 10 tracks on the recording, which was released
on May 6, explore the ties that bind and break in every
heart and home.
A woman is sacrificed on The Alter of Love and
becomes another struggling single mother. A Farmers
Daughter sees the family homestead washed away by
the tide of agribusiness. And City of Dreams offers a
wistful look at the Inland Valley before citrus groves
were replaced by suburban sprawl.
In A House is a Home, their voices blend in the
kind of harmonies you can only get through genetics
and proximity as they sing about the way we all make
do.
A house is a home, even when its dark/even when
the grass is overgrown in the yard/even when the dog is
too old to bark/and when youre sitting at the table try-
ing not to starve. A house is a home, even when theres
ghosts/even when you gotta run from the ones who
love you most.
The album, which is Bens 16th record, is receiving
considerable media attention. It was touted on Rolling-
Stone.com, where visitors could listen to A House is a
Home in advance.
Ellen has joined Ben on his latest tour, performing a
few songs each night in venues throughout Europe, in-
cluding stops in England, France, Switzerland and
Italy.
A rock star collaborating with his mom is enough of
a novelty that the media has come calling. The pair has
undertaken a number of national TV and radio appear-
ances, including spots on CBS This Morning and
WXPNs World Caf.
An internationally renowned musician who has gar-
nered three Grammies, Ben is pretty well used to the
attention. Ellen, however, a multi-instrumentalist who
spends much of her time behind the counter of Clare-
monts legendary Folk Music Center, tends to keep a
lower-profile. Her cover is blown now, but she is philo-
sophical.
Being in Rolling Stone is not gonna get me a fresh
coffee at Some Crust, Ellen joked in a recent inter-
view with the COURIER. However, it would be great
if the record and songs get the attention I feel they de-
serve. Rhino sure has a cool display. Thanks Rhino!
Thats the beauty of Claremont. Everyone is well
known for whatever it is they do, so its a level playing
field, she continued. I have seen Ben walk around
the Village and people just wave and say hello to him
and keep right on going, as if he graduated from Clare-
mont High School in 2007, not 1987. Unfazed. Thats
kind of what this record is about, I suppose. Having
somewhere like Claremont in your life.
However far Ben may roam, he is deeply rooted in
Claremont. His grandparents, Charles and Dorothy
Chase, founded The Folk Music Center in the late
1950s. Their daughter Ellen grew up surrounded by a
wealth of instruments and learned to play many, from
guitar to ukulele to piano, with skill.
She was a single mother and so her kids, which in-
clude author Joel Harper and sculptor Peter Harper
both apt musicians themselvesgrew up at the local
music hub. Ben says his mother was always a musical
inspiration.
I spent my entire youth rifling through my moms
record collection, scarring and scratching the vinyl for
life, he joked. She never said I couldnt. Whenever
she would start working on her own music, playing her
guitar and singing, I was singing right along with
herand loudly.
She never even one time told me I couldnt, never
once said stop, he continued. She even let me and
my pal Yo draw a giant WHO concert right on my bed-
room wall! So thanks, Ma.
With music as a shared passion, it was inevitable that
Ellen and Ben would collaborate on an album. It took a
while, though.
For me, the process was in the making for 17 years
at least. As Ben said, We had a lifetime of production
for this album, Ellen said. When we did decide the
time was right, it flowed smoothly and quickly. The
album was recorded in 12 days. When I walked into
the studio, Ben was at the piano playing Born to Love
You. I sat down on the piano bench and we were in the
vocal booth in less than an hour.
The process was completely unforced, Ben
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 19
FOLLK MUSIC FESTIVAL/page 26
Harpers return to their Childhood Home with album, performance
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Ellen Harper, seen here at the Folk Music Center, will
perform with her son Ben at this years Folk Festival.
CALENDAR
Performing arts
Vargas Conservatory of Music
presents a student recital.
Page 22
Friday, May 16 through Saturday, May 24
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 20
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeks
concerts include Fab 8 (Beatles cover)
at the Public Plaza, Ultimate Vibe
(rock) at the chamber and Rushingwind
Project (Native American) at city hall.
ASTRONOMYPomona Valley Am-
ateur Astronomers present speaker
Vatche Sahakian, professor of physics
at Harvey Mudd Colleg. The title of
his talk is Peeking Under the Cosmic
Veil. He will speak about the recent
discovery of evidence of gravitational
waves in the cosmic microwave back-
ground and its impact on inflation
theory. 7:30 p.m. PVAA meetings are
in Harvey Mudd Colleges Beckman
Hall, 1250 Dartmouth Ave., with
parking on Dartmouth Avenue, 12th
Street or off Foothill Boulevard.
Beckman Hall is located west
of Galileo Hall in the same building.
Contact info@pvaa.us or visit pvaa.us.
FARM VOLUNTEER HOURS All
ages and skill levels are welcome to as-
sist at the Pomona College Organic
Farm. Staff will be on hand to direct a
work project, and volunteers are wel-
come to take home produce. 10 a.m. to
noon. Pomona College Organic Farm,
130 Amherst Ave., Claremont. Contact
(909) 607-8341 or farm@pomona.edu
or visit farm.pomona.edu.
ART LESSONS FOR KIDS An art
program co-hosted by the Claremont
High School Art Club and the Clare-
mont Library. Participants will use
shading and complementary colors to
create a geometric landscape. Sign-ups
are required. Visit the Childrens Desk
for more information. 2 to 3 p.m. This
program is for grades 3 through 5. Free
and open to the public. Claremont Li-
brary, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.
(909) 621-4902.
ART EXHIBITIONClaremont Her-
itage presents Underwood & Under-
woodIntersection: The Art and
Architecture of Martha and S. David
Underwood. A silent auction will be
held featuring original artwork, giclees
and lithographs by Martha Underwood
and other Claremont artists to benefit
Claremont Heritage educational pro-
grams. 6 to 8 p.m. Ginger Elliott Exhi-
bition Space at the Garner House in
Memorial Park, 840 N. Indian Hill
Blvd., Claremont.
LIVE JAZZ performance by Polyhe-
dra on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665
E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. (909)
946-1398.
LEISURE LIVING of Claremont cel-
ebrates its two-year anniversary with
tours of the residential care facility for
the elderly, a raffle, plus food and
drinks. Free and open to the public. 3
to 6 p.m. 1738 Finecroft Dr., Clare-
mont. (626) 622-7296.
INTRO TO BELLYDANCE Learn
how to bellydance. Bring a yoga mat
and water. Must be over 17 years old.
5:15 to 6:15 p.m. $10. Buddhamouse
Emporium, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont.
SAN ANDREAS FAULT Kathleen
Springer of the San Bernardino
County Museum will talk about earth-
quake predictions and preparedness.
Buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. for $13 or
dessert and coffee for $6. The Univer-
sity Club meets Tuesdays at the
Hughes Community Center, 1700
Danbury Rd., Claremont.
CLAREMONT SUNRISE ROTARY
will be presenting a check in the
amount of $9000 to the Claremont
Youth Sports Committee, which will be
used to either purchase new equipment,
cover transportation costs and/or finan-
cially assist a youth who cannot afford
to play sports due to economic hard-
ship. These funds are a result of Clare-
mont Sunrise Rotary fundraising
efforts through the annual Turkey Trot
5k fun run on Thanksgiving morning.
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page
May
Friday 16
May
Saturday 17
May
Sunday 18
May
Monday 19
May
Tuesday 20
Claremont kids
Fun reading and activities for
children and family.
Page 28
7 p.m. at the Hughes Center, 1700 Dan-
bury Rd., Claremont.
COMPUTER CLUB presents So
You Got a New Computer, Now
What? The Claremont Senior Com-
puter Club meets on Tuesday evenings
at the Hughes Community Center at
1700 Danbury Rd. Meetings begin at
7:30 p.m. cscclub.org.
PETTERSON MUSEUM of Intercul-
tural Art at Pilgrim Place will honor Alba
Honor Cisneros at 5 p.m. for her mosaic
artwork entitled, Japanese Crane,
which has adorned the front of the mu-
seum since 1986. Ms. Cisneros was
born and raised in Claremont and has
been making art since her early years at
Sycamore Elementary School through
her time at Pitzer College in the early
1970s. She then spent 17 years working
in the mosaic studios of Millard Sheets
and Denis OConnor. Ms. Cisneros is
now a self-employed artist working in
her own studio and for Land Design in
Pomona, a landscape architecture office
where she has been a designer for more
than 25 years. While working with Mil-
lard Sheets, Denis OConnor and Sue
Hertel, among others, Ms. Cisneros
helped complete more than 80 large-
scale mosaic murals for Home Savings
and Loan of America. Ms. Cisneros has
also designed and fabricated mosaic ta-
bles, signs and logos for various busi-
nesses, churches and private residences.
Her other creative endeavors include
stained glass, ceramics, quilted fabric
panels, drawings and various other
mediums. 5 to 7 p.m. 625 Mayflower
Rd., Claremont. (909) 399-5511.
CONCERT Claremont Unified
School District instrumental music stu-
dents in fourth through twelfth grades
will perform two concerts at the El
Roble Intermediate School gym. The
strings and orchestra students concert
will take place on Wednesday, May 21
followed by the band and percussion
students concert on Thursday, May 22.
Both concerts will begin at 7 p.m. and
are open to the public free of charge.
WINE INDULGENCE SERIES
Guests are invited to taste and learn
with Graham Chadwich from DVF
Winery. 7 to 9 p.m. $10. Guests must
be 21 and over. Vom Fass, 101 N. In-
dian Hill Blvd., Claremont.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll through
the Village and listen to free, live music
from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeks concerts in-
clude Claremont Voodoo Society (blues)
at the Public Plaza and Amanda Castro
Band (blues/swing) at the chamber.
FARM VOLUNTEER HOURS All
ages and skill levels are welcome to as-
sist at the Pomona College Organic
Farm. Staff will be on hand to direct a
work project, and volunteers are wel-
come to take home produce. 10 a.m. to
noon. Pomona College Organic Farm,
130 Amherst Ave., Claremont. Contact
(909) 607-8341 or farm@pomona.edu
or visit farm.pomona.edu.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 21
9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page
May
Thursday 22
May
Wednesday 21
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Cori Griffin-Ruiz, center, leads a full moon prayer circle with her friends Jehan Izhar, left,
and James Jolicoeur on Wednesday at Memorial Park. The trio were praying for the safe
return of the nearly 300 schoolgirls who have reportedly been kidnapped by an Islamic
group in Nigeria. According to Ms. Griffin-Ruiz, the goal of the prayer was to, Join hands
and let the parents and children know that they are not alone. Ms. Griffin-Ruiz has ob-
tained a city permit for the full moon prayer circle and plans to hold another next month.
May
Friday 23
May
Saturday 24
BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way,
Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 607-1139.
Purchase tickets online; choose seats at
pomona.edu/bridges.
Friday and Saturday, May 30 and 31: Claremont
High School Theatre presents Shrek The Musical.
Join our unlikely hero and his loyal steed Donkey as
they embark on a quest to rescue the beautiful (if
slightly temperamental) Princess Fiona from a fire-
breathing, lovesick dragon. Add the diminutive Lord
Farquaad, a gang of fairytale misfits and a biscuit
with attitude, and youve got the biggest, brightest
musical comedy around. Show times are May 30 at
7:30 p.m. and May 31 at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets are
$8 for children, $10 for students/seniors and $15 for
general admission. For more information, contact
(909) 624-9053 ext. 30463. Tickets are available only
through Claremont High School ASB store. Visit
chstheatre.cusd.claremont.edu.
LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural
Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call (909) 477-
2752 or visit lewisfamilyplayhouse.com.
Saturday, May 31: Steppin Out with Ben Vereen.
$65. 8 p.m.
SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona Col-
lege, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office
is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to
4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call (909)
607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu.
May 23 through June 1: Ophelias Jump presents
Eurydice by Sarah Ruhl. Under the affectionate
tutelage of her father, Eurydice regains her memo-
ries of earthly love. But when Orpheus channels
down to retrieve her, after firing off a barrage of
love letters from above, she has to choose between
her husband and her father. Showtimes are Fridays
at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 3 and 8 p.m. and Sunday at
4 p.m. General admission is $25 or $22 for stu-
dents/seniors. Group discounts are also available.
Visit opheliasjump.org or call (909) 624-1464.
PERFORMING ARTS
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertain-
ment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before
publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone
number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email:
calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761.
Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd.,
Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee
that items submitted will be published.
Image courtesy of the Vargas Conservatory of Music
Guests gather at Hip Kitty during last years Vargas
Conservatory of Music student recital.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 22
T
he Vargas Conservatory of Music
will host its second annual student
piano recital. After the success of
last years event, the Vargas Conserva-
tory of Music will return to the Hip Kitty
at the Claremont Packing House, this
time with two segments of the program
with an intermission in between.
Beginner students will be featured in the first seg-
ment from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. and advanced students
will be featured in the second segment, from 4 to 6
p.m. The event is held at Hip Kitty Jazz and Fondue,
which is located at 502 W. First St., Claremont in the
Packing House.
Students may attend for free, but due to the pop-
ular demand of the recital, the event is introducing
a ticketing system to ensure that there is sufficient
space for all who RSVP in advance.
Tickets can be purchased at http://bit.ly/1mvStXI
for the beginner segment and http://bit.ly/1njlVgK
for the advanced segment.
The Vargas Conservatory of Music provides pri-
vate lessons in a relaxed and encouraging environ-
ment at the Claremont Packing House. Piano lessons
help to establish the basic foundation of music. Stu-
dents learn the fundamentals of music theory, to read
and analyze music including a wide-ranging reper-
toire of classical, jazz and popular music.
The organization prides itself on providing a fun
learning approach that inspires and motivates.
Lessons are for students of all ages and is located
upstairs in the Packing House at 532 W. First St.,
Claremont.
Vargas Conservatory of Music
to showcase student talent
OUR TOWN
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 24
COURIER CROSSWORD
Across
1. Casting requirement?
4. Claremont professor who is on
the California Board of
Education, Carl ____
8. Fulbright advisor for Pitzer
College, Dr. Nigel _____
13. Before
14. Go around
16. Keats poem
17. Baglike structure
18. Release
19. Fancy tie
20. Cream stuffed pastry
22. Socrates and Plato, for two
24. Mooring places
25. Tiger's walking areas
26. Salamander
27. Propositions
29. Point
32. Philosophies
34. Winter wear
36. Proof of purchase
39. Someone who is the first to
observe something
41. "Cheers" alternative, in a letter
42. Play in the N.H.L.
43. Sign off
44. Back problem
47. Dethrone
51. Vista Del Valle School librarian
who recently retired, Cindy ___
52. Of the eyes
54. The real thing
57. Bad sound in the engine
58. Set off
59. Construction piece
61. It's charged
62. Hindu queen
63. Vise device
64. Carnaby Street type of the '60s
65. Dig discovery: var.
66. Flight data, briefly
67. "___ Man of Mine"
(Shania Twain song)
Down
1. Stitched anew
2. Spinach like plant
3. Remove the nails from, as a cat
4. Hollywood, ___
5. Go past the acceptable limit
6. All the rage
7. Fusses
8. Fungal disease of plants
9. Haven
10. Gym site
11. "The _____ King"
12. Takes in
15. Actress Day of
"The Pajama Game"
21. More stylized, maybe
23. Course setting: Abbr.
28. Headgear
29. A kind of gallery
30. Cold War president,
familiarly
31. Scuff
33. Analyzed closely
35. Dined at McDonald's
36. White alternative
37. Longest time span,
geologically
38. Cow chew
39. Water ___
40. Broad view
42. Capable of being stated
45. Time for a late lunch, maybe
46. Dig find
48. Word's last syllable
49. Locale for many a
western brawl
50. Cool
51. Evel Knievel for one
53. Pitches a tent
54. Autos
55. Brilliantly colored fish
56. Stick
60. Fast no more
Crossword by Myles
Mellor. Puzzle #263
Answers to last weeks puzzle #262
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a
restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. (909)
445-1200.
Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m.
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist
Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m.
Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Clare-
mont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through
Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday.
Hoppy Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909) 445-8875.
Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week.
Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month.
Thursday, May 22: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off
and Eureka Thursday Night Music with Craic Haus
(Irish pub/punk).
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont
Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 and 10
p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased online or at the door.
Friday, May 16: Jen Kober from The Mindy Proj-
ect. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 17: Jen Kober from The Mindy
Project. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 18: Two Milk Minimum at 4:30 p.m.
and First Timer Funnies with Nick Cobb at 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 22: First Timer Funnies with Luck
Ashlocke. 8 p.m.
Friday, May 23: Grant Cotter from MTV. 7 and
9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 24: Grant Cotter from MTV. 7 and
9:30 p.m.
FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave.,
Pomona. foxpomona.com.
Saturday, May 17: Scion Rock Fest with Machine
Head, High On Fire, Red Fang, Orchid, Crowbar, King
Buzzo, Midnight, BLAST, Speedwolf, Power Trip,
Coffins, Jex Thoth, Windhand, Exhumed, In Cold
Blood, Nekrogoblikon, Lord Dying, Hot Lunch, Aqua
Nebula, Oscillator, All Them Witches, Pins of Light,
Carousel, The Well, Big Business, Moab, and Black
Sheep Wall. 3 p.m. Tickets are free with RSVP.
Friday, June 6: Saosin. 9 p.m. $30-$32.50
GELENCSER HOUSE CONCERTS: gelencser-
houseconcerts.com. Directions given upon reservation,
(909) 596-1266 or singfolk@yahoo.com.
Saturday, June 21: John York. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, June 26: Trippin the Sixties featuring
Barry McGuirre and John York. $20. 7:30 p.m.
HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday,
5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission:
Two-drink minimum. Info: (909) 447-6700 or hipkit-
tyjazz.com.
Friday, May 16: Linnzi Zaorski (swing/lounge). 8
p.m. $5 cover charge.
Saturday, May 17: Flattop Tom and his Jump Cats
(jump blues/swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
Sunday, May 18: Sweet Heat World Beat & Latin
Rhythms (Latin/world). 7 p.m.
Tuesday, May 20: Beat Cinema presents Beat Battle
Vol. 7 (DJ). 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 21: Jam Night with Carl Bunch &
Friends (jazz). 8 p.m.
Thursday, May 22: The Will Jackson Group. 7 p.m.
Friday, May 23: Griff Hamlin and the Circle City
Horns (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
Saturday, May 24: Lil A and the Allnighters
(blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2
a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over
after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No
cover. (909) 625-4808.
Saturday, May 24: Desperation Squad (rock/
punk). 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 25: Piano Sunday with Patrick Var-
gas and Cinema Sundays, featuring Urgh! A Music
War (1981).
Tuesday, May 27: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 28: Wine Wednesday with music
by Joe Atman at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 29: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band
(jazz) at 8:30 p.m. and DJ Sebastian Karim
(dance/electro/soul/hip hop) at 11 p.m.
Friday, May 30: Technicolor Hearts (electro) and
Gina Roode (acoustic). 10 p.m.
Saturday, May 31: Blues Highway (blues/rock).
10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thurs-
day, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1
a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Sat-
urdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID).
(909) 547-4266.
Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas
and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band.
Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic or
jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rock-
stars. 9 p.m.
RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN:
1500 N. College Ave., Claremont in the California
Courtyard. Tickets: $6 for adult members, $3 for sen-
iors, students and children 3 to 12 years. Non-member
prices are $10 for adults, $5 for seniors, students and
children. Call 625-8767 or visit rsabg.org. Gates open
at 6 p.m., performances begin at 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 31: Ben and Ellen Harper headline
the 2014 Claremont Folk Festival. Various folk musi-
cians perform at the festival; art and food vendors will
also be present. Tickets are $40 to $125; children 12
and under may attend for free. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Visit
folkmusiccenter.com/folk-festival for more informa-
tion and ticket purchases.
NIGHTLIFE
Image courtesy of Craic Haus
Shamrockabilly band Craic Haus will perform at Eu-
reka Claremont on Thursday, May 22.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 25
RESTAURANT ROW
CALL MARYTODAY: 621-4761
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave.,
Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
buddhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322.
Through May 31: Cindy Rinnes Mapless,
mixed-media textile art.
BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254 W. Bonita
Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238.
Through May 31: Masquerade by Cheryl Book-
out and Drawings by Meme Ortega are featured for
the month of May.
CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Cham-
ber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
Through May 31: Sixth annual Claremont High
School Student Art Show.
CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First
St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday,
noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.;
and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. (909) 626-3066.
Through May 31: Relative Expressions: a Light-
hearted Exhibit, featuring the works of Elizabeth
Blackford Preston and Michael Blackford.
CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART: claremont
museum.org.
Through July 13: The Claremont Museum of Art
presents Steve Comba Arboretum in the gallery at
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College
Ave., Claremont, daily 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Garden ad-
mission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students,
$4 for children and free for CMA and RSABG mem-
bers. For more information, go to claremontmu-
seum.org. The Claremont Museum of Art exhibition
features Mr. Combas drawings, sketches, photo-
graphs and paintings that relate to and culminated in
the eight-foot painting, Arboretum. In 2011, the
artist devoted eight months to create the painting
using photos, sketches and studies from 1984 to the
present day. It is both an autobiographical journey
through his own work in landscape as well as a trea-
tise on the artificial nature of painting and the objec-
tive beauty of nature.
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St.,
#204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday
through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours
on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art
Walk until 9 p.m., with live music at 8 p.m. Visit
loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information
about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork dis-
play or to inquire about event rental of gallery space.
Call Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626) 963-4238 for
one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high
school age students.
Through May 31: Abandoned Fabric: Our Life,
an exhibition by Sumi Foley. As a child, Ms. Foley
would spend hours at her grandmothers house look-
ing through boxes of kimono scraps, gazing at the
textures and colors. Seeing her passion for fabric, her
grandmother taught young Sumi the art of sewing.
Years later, her grandmother decided to throw away
a bundle of old kimono fabric. Not able to bear the
thought of the beautiful fabric being discarded, Ms.
Foley decided to transform the abandoned fabrics,
full of beautiful designs and colors and turn them into
something new and beautiful.
GALERIA DE PROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211,
Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment.
Tuesdays: Tribe Tuesday, an open studio session
for artists to share the space and work on their pieces.
Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Space
is limited to 10 people per session. Call (909) 236-
1562 or visit facebook.com/galeriadeperolas.
Through May 31: 50/50 50 pieces under $50.
MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS &
CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412,
info@malooffoundation.org or malooffoundation.org.
Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays
and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam
Maloofs handmade home, furniture and the exten-
sive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to lim-
ited capacity, advance reservations are strongly
recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for
adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Dis-
covery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and
Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge.
Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden
features drought-tolerant plants native to California
and other parts of the world.
Through July 10: Sculpture in the Garden, fea-
turing works by 40 California artists in a range of ma-
terials including ceramic, metal, stone and other
media. Each sculpture is displayed in an outdoor set-
ting selected by its artist.
PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL
ART: 730 Plymouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Friday, Sat-
urday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections
of international fine art, folk art and material culture
from 10,000 BCE to the present, contributed by Pil-
grim Place residents and community friends, cover-
ing every continent. (909) 399-5544.
Through August 24: Lifestyles of the Rich and Fa-
mous: Chinese Luxury Goods of the Ming and Qing
Dynasties. Drawing on the Petterson Museums ex-
tensive collection of Chinese art and artifacts, they
will highlight prestige items used by the nobility and
wealthy civil servants during Chinas last two dynas-
ties, spanning the years between 1368-1912. The ex-
hibit will include silk robes, jewelry and costume
accessories, paintings, ivory, ceramic, lacquer and
metal artifacts once used by the ruling elite of China.
RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY:
1030 Columbia Ave., at 11th and Columbia Streets on
the Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sun-
day, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. (909)
607-3397 or scrippscollege.edu/williamson-gallery.
Through May 18: Misc. senior art exhibition.
SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Clare-
mont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or
by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait
Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks.
Call (909) 621-9091 or email info@squareigallery.com.
Through May 31: All About Claremont, water-
colors by Patrick Dooley. This show will features new
works focusing on the college campuses in this quaint
California town. Mr. Dooley has a large following for
his depictions of these now-famous colleges and their
tree-covered campuses.
GALLERIES
Image courtesy of Square i Gallery
All About Claremont, an exhibition of watercolors by Patrick Dooley, is on display at Square i Gallery through May 31.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 26
agreed. After the first few songs were down, the record
took a hold of a sound and character.
Ben told Rolling Stone he set out to produce Child-
hood Home like early Elvis, with all of the instruments
unplugged and unamplified.
I wouldnt say this record is lo-fi. Its sparse, and
theres a big difference between those two, Ellen said.
The value in this is that the songs, the lyrics and the vo-
cals, are at the forefront and all of the instrumentation is
in support of thisthe musicians keeping out of the way
as much as adding their part. Its quite a dance.
Ellen has, for years, been integral in planning The
Claremont Folk Festival. But though shes out of town,
not to worry. The show, set for Saturday, May 31 at the
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, will go on. Local tal-
ent buyer Robin Young, Claremonters Brian DAm-
brosia Donner and Cindy Eiland have been on the job,
making sure this years festival goes off without a hitch.
Ben and Ellen will be showcasing their new material
at the event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets,
which cost $40 to $125, can be purchased on the Folk
Music Center website (www.folkmusiccenter.com/folk-
festival).
Other performers scheduled to take the stage at the
folk music extravaganza include Very Special Musical
Guests, Dave Alvin & The Guilty Ones, The Gonzalo
Bergara Quartet, The Coals, The Chapin Sisters and The
Ooks of Hazzard. Also making a joyful noise will be the
performers Blue Highway, Steve James, Rich Shea,
Ross Altman, Peter Harper, Phoebe Bridgers and Old
Brown Shoe.
Peter Harper is focusing increasingly on his music,
singing and playing original music on the 4-string tenor
guitar. Like his mother and brothers, Joe Harper has been
similarly sponge-like, soaking up musical acumen from
his creative childhood environment.
With this in mind, the COURIER asked whether there
would ever be an album with musical input from the en-
tire Harper brood.
I wonder what it would sound like? Ellen pondered.
Ben noted that the Harper family has grown with the
addition of a number of grandkids.
Maybe it would have to be a choir, he said. Big
Band? Folkestra.
Whatever you call it, it is certain that the Harpers will
continue making music that comes from the heart and
from the home.
The Claremont Folk Music Festival along with the
Folk Music Center are still thriving and serving the com-
munity, Ben noted. Without Dot and Charles, none of
this is possible. Not this interview, not the record mom
and I made, not the festival, not the music store and not
Claremont having such a rich cultural heritage. So thank
you, Dorothy and Charles Chase. Without both of you,
its just a ton of silence.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
COURIERarchive photo
Ben Harper, performing here at the Claremont Folk Mu-
sic Centers 50th anniversary party in 2008, has re-
cently released an album with his mother, Ellen Harper.
FOLK MUSIC FESTIVAL/continued from page 19
College commencement speakers range
from politicians to business mavens
B
elieve it or not, graduation from
the various colleges in Claremont
is upon us. The prestigious collec-
tion of schools has lined up a varied and
impressive array of speakers. Details
about the commencements and their re-
spective honored guests are listed below.
Claremont Graduate University
Claremont Graduate University will hold its 87th
Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, May 17 at
9 a.m. in the Mudd Quadrangle, loated at 170 E.
Tenth Street in Claremont.
Two powerhouse women will be on hand to re-
ceive honorary degrees and speak.
These include Andrea Bertozzi, a world-class ap-
plied mathematician with years of distinguished per-
formance as a teacher, scholar and leader in her field.
Recently named UCLAs Betsy Wood Knapp Chair
for Innovation and Creativity, she also chairs the sci-
ence board of the National Science Foundations In-
stitute for Computational and Experimental Research
in Mathematics at Brown University.
The second distinguished guest is Sherry Lansing,
a former actress and former CEO of Paramount Pic-
tures. As president of production at 20th Century
Fox, she was the first woman to head a Hollywood
studio. Six of Paramounts 10 highest-grossing films
were released during her tenure.
Claremont Lincoln University
Claremont Lincoln Universitywhich nurtures
future leaders skilled in fostering interfaith coopera-
tionwill have its convocation on Tuesday, May 20
at 4 p.m. The ceremony will feature hip hop magnate
Russell Simmons as keynote speaker.
Mr. Simmons co-founded the influential hip hop
music label Def Jam which, under his leadership, re-
leased music by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, the
Beastie Boys and Warren G, among others.
Mr. Simmons also created the fashion lines Phat
Farm, Argyleculture and American Classics. Noted
as one of the wealthiest people in hip hop, he is in-
volved in philanthropic efforts around the world.
He has written widely about ethical business prac-
tices, including co-authoring the book Rich: A
Guide to Having it All, which espouses giving as a
lifestyle choice.
The Claremont Lincoln convocation will be held
at Garrison Theater, 231 E. 10th St. in Claremont.
The event is free and open to the public, but reser-
vations are required.
Harvey Mudd College
With Harvey Mudd College awarding more engi-
neering degrees to women than men for the first time,
the star of the schools 56th commencementset for
Sunday, May 18is really a percentage. Fifty-six
percent of HMCs newly-minted engineers are fe-
male.
Evolutionary Biologist Beth Shapiro will take cen-
ter stage as keynote speaker, address some of the na-
tions most gifted engineering, science and
mathematics graduates when she delivers the
keynote address.
Ms. Shapiro, co-author of the textbook Ancient
DNA: Methods and Protocols, is associate profes-
sor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Univer-
sity of California Santa Cruz. With her specialty in
the genetics of ice age animals, she has traveled ex-
tensively through the Arctic regions of Alaska,
Siberia and Canada.
The commencement ceremony will be held at 1:30
p.m. at the Harvey S. Mudd Quadrangle on the Har-
vey Mudd campus, located at 301 Platt Blvd. in
Claremont. It will also be streamed live on the HMC
website.
Keck Graduate Institute
The Keck Graduate Institute will welcome the
Honorable Bob Kerrey, former US senator and gov-
ernor of Nebraska, as the keynote speaker for its
2014 commencement, set for Saturday, May 17 at 11
a.m.
Senator Kerrey is the managing director at the pri-
vately-held boutique investment bank Allen and
Company and serves as executive chairman of the
Minerva Institute for Research and Scholarship, sup-
porting the Minerva Project. KGI has partnered with
the Minerva Project to create Minerva Schools at
KGI, a program that a KGI release says will offer a
unique undergraduate education to some of the
worlds brightest and most motivated students.
Senator Kerrey, who is the author of the 2002
memoir When I Was A Young Man, served as a US
Navy SEAL during the Vietnam War, during which
time he was wounded. He received the Medal Of
Honor for his heroism in combat.
The commencement will take place on the east
lawn of Keck Graduate Institute, located at 525 Wat-
son Dr. in Claremont.
Pitzer College
Members of the Pitzer College Class of 2014 will
be sent on their way with words of inspiration from
civil rights activist and CNN correspondent Van
Jones during the schools upcoming commencement,
set for Saturday, May 17 at 10 a.m. at the Stephen L.
Glass Commencement Plaza.
The ceremony, which will be broadcast live at
www.pitzer.edu/commencement/live, is kind of a big
deal, because it is the schools 50th annual com-
mencement. With this in mind, the college has made
sure it obtains a particularly accomplished keynote
speaker.
Mr. Jones, who was recently named a co-host on
CNNs Crossfire, was a primary advocate for the
Green Jobs Act signed into law by President George
W. Bush in 2007. In 2009, he joined the Obama Ad-
ministration as the green jobs adviser.
He is also president and co-founder of Rebuild the
Dream, a nonprofit that strives to innovate grass-
roots, people-powered solutions to help repair the
US economy. He also founded Green For All, an or-
ganization aimed at developing green jobs in under-
served communities. The indomitable Mr. Jones has
also created two social justice organizations, the Ella
Baker Center for Human Rights and Colo-
rOfChange.org. He is the author of two New York
Times bestsellers, The Green Collar Economy and
Rebuild the Dream.
Pitzer College is located at 1050 N. Mills Ave. in
Claremont. The live webcast begins at 9:45 a.m. and
will be viewable at www.pitzer.edu.
Pomona College
Pomona College has arranged for three notable
speakers to inspire graduates at the schools 121st
commencement exercises, set for Sunday, May 18 at
10 a.m. The ceremony will be held in Marston Quad-
rangle, located between Fourth and Sixth streets in
Claremont.
Valerie B. Jarrett will take to the podium as
COMMENCEMENT/next page
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 27
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Torchbearer Bill Moremen smiles as he begins the trek across Mayflower Road as
residents of Pilgrim Place celebrate the opening ceremonies of their second an-
nual Senior Olympics on Monday at Pilgrim Place. The competition continued all
week with events like table tennis, aquatic fitness, freestyle walking, horseshoes
and a scooter challenge.
COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger
One of the events in this weeks second annual Pilgrim Place
Senior Olympics is table tennis. This single elimination tournament
was held on Wednesday and included Donna Blackstock during
the opening rounds. Ms. Blackstock went on to lose in the open-
ing round to fellow Pilgrim Place resident Chris Blackburn.
BELOW: Pilgrim Place Life Enhancement Coordinator Krista Ward,
center, leads Pilgrims in the wave during a pause in the table ten-
nis competion Wednesday.
keynote speaker for the 390 members of the Class of
2014. Ms. Jarrett, a Chicago lawyer, businesswoman
and civic leader, is senior adviser to President Barak
Obama.
Ms. Jarrett serves as Assistant to the President for
Public Liaison and Intergovernmental Affairs as well
as chairing the White House Council on Women and
Girls and the White House Office of Olympic, Para-
lympic and Youth Sport. She was an integral part of
President Obamas campaign and was co-chair of his
presidential transition team.
Three additional speakers will receive honorary de-
grees and enliven the commencement: Father Gregory
Boyle, who has dedicated his life to helping gang mem-
bers and former prisoners thrive; famed singer and con-
ductor Plcido Domingo; and Michael Starbird, a 1970
Pomona alumnus who is a professor of mathematics at
the University of Texas at Austin.
In 1992, Father Boyle founded Homeboy Industries,
a revolutionary program that offers intervention serv-
ices for high-risk youth, former gang members and peo-
ple who have recently been incarcerated. Homeboy
Industries, which serves 10,000 community members
every year, offers numerous free programs, including
tattoo removal, work training and employment serv-
ices, parenting classes, legal services, mental health
counseling for issues like substance abuse and anger
management and self-development courses such as
yoga and art.
Father Boyle is author of the best-selling memoir
Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Com-
passion.
The Marston Quadrangle will be alive with the sound
of music epitomized when Plcido Domingoan in-
ternationally acclaimed Spanish vocalist, composer and
conductorspeaks to the slew of grads, dads and other
relatives.
Mr. Domingo is one of The Three Tenors, a venera-
ble group that also includes opera singers Jos Carreras
and Luciano Pavarotti. Throughout his decades-long
career, he has performed at myriad opera houses and
festivals and sung more than 144 roles, with his signa-
ture part being Mario Cavaradosi in Puccinis Tosca.
He has conducted more than 500 opera performances
and symphonic concerts and released more than 100
recordings, for which he has earned a dozen Grammy
Awards.
The final speaker is a mover and shaker in the world
of mathematics who is proud to call Pomona College
his alma mater. Mr. Starbird, a University Distinguished
Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin,
was given the national teaching award by the Mathe-
matical Association of America in 2007.
No tickets are required for the ceremony, but you
should plan on getting there early because parking can
get tricky. You can also watch the entire ceremony from
home, because it will be live-streamed at
www.pomona.edu.
Pomona College is located at 333 N. College Way in
Claremont.
Scripps College
Global entrepreneur Nonie Creme, a Scripps College
alumna who has made a splash in the beauty business,
will serve as the keynote speaker for the schools upcom-
ing commencement, set for Saturday, May 17 at 5 p.m.
She will speak to the 232 students graduating from
the liberal arts womens college on Flying by the Seat
of Your Pants, but Flying Just the Same.
Ms. Creme, who graduated from Scripps in 1994, is
the founding creative director of the hugely successful
cosmetic company Butter London. She is now in the
midst of launching a new mass-market beauty line
called Nonie Creme-Colour Prevails, which will in-
clude beauty products of every ilk.
She is passionate in her message to all women, a
message that comes from her own story: Find your-
self, and then be yourself. Success and opportunity are
hidden in every facet of our lives, Scripps President
Lori Bettison-Varga said.
Tickets are not required for the commencement cer-
emony, which will take place on Elm Tree Lawn of the
Scripps College campus, 1030 Columbia Ave. in Clare-
mont. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis be-
ginning at 3:30 p.m.
Claremont School of Theology
Commencement for Claremont School of Theology
will be held on Tuesday, May 20 on the Kresge Chapel
lawn. The ceremony begins at 9 am., but guests are en-
couraged to begin arriving as soon as 8 a.m. Seating
will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. CST
is located at 1325 N. College Ave. in Claremont.
The Claremont School of Theology did not provide
information on the graduation ceremonies as of press
time.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
More complete accounts of commencement speakers
are available at www.claremont-courier.com.
COMMENCEMENT/from previous page
Let the games begin
Pilgrim Place hosts its second
annual Olympic Games
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 28
Undersea explorers find treasure trove in Ship of Gold
W
eve all heard tales of hidden
treasure, buried for years at
the bottom of the sea.
In what sounds like a storybook come to life,
Odyssey Marine Exploration, a company that exca-
vates deep-ocean shipwrecks, announced that they
have struck gold.
On April 15, the Odyssey team used a remotely-
operated underwater vehicle to retrieve more than 60
pounds of treasure from a sunken ship off the coast of
South Carolina. The booty included five gold bars and
two gold coins, valued at $1 billion.
As in many cases of undersea treasure, the story
begins with a tragedy.
In 1857, the S.S. Central America, a 280-foot
steamship, set out from California to New York.
Along with 600 people, the ship carried hun-
dreds of crates of gold bars and gold coins.
Because the voyage took place at the tail
end of the California Gold Rush,
many passengers had stowed
golden nuggets and coins in
their luggage.
The S.S. Central
America got caught in
a hurricane and sank,
leaving 425 people
dead. In 1998, a team
of explorers called the
Columbus-America
Discovery Group used
sonar technology to
find the long-lost ship,
which had come to
rest at a depth of 7,200
feet. Before legal dis-
putes derailed their efforts, they recovered about
$50 million in gold.
Twenty-five years later, Odyssey Marine Explo-
ration is back at the site. They will stay there
through late summer and hope to recover what ex-
perts estimate is $80 million in treasure still housed
in The Ship of Gold.
Its hard to know exactly how much gold may lie
in the ill-fated steamship, but the 41-member
Odyssey team intends to find out.
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com
P
ersis and Chuck New-
land, owners of the
Claremont healing cen-
ter Kindred Spirits, have some
pretty unusual pets. Actually,
they dont think of them as
pets but as friends who they
are helping out in a pinch.
Their one-acre Chino ranch is home
to chickens, rabbits, a couple of guinea
pigs and a growing number of tortoises
whose owners have abandoned them.
They have six African spur-thigh tor-
toises, the largest of which is an 80-
pound gentle giant named Digger.
They also have two California desert
tortoises the size of dinner plates.
The Newlands call their little farm
Wild Rock. There, they grow white
sagea plant some believe can purify
an areato sell at their store, along
with other herbs. They also have many
of fruit trees and a vegetable garden.
Those come in handy for the California
desert tortoises, which love to munch
on fruit and veggies. The African spur-
thigh tortoises, which include a mated
pair known as Mr. and Ms. and a little
lady named Lucy, eat a dry hay called
bromegrass.
Persis and Chuck believe it is impor-
tant to provide a sanctuary for tor-
toises, because
the reptiles face
so many chal-
lenges. African
spur-thigh tortoises are sold at many
pet stores and people go gaga for the
cute critters, who start out small
enough to fit in the palm of your hand.
But adult African spur-thighs average
three feet and can reach 100 pounds.
Many owners panic when their pet be-
gins to grow and grow, realizing they are
unable to care for such a large animal.
When we bring live things into our
space, we have to plan for the future,
Ms. Newland said.
California desert tortoises are endan-
gered, so they are no longer sold at pet
stores. When they come into contact
with humans, they get respiratory prob-
lems. So the two tortoise the Newlands
have taken in must be given medicine
for runny noses, gooey eyes and con-
gested lungs when they first wake up
in the spring.
The African spur-thigh, by contrast,
doesnt hibernate. So Digger, the farms
newest guest, will continue his high-
jinks year-round. The big guy sleeps in
the barn, is adept at getting out of fenced
areas and has been known to wander into
the Newlands house. Persis has defi-
nitely developed into a tortoise booster.
They move like the elders. To us,
they definitely carry a lot of wisdom,
she said. They also bring a lot of play-
fulness to the table, because they work
very hard to get through obstacles.
If someone you know has an un-
wanted tortoise, contact Kindred Spirits,
Ms. Newland advises. They have a net-
work of friends devoted to caring for tor-
toises, which she notes have long been
considered sacred in many cultures.
Kindred Spirits is located at 813 W.
Foothill Blvd. in Claremont. For infor-
mation, call (909) 626-2434, visit
uniquelykindredspirits.com/index.html
or find the shop on Facebook.
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com
Image courtesy of Odyssey
Marine Exploration
Image courtesy of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 1857
Meet Digger
and his shell-
backed friends
Want to find out how to be a Claremont Kid, making your
way into the paper as a reporter, a photographer or an
artist or as the star of your own article? Email Sarah at
kids@claremont-courier.com.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2014 29
T
oo often, we hear
about animals that
are extinct or in
danger of being wiped out.
A report in the journal
Amphibian & Reptile
Conservation contains bet-
ter news. A team of scien-
tists has discovered that a
species of toad they were
sure had croaked is alive
and well.
In November 2012, they were
surveying the damp and misty
cloud forests of Ecuador when
they came across a pair of toads
perched on leaves above a stream.
Before long, they found 16 more
of the amphibians, which they
identified as the Tandayapa An-
dean Toad. Only one of the tiny
brown toads had ever been spotted
and, after 42 years without seeing
another one, scientists had as-
sumed the species was extinct.
I was absolutely ecstatic and a
little shocked at how lucky we
were, Biodiversity team member
Ryan Lynch said.
The Tandayapa Andean Toad is
a cool-looking critter. The adults
are solid brown while the
younger toadlets have mottled
skin in shades of white, copper
and gold. The toad has bright red
eyes that look like gem-stones.
It has an unusual life cycle. In-
stead of starting life as tadpoles,
like most toad babies, Tandayapa
Andean toadlets develope on
land, skipping the tadpole stage.
The re-discovery of the toad
doesnt mean the little guys
should be taken for granted.
Among other dangers, the clear-
ing of much of the forest where
they live threatens their survival.
Hopefully, the publicity surround-
ing this terrific toad will help
spread word of the need to protect
their habitat.
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com
A toad among the clouds
Mums the word
Mark Wenzel, one of Californias most
popular mimes, will present a workshop
for children at the Claremont Library on
Saturday, May 24. During this event,
which runs from 2 to 3 p.m., Mr. Wenzel
will teach you how to communicate and
create a world of action, without a word.
The library is located at 208 N. Harvard
Ave. in Claremont. Call (909) 621-4902.
Beautiful butterflies
Do butterflies make your heart flut-
ter-by? Visit the Butterfly Pavilion at
the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
(RSABG), which is open 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. through August 3.
The Pavilion, which costs $2 to visit
on top of regular Garden admission,
features insects in all stages of life,
from egg to caterpillar and from co-
coon to butterfly. The butterflies are all
native to southern California, including
the Checkerspot, the Monarch, Cab-
bage White and Tiger Swallowtail.
Admission to the Rancho Santa Ana
Botanic Garden (1500 N. College Ave.
in Claremont) is $8, $4 for children
ages 3 to 12. For more information,
visit rsabg.org or call (909) 625-8767.
News Bites
I
ts springtime and its
time to get planting.
One neat project for kids
and their families is to create
a butterfly garden.
Having beautiful visitors flitting
through your yard isnt the only perk of
a butterfly garden. The butterfly popu-
lation is declining because their habitat
is disappearing. So it provides a wel-
come refuge for our winged friends.
The southern California butterfly
season runs from February to Novem-
ber, but some species can be spotted
throughout the year. You can encourage
butterflies to linger by giving them
what they need.
Butterflies are cold-blooded, so pick
a sunny spot for your butterfly garden.
If you can, protect your patch from the
wind with a fence or some shrubs.
Then, place a few flat rocks in your
garden. The rocks will soak up the
suns heat and provide the perfect perch
for butterflies craving a sunbath.
Butterflies cant drink directly from an
open water source. So fill a birdbath or
clay saucer with wet sand, and the but-
terflies will thank you. Dont use pesti-
cides or herbicidesinsect killer or
weed killerin your garden, because
theyre bad for the butterflies. Its okay
if you let some grass and weeds grow in
your insect oasis, because they provide
a place to rest and a food source.
Next, its time to pick your plants. You
need food plants for larvae and caterpil-
lars to eat and nectar-producing plants
for butterflies.
As a general rule of thumb, butterfly-
friendly flowers have purple, pink, yellow
or white flowers and thrive in the sun.
With a little research, you can find
out more specifically which plants en-
courage certain butterflies. For in-
stance, milkweed is an excellent host
for the larvae and caterpillars of the
Monarch butterfly. A hardy plant called
rock-cress, which has blue and pink
flowers, is attractive to cabbage white
butterflies. American Lady butterflies
are attracted to milkweed, butterfly
bush, marigolds, white clover and pur-
ple coneflower, among other blooms.
April Garbat of the Rancho Santa
Ana Botanic Garden, who has planted
her own butterfly garden at home, says
that because caterpillars like to
munch, its best to put in several of
each kind of plants.
People shouldnt be discouraged if
they dont see butterflies the first year,
she advises. I didnt see any butterflies
the first year I planted milkweed and
Epilobium [California fuschia], but now
I have a few every spring. Sometimes it
takes them a while to find new plants if
they arent otherwise in the area.
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com
Painted wings and growing things: How to make a butterfly garden
Image courtesy of the thecoloringbarn.com
Garden
word search
flowers
fruit
gardener
grow
hoe
lawn
leaves
nursery
plant
rake
roots
seeds
shovel
sunshine
trees
water
weeding
Image courtesy of Santiago Ron,
courtesy of National Geographic
CLAREMONTKIDS/continues on the next page
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 16, 2013 30
W
inged monkeys? Talking scarecrows?
Evil witches? The Wizard of Oz is
back in this colorful graphic novel
produced by Marvel.
A girl named Dorothy is swept away into a
mystical land called Oz, where good and evil
witches rule the land. After Dorothy accidentally
squashes a bad witch and kills her, the
Munchkinsthe people of the landare freed
from her evil rule. In return, they bow down to
Dorothy as a great sorceress.
But Dorothy just wants to go home.
When the Good Witch of the North informs the
girl that, to go home, she should seek out the wiz-
ard named Oz, she embarks on a quest. During
her journey to Oz, Dorothy meets the most un-
likely of friends: a simple-minded scarecrow, a
lily-livered lion and a talking tin man.
You'll enjoy this brilliant graphic novel, with
the beautiful array of colors. Recommended for
4th graders and above.
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is available in pa-
perback for $24.99 and in hardback for $29.99 at
A Shop Called Quest, on Indian Hill near the
Laemmle Theater in Claremont. For information,
call (909) 624-1829.
Review by Claremont Kids correspondent Eden
Yu, a sixth grader at Chaparral Elementary School
Book Nook
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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

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Q. What kind of flower does everyone have on their face?
Q. Why did the tomato turn red?
Q: Why did the banana go to the doctor?
Q: Why didn't anyone laugh at the farmers jokes?
Q: What did Santa Claus say when he walked
through the garden?
Q: What do you get if you divide the circumference
of a pumpkin by its diameter?
A . T u l i p s .
A . B e c a u s e i t s a w t h e s a l a d d r e s s i n g .
B e c a u s e s h e w a s n o t p e e l i n g w e l l .
A . H o e ! H o e ! H o e !
A . P u m p k i n p i .
A . B e c a u s e t h e y w e r e t o o c o r n - y .
Fun fact:
A hummingbird nest
is about the size of
half a walnut shell.
Knock, knock on wood
Knock, knock.
Whos there?
Honeydew.
Honeydew who?
Honeydew you want to hear
some garden jokes?
Knock, knock.
Whos there?
Orange.
Orange who?
Orange you going to let me in?
Knock, knock.
Whos there?
Lettuce.
Lettuce who?
Lettuce in, its cold out here!
Knock, knock.
Whos there?
Arthur.
Arthur who?
Arthur any tomatoes in your garden?
Knock, knock.
Whos there?
Garden.
Garden who?
Garden the secret treasure.
Knock, knock.
Whos there?
Berry.
Berry who?
Berry nice to meet you!
T
hink about what you had for break-
fast. Was it a colorful bowl of ce-
real or a plate of hot Pop Tarts?
These foods and many others all have one
thing in common: artificial food coloring.
This harmless-looking liquid that you can buy at
the store can cause cancer. Many people in the
United States consume it every day and most of
them have no idea what it can do. Im a strong be-
liever in getting rid of food coloring, and in this
essay I hope to convince you to join my side.
Headaches, vomiting, sleep problems, violence and
aggression, and mood swings; these are all problems
caused by food coloring sensitivity. Eliminating food
coloring is a good choice for anyone, especially those
who are allergic or sensitive to it. Even cancer can be
caused by food dyes. Red 40, Yellow 5 and Yellow 6
have been proven to have cancer-causing substances.
If we remove these dyes from our diet and replace
them with beet, carrot and other fruit or vegetable ex-
tracts, we will all lead healthier lives.
One of the effects of food coloring is hyperactivity.
Hyperactivity is when we are too active or hyper. A
lot of products that include food coloring are targeted
to children, and when children eat these foods they
can lose the ability to concentrate. Some studies even
suggest that there is a connection between the effects
of food coloring and ADHD. The United Kingdom
Food Standard Agency gave a mixture of food color-
ing equal to the amount in two bags of candy to 3, 8
and 9-year-olds. Afterwards, the parents observed a
change in their childrens behavior. The kids were re-
ally hyper. This proves that food coloring can cause
extreme hyperactivity.
Cereal, yogurt, fruit roll-ups, candy, macaroni and
cheese; all contain dye. Food coloring has become
a part of our daily meals, and not many people have
even realized. Food coloring has no nutritional
value, and is only used to make foods look good to
eat. The colors in the United States are made from
coal tar and chemicals, while in Europe they use real
strawberries or extracts. The United States could use
natural dyes, but synthetic is cheaper. Food coloring
is unnecessary, but it has become so important that
our food system almost revolves around it.
In conclusion, I believe that food coloring is a
harmful substance that should be eliminated from our
diet. It is used unnecessarily and is a threat to our
health. It can stop us from focusing on important
things and is used only to make foods look appealing,
because no one wants to eat foods that are in dull col-
ors. We are harming ourselves by using synthetic
dyes, and that is an uncalled-for risk. I hope that this
essay has convinced you to stop eating products with
food coloring.
[Amelie Cook is a sixth grader at Sycamore Ele-
mentary School.]
Food Coloring: A persuasive essay by Amelie Cook
RENTALS
Condo For Rent
ONE bedroom furnished or
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Land For Sale
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Help Wanted
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Internship
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MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know 144 million US
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MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know newspaper-
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Antiques
AMERICAN and European an-
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Donations
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Estate Sales
1257 HARVARD Ave. Satur-
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Antiques, furniture, appli-
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CLAREMONT neighborhod
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For Sale
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rentals..............31
services...........34
legals..............32
real estate.......37
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday 05-16-14
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 31
AUTO
Yellow 1992 Fire Bird T-Top. 70,200 miles.
$8000. Call (909) 984-6485.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 16, 2014 32
County of Los Angeles
Department of the Treasurer
and Tax Collector
Notice of Divided Publication
Pursuant to Sections 3702, 3381, and 3382, Revenue
and Taxation Code, the Notice of Sale of Tax De-
faulted Property Subject to the Power of Sale in and
for the County of Los Angeles, State of California has
been divided and distributed to various newspapers
of general circulation published in said County for
publication of a portion thereof, in each of the said
newspapers.
Public Auction Notice (R&TC 3702) of Sale Of
Tax-Defaulted Property Subject To The Power
Of Sale (Sale No. 2014B)
Whereas, on April 1, 2014, I, MARK J. SALADINO,
Treasurer and Tax Collector, was directed by the
Board of Supervisors of Los Angeles County, State
of California, to sell at online auction certain tax-de-
faulted properties, which are Subject to the Power of
Sale. Public notice is hereby given that unless said
properties are redeemed prior thereto, I will, begin-
ning on May 28, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. (Pa-
cific Time), offer for sale and sell said properties at an
online auction to the highest bidder for cashier's
check, bank-issued money order, or wire transfer in
lawful money of the United States for not less than
the minimum bid. The sale will run continuously
through May 30, 2014, 12:00 noon (Pacific Time) via
the Internet at www.bid4assets.com/losangeles.
Parcels that receive no bid will not be re-offered for
a reduced minimum price.
The minimum bid for each parcel will be
$1,125.00, as authorized by Revenue and Taxation
Code Section 3698.5(c).
Prospective bidders should obtain detailed infor-
mation of this sale and registration via the Internet
at www.bid4assets.com/losangeles. Bidders will
be required to submit a refundable deposit of
$5,000 and is accepted electronically at
www.bid4assets.com/losangeles. Only cashier's
check, bank issued money order, or wire transfer are
required at the time of registration. Registration will
begin at 8:00 a.m. (Pacific Time) Monday, May 5,
2014, and will end at 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) on
Wednesday, May 21, 2014. To participate in the
auction by mail or fax call Bid4Assets at 1-877-
427-7387, registration must be completed by May
15, 2014. No personal checks, two-party checks,
business checks, or credit cards will be accepted
for registration.
Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code Section
3692.3, all property is sold as is and the County and
its employees are not liable for the failure of any elec-
tronic equipment that may prevent a person from par-
ticipating in the sale.
If the property is sold, parties of interest, as defined by
Section 4675 of the Revenue and Taxation Code,
have a right to file a claim with the County for any
proceeds from the sale, which are in excess of the
liens and costs required to be paid from the proceeds.
If excess proceeds result from the sale, notice will be
given to parties of interest, pursuant to law.
All information concerning redemption, provided the
right to redeem has not previously been terminated,
will upon request be furnished by MARK J. SAL-
ADINO, Treasurer and Tax Collector.
If redemption of the property is not made according
to the law before 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) on Tues-
day, May 27, 2014, which is the last business day
prior to the first day of the auction, the right of re-
demption will cease.
The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN) in this
publication refers to the Assessor's Map Book, the
Map Page, and the individual Parcel Number on the
Map Page. If a change in the AIN occurred, both
prior and current AINs are shown. An explanation of
the parcel numbering system and the maps referred to
are available at the Office of the Assessor located at
500 West Temple Street, Room 225, Los Angeles,
California 90012.
Alist explaining the abbreviations used in this publi-
cation is on file in the Office of the Treasurer and Tax
Collector, 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los An-
geles, California 90012, or telephone (213) 974-2045.
I certify under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is
true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles, California,
on April 22, 2014.
MARK J. SALADINO
Los Angeles County
Treasurer and Tax Collector
State of California
The real property that is subject to this notice is situ-
ated in the County of Los Angeles, State of Califor-
nia, and is described as follows:
PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF TAX-
DEFAULTED PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE
POWER OF SALE(SALE NO. 2014B)
2501 AIN 8669-010-013 T S C C INC LOCATION
COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2506 AIN 8673-004-003 LINAN,VICTOR AND
LUCYLOCATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES
$1,125.00
2507 AIN 8673-004-016 CAMERON,CHESTER A
LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
$1,125.00
2508 AIN 8673-005-009 COHEN,BECKIE LOCA-
TION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2510 AIN 8673-017-001 DE SAW,DONALD J ET
AL DE SAW,DONNA LOCATION COUNTY OF
LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2511AIN8673-017-011BAUTISTA,LATONYALO-
CATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2512 AIN 8675-018-004 SARAVIA,ELBAM LO-
CATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2515 AIN 8675-018-013 FARM AND MER-
CHANTS TRUST CO TR FRED MUNOZ DECD
TRUSTLOCATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES
$1,125.00
2518 AIN 8678-030-007 HOPE,BEVERLYTR ET
ALHOPE FAMILYTRUSTAND BABBITT,BRICE
LOCATION CITY-SAN DIMAS $1,125.00
CN898190
Publish: 5/9/14, 5/16/14, 5/23/14
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014101967
The following person is doing business as DOGGY
STYLES MOBILE PET GROOMING, 2105
Foothill Blvd., #B126, La Verne, CA91750. Mark
David Vartanian, 2105 Foothill Blvd., #B126, La
Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
/s/ Mark D. Vartanian Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County in
04/15/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed
before that time. The filing of this statement does not
of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 106326
The following person is doing business as
DRAGON MUSIC COMPANY, 28908 Grayfox
St., Malibu, CA 90265. Richard Henn (Trustee),
28908 Grayfox St., Malibu, CA 90265, James
Biava (Trustee), 22526 Pacific Coast Highway,
Malibu, CA90265, Ellen OConnor (Trustee), 274
Autumnwood St., Thousand Oaks, CA91360.
This business is conducted by a trust.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious business name or names listed herein on
April 26, 1984.
/s/ Richard Henn Title: Trustee
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/21/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. A new statement must be
filed before that time. The filing of this statement does
not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014090354
The following person is doing business as CAS-
SIDYS BOUTIQUE 2 YOU, CASSIDYS
TRENDS, 5925 Birdie Dr., La Verne, CA91750. Au-
drey Sapien, 5925 Birdie Dr., La Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by an individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
/s/ Audrey Sapien Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County in
04/04/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement
expires five (5) years from the date it was filed in
the office of the county clerk. A new statement
must be filed before that time. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of a fictitious business name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 103379
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
BIKRAM YOGA CLAREMONT, BIKRAMS
YOGACOLLEGE OF INDIA, CLAREMONT,
150 W. San Jose Ave., Claremont, CA91711. Reg-
istrant(s): Joseph Henry Fuchs III, 1758 La Man-
cha, Pomona, CA91768.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
06/07/2003.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Joseph Henry Fuchs III Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
04/16/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after
any change in the facts set forth in the statement
pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered owner. Anew
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: April 25, May 2, 9 and 16, 2014
Title Order No. 1149600 Trustee Sale No. FELDER
1007124WS Reference No: CPH645 APN: 8315-
010-075 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE YOU ARE
IN DEFAULT UNDER A NOTICE OF DELIN-
QUENT ASSESSMENT RECORDED 9/24/2007.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAYBE SOLD AT APUB-
LIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION
OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A
LAWYER. On 5/27/2014 at 10:30 AM., McIntyre
Law Group as the duly appointed trustee will sell all
right, title and interest held by the trustee, but with-
out covenant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy
to the obligation secured by the lien as set forth in
that certain Notice of Delinquent Assessment,
recorded on 9/24/2007 as Document No. 07-
2197231 of Official Records in the Office of the
Recorder of Los Angeles County, California,
wherein this office is the duly appointed trustee. The
original trustor (record owner at the time the Notice
of Delinquent Assessment was recorded) was
Michelle P. Felder. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUC-
TION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH
(payable at time of sale in lawful money of the
United States, by cash, cashiers check drawn on a
state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or
federal savings and loan association, savings associ-
ation, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of
the Financial Code and authorized to do business in
this State) at: Near the fountain located at 400 Civic
Center Plaza Pomona, CA91766. All right, title and
interest under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment
in the property situated in said County. The street ad-
dress and other common designation, if any of the
real property described above is purported to be: 645
S. College Ave Claremont CA 91711. This sale is
subject to a 90-day right of redemption pursuant to
Civil Code 5715. The undersigned Trustee disclaims
any liability for any incorrectness of the street ad-
dress and other common designation, if any, shown
above. Said sale will be made, but without covenant
or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining
principal sum expressed or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining
principal sum expressed or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining
principal sum due under said Notice of Delinquent
Assessment, with interest thereon, as provided in
said notice, advances, if any, reasonably estimated
fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee, reason-
ably estimated to be: $15,660.86. Accrued Interest
and additional advances, if any, will increase this fig-
ure prior to sale. The claimant, College Patio Town-
homes Association, under said Notice of Delinquent
Assessment heretofore executed and delivered to the
undersigned a written Declaration of Default and De-
mand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and
Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice
of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the
county where the real property is located and more
than three months have elapsed since such recorda-
tion. PLEASE NOTE THAT WE ARE A DEBT
COLLECTOR. Date: 4/24/2014 McIntyre Law
Group 15612 Graham Street, Huntington Beach, CA
92649 714-893-9919 For Sales Information: Please
Call (714) 480-5690 Carolina Abadia, Legal Assis-
tant TAC: 968659 PUB: 5/02 5/09 5/16/14.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 108088
The following person is doing business as HER-
RERA DESIGNS, 2438 Eighth St., La Verne, CA
91750. Kimberly Kay Holder, 2438 Eighth St., La
Verne, CA 91750. Daniel J. Herrera, 2438 Eighth
St., La Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by a married couple.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business name or names listed herein
on July 22, 2005.
/s/ Kimberly Kay Holder Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/22/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement
expires five (5) years from the date it was filed in
the office of the county clerk. A new statement
must be filed before that time. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of a fictitious business name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 111377
The following person is doing business as AC-
CENSUS, ACCENSUS L.E.D., 1007 Cascade
Place, Claremont, CA91711. Brandon G. Jagielo,
24662 Brighton Dr., Unit B, Valencia, CA91355.
This business is conducted by an individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business name or names listed herein
on April 14, 2014.
/s/ Brandon G. Jagielo Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/24/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement
expires five (5) years from the date it was filed in
the office of the county clerk. A new statement
must be filed before that time. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of a fictitious business name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 119959
The following person is doing business as RED
RAVEN, 415 W. Foothill Blvd. Ste. 121, Claremont,
CA91711-2782. Terra-Petra, Inc., 415 W. Foothill Blvd.
Ste. 121, Claremont, CA91711-2782.
This business is conducted by a corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious business name or names listed herein on
02/28/2014.
/s/ Hugh Avery Title: President
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County in
05/02/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the office
of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed be-
fore that time. The filing of this statement does not of it-
self authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business
name in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Busi-
ness and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014115953
The following person is doing business as VICTO-
RIOUS GALLERY, VICTORIOUS GALLERY
TATTOOS, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 102B,
Claremont, CA91711. Hector J. Paramo, 6709 Mango
St., Rancho Cucamonga, CA91701.
This business is conducted by an individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
/s/ Hector J. Paramo Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/29/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed
before that time. The filing of this statement does not
of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
NOTICEOFTRUSTEE'SSALET.S. No. 13-21485-SP-
CA Title No. 130233353-CA-MAI ATTENTION
RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO
AN ATTACHED SUMMARYIS APPLICABLE TO
THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR
ONLYPURSUANTTO CIVILCODE 2923.3 NOTE:
THERE IS ASUMMARYOF THE INFORMATION
IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN
DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED
07/17/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAYBE SOLD ATA
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION
OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A
LAWYER. Apublic auction sale to the highest bidder for
cash, (cashier's check(s) must be made payable to Na-
tional Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or
national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit
union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, savings association, or savings bank
specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and au-
thorized to do business in this state; will be held by the
duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title,
andinterest conveyedtoandnowheldbythetrusteeinthe
hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a
Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in
an"asis"condition, but without covenant or warranty, ex-
pressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encum-
brances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s)
securedbytheDeedofTrust, withinterest andlatecharges
thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the
terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges
and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the
time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) rea-
sonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may
be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: George S Anaya,
and Sarah E Anaya, Husband and wife as joint Tenants
Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT
SERVICINGCORPORATIONRecorded07/26/2007as
Instrument No. 20071767203 (or Book, Page) of the Of-
ficial Records of Los Angeles County, California. Date of
Sale: 05/22/2014at 11:00AMPlaceof Sale: Bythefoun-
tain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA
91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other
charges: $704,395.28 Street Address or other common
designation of real property: 1001 Richmond Drive,
Claremont, CA91711-3351 A.P.N.: 8303-018-004 The
undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor-
rectness of the street address or other common designa-
tion, if any, shown above. If no street address or other
common designation is shown, directions to the location
of the property may be obtained by sending a written re-
quest to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first
publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable
to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole
and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid
to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no fur-
ther recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or
authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pur-
suant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares
that themortgagee, beneficiaryor themortgagee'sor ben-
eficiary's authorized agent has either contacted the bor-
rower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower
as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE
TOPOTENTIALBIDDERS: If youareconsideringbid-
dingonthispropertylien, youshouldunderstandthat there
are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will
be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the
highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically en-
title you to free and clear ownership of the property. You
shouldalsobeawarethat thelienbeingauctionedoff may
beajunior lien. If youarethehighest bidder at theauction,
you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens sen-
ior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investi-
gate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens
that may exist on this property by contacting the county
recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this information. If you
consult either of theseresources, youshouldbeawarethat
the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property. NOTICETOPROPERTY
OWNER:Thesaledateshownonthisnoticeofsalemaybe
postponedoneor moretimesbythemortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or acourt, pursuant toSection2924gof theCalifor-
nia Civil Code. The law requires that information about
trustee sale postponements be made available toyouandto
thepublic, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale.
If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and
date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-
730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site www.nd-
scorp.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this
case 13-21485-SP-CA. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be
reflected in the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale. Date:
04/28/2014 NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING
CORPORATION 7720 N. 16th Street, Suite 300
Phoenix,AZ85020phone602-264-6101SalesLine714-
730-2727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com/sales Nic-
hole Alford, Trustee Sales Representative A-4455208
05/02/2014, 05/09/2014, 05/16/2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 106125
The following person is doing business as SALON
BLOOMS ATTIC, THE LASH ATTIC, 915 W.
Foothill Blvd., Unit J, Claremont, CA91711. Ju-
dith Ann Olmstead, 1320 Saint Tropez St., Upland,
CA91784. Kristin Marshall, 1504 Via Corona, La
Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by copartners.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
/s/ Judy Olmstead Title: Co-Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/18/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed
before that time. The filing of this statement does not
of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 16, 2014 33
NOTICE OF DIVIDED
PUBLICATION
Made pursuant to Section
3381, Revenue and
Taxation Code
Pursuant to Sections 3381 through 3385, Revenue
and Taxation Code, the Notice of Power to Sell
Tax-Defaulted Property in and for Los Angeles
County, State of California, has been divided and
distributed to various newspapers of general circu-
lation published in the County. Aportion of the list
appears in each of such newspapers.
NOTICE OFIMPENDING POWER TO SELL
TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY
Made pursuant to Section 3361,
Revenue and Taxation Code
Notice is hereby given that real property taxes and
assessments on the parcels described below will
have been defaulted five or more years, or, in the
case of nonresidential commercial property, prop-
erty on which a nuisance abatement lien has been
recorded or that can serve the public benefit by pro-
viding housing or services directly related to low-
income persons when three or more years have
elapsed and a request has been made by a city,
county, city and county, or nonprofit organization
that property will become subject to the Tax Col-
lector's power to sell.
The parcels listed will become subject to the Tax Col-
lector's power to sell on July 1, 2014, at 12:01 a.m.,
by operation of law. The Tax Collector's power to
sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed
or made subject to an installment plan of redemption
initiated as provided by law prior to 5:00 p.m., on
June 30, 2014. The right to an installment plan ter-
minates on June 30, 2014, and after that date the en-
tire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale
of the property at public auction.
The right of redemption survives the property be-
coming subject to the power to sell, but it termi-
nates at 5:00 p.m. on the last business day before
actual sale of the property by the Tax Collector.
All information concerning redemption or the ini-
tiation of an installment plan of redemption will be
furnished, upon request, by Mark J. Saladino, Los
Angeles County Treasurer and Tax Collector, 225
North Hill Street, First Floor, Los Angeles, Cali-
fornia 90012.
The amount to redeem, in dollars and cents, is set
forth opposite its parcel number. This amount in-
cludes all defaulted taxes, penalties, and fees that
have accrued from the date of tax-default to the
date of June 30, 2014.
I certify, under penalty of perjury, that the forego-
ing is true and correct. Dated this 18th day of
April, 2014.
MARK J. SALADINO
TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
STATE OF CALIFORNIA
PARCELNUMBERINGSYSTEMEXPLANATION
The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN), when
used to describe property in this list, refers to the As-
sessor's map book, the map page, the block on the
map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the
map page or in the block. The Assessor's maps and
further explanation of the parcel numbering system
are available in the Assessor's Office, 500 West Tem-
ple Street, Room 225, Los Angeles, California 90012.
The real property that is the subject of this notice is
situated in the County of Los Angeles, State of Cali-
fornia, and is described as follows:
PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED IN YEAR 2011
FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENT, AND OTHER
CHARGES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010-2011
5575 $1,925.48
HSBC BANK USATR DEUTSCHE ALT A 2006
AR3 C/O C/O AMERICAS SERVICING COMPA
AIN: 8302-021-065
5576 $7,718.73
OMEGA INVESTMENT GROUP C/O TESFAI
GOITOM AIN: 8303-013-032
5577 $4,725.51
SANDBLOSSOM LLC C/O C/O ALFONCINA
SANDOVALCOOK SITUS:1978 N INDIAN HILL
BLVD CLAREMONT CA91711-2765 AIN: 8306-
001-046
5858 $4,265.23
PLUMLEY,JEFF D AND EILEAN N AIN: 8664-
010-032
5859 $285.24
KAPLAN,MICHAEL M AND JANET L AIN:
8664-010-037
5862 $232.81
KURWA,NARGIS AIN: 8666-059-008
5863 $3,030.10
RANDOM PROPERTIES ACQUISITION CORP
III C/O C/O ONEWEST BANK AIN: 8669-013-015
5864 $1,246.21
HANNA,CARTER AND VIRGINIAAAIN: 8671-
025-052
5866 $671.15
CALIRI,JOHN S AND ELVIRAAAIN: 8673-004-010
5867 $167.72
ZIEVE,LORRAINE TR TESSIE ZIEVE DECD
TRUST AIN: 8673-005-007
5868 $353.19
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-010-017
5869 $407.61
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-010-018
5870 $407.61
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-010-019
5871 $406.94
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-013-001
5872 $406.94
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-013-002
5873 $698.44
ROCKFELLOW,JOHN AAIN: 8673-014-007
5874 $11,928.76
MENJIVAR,OSCAR E AND RUBALCAVA,SAL
AIN: 8678-030-024
PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED IN YEAR 2009
FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENT, AND OTHER
CHARGES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009
5654 $1,132.33
RUNNELLS,JUDI AND
KIRCHNER,CHRISTOPER SITUS:2334 7TH ST
LAVERNE CA91750-4529 AIN: 8375-028-008
5655 $2,356.67
CANALES,AMERICA SITUS:2374 LOMELI LN
LAVERNE CA91750-3642 AIN: 8375-034-023
5657 $11,727.46
RIVAS,CLEMENTE AND JUSTINA B AND
SITUS:1728 2ND ST LAVERNE CA91750-5313
AIN: 8381-032-008
5664 $14,188.06
OLVERA,EDWARD F SITUS:2249 DAMIEN AVE
LAVERNE CA91750-5117 AIN: 8391-024-031
5665 $7,844.47
MALLORY,LOU A SITUS:915 QUEENSBURY
AVE LAVERNE CA91750-5158 AIN: 8391-024-042
5865 $3,280.71
MILLER,DENNIS F SITUS:5505 PALMER
CANYON RD CLAREMONT CA 91711-1490
AIN: 8673-003-023
5875 $1,668.23
GEDIGIAN,DAVID AND TAMARA SITUS:6865
STARLINE ST LAVERNE CA 91750-2367 AIN:
8678-062-011
CN898445
Publish: 5/16/14, 5/23/14
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE File No.
7037.105217 Title Order No. NXCA-0130908
MIN No. APN 8313-003-043 YOU ARE IN DE-
FAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED
10/05/06. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED
AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT ALAWYER. Apublic auction sale to
the highest bidder for cash, cashiers check drawn
on a state or national bank, check drawn by state
or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state
or federal savings and loan association, or savings
association, or savings bank specified in 5102 to
the Financial code and authorized to do business in
this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or
warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, pos-
session, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation
secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the property address or other common des-
ignation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): MARY
LOUISE CLASS, A MARRIED WOMAN AS
HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY
Recorded: 10/12/06, as Instrument No. 06
2268241,of Official Records of LOS ANGE-
LES County, California. Date of Sale: 06/05/14
at 1:00 PM Place of Sale: In the main dining
room of the Pomona Masonic Temple, located
at 395 South Thomas Street, Pomona, CA The
purported property address is: 147 MARYWOOD
AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessors
Parcel No. 8313-003-043 The total amount of
the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by
the property to be sold and reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the time of the ini-
tial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$188,848.43. If the sale is set aside for any reason,
the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a
return of the deposit paid, plus interest. The pur-
chaser shall have no further recourse against
the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. NO-
TICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are con-
sidering bidding on this property lien, you should
understand that there are risks involved in bidding
at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien,
not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid
at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle
you to free and clear ownership of the property.
You should also be aware that the lien being auc-
tioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the high-
est bidder at the auction, you are or may be
responsible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are encouraged to
investigate the existence, priority and size of out-
standing liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorders office or a title in-
surance company, either of which may charge you
a fee for this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware that the same
lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed
of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY
OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more times by the
mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant
to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trustee sale
postponements be made available to you and to the
public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale.
If you wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this property, you may
call 877-484-9942 or 800-280-2832 or visit this In-
ternet Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com using the file number assigned
to this case 7037.105217. Information about post-
ponements that are very short in duration or that
occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not
immediately be reflected in the telephone informa-
tion or on the Internet Web site. The best way to
verify postponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale. Date: May 7, 2014 NORTHWEST
TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Bonita
Salazar, Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road,
Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 866-387-6987
Sale Info website: www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com Automated Sales Line: 877-
484-9942 or 800-280-2832 Reinstatement and Pay-
Off Requests: 866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS
ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND
ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER #
7037.105217: 05/16/2014,05/23/2014,05/30/2014
RESOLUTION NO. 2014-30
A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, CALIFOR-
NIA, DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO
LEVY AND COLLECT ASSESSMENTS
WITHIN LANDSCAPE AND LIGHTING DIS-
TRICT NO. LL001 FOR THE FISCALYEAR
2014/15 PURSUANT TO THE LANDSCAPE
AND LIGHTING ACT OF 1972 FOR THE
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF
LIGHTING AND LANDSCAPING, AND GIV-
ING NOTICE OF AND SETTING THE TIME
AND PLACE OF THE PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE LEVY OF THE PROPOSED AS-
SESSMENTS
WHEREAS, in March 1990, the City Council of
the City of Claremont (the "City") adopted Land-
scape and Lighting District No. LL001 pursuant to
the Landscaping and Lighting Act of 1972, Part 2
(commencing with 22500) of Division 15 of the
Streets and Highways Code (the "Act"), for the
maintenance and servicing of street lighting, street
trees, parkways, median islands, and city parks;
and
WHEREAS, Landscape and Lighting District No.
LL001 qualifies for continued levying under Sec-
tion 5 of Article XIII D of the California Constitu-
tion; and
WHEREAS, the City is required under the Act to
follow certain annual procedures for levying as-
sessments; and
WHEREAS, on February 11, 2014, the City Coun-
cil adopted Resolution No. 2014-10 initiating pro-
ceedings for the levy and collection of assessments
for Fiscal Year 2014/15; and
WHEREAS, by said resolution, the City Council
ordered Willdan Financial Services, for the purpose
of assisting the City with the annual levy and col-
lection of assessments within said assessment dis-
trict, to prepare and file a report with the City Clerk
in accordance with Article 4 (commencing with
22565) of Chapter 1 of Part 2 of Division 15 of
the Streets and Highway Code; and
WHEREAS, Willdan Financial Services has filed
such report with the City Clerk, and such report has
been presented and considered by the City Council.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, DE-
TERMINED, AND ORDERED BY THE CITY
COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT,
CALIFORNIA, AS FOLLOWS:
Section 1. Intention. The City Council hereby de-
clares that it is their intention to levy and collect
assessments for Landscape and Lighting District
No. LL001 for the Fiscal Year 2014/15 pursuant to
the Landscaping and Lighting Act of 1972. The
area to be assessed is located in the City of Clare-
mont, County of Los Angeles. The boundaries of
Landscape and Lighting District No. LL001 are de-
scribed in the Fiscal Year 2014/15 Annual Engi-
neer's Report (on file in the City Clerk's office). No
assessments shall be imposed upon a federal or
state government agency (county, city, and/or spe-
cial district) located within the boundaries except
when such property is not devoted to a public use.
Section 2. Purpose. The purpose of Landscape
and Lighting District No. LL001 is for maintenance
and servicing of street lighting, street trees, park-
ways, median islands, and city parks.
Section 3. Report. The Willdan Financial Serv-
ices report is on file with the City Clerk and has
been accepted by the City Council at the meeting at
which this Resolution has been adopted. All inter-
ested persons are referred to the Willdan Financial
Services report for a full and detailed description
of the work, the boundaries of the proposed as-
sessment district, and the proposed assessments
upon assessable lots and parcels of land within
Landscape and Lighting District No. LL001.
Section 4. Time and Place of Hearing. On Tues-
day, May 27, 2014, at the hour of 7:00 p.m., during
the course of its regular scheduled meeting, the City
Council will conduct a public hearing on the ques-
tion of the levy of the proposed annual assessment.
The hearing will be held at the City Council Cham-
ber, 225 Second Street, Claremont, California.
Section 5. Notice. The City Clerk shall give no-
tice of the time and place of said hearing by pub-
lishing a copy of this Resolution once in the
Claremont Courier and once in the Daily Bulletin
not less than ten (10) days before the date of the
hearing.
Section 6. Limitation on Increase of Annual As-
sessment. The proposed annual assessment shall
be based on actual total costs, as delineated by
Streets and Highways Code 22569. The City
Council has declared its intention to use, as a guide,
for the purpose of determining the appropriateness
of annual increases in assessments, the Consumer
Price Index for All Urban Consumers for the Los
Angeles-Riverside-Orange County area (1982-
1984=100), published by the United States De-
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics;
provided, however, that any such annual increase
in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%).
The proposed 2014/15 assessment represents a
1.04% increase over the previous year.
PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this
13th day of May, 2014.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES )ss.
CITY OF CLAREMONT )
I, Shelley Desautels, City Clerk of the City of
Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of Cali-
fornia, hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution
No. 2014-30 was regularly adopted by the City
Council of said City of Claremont at a regular
meeting of said Council held on the 13th day of
May, 2014, by the following vote:
AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: CALAY-
CAY, LYONS, NASIALI, PEDROZA,
SCHROEDER
NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE
ABSTENSIONS: COUNCILMEMBERS:
NONE
ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE
Publish: May 16, 2014
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF CHARLES E. HUNTER
CASE NO. BP150731
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent cred-
itors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in
the will or estate, or both, of CHARLES E.
HUNTER,
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
ELEANOR ARIZMENDI in the Superior Court of
California, County of Los Angeles.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
ELEANOR ARIZMENDI be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of the decedent.
The PETITION requests authority to administer the
estate under the Independent Administration of Es-
tates Act. (This authority will allow the personal rep-
resentative to take many actions without obtaining
court approval. Before taking certain very important
actions, however, the personal representative will be
required to give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to the proposed
action.) The independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person files an objec-
tion to the petition and shows good cause why the
court should not grant the authority.
AHEARING ON THE PETITION WILLBE HELD
IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: June 6, 2014
at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 29 located at:
Superior Court Of California, County Of Los Angeles,
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Central District
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you
should appear at the hearing and state your objections
or file written objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by
your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT
CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file
your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per-
sonal representative appointed by the court within the
later of either (1) four months from the date of first
issuance of letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Pro-
bate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or
personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may
affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to
consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali-
fornia law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BYTHE
COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate,
you may file with the court a Request for Special No-
tice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as
provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for
Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Petitioner:
Eleanor Arizmendi, In Pro Per
3303 South Archibald Ave., #19
Ontario, CA91761
626-862-1351
Publish: May 16, 23 & 30, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE
(UCC Sec. 6105)
Escrow No. 42389-TL
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is
about to be made. The name(s) and business ad-
dress(es) to the Seller(s) are: GURZ DENTAL,
INC, 23525 GOLDEN SPRINGS DR #F, DIA-
MOND BAR, CA 91765
Doing Business as: GURZ DENTAL, INC
All other business name(s) and address(es) used
by the Seller(s) within three years, as stated by the
Seller(s), is/are: NONE
The location in California of the Chief Executive
Officer of the Seller(s) is: NONE
The names and address of the Buyer(s) is/are:
MOHAMED SELEIT DDS, INC, 17333 SUN-
RISE RIDGE DR, RIVERSIDE, CA 92503
The assets to be sold are described in general as:
FURNITURE, FIXTURES AND EQUIPMENT
TO RUN ADENTAL PRACTICE and are located
at: 23525 GOLDEN SPRINGS DR #F, DIA-
MOND BAR, CA 91765
The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at
the office of: DIAMOND COUNTRY ESCROW,
21700 COPLEY DR, STE 180, DIAMOND
BAR, CA 91765 and the anticipated sale date is
JUNE 4, 2014
The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform
Commercial Code Section 6106.2.
[If the sale subject to Sec. 6106.2, the following
information must be provided] The name and ad-
dress of the person with whom claims may be
filed is: DIAMOND COUNTRY ESCROW,
21700 COPLEY DR, STE 180, DIAMOND
BAR, CA91765 and the last date for filing claims
shall be JUNE 3, 2014, which is the business day
before the sale date specified above.
Dated: 5/10/14
MOHAMED SELEIT DDS, INC, Buyer
LA1416797 CLAREMONT COURIER 5/16/14
Trustee Sale No. 14-000798 CXE Title Order No.
8398612 APN 8281-002-047 NOTICE OF
TRUSTEES SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER ADEED OF TRUST DATED 02/07/07.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANA-
TION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED-
INGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. On 06/05/14 at 9:00
A.M., Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly
appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the power
of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust ex-
ecuted by Ariel Chavez, a single man, as
Trustor(s), in favor of Mortgage Electronic Regis-
tration Systems, Inc., solely as Nominee for Coun-
trywide Home Loans, Inc., as Beneficiary,
Recorded on 02/16/07 in Instrument No.
20070339167 of official records in the Office of
the county recorder of LOS ANGELES County,
California; DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HOLD-
ERS OF THE GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST
2007-5 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES SE-
RIES 2007-5, as the current Beneficiary, WILL
SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGH-
EST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale
in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a
cashiers check drawn by a state or national bank,
a check drawn by a state of federal credit union, or
a check drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, savings association, or savings
bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial
Code and authorized to do business in this state),
Doubletree Hotel (Vineyard Ballroom) Los Ange-
les-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk,
CA90650, all right, title and interest conveyed to
and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the
property situated in said County, California de-
scribed as: 24337 VISTA BUENA DRIVE, DIA-
MOND BAR, CA91765 The property heretofore
described is being sold as is. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other common des-
ignation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be
made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed
or implied, regarding title, possession, or encum-
brances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with inter-
est thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances,
if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, esti-
mated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-
wit: $632,566.64 (Estimated) Accrued interest and
additional advances, if any, will increase this fig-
ure prior to sale. The undersigned caused said No-
tice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded
in the county where the real property is located and
more than three months have elapsed since such
recordation. DATE: May 13, 2014 Robbie Weaver
Assistant Secretary & Assistant Vice President
Aztec Foreclosure Corporation 3636 N. Central
Ave., Suite #400 Phoenix, AZ 85012 Phone: (877)
257-0717 or (602) 638-5700 Fax: (602) 638-5748
www.aztectrustee.com NOTICE TO POTENTIAL
BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this
property lien, you should understand that there are
risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You
will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself.
Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not
automatically entitle you to free and clear owner-
ship of the property. You should also be aware that
the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If
you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or
may be responsible for paying off all liens senior
to the lien being auctioned off, before you can re-
ceive clear title to the property. You are encour-
aged to investigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this property
by contacting the county recorders office or a title
insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult either
of these resources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROP-
ERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this no-
tice of sale may be postponed one or more times by
the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pur-
suant to Section 2924g of the California Civil
Code. The law requires that information about
trustee sale postponements be made available to
you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether
your sale date has been postponed, and, if appli-
cable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call or visit the Internet
Web site, using the file number assigned to this
case 14-000798. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or that occur
close in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone informa-
tion or on the Internet Web site. The best way to
verify postponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale. www.Auction.com or call (800)
280-2832 Or Aztec Foreclosure Corporation (877)
257-0717 www.aztectrustee.com P1094315 5/16,
5/23, 05/30/2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 16, 2014 34
909-621-5626
SERVICES
909.621.4761
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Assessor's Parcel No.: 8281-010-049
T.S. No.: 13-12313-01
NOTICE OFUNIFIED
TRUSTEE'S SALE
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF
TRUST DATED 5/6/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE
ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT
MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE
OFTHE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT ALAWYER.
On 5/30/2014, at 9:00 AM, 400 CIVIC
CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CALIFORNIA,
WT Capital Lender Services, a California corpora-
tion as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant
to Deed of Trust recorded on 5/8/2008 as Document
No. 20080814588, of Official Records in the Office of
the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, exe-
cuted by Frydoun Sheikhpour, as Trustor, in favor of
Habib American Bank as Beneficiary,
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION
TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at
time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by
Cash, a Cashier's check drawn by a state or national
bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union,
or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, savings association, or savings bank spec-
ified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and autho-
rized to do business in this state) all right, title and
interest conveyed to and now held by it under said
Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County,
California, describing the land therein:
PARCEL 1 AS SHOWN ON PARCEL MAP NO.
1185, IN THE CITYOFDIAMOND BAR, COUN-
TY LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA,
AS PER MAPFILED IN BOOK 27 PAGE 88 OF
PARCEL MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE
COUNTYRECORDER OFSAID COUNTY.
EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, GAS AND
OTHER HYDROCARBONS AND MINERALS
NOW OR AT ANY TIME HEREAFTER SITU-
ATED THEREIN AND THEREUNDER,
TOGETHER WITH THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT
TO DRILLFOR, PRODUCE, EXTRACT, TAKE
AND MINE THEREFROM SUCH OIL, GAS
AND OTHER HYDROCARBONS AND MINER-
ALS AND TO STORE THE SAME UPON THE
SURFACE OF SAID LAND, OR BELOW THE
SURFACE OFSAID LAND, TOGETHER WITH
THE RIGHT TO STORE UPON THE SURFACE
OF SAID LAND, OIL, GAS AND OTHER
HYDROCARBONS AND MINERALS WHICH
MAY BE PRODUCED FROM OTHER LANDS,
WITH THE RIGHT OF ENTRY THEREON
FOR SAID PURPOSES AS RESERVED BY
TRANSAMERICA DEVELOPMENT COMPA-
NY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, IN
DEED RECORDED MARCH 29, 1968 AS
INSTRUMENT NO. 2456 IN BOOK D3955 PAGE
185, OFFICIALRECORDS.
ALL ENTRY RIGHTS AND RIGHTS OF SUR-
FACE STORAGE AS RESERVED ABOVE
WERE QUITCLAIM TO THE RECORD
OWNER BY DEED RECORDED DECEMBER
10, 1968 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 2736 IN BOOK
D4220 PAGE 214, OFFICIALRECORDS.
ALLRIGHTS TO THE USE OFSURFACE AND
SUBSURFACE TO A DEPTH OF 500 FEET
FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, FOR
ANY PURPOSE INCIDENTAL TO THE OWN-
ERSHIP OF THE OIL, GAS AND OTHER
HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES AND MINER-
ALS AS RESERVED ABOVE, WERE QUIT-
CLAIMED TO THE RECORD OWNER BY
DEED RECORDED OCTOBER 29, 1970 AS
INSTRUMENT NO.1292 IN BOOK D4874 PAGE
57 OFFICIALRECORDS.
The property heretofore
described is being sold "as is". The street address and
other common designation, if any, of the real property
described above is purported to be: 206 S. Diamond
Bar Blvd.
Diamond Bar, CA
The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the
street address and other common designation, if any,
shown herein.
Beneficiary hereby elects to conduct a unified foreclo-
sure sale pursuant to the provisions of California
Commercial Code section 9604, et seq., and to include
in the non-judicial foreclosure of the real property
interest described in the Notice of Default and Election
to Sell Under Deed of Trust, all of the personal proper-
ty and fixtures, together with replacements and pro-
ceeds, if applicable, described in the security agree-
ment, dated 5/6/2008, and in a UCC-1 Financing
Statement filed with the Secretary of State, State of
California, on 9/3/2010, as 107243856187, and
recorded in the Office of the Los Angeles County
Recorder on 5/8/2008 as 20080814591 between the
original trustor and the original beneficiary, as it may
have been amended from time to time, and pursuant to
any other instruments between the trustor and benefi-
ciary referencing a security interest in personal proper-
ty. Beneficiary reserves its right to revoke its election
as to some or all of said personal property and/or fix-
tures, or to add additional personal property and/or fix-
tures to the election herein expressed, at Beneficiary's
sole election, from time to time and at any time until
the consummation of the Trustee's Sale to be conduct-
ed pursuant to the Deed of Trust and this Notice of
Trustee's Sale. Adescription of the personal property,
which was given as security for trustor's obligation is:
ALL INVENTORY, EQUIPMENT, ACCOUNTS
(INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL
HEALTH-CARE-INSURANCE RECEIV-
ABLES), CHATTEL PAPER, INSTRUMENTS
(INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL
PROMISSORYNOTES), LETTER-OF-CREDIT
RIGHTS, LETTERS OF CREDIT, DOCU-
MENTS, DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS, INVEST-
MENT PROPERTY, MONEY, OTHER RIGHTS
TO PAYMENT AND PERFORMANCE, AND
GENERAL INTANGIBLES (INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO ALLSOFTWARE AND ALL
PAYMENT INTANGIBLES); ALL OIL, GAS
AND OTHER MINERALS BEFORE EXTRAC-
TION; ALL OIL, GAS, OTHER MINERALS
AND ACCOUNTS CONSTITUTING AS-
EXTRACTED COLLATERAL; ALL FIX-
TURES; ALL TIMBER TO BE CUT; ALL
ATTACHMENTS, ACCESSIONS, ACCES-
SORIES, FITTINGS, INCREASES, TOOLS,
PARTS, REPAIRS, SUPPLIES, AND COMMIN-
GLED GOODS RELATING TO THE FOREGO-
ING PROPERTY, AND ALL ADDITIONS,
REPLACEMENT OF AND SUBSTITUTIONS
FOR ALL OR ANY PART OF THE FOREGO-
ING PROPERTY; ALLINSURANCE REFUNDS
RELATING TO THE FOREGOING PROPER-
TY; ALL GOOD WILL RELATING TO THE
FOREGOING PROPERTY; ALL RECORDS
AND DATA AND EMBEDDED SOFTWARE
RELATING TO THE FOREGOING PROPER-
TY, AND ALLEQUIPMENT, INVENTORYAND
SOFTWARE TO UTILIZE, CREATE, MAIN-
TAIN AND PROCESS ANY SUCH RECORDS
AND DATA ON ELECTRONIC MEDIA; AND
ALL SUPPORTING OBLIGATIONS RELAT-
ING TO THE FOREGOING PROPERTY; AND
ALL PRODUCTS AND PROCEEDS (INCLUD-
ING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALLINSURANCE
PAYMENTS) OF OR RELATING TO THE
FOREGOING PROPERTY. No warranty is made
that any or all of the personal property still exists or is
available for the successful bidder and no warranty is
made as to the condition of any of the personal proper-
ty, which shall be sold "as is, where is".
Said sale will be made,
but without covenant or warranty, expressed or
implied, regarding title, possession, encumbrances,
quiet enjoyment, or the like, to pay the remaining prin-
cipal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust,
with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s),
advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust,
estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trust created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit:
$2,170,518.76 Estimated
Accrued interest and additional
advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale.
You have the right to
request an accounting of the unpaid indebtedness
secured by the property being sold. You may submit
your request to the address listed below. The charge
for this request is $30.00. You may be liable for any
deficiency if the secured obligation is not paid in full.
The beneficiary under said Deed of
Trust and Security Agreement heretofore executed and
delivered to the undersigned, a written Declaration of
Default and Demand for Sale, and a Written Notice of
Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused
said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be
recorded in the County where the real property is locat-
ed and more than three months have elapsed since such
recordation.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are
considering bidding on this property lien, you should
understand that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not
on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to
free and clear ownership of the property. You should
also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may
be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the
auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before
you can receive clear title to the property. You are
encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and
size of outstanding liens that may exist on this prop-
erty by contacting the county recorder's office or a
title insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult either
of these resources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date
shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil
Code. The law requires that information about trustee
sale postponements be made available to you and to
the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale.
If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and
date for the sale of this property, you may visit the
Internet Web site address listed below for information
regarding the sale of this property, using the file num-
ber assigned to this case file number. Information
about postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not
immediately be reflected in the telephone information
or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify post-
ponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
DATED: April 29, 2014
WT Capital Lender Services, a California corporation
7522 North Colonial Avenue, Suite 101
Fresno, California 93711
(559) 222-4644
WTCap.com
By______________________________________
Debra Berg, Senior Vice President
PUBLISH: 5/9/14, 5/16/14, 5/23/14
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 35
SERVICES
Friday 05-16-14
CONTACT US
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Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
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Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name State-
ment (D.B.A.) is required if
youre in business. You are re-
quired to file and publish a DBA
in the local newspaper. You
must renew every five (5)
years. You must republish if any
changes have been made to
your business. If your business
is in LA COUNTY, The Courier
will provide the legal form, file it
with the L.A. County Clerk, pub-
lish the Statement and provide
you with proof of publication.
Only $95.00 to publish plus a
$26 county fee. Claremont
Courier: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont.
Call Vickie, 909-621-4761.
Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.
Garage Doors
SERVICE REPAIR INSTALL
Doors, Openers, Gates
Same Day
24/7 Emergency Service
909-596-3300
accessdoorsco.com
Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award
winning maintenance! We
create a customized main-
tenance program for your
property and lifestyle needs.
Sprinkler repairs and low
voltage lighting. Call Alan
Cantrall, 909-224-3327.
Lic.861685 and insured.
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn main-
tenance, bush trimming,
general maintenance, tree
trimming and removal. Low
prices and free estimates.
Please call 909-391-3495 or
909-239-3979.
Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583
Girl Friday
I'M here to help! Housekeep-
ing, shopping, errands. Se-
nior, pet, house sitting.
Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027,
anytime!
DOT Will Do It! A full-service
errand business. Dorothy
"Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwill
doit.com. 909-621-9115 or
909-782-2885.
Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing,
gates, brick block, concrete
cutting, breaking and repair.
25 years in Claremont. Paul,
909-753-5360.
Handyman
HOME Repair by Ken. Local
for 11 years. We can get it
done for you! 909-374-0373.
Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
ODD jobs, small repairs, low
prices. Jim, 951-264-2898.
A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard,
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.
Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimated.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!
909-599-9530
Health Care
MALE ICU nurse available for
in-home position. Full nursing
care provided for patients of
all ages. 909-542-9690.
House Cleaning
ESTABLISHED, upbeat, li-
censed house cleaning ser-
vice. Specializing in larger
homes. Organic cleaning
supplies used. 26 years of
experience. 909-224-1180,
909-946-7475.
CAROUSEL Quality Clean-
ing. Family owned for 25
years. Licensed. Bonded.
Senior rates. Trained profes-
sional services including:
baseboards, ovens, win-
dows. Hauling. Move in/out.
In home care. House/pet sit-
ting. 10 percent discount to
Claremont College faculty.
Robyn, 909-621-3929.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commer-
cial, vacant homes, apart-
ments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-986-8009.
Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151
909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark!
We offer expert design instal-
lation and repair of low volt-
age lighting. Alan Cantrall
Landscaping. 909-224-3327.
Contractor Lic.861685.
Landscaping
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irri-
gation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
DLS Landscaping and De-
sign. Claremont native spe-
cializing in drought tolerant
landscaping, drip systems
and lighting. Artistic solu-
tions for the future. Over 35
years experience. Call: 909-
225-8855, 909-982-5965.
Lic.585007.
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting,
irrigation and yard cleanup.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
Landscaping
DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, re-
paired. Clean-up, hauling.
Sod, seed, planting,
lighting, drainage.
Free written estimates.
Insured. References.
Since 1977. Lic.508671.
Please call 909-989-1515.
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
Learn Chinese
Fun and Easy
All Levels
Small Groups
School age children
Afternoon and Summer
Classes
Claremont
909-254-7084
Learn Japanese
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at
the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday after-
noons/evenings. All levels
welcome. Excellent brain exer-
cise for seniors! 909-626-3066.
Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi-
dential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.
Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
COLLINS Painting & Con-
struction Company, LLC. In-
terior, exterior. Residential
and commercial. Contractors
Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.
STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552
Please call
909-989-9786.
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small. 20
years of Claremont resident
referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-922-8042.
www.vjpaint.com.
Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.
PLASTER, stucco, drywall,
texture. Small job specialist.
909-629-7576. Unlicensed.
Local 30 years.
Pools
Carr Pools
Family owned/operated
Claremont natives
Over 10 years experience
Dependable Timely Efficient
Tablets/filter
cleans included
909-624-5648
Plumbing
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
STEVES PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates.
All plumbing repairs.
Complete drain cleaning,
leak detection,
water heaters.
Your local plumber
for over 25 years.
Senior discounts.
Insured, Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, re-
pairs. Prices to fit the working
familys budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.
Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all
types. Free estimates. Qual-
ity work. Lic.C39588976.
909-944-3884.
Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151
Tile
Regrout, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-
764-7688.
MASTER tile layer. Quick
and clean. Stone and gran-
ite work. Residential, com-
mercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.
DIAMOND TILE
20 years quality work.
Kitchens Showers Baths
Great prices Discounts
909-346-3707
Lic.588500
Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning
and removals. Landscaping,
corrective and restoration
trimming and yard clean up.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, depend-
able service for all your tree
care needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.#836027. Matt Gray-
Trask. Call 946-7444.
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years
in Claremont.
Pruning of your small
and medium perennials.
909-624-8238
www.bauertreecare.com
Upholstery
PINK UPHOLSTERY
48 years of experience. Up to
30 percent discount on fabric.
Free pickup and delivery.
Please call 909-597-6613.
Weed Abatement
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in an
environmentally safe manner.
To receive loads of quality wood
chips. Please call 909-214-
6773. Tom Day Tree Service.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clear-
ing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call Na-
cho, 909-816-2435. Free es-
timates, satisfaction guaran-
teed. Resident of Claremont.
36
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
SERVICES
Friday 05-16-14
tax help antiques house cleaning landscaping
pet care roofing elder care computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the
Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.
REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate
section in the area.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
Call JESSICA at 621-4761
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 37
REAL ESTATE
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Friday 05-16-14
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616
CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com
We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, profession-
alism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood
knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know
and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential Investment Historical Green Short Sales
Check out
our reviews!
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SUNDAY, MAY 18
1-4 p.m. 1527 W. Clark, Upland. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
1-4 p.m. 4237 La Junta Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
2-4 p.m. 507 Martin Way, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
2-4 p.m. 2590 King Way, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
2-5 p.m. 1678 Winston Way, Upland. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
2-5 p.m. 414 Elder Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
Your trusted resource as you
transition through the new
stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist
250 W. First St. Suite 100, Claremont
pamelabergman@ymail.com
(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 16, 2014 38
MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area
Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com
EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
M MALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711
BRE# 00545647
REAL ESTATE
(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,
Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese
Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947
107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711
(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com
VILLAGE WEST TOWNHOME
Charming tri-level in Claremont Village
Walk. 3 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms.
Wood floors, master bedroom opens to
covered patio, fireplace in living room.
Community pool, spa, BBQ and play-
ground. $510,000. (F757)
1221 HARVARD AVE., CLAREMONT
Rare, historic Village 2-on-a-lot! Main
house is a 1911, 2-story Craftsman with
4 bedrooms, 1.75 remodeled bath-
rooms in 2,034 sq. ft. Covered front
porch, hardwood floors, beamed ceil-
ing, fireplace, built-ins, bay window plus
upgrades to plumbing and electric.
Back house, circa 1930, has separate
alley access, 3 bedrooms, 1.75 bath-
rooms, covered porch, fenced yard and
carport. $985,000. (H1221)
2014 2013 Change From Previous Year
Number of Homes Sold
Number Sold > $750,000
Number Sold < $750,000
Highest Sale Price
Lowest Sale Price
Average List Price of Homes Sold
Average Sold Price
Average Days On Market
April
Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot
April was one of the fastest paced sales months we have seen in quite some time. Many homes
that hit the market didnt last much longer than a week, and many have been receiving multiple
offers. Interest rates continue to hover in the mid four percent range, and actually have taken a
few dips to the lower four percent range. Prices seem to be continuing to move up, however with
the rapid increases in prices we have seen over the past 6-12 months, there is some concern
that they are moving up faster than the market can sustain. With more $1,000,000 plus homes
selling, average prices of homes sold is moving up considerably.
Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty.
Contact Ryan at ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com.
37
7
30
$1,610,000
$251,250
$646,800
$634,893
70
34
3
31
$1,115,000
$215,000
$481,132
$470,482
64
+9 percent
+133 percent
-3 percent
+44 percent
+17 percent
+34 percent
+35 percent
+9 percent
Best rates for LEGALS. Call Vickie:
909-621-4761, Claremont COURIER.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 16, 2014 39
GEOFF T. HAMILL
GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES
Celebrating 25 years of service 1988-2013!
For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500
NEAR VILLAGE & COLLEGES - $468,500
414 Elder Drive, Claremont.
Beautiful home in a great neighborhood. Quality
built by Stover Bros. in 1947. Three bedrooms, two
bathrooms and approximately 1565 sq. ft. per tax
assessor. Remodeled (with permits) adding a
huge master bathroom with dual-entry and dual-
headed shower stall, walk-in closet and indoor
laundry. Upgraded tile and original oak hardwood
floors. Spacious yard with mature landscape, tall
trees and a vegetable garden. Two-car finished
garage currently used as a game room. (E414)
CLARABOYA HILLSIDE PANORAMIC VIEWS $975,000
Contemporary Mid-Century custom one-story resi-
dence. Professionally decorated, shows light and
airy throughout with neutral decor. Perfectly situated
on a quiet cul-de-sac street offering picturesque val-
ley, city lights and hillside vistas! Well-designed floor
plan perfect for entertaining and family living. Up-
dated chefs kitchen opens to eating area and gar-
den views. Fabulous family great room looks out to
twinkling lights. Multiple built-ins throughout. Beauti-
ful manicured grounds exude privacy, featuring spa,
covered patio and grassy yard areas.
NORTHEAST CLAREMONT VACANT
ESTATE HOME LOT - $695,000
One of the few lots left to build your custom dream
home in prestigious north Claremont near the
foothills and Wilderness Park. Nearly one rural
acre provides plenty of room to build a large
home, pool, spa, guest house, multi-car garage,
sports cour and more. Block walls are already in
place on all three sides of the site. Utilities are al-
ready brought to the street. Most coveted locale
with panoramic mountain views, surrounded by
million and multi-million dollar estates.
CLAREMONT CLUB TERRACE
END UNIT CONDO - $425,000
Newly renovated with an open floor plan that boasts
three bedrooms, three bathrooms, approximately
1600 sq. ft. Living room and dining room area with
fireplace. Updated kitchen includes granite coun-
ters. Master suite with mountain views and lavish
bathroom with shower and separate tub. Light, neu-
tral dcor throughout with extensive high vaulted
ceilings. Two-car attached garage. Private and spa-
cious covered patio. Ample guest parking. Park-like
community grounds plus pool and spa nearby.
SECLUDED OAK TREE STUDDED
VINTAGE CLAREMONT ESTATE - $895,000
Spanish Hacienda-style four bedroom residence,
custom built in 1922 with a light filled floor plan.
Large living room with arched picture window and
fireplace plus a separate dining room. Sunny
kitchen with breakfast nook and storage. Situated
on over 1.5 acres of natural wilderness and man-
icured grounds among approximately 25 oak
trees. Separate guest house approximately 500
sq. ft. with kitchen and bathroom. Bonus room at-
tached to garage. (W3822)
QUALITY BUILT LUSK HOME NEAR
CLAREMONT FOOTHILLS - $665,000
Condit Elementary School locale above Base Line
near Claremont Foothills and Thompson Creek
Trails. Four bedroom contemporary home with
over 2000 sq. ft. perfect for entertaining and fami-
ly living. Bright and sunny kitchen upgraded with
granite counter tops opens to family room boasting
fireplace. Formal living and dining rooms. Indoor
laundry room. Nearly 1/3 acre lot with swimming
pool and spa among beautiful grounds. Three-car
garage and RV parking. (E208)
NEWLISTING!
"Best Possible
Price Achieved,
Every Time!"
D.R.E. #00997900
Tell a Friend...
COMING SOON:
Newly Built North Claremont Estate - $1,650,000
New Orleans Claremont Village
Colonial - $1,100,000
Historic Claremont Village Estate - $1,350,000
Northeast Claremont Estate Area - $625,000
Claremont University Terrace
Four Bedroom - $525,000
Commercial/Professional Craftsman House
on Euclid Avenue - $498,000
Spanish-Style with Guest House - $425,000
SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers look-
ing for a Claremont home. Please call today for
a FREE complimentary market analysis of
your property. Thank you!
909.621.0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
SALEPENDING!
OPENHOUSESUN 2 - 5 PM COMINGSOON!
SALEPENDING!
COMINGSOON!

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor


in the COURIERs Best of the Best Contest
Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES
909.447.7708 Mason@MasonProphet.com
www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
From start to finish, Mason was a pleasure
to work with. He was professional, thorough,
knowledgeable, and followed through on
every aspect of the sale and escrow. I would
definitely use him again as my realtor, and will
be recommending him to family and friends.
Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com
and click on "Testimonials," or find me on www.Yelp.com.
Linda A.
Your Local
Real Estate Resource
CHANTECLAIR ESTATE - 4238 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE., CLAREMONT
Experience the majestic presence of this enchanting European-style estate that makes a statement
with impressive architectural features. Enter to find a foyer that overlooks the living and formal din-
ing rooms as you take in the sweeping staircase. Voluminous ceilings and ample windows are per-
fectly proportioned, making the space open and bright. This home boasts six bedrooms, six
bathrooms and is elegantly appointed throughout. Be the star in the gourmet kitchen, which offers two
islands with granite counters, and enjoy the adjoining family room with its cozy fireplace. Generous
master suite includes a lovely retreat area. There is a bonus room perfect for teens, the main floor
bedroom is convenient for guests and the 2/3-acre yard features a lighted full-sized basketball court.
Located on a quiet cul-de-sac with glorious mountain views in close proximity to the Thompson Creek
Trail and Wilderness Park. Call on this estate today 909-398-1810! $1,625,000. (N4238)
LIVE OAK CANYON
Experience serene privacy and city light views from this home on its magnificent mountain
perch. Prepare to escape to your own private retreat tucked away in Live Oak Canyon. Minutes
from all the amenities of Claremont and La Verne. You will feel as though you have left the city
behind as you approach this beautifully secluded custom-built home that sits amongst lush, ma-
ture trees. The open and bright floor plan welcomes you to spacious living in this immaculately
maintained residence. The kitchen is elegantly appointed and offers granite countertops. Up-
stairs, you will find a sumptuous master suite with luxurious master bathroom that boasts all the
amenities you would expect in a home of this caliber. Watch fireworks from the viewing deck that
also overlooks the roomy and level yard. Call today to view this exceptional home 909-398-
1810! $890,000. (L4738)
CUL-DE-SAC HOME
Beautifully updated kitchen with stainless steel
appliances, Corian counters and designer cab-
inetry. Spacious four bedroom floor plan with
high ceilings and dual-pane. Low-E windows
The master suite is located downstairs. Enjoy
casual evenings in front of the cozy fireplace in
the family room. There is a three-car garage,
tile roof and large backyard! Call today, 909-
398-1810. $575,000. (G2642)
TIMELESS ROMANTICISM
Step into another world as you breathe in the
elegant living room with custom-designed fire-
place and coffered ceilings, the spacious fam-
ily room with wet bar, the billiard room, show
stopper kitchen and so much more! Artfully
manicured grounds are complete with pool
and spa, patios plus an orchard. Call to
schedule your appointment 909-398-1810.
$2,495,000. (B659)
SPRAWLING CUSTOM RANCH
San Antonio Heights custom home. Win-
dows and glass doors allow in an abun-
dance of natural light. The comfortably
casual great room opens to the gourmet
kitchen. Front courtyard, bonus room with
a large wet bar and beautifully manicured
grounds. 909-398-1810. $690,000.
(M2431)
CLAREMONT ESTATE
The circular drive surrounded by one acre of
impeccable grounds welcomes you! Formal liv-
ing and dining rooms spill over into the spa-
cious family room. Kitchen boasts double
islands with granite counters. Game room
opens to the backyard patio and tennis court.
The interior offers two downstairs bedroom
suites plus an office, a teen room and a library
area. 909-398-1810. $1,750,000. (P767)
SPECTACULAR VIEWS
Hillside estate in Padua Hills, just minutes to
downtown Claremont, yet very secluded. Wood
floors and walls of windows. Remodeled with
plans by Hartman Baldwin. Viking professional-
grade kitchen and a gallery that is the perfect
place to showcase your artwork and special
treasures, or it could be used as a home office
or gym. Viewing deck overlooks the Wilderness
Park. 909-398-1810. $875,000. (V4026)
CHARMING BUNGALOW
This wonderful bungalow offers many options
for its owner, and is a rare opportunity to own
a home for this excellent price. Super cute
and with a front porch, you will love the
home's little details. Now you can own your
first home or expand your real estate portfolio.
Call before it's too late, 909-398-1810!
$214,000. (E261)
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CELEBRATE LIVING
Beautiful home with lush landscaping and up-
graded interior. Living room with fireplace opens
to the dining room with bay window and French
doors. Kitchen offers stainless steel appliances
and slab countertops. Master suite features fire-
place and French doors. Backyard showcases
a wrap-around, built-in BBQ that seats four, a
gazebo and cabernet vines. 909-398-1810.
$710,000. (S2356)
CLAREMONTS
QUINTESSENTIAL LIFESTYLE
This prestigious Stone Canyon estate will
take your breath away! Privately gated
courtyard. Large private backyard with spa-
cious patio area and built-in BBQ. Fireplace
in spacious master suite sitting area.
Three-car garage parking. 909-398-1810.
$1,298,500. (A1323)
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OPENHOUSESUNDAY 1 - 4 PM