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THE METROPOLITAN « OCTOBER 2, 2008 « A3

NUMBER OF STUDENTS

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TARA MOBERLY » NEWS EDITOR » tmoberly@mscd.edu

metro TARA MOBERLY » NEWS EDITOR » tmoberly@mscd.edu Photo by LInh nGO/ lngo@mscd.edu Barack Obama speaks

Photo by LInh nGO/lngo@mscd.edu

Barack Obama speaks Sept. 30 at Mountain Range High School in Denver .

Stars align for Obama; stop at Auraria to stump

By DOMINIC GRAZIANO

dgrazia1@mscd.edu

Stars will be shining on Auraria, Oct. 4,

when Eva Longoria and Kal Penn make a stop for the Students for Barack

Obama Campus Tour. Penn has only recently started volunteering for the

Obama camp. The Harold and Kumar star originally stumped for Howard Dean during the 2008 primaries. The youth vote is especially important to Penn, who has spoken at numerous college and high school campuses across the country. Longoria, known for her role on ABC’s Des-

perate Housewives, originally supported Hillary Clinton for the 2008 Democratic presidential nominee, but has since switched her attention

to Obama. Longoria has said that Obama seems will-

ing to fight for good medical coverage, advocate protecting a woman’s right to choose and push crucial women’s rights legislation through Con- gress. CSI: Miami star Adam Rodriguez will also be stopping by Auraria in support of Obama. Rodriguez has called Obama “the people’s leader” in interviews and cites Obama’s dedica- tion to immigration reform and education. Oct. 2, John McCain will hold a women’s town hall meeting at the Sheraton Grand Hotel

in Denver. The event will start at 12:30 p.m.

Oct. 3, McCain will be in Pueblo for another meeting at 11 a.m. at Colorado State Univer- sity.

McCain’s visit to Pueblo comes less than

a month after Obama visited the Democratic stronghold in southern Colorado.

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2008

THE ELECTION

Metrolooksforlong-termgrowth

By ANDREW FLOHR-SPENCE spencand@mscd.edu

The Office of Institutional Research re-

leased its yearly student census data this month, and at first glance, the numbers appear to have changed little. Most of the movement in student demo- graphics from one semester to the next can be measured in tenths of a percent and are due to

a complex list of reasons. But several organizations at Metro endeavor to move those numbers. Metro has a range of recruiting events throughout the year designed to bring more students in general to the college, but in recent years the college has begun looking into alter- native ways to reach out to prospective stu- dents. And they are finding that the answer is more than just marketing. “It can’t just be about recruiting new stu- dents,” said Elena Sandoval-Lucero, Metro’s director of admissions and outreach. Reach- ing the college’s goals means not only going out and finding new students, but equally impor- tant is making sure that the new recruits stay in school, she said. “We have to keep the ones that enroll.” Sandoval-Lucero said that, because the cost of recruiting a new student was four times higher than the cost of retaining one, focusing the college’s resources on retention was the most cost effective way to increase long-term enrollment. The demographic that increased most this year over last was the Asian and Pacific Island- ers, what many are calling a success of the Asian Student Discovery Day held in April. The college’s Asian and Pacific student numbers had long hovered slightly below 4 per-

cent of the total student population. In the last four years, the percentage went up one tenth of 1 percent. This year they went up almost half a percent, to 4.4 percent. But Sandoval-Lucero does not credit last spring’s Asian Discovery Day with the increase in Asian students this fall. Many factors can contribute to increased enrollment, she said. “Given the fact that Metro State offers Col- orado’s best value among four-year schools in higher education combined with the current economy, our tuition rates make us a very at- tractive option for students who may have oth- erwise gone elsewhere,” she said. Ray Moroye, assistant professor in the De- partment of Hospitality, Tourism and Events, who organized the Asian Student Discovery Day, is hesitant to claim the rise in Asian students alone as a victory for the recruitment event. “There are many complicated factors in- volved in a student choosing one school over another,” Moroye said. “The fundamental thing

is getting them to understand that education is

the key to moving up in life.” Moroye said he established the Asian Stu- dents Discovery Day to reach out to a growing segment of population in Denver. He said his

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AGE MAKEUP OF STUDENT BODY

25-29
25-29

25-29

25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER

20-24

20-24
20-24

19

25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER
25-29 20-24 19 35-39 30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER

35-39

35-39
30-34 45 40-44 OR OLDER

30-34

45

40-44

OR OLDER

OR YOUNGER

2006

2007

2008

ETHNIC MAKEUP OF STUDENT BODY

WHITE, NON-HISPANIC 66.5%
WHITE, NON-HISPANIC 66.5%

AMERICAN INDIAN OR ALASKA NATIVE 1.8%

HISPANIC 13.3%

BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN, NON-HISPANIC 5.7%

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 0.6%

ALL OTHERS, UNKNOWN 8.2%

ASIAN OR PACIFIC ISALNDER 4.4%

AVERAGE AGE

25.77

MEDIAN AGE

23

By nIC GARCIA/information from fall 2008 census report

group tries to impress on the prospective stu- dents that coming to Metro is career building. The goal of Asian Student Discovery Day is to connect students with Metro professors and community business leaders, such as the Asian Chamber of Denver, so students not only get an education, but they graduate with the network of connections they need to succeed in the busi- ness world. Judy Diaz-Bonaquisti, assistant vice-presi- dent of enrollment services, said the key to both recruitment and retention is impressing on stu- dents the benefits of getting a college degree. One factor is if students have at least one person in their family that has gone to college – simply having someone to ask about how to file all the paperwork can make the difference. “It can be a very intimidating process if you didn’t have parents who went through it,” Diaz- Bonaquisti said. “A lot of parents want to help but maybe don’t know how to help. A lot of par- ents value it but don’t know where to go to get the information.” Diaz-Bonaquisti who is co-chair of the com- mittee aiming to get the college designated a Hispanic Serving Institution said Metro has people in admissions and financial aid who can

help students navigate the paperwork. In its second year at Metro, HSI is a program that grants millions of dollars in federal support to colleges with 25 percent Hispanic enrollment or more. But the increase in Hispanic enrollment over last year is 0.1 percent, making Metro’s Hispan- ic population 13.3 percent of the college’s stu- dent body, 11.7 percent away from HSI goals. If the HSI committees goals are to be reached by the proposed 2018 date, an increase of 1 full percentage point per semester is needed, or ten times the increase of this year over last. Diaz-Bonaquisti said everyone on the HIS committee knows they have a lot of work to do to reach the 25 percent. After spending all last year planning and making recommendations, she is excited they are finally getting down to work. “Our staff is out on the road right now this fall recruiting students who will come in Janu- ary and next fall, but this is a long process,” she said. She says not to expect a sudden bump in Hispanic student numbers. “On the Recruitment side, it takes years to see the fruit of those labors.”