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MERRY MIX: F un Works wit h Mixtures Camper’s Activity Module Prepared by: Raquel E.

Camper’s Activity Module

Prepared by:

Raquel E. Lizardo

(Camp Facilitator - Chemistry)

F un Works wit h Mixtures Camper’s Activity Module Prepared by: Raquel E. Lizardo (Camp Facilitator
F un Works wit h Mixtures Camper’s Activity Module Prepared by: Raquel E. Lizardo (Camp Facilitator
F un Works wit h Mixtures Camper’s Activity Module Prepared by: Raquel E. Lizardo (Camp Facilitator
F un Works wit h Mixtures Camper’s Activity Module Prepared by: Raquel E. Lizardo (Camp Facilitator

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures How to Use the

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

How to Use the Camper’s Activity Module

1. The activity module consists of three sections – “Experiment Time!”, “The Science behind…”, and “Learning Mix Blotter”.

2. “Experiment Time!” provides the list of materials and procedure to follow for a task related to a fun challenge.

3. “The Science behind…”, includes three subsections “Based on observations…” (prompts to answer based on the observations made during the activity proper), “How does it work?” (the scientific explanation behind the observation considered as most striking), and The essential concept is…” (prompts that will finally give focus to the most essential concept to be discovered and learned from the activity).

4. “Learning Mix Blotter”, is a writing template to be filled out with responses to all activity prompts given.

LEARNING TARGETS Upon completing all the activities included in this module, you should be able
LEARNING TARGETS
Upon completing all the activities included in this
module, you should be able to:
 Identify important properties of a solution that
clearly distinguish it from other classes of
mixture.
 Give the similarities and differences between
a suspension and an emulsion.
 Describe the unique properties of a colloid as
a form of mixture.
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Experiment Time!
Experiment Time!
Experiment Time! Activity 1. “Mystery Mixtures” The Science behind… Based on observations… 1. Which of the
Experiment Time! Activity 1. “Mystery Mixtures” The Science behind… Based on observations… 1. Which of the

Activity 1. “Mystery Mixtures”

Experiment Time! Activity 1. “Mystery Mixtures” The Science behind… Based on observations… 1. Which of the
The Science behind…
The Science
behind…
Based on observations… 1. Which of the five mixtures is/are acidic? Basic? 2. What is
Based on observations…
1. Which of the five mixtures
is/are acidic? Basic?
2. What is the identity of each
mixture?
3. How many phase(s) does
each mixture show?
Identify the phase(s).
4. Each mixture is composed
of a common household
product mixed with water.
Which between the
household product and
water is the “solute” and
which one is the “solvent”?
(NOTE: Solute is the part of
mixture which is smaller in
amount; solvent is the part
in bigger amount.)
How does it work?
Red cabbage contains a pigment molecule called flavin
(an anthocyanin).
Very acidic solutions will turn anthocyanin red in color.
Neutral solutions result in a purplish color. Basic solutions
appear in greenish-yellow. Therefore, it is possible to
determine the pH of a solution based on the color it turns
the anthocyanin pigments in red cabbage extract into.
The color of the extract changes in response to changes in
its hydrogen ion concentration.
The “essential concept”
is…
Each of the five mystery mixtures is
classified as a “solution”. Based on
your responses to prompts 3 and 4,
describe in one sentence what a
solution is.

What’s the Challenge?

in one sentence what a solution is. What’s the Challenge? With the use of red cabbage

With the use of red cabbage extract, you will test the pH of each of five mixtures in liquid form to determine if it is acidic or basic.

What you need

o

red cabbage extract

o

plastic dropper

o

5 unknown mixtures (each contained in a plastic cup)

Hands-on

1. Add five drops of the red cabbage extract onto each of the five plastic cups containing a mystery mixture. Swirl the content of the plastic cup thoroughly.

2. Determine the pH of the resulting mixture by referring to the figure below.

of the resulting mixture by referring to the figure below. 3. With the use of your

3. With the use of your sense of smell, identify each of the five mystery mixtures. (HINT:

Each mixture is a common or familiar household product mixed with water.)

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

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Learning Mix Blotter Based on observations… 1. 2. 3. 4. The “essential concept” is… A
Learning Mix Blotter
Based on observations…
1.
2.
3.
4.
The “essential concept” is…
A “solution” is a mixture that
MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures
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Experiment Time!
Experiment Time!
Activity 2. “Ooey, Gooey Oobleck”
Activity 2. “Ooey, Gooey Oobleck”

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

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What’s the Challenge?

You will make a liquid mixture of cornstarch and water turn into solid by tapping on it. The mixture is known as an “Oobleck”!

What you need

o

corn starch (about ¼ cup)

o

water (about ¼ cup)

o

food coloring

o

mixing bowl

o

newspaper

o

spoon

o

plastic cup

Hands-on

1. Place a sheet of newspaper flat on the floor; put the mixing bowl in the middle of the newspaper.

2. Add ¼ cup of dry cornstarch to the bowl; then, add about 1/8 cup (2 tablespoons) of water (added with food coloring) to the corn starch and stir slowly. (Add water slowly to the mixture, with stirring, until all of the powder is wet.)

3. Continue to add water until the cornstarch acts like a liquid when you stir it slowly. When you tap on the liquid with your finger, it shouldn't splash, but rather will become hard.

(NOTE: If your mixture is too liquid, add more cornstarch. Your goal is to create a

mixture that feels like a stiff liquid when you stir it slowly, but feels like a solid when you tap on it with your finger or with a spoon.)

solid when you tap on it with your finger or with a spoon.) The Science behind…
solid when you tap on it with your finger or with a spoon.) The Science behind…
The Science behind…
The Science
behind…
Based on observations… 1. What happens to the Oobleck when you rub it between your
Based on observations…
1. What happens to the
Oobleck when you
rub it between your
palms? When you
you stop rubbing?
2. After leaving the
cornstarch mixture in
a plastic cup for
some time, what can
be seen at the
bottom of the plastic
cup?
How does it work?
Scientists call Oobleck a “non-Newtonian
fluid” (just like ketchup and quicksand).
In an Oobleck, the cornstarch is suspended
in
the
water
(instead
of
completely
dissolving, just like sugar or salt).
Applying a force to the Oobleck squeezes
the water out from between the cornstarch
bits. Pulling or pouring the Oobleck, on the
other hand, gently lets the water stay
between the cornstarch bits.
The “essential concept”
is…
An
Oobleck
is
classified
as
a
“suspension” rather than a solution.
Based on your response to prompt 2,
what then is a suspension?

4. Scoop the Oobleck into your palm, then slowly work it into a ball by rubbing the mixture between your palms.

5. Stop rubbing, and observe the Oobleck on your palm.

Learning Mix Blotter Based on observations… 1. 2. The “essential concept” is… A “suspension” is
Learning Mix Blotter
Based on observations…
1.
2.
The “essential concept” is…
A “suspension” is a mixture that
MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures
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Experiment Time!
Experiment Time!
Experiment Time! Activity 3. “Blobs in a Bottle” What’s the Challenge? You will create a “lava

Activity 3. “Blobs in a Bottle”

What’s the Challenge?

Activity 3. “Blobs in a Bottle” What’s the Challenge? You will create a “lava lamp” by

You will create a “lava lamp” by making “colored blobs” float in a mixture!

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

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What you need

o

1-liter clear soda bottle

o

¾ cup water

o

vegetable oil

o

fizzing tablets (ex. Alka Seltzer®)

o

food coloring

o

funnel

o

flashlight

Hands-on

1. Pour the water into the bottle.

2. Using a funnel, add the vegetable oil into the bottle until it is almost full.

3. Add ten drops of food coloring into the bottle.

4. Break a seltzer tablet in half and drop the half tablet into the bottle. Watch it sink to the bottom and let the blobby greatnessbegin!

5. To keep the effect going, just add another tablet piece. (NOTE: For a true lava lamp effect, shine a flashlight through the bottom of the bottle.)

shine a flashlight through the bottom of the bottle.) The Science behind… Based on observations… 1.
The Science behind… Based on observations… 1. What happens to the vegetable oil when it
The Science
behind…
Based on observations…
1.
What happens to the
vegetable oil when it is
added to water?
2.
To which does the
food coloring mix, with
water or with oil?
3.
What are the “colored
blobs” made of?
4.
On which part of the
mixture do the colored
blobs float as the
seltzer tablet is added?
How does it work?
Water and oil do not mix (they are said to be
immiscible liquids) so when we add oil to the
water, the water sinks to the bottom of the
bottle, while the oil settles at the top.
The food coloring mixes with the water but
does NOT with the oil.
The Alka-Seltzer tablet reacts with the water,
making bubbles of carbon dioxide gas. Those
bubbles attach themselves to the colored
water making them float - hence the “lava
lamp” effect.
The “essential concept”
is…
The mixture consisting of the “colored water
blobs” floating on oil in the lava lamp is
classified as an “emulsion”.
What
is
the
similarity
and
what
is
the
difference between an “emulsion” and a
“suspension”? (HINT: Consider the phases of
the individual components of the mixture.)
Based on observations… 1. 2. 3. 4. The “ essential concept ” is … Learning

Based on observations…

1.

2.

3.

4.

The essential conceptis

Learning Mix Blotter

The similarity between an “emulsion” and a “suspension” is

The difference, on the other hand, is

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

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Experiment Time!
Experiment Time!
Experiment Time! Activity 4. “Sweet Treat: Oohh…Ice Cream” What’s the Challenge? Satisfy your sweet tooth by

Activity 4. “Sweet Treat: Oohh…Ice Cream”

What’s the Challenge?

Satisfy your sweet tooth by making a delectable frozen delight ― ice cream!

What you need

(per ½ cup serving):

o

50 mL (¼ cup) milk

o

50 mL (¼ cup) whipping cream

o

25 mL (5 tsp) sugar

o

0.5 mL (1/8 tsp) vanilla or vanilla flavorings

o

100-175 mL (½ cup) salt

o

500 mL (2 cups) ice cubes

o

one 1-L (1 quart) zip-top bag

o

one 4-L (1 gallon) zip-top bag

o

spoon

Hands-on

1. Place the pre-measured sugar, milk, whipping cream and vanilla into the smaller zip-top bag; seal the bag securely.

2. Put the ice cubes into the larger zip-top bag. Add salt to the bag of ice.

3. Place the sealed smaller bag inside the larger bag of ice and salt; seal the larger bag securely.

4. Gently rock the larger bag from side to side. (Caution: Hold the bag by the top seal as the bag gets too cold through continuous shaking.)

5. Shake and rock the bag for 5-10 minutes

or until the content of the smaller bag has solidified into ice cream.

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures

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into ice cream. MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures 8 The Science behind… Based on observations…
The Science behind…
The Science
behind…
Based on observations… 1. Describe the “consistency” of the ice cream. 2. How many phase(s)
Based on observations…
1. Describe the
“consistency” of the
ice cream.
2. How many phase(s)
of matter is/are seen
in the ice cream?
How does it work?
Milk with dissolved sugar and whipping cream
freezes at much colder temperature than fresh
water (0°C).
When salt is added to ice, it dissolves in the water
on the surface of the ice cubes. Salty water
freezes at a much lower temperature than fresh
water.
Thus, the salt and ice mixture gets much colder at
a temperature lower than zero degree Celsius,
enough to turn the mixture into ice cream.
The “essential concept”
is…
Ice cream is both an emulsion and a foam.
The air in the ice cream does not mix with the
other ingredients but forms small bubbles in
the bulk (foam). An emulsion is also formed as
the milk/whipping cream is evenly scattered
in the ice/water, but does not dissolve.
These are what make ice cream a “colloid”.
Why is colloid still NOT considered a solution
though it exists in one phase of matter (i.e.,
homogeneous)?

6. Remove the small bag, open it, grab a spoon and enjoy!

6. Remove the small bag, open it, grab a spoon and enjoy! Based on observations… 1.

Based on observations…

1.

Learning Mix Blotter

2.

And so, the “essential conceptis

Colloid is NOT a solution because

MERRY MIX: Fun Works with Mixtures