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Henderson Utility Guidelines

Potable Water Facilities



















Department of Utility Services

May 2005

Version 1.0

Henderson Utility Guidelines
TABLE OF CONTENTS


CHAPTER 1 GENERAL................................................................................................. 1.1
1.01 Introduction.................................................................................................. 1.1
1.01.01 General........................................................................................... 1.1
1.01.02 Scope and Coverage....................................................................... 1.1
1.01.03 Abbreviations................................................................................. 1.2
1.01.04 Permits........................................................................................... 1.4
1.01.05 Security Features............................................................................ 1.5
1.01.06 Deviations from Henderson Utility Guidelines............................. 1.5
1.02 Project Processing........................................................................................ 1.5
1.02.01 Review and Approval .................................................................... 1.5
1.03 Advertise, Bid and Construction......................................................... 1.6
1.03.01 Construction Phase Checklist........................................................ 1.7
1.04 Project Closeout........................................................................................... 1.7
1.04.01 Notification of Substantial Completion......................................... 1.8
1.04.02 Development and Resolution of a Punchlist.................................. 1.8
1.04.03 Training Schedule.......................................................................... 1.8
1.04.04 Operation and Maintenance Manuals........................................... 1.8
1.04.05 Start-up and Commissioning........................................................ 1.12
1.04.06 Letter of Compliance to Design................................................... 1.21
1.04.07 Record Drawings......................................................................... 1.22

CHAPTER 2 PUMP STATIONS.................................................................................... 2.1
2.01 Design Concept Phase.................................................................................. 2.1
2.01.01 General........................................................................................... 2.1
2.02 Pre Design Phase.......................................................................................... 2.1
2.02.01 General........................................................................................... 2.1
2.02.02 Geotechnical Investigation............................................................. 2.3
2.02.03 Hydraulics and Surge Analysis...................................................... 2.9
2.02.04 Preliminary Design Elements...................................................... 2.12
2.03 Final Design Phase..................................................................................... 2.18
2.03.01 General......................................................................................... 2.18
2.03.02 Site Civil ...................................................................................... 2.18
2.03.03 Architecture and Landscaping..................................................... 2.23
2.03.04 Mechanical ................................................................................... 2.27
2.03.05 Structural Design Requirements.................................................. 2.43
2.03.06 Electrical Systems........................................................................ 2.47
2.03.07 Instrument and Control ................................................................ 2.56





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CHAPTER 3 RESERVOIRS........................................................................................... 3.1
3.01 Design Concept Report................................................................................ 3.1
3.01.01 General........................................................................................... 3.1
3.02 Pre-Design Report........................................................................................ 3.1
3.02.01 General........................................................................................... 3.1
3.02.02 Site Selection................................................................................. 3.3
3.02.03 Volume Criteria............................................................................. 3.4
3.02.04 Survey............................................................................................ 3.5
3.02.05 Geotechnical Investigation............................................................. 3.6
3.02.06 Schematic Design........................................................................... 3.9
3.02.07 Document Preparation................................................................... 3.9
3.03 Final Design Phase..................................................................................... 3.11
3.03.01 General Submittal Requirements................................................. 3.11
3.03.02 General Design Requirements..................................................... 3.11
3.03.03 Design Assumptions.................................................................... 3.13
3.03.04 Site Design Guidelines................................................................. 3.14
3.03.05 Concrete Reservoir Design.......................................................... 3.16
3.03.06 Steel Tank Design........................................................................ 3.20
3.03.07 Electrical Systems........................................................................ 3.26
3.03.08 Instrument and Control ................................................................ 3.27
3.03.09 Landscaping................................................................................. 3.29

CHAPTER 4 PIPELINES................................................................................................ 4.1
4.01 General ......................................................................................................... 4.1
4.01.01 Transmission Main Definition....................................................... 4.1
4.02 Design Concept Phase.................................................................................. 4.1
4.02.01 General........................................................................................... 4.1
4.03 Pre-Design Phase......................................................................................... 4.1
4.03.01 General........................................................................................... 4.1
4.03.02 Utility Coordination....................................................................... 4.3
4.03.03 Survey............................................................................................ 4.6
4.03.04 Geotechnical Evaluation................................................................ 4.6
4.03.05 Hydraulic Analysis....................................................................... 4.12
4.04 Final Design Phase..................................................................................... 4.13
4.04.01 Pipeline Systems.......................................................................... 4.13
4.04.02 Steel Pipeline Design................................................................... 4.17
4.04.03 Ductile Iron Design Criteria......................................................... 4.23
4.04.04 Protective Coatings and Linings.................................................. 4.25
4.04.05 Appurtenances and Structures...................................................... 4.27
4.04.06 Thrust Restraint............................................................................ 4.32
4.04.07 Corrosion Control ........................................................................ 4.34

APPENDIX A CHECKLISTS......................................................................................A.1

APPENDIX B WATER DEMANDS............................................................................B.1


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LIST OF TABLES

Table 2.1 Typical Criteria for Background Noise........................................................ 2.22
Table 2.2 Radio Cable Sizing Requirements................................................................ 2.55
Table 2.3 I&C Standards............................................................................................... 2.59

Table 3.1 Dead Loads................................................................................................... 3.13

Table 4.1 Maximum Allowable Hoop Stress for Welded Steel Pipeline..................... 4.18
Table 4.2 Maximum Allowable Combined Stress for Welded Steel Pipeline.............. 4.22
Table 4.3 Allowances for Casting Tolerance................................................................ 4.25

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1.1 Design Process Schematic
Figure 1.2 Construction Process Schematic

Figure 3.1 Roof Vent Security Cage (Steel)
Figure 3.2 Ladder Assembly Knuckle Roof (Steel)
Figure 3.3 Roof Guardrail Assembly (Steel)
Figure 3.4 Tank Underdrain (Steel)
Figure 3.5 Overflow Drain Headwall and Flap Valve
Figure 3.6 Roof Vent 48 Diameter
Figure 3.7 Access Hatch

Figure 4.1 Utility Separation
Figure 4.2 Typical Isolation Valve Vault
Figure 4.3 Drain Valve Assembly





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Chapter 1 General
1.01 Introduction
1.01.01 General

The City of Henderson (COH) is located in Clark County, Nevada. The
population, as of 2004, is 220,000 people and is projected to be 310,000 in
the year 2010. The COH was the fastest growing city in America from
1990 to 1998 and remains one of the top five fastest growing cities in the
nation (U.S. Census).

Potable water is supplied to the COH by Southern Nevada Water
Authority (SNWA) rate of flow control structures, as well as, COH owned
and operated water facilities. The COH facilities include a water
treatment plant, pump stations, reservoirs, and pipelines 16 inches in
diameter and larger.

These guidelines, entitled Henderson Utility Guidelines (HUGs), are
intended to aid the Project Team in implementing accepted COH design
practices of potable water facilities.

The main purpose of the HUGs is to assure uniformity of design concepts,
formats, methodologies, procedures, and quality of work products for the
COH. The project Engineer shall note the details and descriptions
contained within these guidelines are conceptual in nature and are not
intended to preclude sound engineering judgment.

1.01.02 Scope and Coverage

To effectively use the HUGs, it is beneficial to review the Table of
Contents for familiarity with the format and layout of the document.
HUGs has been divided into chapters, and within each chapter are sections
and subsections. In Chapter 1 the introduction and general design
guidelines are presented. Chapter 2, 3, and 4 are utility guidelines for the
design of pump stations, reservoirs, and transmission pipelines 16 inches
in diameter and larger.







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1.01.03 Abbreviations

AABC: Associated Air Balancing Council
AASHTO:
American Association of State Highway and
Transportation Officials
AC: Asphaltic Concrete
ACI: American Concrete Institute
ACP: Asbestos Concrete Pipe
ADC: Air Diffuser Council
AFBMA:
Anti-Friction Bearing Manufacturers
Association
AMCA: Air Movement and Conditioning Association
ANSI: American National Standards Institute, Inc.
APN: Assessors Parcel Number
APWA: American Public Works Association
ARI: American Refrigeration Institute
ASCE: American Society of Civil Engineers
ASHRAE:
American Society of Heating, Refrigeration,
and Air Conditioning Engineers
ASME: American Society of Mechanical Engineers
ASPE: American Society of Professional Engineers
ASTM: American Society of Testing and Materials
AV: Air Valve
AWWA: American Water Works Association
BEP: Best Efficiency Point
C/L: Centerline
CCRFCD: Clark County Regional Flood Control District
CCUSD: Clark County Uniform Standard Drawings
CFC: Clorofloracarbons
CFR: Code of Federal Regulation - OSHA
CIP:
Cast Iron Pipe or Capital Improvement
Program
CLSM: Controlled Low Strength Material
COH: City of Henderson
CPVC: Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride
CSA: Canadian Standards Association
DC: Direct Current
DCR: Design Concept Report
DIP: Ductile Iron Pipe
DIPRA: Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association
DSC: Development Services Center
DUS: Department of Utility Services
DV: Drainvalve
EPA: Environmental Protection Agency
EPS: Expandable Polystyrene
FM: Factory Mutual System
FPS: Feet Per Second
FT: Feet

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GPM: Gallons Per Minute
GPS: Gallons Per Second
HART: Highway Addressable Remote Transducer
HDPE: High Density Polyethylene
HOAR: Hand, On, Off, Auto, Remote
HS: Hand Switches
HUGs: Henderson Utility Guidelines
HVAC: Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
I&C: Instrument and Control
I/O: Input/Output
IBC: International Building Code
ID: Inside Diameter
IEEE: Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
IP: Iron Pipe
LED: Light Emitting Diode
LF: Linear Feet
MAS: Multiple Address
MCC: Motor Control Center
MDD: Maximum Day Demand
MDFT: Multi-Dimensional Family Therapy
MGD: Million Gallons Per Day
MLCSP: Mortar Lined and Coated Steel Pipe
MSS: Manufacturer's Standardization Society
NACE: National Association of Corrosion Engineers
NAVD: North American Vertical Datum
NEBB: National Environmental Balancing Bureau
NEC: National Electric Code
NEMA: National Electric Manufacturers Association
NFPA: National Fire Protection Agency
NPC: Nevada Power Company
NPSH: Net Positive Suction Head
NPSHR: Net Positive Suction Head Required
NPT: National Pipe Thread
NSF: National Sanitation Federation
O&M: Operation and Maintenance
OD: Outside Diameter
OSHA: Operational Safety and Health Administration
P&ID: Process and Instrumentation Diagram
PDR: Pre Design Report
PHD: Peak Hour Demand
PL: Property Line or Pilot Lights
PLC: Programmable Logic Controller
PPM: Parts Per Million
PRD: Planned Residential Development
PRV: Pressure Reducing Valve


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PSI: Pounds Per Square Inch
PVC: Polyvinyl Chloride Pipe
Q: Rate of Flow
QC: Quality Control
RC: Reinforced Concrete
RCP: Reinforced Concrete Pipe
ROFCS: Rate of Flow Control Station
ROW: Right-of-Way
RPPA: Reducing Pressure Principle Assembly
RTU: Remote Telemetry Unit
SCADA: Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition
SMACNA:
Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors
National Association
SNWA: Southern Nevada Water Authority
SPT: Standard Penetration Test
SSPC: Structural Steel Protective Coating
SST: Stainless Steel
SWC: Surge Withstand Capability
TDH: Total Dynamic Head
TDS: Total Dissolved Solids
TO: Turnout
UBC: Uniform Building Code
UFC: Uniform Fire Code
UL: Underwriters Laboratory
UPS: Uninterruptible Power Supply
USA: Underground Service Alert
USGS: United States Geological Survey
V: Velocity of Flow
VFD: Variable Frequency Drive
VOC: Volatile Organic Compounds
YD: Yard


1.01.04 Permits

The Engineer is responsible for reviewing the information regarding State
and Local permits required for the project and the acquisition of all
federal, state, and local permits, with all such efforts being coordinated
through the COH.


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1.01.05 Security Features

City of Henderson, Department of Utility Services, Technical Services
will be evaluating all proposed project design information for compliance
with the Department of Homeland Security Bio-Terrorism Act of 2002.
The Engineer may be required to include security features into the project
bid documents for all new facilities or the expansion of existing facilities,
as required.

1.01.06 Deviations from Henderson Utility Guidelines

HUGs are intended to standardize the design and ultimately the
construction of COH owned and operated utility infrastructure. Although
HUGs provides direction in design, it is still the responsibility of the
Engineer to provide the highest professional quality design. The Engineer
is still charged to utilize creativity and innovation in providing an
acceptable cost effective design. This document is intended to provide
guidance only and deviation from HUGs may be appropriate.

All major deviations from HUGs shall be identified and noted in the
preliminary design report. Resolution and acceptance of the deviation
shall be at the discretion of the Department of Utility Services.

1.02 Project Processing
1.02.01 Review and Approval

This review and acceptance process has been developed by COH to
standardize the review and acceptance procedures for large water
facilities. The design process includes three phases: the Design Concept
Report (DCR), the Pre-Design Report (PDR), and the Final Design. The
following is a brief summary of each phase and their respective
advancement through the review and acceptance process. This process is
presented schematically in Figure 1.1, included at the end of this section..

The DCR essentially defines the project. It provides information on
project location, service area (size), design alternatives, etc. A listing of
items that should be addressed in the DCR has been outlined in each
specific facility section.

A DCR for the facility shall be submitted and accepted by the City of
Henderson Department of Utility Services New Development Section
(DUS-NDS). Six (6) copies of the DCR shall be submitted to the COH-

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DUS-NDS. Once the DCR has been accepted, the Engineer may proceed
to the PDR.

The PDR (which includes 30% drawings) establishes specific design
criteria and summarizes all activities that will be performed necessary to
prepare the project for design. These activities include, but are not limited
to, property needs, geotechnical requirements, environmental review,
coordination workshops, etc. A listing of items that should be addressed
in the PDR has been outlined in each specific facility section.

The Engineer is required to submit a PDR, no matter the size or
complexity of the project. Six (6) copies of the PDR shall be submitted to
the COH-DUS-NDS. Following review and acceptance of the PDR, DUS-
NDS will issue an acceptance letter and the Engineer shall proceed to the
Design. Along with the PDR, the Engineer shall submit a drainage study
and traffic study (if necessary) for the COHs review. These studies shall
be submitted through the COH DUS-NDS. The DUS-NDS will issue
acceptance letters for each of the studies, once all comments are
addressed.

Included in the Final Design are a minimum of three submittals: the 60%
Submittal, the 100% Submittal and Final Mylars. The 60% Submittal
shall include expanded 30% drawings and preliminary specifications. Six
(6) copies of the 60% Submittal (drawings and specifications) shall be
submitted to the DUS-NDS. Once all the 60% Submittal review
comments are addressed, the Engineer shall proceed to the 100% Design.
The 100% Submittal shall include finalized drawings and complete
specifications. The Engineer shall submit twelve (12) copies of the 100%
Submittal drawings and three copies of specifications to the DSC. Once
the 100% Design is reviewed and accepted by all applicable departments,
the DSC shall notify the Engineers that the Final Mylars may be submitted
for final review and signature. Along with the final set of signed mylars,
an electronic copy of the final drawings and specifications will be
submitted. (Note: The mylar cover sheet shall be signed off by all
applicable outside utility agencies prior to submittal to the COH.)

1.03 Advertise, Bid and Construction

Once signed mylars are received the Owner/Developer can proceed with
contracting of the work. The advertising, bidding, and construction
process is presented in Figure 1.2. Inspection of construction will remain
the responsibility of the owner. The COH will also provide inspection to
ensure satisfaction that the facility is being constructed to the approved
plans and specifications.


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1.03.01 Construction Phase Checklist

Construction process is presented in Figure 1.2. A checklist of the
procedure is provided on the following page:

Advertise.
Contracting of Work.
Notice of Award.
Notice to Proceed.
Pre-Construction Conference.
Permit acquisition
Construction.
Substantial Completion.
Operator Training.
Punch List Development/Resolution.
Facility Start-up.
O&M Manual.
Final walk through.
As-Builts.
Final Acceptance.

1.04 Project Closeout

Project close out shall include the steps outlined in the construction phase
schematic presented in Figure 1.2. The closeout process shall include but
not limited to the following:

Notification of Substantial Completion.
Development of a punchlist.
Training Schedule.
Start-up Commissioning.
Distribution of Final operation and maintenance manuals.
Confirmation of Property title transfer to the City of
Henderson.
Utility Services Records transfer and verification.
Final walk through.
Record Drawings.
Release of Bonds.
Final Close-out Notification.


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1.04.01 Notification of Substantial Completion

Contractor shall notify the Engineer and the COHs Quality Control
Division in writing that the project is substantially complete.

1.04.02 Development and Resolution of a Punchlist

A project walk through is scheduled by the COHs Quality Control
Division with the contractor, developer, and engineer. A punchlist will be
made of outstanding items that need to be completed.

1.04.03 Training Schedule

Contractor is to schedule through the Citys Quality Control Division, as
directed by the specifications for training of COHs operations personnel.

1.04.04 Operation and Maintenance Manuals

Operation and maintenance (O&M) manuals shall be supplied through the
COH-QC to the DUS-NDS prior to project closeout. The manuals shall be
supplied in a hard copy format as well as Portable Document Format
(pdf). The contractor shall submit a total of seven (7) copies of the O&M
manuals. Five (5) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy on CD shall go
to COH-QC and one (1) additional electronic copy shall go to the
Engineer. Electronic copies shall be submitted in MicrosoftWord,
MicrosoftExcel, and/or AutoDesk/AutoCAD(Versions as determined
by the COH).

The hard copy of the O&M manuals shall conform to the following
format:

Binders shall be commercial quality 3-ring binders (1
maximum ring size) with durable and cleanable plastic
covers. When multiple binders are used, correlate data into
related consistent groupings.
White, 8 x 11, 20 lb minimum paper for typed pages.
Text shall be manufacturers printed data, or neatly
typewritten.
Drawings shall be bound in with the text with a reinforced
punched binder tab. Fold larger drawings to the size of text
pages.

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Provide a flyleaf for each separate product or piece of
operating equipment.
Provide a typed description of the product and major
component parts of the equipment.
Provide indexed tabs.
The cover of each volume shall include the title of the
project, identity of each separate structure as applicable and
general subject matter covered in the manual.

Each O&M manual shall include the following general information as
applicable:

Date O&M issued.
Neatly typewritten table of contents for each volume,
arranged in systematic order.
Identify the contractor, name of the responsible principle,
address and telephone number.
List each product required to be included, indexed to
content of volume.
List, with each product, name, address and telephone
number of:

o Subcontractor or installer.
o Maintenance contractor, as appropriate.
o Identify area of responsibility of each.
o Local source of supply for parts and replacement
and list of recommended spare parts.

Identify each product by product name and other
identifying symbols as set forth in the Contract Documents,
including nameplate information and shop order numbers
for each item of equipment furnished.
Include only product data sheets which are pertinent to
specific product. Annotate each sheet to:

o Clearly identify specific product or part installed.
o Clearly identify data applicable to installation.
o Delete references to inapplicable information.

Supplement product
data with drawings as necessary to clearly illustrate:

o Relations of component parts of equipment and
systems.
o Control and flow diagrams

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Coordinate drawings with information in the project record
documents to assure correct illustration of completed
installation.
Do not use project record documents as maintenance
drawings.
Provide additional written text, as required to supplement
product data for a particular installation. Organize in a
consistent format under separate headings for different
procedures. Provide logical sequence of instructions for
each procedure.
Provide a copy of each warranty, bond and service contract
issued. Provide an information sheet for the COH, giving:

o Proper procedures in event of failure.
o Instances which might affect validity of warranties
or bonds.
o Life of all bonds and warranties.

O&M manuals specific to equipment and systems shall include the
following information as applicable:

Contents, for each unit of equipment and system, as
appropriate.
Description of unit and component parts:

o Function, normal operating characteristics and
limiting conditions.
o Performance curves, engineering data and tests.
o Complete nomenclature and commercial number of
replaceable parts.
o Life of all bonds and warranties. (start and end
dates)

Operating procedures:

o Start-up, break in, routine and normal operating
instructions.
o Regulation, control, stopping, shutdown and
emergency instructions.
o Summer and winter operating instructions.
o Special operating instructions.


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Maintenance procedures:

o Routine operations.
o Guide to trouble shooting.
o Disassembly, repair and reassembly.

Alignment, adjusting and checking.
Servicing and lubrication schedule: List of lubricants
required.
Manufacturers printed operating and maintenance
instructions.
Description of sequence of operation by control
manufacturer.
Original manufacturers parts list, illustrations, assembly
drawings, and diagrams required for maintenance.
Predicted life of parts subject to wear.
Items recommended to be stocked as spare parts.
As installed control diagrams by control manufacturer.
List of original manufacturers spare parts, manufacturers
current prices and recommended quantities to be
maintained on storage.

Contents, for each electrical and electronic system, as appropriate:

Description of system and component parts:

o Function, normal operating characteristics and
limiting conditions.
o Performance curves, engineering data and tests.
o Complete nomenclature and commercial number of
replacement parts.

Circuit directories of panelboards:

o Electrical service.
o Controls.
o Communications.
o As installed color coded wiring diagrams.

Operating procedures:

o Routing and normal operating instructions.
o Sequences required.
o Special operating instructions.


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Maintenance procedures:

o Routine operations.
o Guide to trouble shooting.
o Disassembly, repair and assembly.
o Adjustment and checking.

Manufacturers printed operating and maintenance
instructions.

1.04.05 Start-up and Commissioning

As part of the contract documents, the Engineer shall require the
contractor to develop a schedule and procedure for start-up and
commissioning the water facility. Start-up shall be defined to include all
tests, testing, initial operation, and other activities related to providing a
complete, operational, and functional project. Start-up shall include all
factory testing, functional testing, all performance testing, all
commissioning and pre-commissioning activities, all manufacturers
services, all certification of proper installation, and all troubleshooting,
checkout, and shakedown activities. Providing the specified
documentation supporting the performance of these activities and the
documentation required to report test results is also considered part of
start-up.

The following equipment shall be inspected and tested in the
commissioning of pump stations:


Bearings
Drives
Motors
Pumps
Piping Systems
Controls and Instrumentation

The following equipment shall be inspected and tested in the
commissioning of reservoirs:

Piping Systems
Chlorination System
Mixing System
Controls and Instrumentation
Valves

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The following equipment shall be inspected and tested in the
commissioning of transmission pipelines.

Piping
Valves

Following substantial completion and prior to final completion, the
contractor shall proceed to start-up and commissioning. The contractor
shall provide supervision, labor, coordination, tools, material, equipment,
and services required to perform start-up and commissioning of each
respective item of equipment and systems furnished and/or installed as
part of the project. Supervision, labor, and assistance to service engineers
and technical directors of installation for equipment installed as part of the
project shall be provided by the contractor. The contractor shall follow
specified procedures and instructions dictated by these representatives.
Representatives will not be present at all times. The COHs QC
representative will determine when representatives will be required.
Labor will be provided as necessary to support the schedule as determined
by the COHs QC representative, including initial total pump station start-
up.

Station start-up will proceed on a schedule determined by the COHs QC
representative and will likely entail 24-hour a day activity until start-up is
complete. With a minimum 48 hour prior notification, the COH will
provide operators for commissioning process. The COHs QC
representative will determine when start-up has been completed. Start-up
refers not only to start-up of total station, but also individual systems
requiring checkout prior to total station start-up.

A. Pre-commissioning

Commissioning responsibilities list including breakdown of
each trades responsibilities during commissioning activities.
Sample documentation for tests and inspections required by
Code Authorities.

B. Record documents

Provide alignment and vibration tolerances and readings after
adjustments for devices and systems defined below.
Provide instrument calibration reports for each field and panel
device furnished and/or installed as part of the contract

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documents. Sample calibration reports shall include, but not be
limited to:

o Equipment: Instrument tag number, manufacturer, model
number and serial number. For valves, include fail
position, model number of actuator, model number of
positioner (if included) and power requirements.
o Service: Application, building, and floor location.
o Test data: Test equipment used, test performance data for
instruments in As Found and As Left conditions.
o Date of calibration and name of individual performing
calibration.

1.04.05.02 Commissioning and Start-up Prerequisites
A. Installation verification

Prior to system start-up the contractor, the Engineer, and the
COHs QC representative shall conduct a final installation
verification audit. Contractor shall be responsible for
completeness of work to the satisfaction of the contract
documents, including change orders, and punch list items.
Audit shall include, but not be limited to, checking of:

o Piping specialties including balancing, control and isolation
valves.
o Control sensor types and locations.
o Identification of piping, valves, equipment, controls, etc.
o Major equipment, fans, valves, starters, gages,
thermometers, etc.
o Documentation of prestart-up tests performed, including
manufacturers factory tests.

If work is found to be incomplete, incorrect or nonfunctional,
contractor shall take corrective action before system start-up
work proceeds. If during system start-up additional items are
found, contractor shall take corrective action before system
start-up is completed.

B. Operation verification

After system equipment, wiring, piping and component
installation has been verified, system start-up and calibration
shall commence. Contractor shall be responsible for operation

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and control of installed systems. During system checkout, an
operation checklist shall be completed to verify system
operation. COHs QC representative shall verify system
operation with responsible contractor.

C. COHs operating procedures for commissioning and start-up

Notify COH QC representative, in writing, 2 business days in
advance of commissioning and start-up of equipment or
systems.
Notify COH, in writing, 2 day in advance of start-up of
equipment of systems upon completion of commissioning
process.
Upon completion of start-up, equipment or systems shall be
turned over to the COH and tagged as accepted. No additional
work on or operation of equipment or systems shall be allowed
by contractor without written consent of the COH-QC
representative.

D. Test equipment

Contractor shall provide all test equipment required for
commissioning and start-up of equipment.
Provide and maintain tools and test equipment in first-class
condition and quantities sufficient to assure timely, successful
performance and completion of required work.
Test equipment shall have recent calibration checks by
equipment manufacturer or authorized facility to assure
accuracy of commissioning process.
1.04.05.03 Equipment Commissioning
A. Bearings

Inspect for cleanliness; clean and remove foreign materials.
Verify alignment.

B. Drives

Inspect for cleanliness; clean and remove foreign materials
before starting operation.

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Adjust drives for all alignment of sheaves, V-belts and
couplings.
Adjust tension in V-belt drives and adjust varipitch sheaves
and drives for proper equipment speed.

C. Lubrication

Lubricants for initial operation shall be furnished by contractor.
Lubricants required for storage and flushing of equipment
furnished shall be furnished by contractor.
Lubricate bearings and fill oil reservoir prior to operation.
Perform lubrication in accordance with manufacturers
recommendations.
After contractor lubricates equipment, contractor shall affix a
tag to equipment stating lubricant used, quantity, date
lubricated and name of person lubricating the equipment.
Submit 2 volumes of lubrication requirements to the COH QC
Representative for each item of equipment furnished requiring
lubrication.

D. Motors

Check each motor for amperage comparison to nameplate
value.
Correct conditions which produce excessive current flow and
which exist due to equipment malfunction.

E. Pumps

Check mechanical seals and packing for cleanliness and
adjustment before running pump.
Verify that pump and connecting piping are free of dirt, debris
and scale before circulating liquid through pump.
Check running clearances.

F. Miscellaneous

Inspect fan wheels for clearance and balance. Provide factory
authorized personnel for adjustment when needed.
Remove and rust, scale and foreign material from equipment
and renew defaced surfaces.

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1.04.05.04 Piping System Commissioning

Check settings of pipe hangers. Check piping for leaks at every point, and
at every screwed, flanged, or welded connection, using Leak-Tek or
other approved compound.

Examine flanged joints:

o Tighten flanges after system has been placed in operation.
o Replace flange gaskets that show any sign of leakage after
tightening.

Inspect screwed joints:

o Promptly remake each joint that appears to be faulty; do not
wait for rust to form.
o Clean threads on both parts, apply compound, and remake
joints.

Vent gasses trapped in any part of the liquid systems. Verify that liquids
are drained from all parts of gas or air systems. After system has been
placed in operation:

Clean strainers, dirt pockets, orifices, valve seats, and headers
in fluid systems to assure they are free of foreign materials.
Open air vents; remove operating elements. Clean thoroughly,
reinstall internal parts and put back in operation.
Repair damaged insulation.

1.04.05.05 Controls and Instrumentation Commissioning

Check out controls and instruments prior to start-up to assure in situ
performance in accordance with contract documents under stipulated
operating conditions. Contractor to determine initial start-up conditions.


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A. Prior to commissioning

Remove shipping stops from instruments before starting with
procedures specified.
Contractor shall have instruction manuals available.
Install miscellaneous components including charts,
illumination, mercury, etc., furnished separately.
Verify nameplate data with respect to conditions of range,
operating temperature, specific gravity, and components as
stated on unit specifications. Discrepancies shall be
immediately called to attention of the COH QC representative
and report of its condition confirmed in writing.

B. Commissioning responsibilities

Verify instrument installation in conformance with
manufacturers recommendations.
Follow manufacturers recommendations for calibrating
control system components including instruments, switches,
valves, etc.

o Calibrate instruments individually and where applicable, as
a system (i.e. transmitter, controller and control valve)
o Verify control system components calibration meets
published accuracies over full operational range.
o Defective equipment: If any instruments cannot be
properly adjusted or does not meet manufacturers
specifications, immediately call to attention of the COH
QC Representative and report of its condition confirmed in
writing. Repair or replace equipment furnished as part of
the contract documents.
o Calibration of supplementary supply and output pressure
gages contained on instruments will not be required. If the
gage is found to be faulty, follow the requirements of the
troubleshooting section of the manufacturers maintenance
and operation manual.

Complete calibration report form for each instrument and
control device and include with applicable O&M manual.
Calibration stickers: Upon successful calibration, affix
calibration sticker to instrument or control component.
Calibration sticker shall contain equipment identification
number, calibrated range or switch set and reset conditions,

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date of calibration, due date for next calibration, and name of
person performing calibration.
Check instrument and control wiring for proper operation.

o After energizing and prior to start-up, check control circuits
and programs for proper sequence of operations and
interlocking functions.
o Correct any wiring changes required as a result of checks
including properly changing terminal strip and/or wiring
markers, and associated documentation including
schematics and termination diagrams.

C. Test procedures

Analog devices: Include 9-point span test (0%, 25%
increasing, 50% increasing, 75% increasing, 100%, 75%
deceasing, 50% decreasing, 25% decreasing, 0%) verifying
linearity and hysteresis meets specified values.
Discrete devices: Use multiple state changes to verify set
point, reset point and deadband.

D. Acceptable calibration standards

Vacuum or draft:

o 0 to 5 w.c.: Inclined water-filled manometer graduated
in hundredths of inches of water.
o 5 to 25 Hg: Mercury manometer graduated in tenths of
inches of mercury.
o 5 to 60 w.c.: Water manometer graduated in tenths of
inches of water.
o Electronic: Digital manometer, 0.25% full scale accuracy,
3.5-digit LCD display, ranges of 0 to 19.99 w.c. and 0 to
199.9 w.c., 1% LSD

Pressure:

o 0 to 5 w.c.: Inclined water-filled manometer graduated
in hundredths of inches of water.
o 5 to 60 w.c.: Water manometer graduated to tenths of
inches of water.
o 3 to 25 psig: Mercury manometer graduated to tenths of a
psi.

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o 25 to 150 psig: Precision pressure gage, 0-160 psi , of
1% accuracy, 8-1/2 dial minimum.
o 150 to 750 psig: Precision pressure gage, 0-800 psi, of
1% accuracy, 8-1/2 dial minimum.
o 750 to 2,750 psig: Precision pressure gage, 0-3,000 psi,
of 1% accuracy, 8-1/2 dial minimum.
o Electronic: Digital manometer, 0.1% full scale accuracy,
3.5-digit display, ranges of 0 to 19.99 psig, 0 to 199.9 psig
and 0 to 1,999 psig, 1 LSD.

Differential:

o 0 to 5 w.c.: Inclined water-filled manometer graduated
in hundredths of inches of water.
o 5 to 300 w.c.: Mercury manometer graduated in tenths of
inches of water.
o 5 to 25 psig: Mercury manometer graduated in tenths of a
psi.
o Above 25 psig: Use pressure gages specified.

o Electronic: Digital differential manometer, 0.1% full
scale accuracy, 5-digit LCD display, ranges of 0 to 200
w.c. and 0 to 2,000 w.c., 1 LSD.

Temperatures:

o -20 to 250F: Laboratory thermometers of suitable range.
o Other ranges: Use thermocouple and precision
potentiometer.
o Electronic: Digital thermometer, 0.1% of reading
accuracy, 4-digit LCD display, 1 LSD.

DC process signal calibrator: 2-wire transmitter simulator:

o 4-20 mA range: 0.5% full scale accuracy, 4-digit LCD
display, 1 LSD.
o 10-50 mA range: 0.06% full scale accuracy, 4.5-digit
LCD display, 1 LSD.
1.04.05.06 Panel Mounted Instruments
A. Receiver instruments

Perform 9-point span test (0%, 25% increasing, 50%
increasing, 75% increasing, 100%, 75% decreasing, 50%
decreasing, 25% decreasing, 0%) verifying linearity and

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hysteresis by impressing measured signal into input or signal
connections on instrument.

B. Controllers (panel or control room mounted)

Check for proper operation and adjust in accordance with
manufacturers instructions. Vary process input signal and
check output signal for direction.
Set initial proportional band, reset rate, and rate time as
recommended by manufacturer. It may be necessary to
determine the process dynamics in actual operation before
settings can be made.
Control loops shall be observed for operability and
conformance by impressing simulated input signal at primary
element and checking response of final control element.

C. Integrators, ratio relays, etc.

Check in conformance to manufacturers recommendations.
Receiver integrators shall be calibrated for proper operation
and multiplication factor by feeding maximum input signal for
specified period of time with stopwatch.
Check conformance to manufacturers recommendations.
Ratio signals shall be simulated to check proper ratio settings
and output.

D. Graphic panel:

If possible, trip each alarm actuator (field device) in sequence and observe
graphics. Check acknowledge and test pushbuttons.

1.04.06 Letter of Compliance to Design

A letter from the Engineer stating that construction is substantially
complete and in compliance with the approvided contract documents shall
be provided to the COH Quality Control Representative. This letter shall
be addressed to the Utility Services Technical Support Manager.


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1.04.07 Record Drawings

The Engineer shall include provisions in the contract documents for
providing AS-BUILT drawings at project closeout. The contract
documents shall instruct the contractor to maintain a working set of
drawings during the course of the project. The contractor shall record
information concurrently with the construction process on a full size (24
x 36) set of plans. The As-built drawings shall indicate changes and/or
revisions resulting from actual construction, change orders, field revisions,
etc. The drawings shall be legibly marked to record actual construction.
Following project close out the contractor shall submit the record
drawings to the Engineer. As part of the project scope, the Engineer shall
incorporate all record drawing changes compiled by the contractor into a
final mylar set and submit to the COH-NDS as a final As-Built record
drawing. As builts shall also include one hard copy and one electronic
copy of all configuration information (to include all settings and setup
information). An electronic file of the As-Built record drawings and
specification shall also be provided to COH QC for distribution. The
drawings shall be in a COH approved AutoCAD

format and the


specifications shall be in Microsoft

Word.

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Chapter 2 Pump Stations
2.01 Design Concept Phase
2.01.01 General

The Design Concept Report (DCR) for the pump station shall be used to
evaluate and analyze pump station design criteria and alternatives. The
Engineer shall meet with the City of Henderson Department of Utility
Services to develop a scope of work that address the specifics as it pertains
to the pump station, the system, and future needs. The DCR shall be
submitted to the COH Department of Utility Services, New Development
Section (DUS-NDS). The DCR shall address as a minimum, but not
limited to the listings provided below:

Determining site ownership.
Preliminary site plans and stations location.
Pumping and piping configuration.
Hydraulic analyses including site modeling and fire flow
requirements.
Expandability of station and provisions for on-site
expansion (if applicable).
Major equipment design criteria parameters.
Standby power requirements including noise attenuation.
Analysis of existing facilities within applicable water
zone(s).
Electrical/Instrumentation and control parameters.
Building design parameters.
Preliminary cost estimate.
Project Water Demands. See Appendix B.

2.02 Pre Design Phase
2.02.01 General

The pre design phase of the project shall be summarized and presented in
a Pre Design Report (PDR). The report will be submitted to the COH
DUS-NDS for review and acceptance. A PDR is required for any water
facility considered in this document, regardless of the projects size or
complexity. The PDR is the basis for the ensuing design process and must
be presented in a fashion which allows the reader to gain a thorough and
complete understanding of the necessity of the project. Without an

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approved DCR from DUS-NDS, the Engineer will not be allowed to
submit on the PDR.

The PDR shall include, but not be limited to:

Executive Summary.
Table of Contents.
The project background.
Existing conditions.
Summary of utility conflict information, including pothole
information or recommendations for utilities proposed to be
potholed.
Topographic mapping information summary
Draft Geotechnical Investigation Report
Draft Environmental Investigation Report
Draft Corrosion Control/Cathodic Protection Report
Summary/overview of the applicable drainage and traffic
study findings with references to those documents
submitted separately.
Preliminary plans and centerline profiles (30% design
drawings) illustrating the recommended pipeline alignment
and profile, facility plan views, proposed site plans and
improvements, any offsite improvements, appropriate
sections, elevations or details, existing features, property
ownership info, rights-of-way/easements, etc.
Alternatives evaluation summary.
Recommendations for future connection and tee locations.
Identifications of appurtenant facilities and spacing criteria
Opinions and recommendations for bidding packages,
scheduling, contractor staffing and impacts to public areas.
Identification of any permanent and temporary
ROW/easement constraints and acquisition needs.
Matrix summary of permits to be obtained.
List of agencies and utilities to review and sign the
drawings.
Outline of technical specification sections and list of final
design drawings.
Preliminary quantity and associated cost estimates.
Preliminary construction schedule.
Project correspondence file, including meeting minutes.
Inventory of existing facilities and improvements.
Graphics, detail sketches, tables, and other displays to
support analyses and recommendations.

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List of relevant reports, plans and maps reviewed and other
relevant project information
Work plan for how construction is to be accomplished if
connecting into existing facilities (phasing, shutdowns,
etc,).
Geotechnical info.
Line of Sight study for PLC/Radio Control (as
requested).
Security.
Description of station operational scheme and controls.
Layouts.
Equipment sizes.

2.02.02 Geotechnical Investigation
2.02.02.01 General

Geotechnical services related to design of pump stations shall be provided
by a Geotechnical Engineer experienced in geotechnical evaluation of
pump station sites. Geotechnical evaluations and recommendations shall
be conducted by a qualified geotechnical professional who is an Engineer
or Geologist with current professional registration in Nevada. The
Geotechnical Engineer shall have experience on previous pump station
projects, previous local experience and knowledge of local soil and
geological conditions and construction practices. The Geotechnical
Engineer shall be responsible for determining the following, specific
design criteria and site conditions.

A. Site Conditions

The Geotechnical Engineer shall be responsible for providing an
evaluation of the site to determine the minimum number and the depth of
exploratory borings required for the design of the pump station structure.
The Geotechnical Engineer shall obtain samples for material classification
and conduct laboratory testing. Laboratory testing shall include pH,
sulfates, total salts, chloride, and moisture content determinations on
selected samples. Single point soil resistivity tests will also be performed
on these samples at in-situ and saturated conditions.


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B. Design Parameters

The following are minimum design parameters to be addressed:

Active and passive soil pressure
At rest soil pressure
Total and differential settlement
Design bearing capacity
Minimum footing embedment
Recommended foundation system
Groundwater
Corrosive soils
Expansive soils
Observed hazardous materials requiring further action
Identify fissures and suitable mitigation
Identify compaction faults and suitable mitigation
Borings or test pit excavations plotted on a suitable map in
the report.
Provide X, Y, Z locations for all boring or test pits
Collapsible soils

C. Seismicity

The following are minimum seismicity parameters to be evaluated by the
Geotechnical Engineer:

Maximum credible earthquake for known major faults.
Probabilistic seismic curve for 50- and 100-year design
lives.
Peak ground acceleration, calculated return period for
design lives of 50 and 100 years and probabilities of
exceedence of 10 and 50 percent.
Seismic response spectra for 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 percent
damping.
Potential for liquefaction and recommendations.
Seismically induced lateral earth pressures.


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D. Groundwater

The Geotechnical Engineer shall evaluate and provide recommendations
for the following groundwater conditions:

During construction.
Dewatering.
Design groundwater elevation.

E. Site Preparation

The Geotechnical Engineer shall provide recommendations for the
following:

Address excavation constraints (rock, caliche, blasting,
etc.) relative to the site.
Temporary excavation slope.
Permanent fill and cut slope.
Pavement design for both flexible and rigid pavement for
Traffic Index of TI =4, 5, 6 and 7.

F. Pipelines

For pipelines and any onsite pipelines, the Geotechnical Engineer shall
provide recommendations for the following:

E Values
Excavation slope.
Trench shoring.
Bedding material and trench backfill.
Chemical test and corrosivity.
Suitability of native soils for backfill and or processing
requirements.
Acceptability of flooding and jetting for compaction.

G. Chemical Test and Corrosivity

Chemical test and corrosivity analysis shall include the following:

Test for pH, chlorides and sulfates.
Corrosion potential for buried pipelines.

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2.02.02.02 Corrosion Analysis and Evaluation

Soil corrosivity concerns are addressed in following section. However,
normally much of the data related to the soil corrosivity study is collected
during or as part of the geotechnical investigation. It will be important to
coordinate the geotechnical investigation and the corrosivity investigation.

The need for corrosion control shall be determined through field
investigations and laboratory analyses to assess the corrosion potential of
the environment toward proposed pump station facilities and site piping
materials. Field investigations shall be conducted at all proposed facility
sites and coordinated with geotechnical studies for efficiency in retrieving
samples.

The corrosion potential of the soil is dependant on soil resistivity.
Generally, as the soil resistivity decreases, corrosion increases. Also, as
the soil moisture increases, resistivity decreases. Soil resistivity is
typically measured using one or both of the following methods. The
Wenner 4-pin method is a soil resistivity test that is performed onsite, and
the soil box resistivity test is performed in a laboratory with samples from
the field.

A. Field Tests

The Wenner 4-Pin Method measures the electrical resistivity of existing
soils. The test is performed by placing four steel pins equidistant from
each other and sending a current through the outer pins. The resistivity of
the soil can be determined by measuring the voltage across the inner pins
and applying Ohms Law (V=IR). The test shall be performed in
accordance with ASTM G57 and made at intervals not exceeding 1,000
feet along the alignment or site. The resistivity shall be measured from
ground level to depths of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 feet. Pipes deeper than 30
feet shall have tests performed at greater depths. Should conditions exist
that make a test other than the Wenner 4-pin method more appropriate, the
Engineer shall notify the COH DUS-NDS on the recommended alternative
testing method, prior to testing.

B. Laboratory Analysis

Soil samples shall be collected for laboratory analysis of corrosive
properties. Tests shall be conducted for the following parameters:


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Electrical resistivity using the soil box method as defined in
ASTM G57 for samples with moisture contents as-received
and saturated with de-ionized water.
Water soluble chloride.
Water soluble sulfate.
pH.

The soil box method is used to measure resistivity of field soil samples in
the laboratory. The principles behind the test are similar to the Wenner 4-
pin method as there are four points of electrical contact with the soil and a
current is passed through the outer points while the voltage drop is
measured across the inner points. Resistivity is calculated using Ohms
Law.

Any samples with pH less than 6.5 shall be tested to determine total
acidity in addition to the other required tests. Additional tests may also be
warranted depending on the results of the field resistivity survey.

C. Stray Currents

The evaluation of stray current may require the use of specialty Engineers
with expertise in this area. It is the Engineers responsibility to provide the
necessary expertise to meet these requirements.

Field investigations shall include interviews with knowledgeable sources
and measurements to determine the potential for stray current from both
AC and DC sources. Possible sources of stray current include cathodic
protection systems operated by other utilities or companies; electric transit
systems, if any; overhead and buried power lines and industrial sources
such as metal processors and welding shops.

Evaluations shall also consider the possible effects of cathodic protection
systems on other buried utilities in the vicinity. It is the Engineers
responsibility to contact the utility companies to determine the extent, if
any, of a cathodic protection system in use.

D. Interpretation of Results

Results of field investigations and interviews shall be evaluated to
determine the needs for cathodic protection. The results shall be
interpreted by persons experienced with corrosion control systems.


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The practices and recommendations of accepted standards and references
shall be used during the course of the work. The following references
should be considered as primary sources of information:

Corrosion Reports.
NACE International.
AWWA Standards and Publications.
Manufacturers Associations.

E. Conclusions and Recommendations

In general, corrosion protection should be provided for buried or
submerged metallic structures if any of the following conditions exist:

Soil resistivity is 12,000 ohm-cm of less, or when a wide
range of soil resistivity exists regardless of the absolute
values.
Soil with high chloride or sulfate concentrations
Waters with high chloride concentrations, high TDS, or
high dissolved oxygen concentration.
Areas subject to stray electrical currents.
Support facility piping for natural gas, fuel, compressed air,
chemicals, and steel storage tanks.

The evaluation will reach one of two possible conclusions. The first
possible conclusion is that, at the time the study is conducted, cathodic
protection is necessary. This approach will result in the installation of
cathodic protection systems concurrent with construction of the site
piping. The cathodic protection system would be designed for a minimum
service life of 30 years, after which it would require replacement for
continued service.

A major consideration for the cathodic protection alternative is that stray
current from the cathodic protection system must be controlled to prevent
damage to other facilities.

The second possible conclusion of the evaluation is that cathodic
protection is not required at the time of construction. Site piping would
then be provided with the test stations and joint bonding system necessary
to allow corrosion monitoring of the pipeline.


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2.02.03 Hydraulics and Surge Analysis

The Engineer shall perform a hydraulic analysis on all new; upgraded or
modified pump station designs. Hydraulic analysis is required if upgrades
or modifications involve pump replacement, modifications to pumping
capacity, pump control and operation adjustment, significant changes in
total dynamic head (TDH), and check valve/control valve closure time
adjustments, etc. The analysis will be used to determine the type and size
of equipment necessary for efficient pump hydraulic operation and to
alleviate hydraulic surges during the normal starting and stopping supply
of the pumps and during electrical power failures. The hydraulic analysis
will consist of a steady-state and a transient (surge) analysis.

2.02.03.01 Steady-State Analysis

The Engineer shall perform a steady-state hydraulic headloss analysis of
the pumping and transmission system to determine the TDH requirements
of the pump station. TDH calculations shall be made for new facility
designs as well as existing facility design modifications. If available, the
Engineer shall obtain pipeline route and profile elevations from the City of
Henderson through the DUS-NDS. The Engineer shall perform a headloss
analysis of the pump suction piping and determine the net positive suction
head available (NPSHA) for the pumping system. NPSHA shall always
be more than the NPSHR requirement of the selected pump(s) under an
agreed-upon, worst-case scenario. The Engineer shall then determine
pumping head requirements, TDH system curves, flow velocities and
travel times. If applicable, the City of Henderson DUS-NDS shall provide
the Engineer the necessary operating criteria of the existing pumped
system, i.e. operation levels, existing and future flow demand, as-built
drawings, existing pump curves, pumping rates and discharge pressures.
In summary, the following criteria shall be provided by the Engineer in
order to establish the steady-state analysis of a particular system:

Minimum and maximum static head analysis.
Recommended pumping rates
Determine pipe class rating.
Maximum allowable shutoff head.
Use Darcy-Weisbach or Hazen-Williams equations
Provide a list of friction factors for typical pipe materials.


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2.02.03.02 Transient Analysis

Every pump, transition main, distribution line system, etc. is subject to
transient pressures and conditions. The Engineer shall perform a transient
(surge) analysis for the worse case scenario of all pumped systems
whether new or a modification of an existing system As an empirical
guideline to assist the Engineer, Sanks, Robert L., Pump Station Design,
provides the following criteria:

TDH greater than 50 feet.
Design flows greater than 500 gpm.
Diameters greater than 10 inches.
Lengths greater than 1,000 feet.
High-lift pumping systems with check valves/control
valves.

Refer to the Sanks-Pump Station Design referenced text above for
additional criteria as well as a check list identifying serious surge
conditions.

Current state-of-the-art computer programs for transient analysis can be
used for evaluation of all transient phenomena, i.e., the nature and
characteristics of surge effects on the system and proposed control
measures. Each program is unique in terms of its capabilities and must be
assessed in each design situation to make sure the program can handle the
complexity of the analysis involved.

In general, the Engineer should model the worse case pumping scenario.
Typically the simulation will consist of instantaneous pump shutdown
(power outage) during peak pumping conditions. The instantaneous
shutdown should account for spin down times of each pumping unit. The
Engineer should determine the preliminary pump control valve
opening/closing times, critical time (t
c
), and the applicable control valve
flow factor, C
v
. (The control valve must be designed with a hydraulically
controlled closure mechanism that will provide soft/restrained closure of
the valve during power failure and not allow the valve to slam closed.)
The allowable surge envelope (maximum minimum surge pressure) for
the system should also be determined. The Engineer shall utilize these
parameters as the basis for establishing the design of the yard and station
piping, including the design of pipe joints (gaskets), fittings, valves, and
appurtenances used in the yard, station, and transition system piping.

The handling of transients is a site specific issue. Depending upon the
analysis performed and the results obtained, surge mitigation strategies
can vary widely and, depending upon the system, can be required on both

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the suction and discharge sides of the pumping units. Typical surge
control/protection measures can include a combination of:

Attenuation of surge pressure by programmed pump
control valve closure.
Use of surge relief control valve or surge anticipation
valves.
Design of pipeline to resist upsurge and downsurge
pressures.
Selection and location of proper control devices, i.e. air
relief/air vacuum valves.
Identification of proper start-up, operation, and shutdown
procedures for the system.
One-way or two-way surge tanks.

Surge relief control valves or surge anticipation valves will be considered
if provisions are included in the design to provide an acceptable method to
pipe the discharge back into a tank/reservoir.

Surge control tanks may be required on the discharge and/or suction side
of the pump system. The Engineer shall review the pump system and its
transient analysis to determine the applicable surge control/protection
measures and applicable control valve opening and closure times. Surge
analysis shall consider all pumps installed in the pump station (including
reserve and standby) operating and failing simultaneously.

The Engineer shall be responsible for all elements of the pump station
design, including the surge protection equipment. The surge protection
equipment recommendation shall be addressed in detail in the PDR.

A. Surge Tanks

Where surge tanks are required, the tank shall be sized to reduce
incremental surge pressure increase to a maximum of 33 percent of the
pipeline design pressure. The surge tank shall be designed, fabricated and
tested in accordance with ASME Code for Unfired Pressure Vessels. The
surge tank shall be equipped with a pad mounted compressed air system
and level sensor to maintain the air-to-water ratio and alarms.

Pump stations which do not require surge tanks and air compressors, the
need for an air compressor to run air tools will be evaluated on a case by
case basis through the DUS-NDS. The compressor shall be capable of
producing a minimum of 50 scfm.


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2.02.03.03 COH Standards

A listing of equipment for surge control/protection to be utilized in the
design of pump stations is provided in this section. Engineer shall
provide:

Steady-state hydraulic headloss and transient (surge)
analysis calculations as part of the submittal of the PDR.
Design pipeline, joints, fittings, valves and various piping
system appurtenances to resist upsurge and downsurge
pressures.
Depending on the transient hydraulic analysis performed
and the results obtained, pump stations may be required to
be designed with a hydro-pneumatic tank on the discharge
and/or supply side of the pump for surge protection.
Hydro-Pneumatic Surge Tanks: The tanks shall meet all
ASME Boiler and Pressure Tank Vessel Codes and be in
compliance with all paint and primer codes TT-P-86 and
AWWA Standards. The tanks must be able to withstand
and exceed all design pressures for the system and be rated
for full vacuum (-14.7 psig). Each tank shall include all
accessories required for proper operation. As a minimum
provide pressure relief valves, access manholes, level
sensors and level switches, isolation valves, drain piping,
etc. Pressure sensor fittings and compressor fittings shall
be outfitted with copper piping and copper or brass fittings.
Galvanized fittings will not be accepted.
Air Compressors: The acceptable manufacturers for the
COH are Ingersoll Rand, Gardner/Denver and Chicago
Pneumatic. Compressors shall be pad mounted, of cast iron
design, and be able to deliver the required volume and
pressure to sustain a hydro-pneumatic tank sized
appropriately for the identified surge condition.
All appurtenances, fittings, piping, and equipment shall be
rated for the system design pressure.

2.02.04 Preliminary Design Elements

The following design elements shall be addressed in the Pre-Design Phase
and presented in the PDR. Included are design elements related to site
civil, mechanical systems, electrical systems, and instrumentation and
control.


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2.02.04.01 Site Civil
A. Site Description

The location of the pump station site shall be described and defined by the
Engineer in sufficient enough detail to enable an individual who is
unfamiliar with the Las Vegas Valley, to located the pump station with
reasonable effort. As a minimum the Engineer shall:

Prepare a location map showing the regional location of the
site with Accessors Parcel Number (APN)
Prepare a vicinity map depicting the site location relative
to streets and recognizable features.
Prepare a survey control map identifying the site by
township, range, section, basis of bearing, coordinates,
and other existing survey control features including
benchmarks.
Provide project specific topographic mapping, locations
and descriptions of all existing easements.
Proposed site configuration including locations of proposed
easements for access, power, water/sewer, etc.

B. Site Layout

Site grading shall preclude site drainage from gaining access to the pump
station building. Adequate setback from property lines shall be provided
in accordance with the Henderson Development Code. Sufficient setback
shall also be provided to allow for fill, cut, or fill transition to existing
contour elevations at property lines. A fill or cut slope of 4:1 or less is
desirable but 3:1 is acceptable.

The pump station shall be positioned and the site developed to ensure a
uniform soil bearing condition. The footing and floor shall be placed on
either native earth material or structural fill. The pump station shall not be
situated where a portion of the station is on native material and a portion is
on fill material.

COH service vehicle access to major station components shall be
incorporated into the site layout.

The Engineer shall incorporate site access and egress for COH Fire
Department vehicles having the following characteristics:

25 foot wheel base.

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30 degree steering locking angle.
28 foot inside turning radius/52 foot outside turning radius.

C. Technical Drainage Study

The Engineer shall prepare a Technical Drainage Study for the pump
station site in accordance with the requirements of the latest edition of the
Clark County Regional Flood Control District (CCRFCD) Hydrologic
Criteria and Drainage Design Manual.

D. Grading and Drainage

The Engineer shall provide a grading plan in accordance with the
requirements of the local reviewing agency, the latest edition of Clark
County Uniform Standard Drawings (CCUSD); Blue Books, and the
latest edition of CCRFCD Hydrologic Criteria and Drainage Design
Manual.

2.02.04.02 Design Performance Guidelines

This section will provide a general basis for the approach to architectural
design of pumping facilities. The following guidelines and criteria are
provided to assure a consistent and thorough process of design for each
facility.

The Engineer shall meet with the COH through the DUS-NDS to establish
the criteria for the appearance and physical performance of the facility.
Areas of focus shall include the sizes and configurations of the major
functional elements to be housed within the facility, as well as the
deployment and inter-relationships of supporting mechanical, electrical
and maintenance provisions. Topics shall include:


2.14
Discover, document and prioritize functional goals for the
facility, including spatial needs and their hierarchy of
importance, public image, the degree or level of security
which is appropriate to the facility location, functions to be
housed, the scope of future expansion and flexibility that is
anticipated, desired links to other functions on the projects
site, maintenance guidelines, and HVAC, electrical,
lighting and acoustical criteria. The COHs plans for use of
the new facility shall be discussed and documented in terms
of intended conformance with, or departure from, existing
COH employee health and safety policies.
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Determine location and sizes of structures and other
functional systems which may already exist at the project
site, as well as the availability and types of utility services
which may be required. Develop strategies to successfully
integrate the design of the new facility into the context.
Review the impact of the project on the existing drainage
patterns. Develop strategies for mitigation if necessary.
Investigate existing zoning constraints, applicable building
codes, and anticipated public and governmental review
procedures which will be necessary during the course of the
design. Develop strategies and assign responsibilities for
their successful negotiation.
Review and document the existing and future planned land
uses in the vicinity of the facility site. Determine
guidelines for the design and character of the new facility
such that is harmonizes as effectively as possible with its
visual and social context.
Develop criteria for appropriate sound power levels and
frequencies at both the project site boundary and the
interior of the facility. General guidelines and strategies for
achieving these levels shall be discussed and documented.

2.02.04.03 Survey

Perform field location survey work consisting of, at a minimum, the
following elements:

Establish two temporary benchmarks and two horizontal
control points shall be set near the site at a location that is
not likely to be disturbed during construction.
Contact public and private utilities, field verify the location
of their installations, and identify design conflicts.
Establish building footprint and limits of other site
development work.
Prepare a record of survey map showing locations of
existing property corners which may be disturbed or
destroyed during construction, including locating of
recording information for all existing easements affecting
the site.
Survey topography including aboveground and
underground utilities, facilities.
Prepare record of survey of property boundary, set lot
corners, file with the County, and prepare legal descriptions
for warranty deeds.

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Prepare a coordinate sheet of aboveground and
underground utilities and facilities including inverts, rims
on storm drainage and/or sanitary sewer, and valve
operating nuts on water mains.
Prepare profile(s) and/or cross-section(s) as required.
Prepare legal descriptions for all proposed permanent and
temporary construction easements.
GPS coordinates for pump station building corners.

2.02.04.04 Mechanical
A. General Station Layout

The Engineer shall work with the COH through the DUS-NDS to establish
a preliminary layout of the pump station. The layout shall address general
room dimensions and use, including length and arrangement of station
piping, location of valves, flow meters, pumps, tanks, MCC panels and
most major equipment. Capacities of the individual pumps have an impact
on the dimensions of the station and thus must be established early on in
the design process. To do this, there are several considerations. It is
desirable to optimize the number of pumps at a given facility. Installing
several small pumps provides flexibility in meeting the range of system
demands but increases the land and maintenance requirements. Installing
only a few pumps decreases the land and maintenance requirements but
does not offer much flexibility in meeting system demands. The capacity
of the station directly affects the overall size of the station and should be
carefully discussed with the COH through the DUS-NDS. At a minimum,
all pump stations shall be equipped with three (3) pumps and have the
capability of automatically alternating the pumps from lead to stand-by.
Station equipment, piping, etc. shall be oriented in the station to provide
convenient safe access for operation and maintenance, including the
installation and removal of equipment.

B. Pump Selection

In general, pump stations should be designed with consideration of the
stations firm pumping capacity as the initial design decision. The firm
capacity of the pump station is the total pumping capacity of the station
(maximum day demand) with the largest pump out of service, at maximum
static differential levels. The pump station is assumed to take suction
from a reservoir or clearwell.

Pumps shall also be selected to provide stable and efficient operation at
average and design conditions. Designers often design pump stations to

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be efficient at future maximum flow (design conditions). A more practical
design is to select pumps that are efficient at an average of the present day
and future design conditions. Pump selection should be made with the
pumps best efficiency point (BEP) to the left of the intersection of the
pump and system curves. The selected BEP shall not exceed the
efficiency of the pump at the intersection of the pump and system curves
by more than 2%. Therefore, as the piping ages, the headloss will
increase and push the operating point to the left into the best efficiency
point.

C. Pump Inlet Configuration

The pump inlet shall be designed in accordance with Hydraulic Institute
Standards to preclude turbulence, vortexing and jet velocities and to
provided adequate Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) to prevent
cavitation of the pumps.

D. Pump Spacing

In general, pumps shall be arranged to provide convenient access for
operation, maintenance, equipment installation, and equipment removal.

E. Pump Efficiency

The Engineer shall select pumps so that pumping hydraulic efficiencies
are not less than 84 percent at design flows and not less than 80 percent
within the full operating range of the pumps. Requirements for lower
efficiencies should be referred through the COHs DUS-NDS.

F. Expandability

Pump station expandability will be evaluated by the Citys DUS-NDS on a
case by case basis. If a pump station is planned to be expanded in the
future, the Engineer shall ensure that adequate space is provided to
accommodate installation of future equipment. The suction and discharge
piping manifold shall be sized for future flows. If it appears to be
impractical or not economical to construct the pump station building to
house the future equipment, the Engineer shall present to the COH DUS-
NDS a comparative evaluation of cost, operability, and constructability
issues. The evaluation shall address alternative means of providing the
desired capacity to meet future capacity requirements.


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2.03 Final Design Phase
2.03.01 General

This section covers the design requirements of potable water pumping
stations.

2.03.02 Site Civil
2.03.02.01 Yard Piping

Pipe materials approved for use as yard piping on COH facilities include
the following:

Mortar Lined and Coated Welded Steel pipe conforming to
ANSI/AWWA C200.
Ductile Iron pipe conforming to ANSI/AWWA C151.

2.03.02.02 Signage

Each pump station site shall be identified with a sign mounted on the
exterior of the masonry perimeter wall adjacent to the site access gates.
Exact location will be determined by the site layout on a case by case
basis. The sign shall be 18 inch wide by 24 inch tall by 0.04 inch
aluminum with baked enamel finish and suitable for exterior locations.

The sign shall be the COHs current standard paint color with font of the
type and size typically used by the COH. These standards shall be
obtained through the DUS-NDS. The sign shall include the following
information:

Identify the site facilities, i.e. pump station(s) and/or
reservoir(s).
Site address.
Current City of Henderson logo.
Day and night emergency contact numbers.
Name and/or number of facility (To be determined by the
City of Henderson).


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2.03.02.03 Access Gates

Access to the pump station site shall be through a minimum 24 wide
double leaf steel frame swing gate. Provisions shall be made by the
Engineer to provide enough space for maintenance vehicles to park out of
traffic and adequate sight distance to safely enter and exit the site.

Sites will be evaluated on a case by case basis, through the COH DUS-
NDS, as to whether the gates shall be automatically operated. At a
minimum, 4-2 conduit shall be installed up to the gate for future use.

Motor operated gates shall be equipped with electronically active edge
sensors. A card swipe shall be included on a 4 x 4 gooseneck stand to
allow for access. A free exit loop shall be provided for vehicle exit from
the site. The gates shall also include automatic vehicle identification
including loops and transmitters for emergency access to the site. One (1)
-inch conduit from the key pad to the pull box containing four (4) 2-inch
conduits shall be provided. Pull boxes shall be identified with COH-DUS
marking.

2.03.02.04 Security

The site shall be enclosed with a design approved by the City of
Henderson Community Development Department through the COH DUS-
NDS. As a minimum, an eight (8) foot tall masonry perimeter wall with
locked entrance. Embedded extension arms with three (3) strands of barb
wire shall be installed on the top of the entire perimeter wall. The wall
shall be compatible with the surrounding environment, including
landscaping.

Down cast site lighting, both wall and pole mounted shall be provided
with at least two photocell-operated lights. Hand/Off/Auto Switch shall
be provided for all exterior lights to enable testing. A motion sensor shall
be located at a strategic location in the interior of the site which will
activate site lighting. At locations agreed upon by COH personnel,
conduit shall be installed and stubbed up for future site security cameras.
Pull boxes shall be identified with COH-DUS marking

Security issues for the pump station building shall also be addressed by the
Engineer. Some examples include intrusion alarms on all doors and roof
hatches, reinforced or caged roof hatches and cages preventing building
access through the louvers. Specific building security issues shall be
discussed with the COH DUS-NDS during the design process


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2.03.02.05 Nevada Power Company (NPC)

The Engineer is encouraged to initiate contact and coordinate efforts with
NPC for projects requiring new power supply or expansion of facilities
currently being served. NPC design drawings are required in the final
mylar submittal and to obtain final approval signatures from the COH.

2.03.02.06 Noise Limits

Noise is a concern from the stand point of human health, from the stand
point of enjoyment of recreational opportunities, and from the stand point
of minimizing it effects on wildlife. Noise levels from pump stations can
have a negative effect on neighbors as well as plant personnel. Neighbors
are affected by transmitted noise that extends beyond project boundaries,
whereas station noise can have a negative effect on the health of plant
personnel. (Maximum noise levels in working environments are regulated
under the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA).) OSHA
requirements and regulations shall be included in the design of all
structures to establish the working environments maximum noise levels.
Station noise discussed herein applies to both structures and enclosed
compounds.

Noise from pump stations can come from a wide variety of sources but are
mostly limited to noise generated from large equipment. These sources
can include pump motors, HVAC systems, and blowers and fans. A
significant contributor to noise can also come from operation and
maintenance activities. Noise generated from these activities usually
contains various tone or frequency. These variations typically have a
greater annoyance impact on the surrounding community than simply the
decibel level.

Noise control measures at pump stations should focus on equipment
selection, use of structure sound barriers and sound traps, acoustical
shrouding and/or enclosures of equipment, wall batting, or incorporating
acoustical architectural measures in the design to attenuate the sound wave
forms. Construction of these facilities can also contribute significantly to
noise levels resulting in human annoyance. Though construction is
temporary, provisions should be included in the design specifications to
ensure that the contractor obeys any and all local noise ordinances. One
way to mitigate construction noise might be to restrict the contractors
work hours to specific time periods during the day/evening and/or require
the use of temporary noise barriers.


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A. Reference Standards and Codes

The following standards and codes shall be used:

Latest update to the federal Occupational Safety and Health
Act.
The latest edition of the International Building Code (IBC).
Comply with all federal, state, and local regulations.

B. Design Issues

As a general design criterion, No noise, odor or vibration will be emitted
so that it exceeds the general level of noise, odor or vibration emitted by
uses outside of site. This is interpreted as noise emitted from the pump
station shall not exceed a value of 50 dB at the property line, when
measured on an A weighted sound level meter according to the
measuring procedures of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
However, if the project site is located in and area with a designated zoned
use of light industrial, The average noise level, measured at the property
line, shall not exceed 55 dB (1 dn) when measured on an a weighted
sound level meter and according to the measuring procedures of the
Environmental Protection Agency.

The following table has been provided for informational purposes only. It
should be used as a frame of reference for comparing typical background
noise levels for indoor and outdoor areas.


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Table 2.1 Typical Criteria for Background Noise
Noise Level
Space Type dBA
____________________________________________________________

Indoor
Conference rooms, offices 42
Lobbies, laboratory, work areas 47 56
Light maintenance shops 52 61
Work spaces communication required 56 66
Work spaces no communication required, but
With no risk of hearing damage 66 80

Outdoor
Quiet residential 40 50
Average residential 50 60
Commercial 55 65
Industrial 60 70

The completed pump station must comply with established noise
ordinances as discussed in the preceding paragraphs.

If buildings are used in the design, main sources of station noise are
anticipated to emanate from HVAC supply and exhaust systems. Fan
selection, duct sizing and configurations, and inlet and outlets shall be
carefully designed to ensure that noise emissions are minimized. It is
recommended that fans/blowers be mounted within in the pump station
building to reduce noise and discharges shall be equipped with appropriate
sound traps.

2.03.02.07 Vault Standards


2.22
For ease of access and maintenance, the COH prefers the use of
manholes/vaults for each buried valve 24 inches and larger.
Manholes/vaults shall incorporate heavy-duty, cast iron frames and covers
capable of withstanding H-20 loads imposed by traffic, heavy maintenance
equipment, chemical delivery trucks, etc. Manholes and vault entrance
risers shall be a minimum of 36 inches in diameter complete with access
ladders. Because of the increasing confined space regulations and
safety issues, the COH has requested that prior to design implementation
of all vaults/manholes, etc., the Engineer must receive prior approval for
their use through the COHs DUS-NDS, prior to the design. Electronics
will not be installed in vault. Electronics must be remote mounted in a
dry, secure area.

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2.03.03 Architecture and Landscaping
2.03.03.01 Design Appearance Guidelines

The Engineer shall engage in a dialogue with representatives of the COH,
through the DUS-NDS, to establish criteria for the appearance and
physical performance of the structural system and building envelope. The
architectural design should be developed in character, style, form, color
and materials to harmonize effectively with it surrounding environment.
Representatives of the COH shall review with the Engineer existing COH
facilities in terms of massing, materials and colors. Traditionally
established COH preferences and guidelines for materials and appearance
systems, structural systems and major building envelope systems will be
discussed and their appropriateness to the specific application will be
assessed. These preferences and guidelines will be developed within the
context of the specific location of the project site, and therefore not all
facility designs should be expected to have the same architectural theme
and character. Construction materials and methods shall be established
and defined, both in terms of their physical appearance and overall visual
effect in harmonizing with the surrounding environment, their emergence
from the basic structural system, and their appropriateness in
accommodating the deployment of mechanical and electrical systems
within the facility.

Weathering systems shall also be defined in terms of the desert climate in
the area. The roofing system and the building perimeter envelope shall be
established for optimum durability over the full range of climatic
variations typical to the area.

These examinations shall form the basis of directions to the Engineer for
appearance of the new building. From these discussions, the Engineer
shall develop specific graphic and written statements defining the
architectural theme and character of the new structure as well as its
relationship to other functions on the project site and its harmony with the
visual context of surrounding land uses. The following are suggested
design parameters which may assist in these aspects of the design of the
facility:

A. Height of Structures

The facilities shall be kept as low in profile as is functionally possible.


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B. Reflective Finishes

Visible and highly reflective materials and surface finishes should be
avoided on the exterior of the facility.

C. Exterior Walls

The use of low maintenance indigenous materials such as split-face
masonry block for exterior walls of the site and pump building is
encouraged. Employment of surface textures and horizontal banding of
harmonious colors are some of the techniques which should be considered
in blending the facility with it environment. Material coloration should be
achieved through the use of integral coloration rather than applied
coloration such as paint, which must be maintained.

All exterior walls of the pump station building shall be constructed with
block core insulation. Block core insulation typically come in two forms:
loose, free-flowing beads or solid block core inserts. The solid inserts are
usually made from expandable polystyrene (EPS), while the beads are
made from either EPS or a natural inert volcanic glass which has be
expanded by a special heat process such as vermiculite.

The exterior walls of the site and pump station building shall be protected
with anti-graffiti coating to protect against vandalism.

D. Roofing


2.24
The design of roof systems should be carefully developed to harmonize
with the visual context of the facility. Pitched tiled roofs are desired and
consideration should be given to selection of the pitch, the tile materials
and coloration to harmonize with the surroundings. Highly reflective roof
surfaces shall not be visible from adjacent property. Interior open wood
truss construction is acceptable.

The Engineer shall incorporate roof deck insulation on top of the open
truss system into the design of the pump station building. The deck
insulation shall be a sandwich type design, incorporating a surface
suitable for nailing the roofing tiles and a thermally efficient insulation
board separated by vent spacer strips creating a cross ventilating airspace.
The roof insulation shall provide a minimum insulation value of R=6.

The Engineer shall incorporate roof hatches in the design of the pump
station building. The roof hatch shall be installed over each pump within
the building. Hatches shall be sized to accommodate the removal of the
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motors and pumps. Safe access and security of the hatches shall be
determined on a case by case basis. Motorization of the hatches will also
be determined during design discussion with DUS-NDS.

E. Windows

Where windows are appropriate to the design, they should be selected
carefully for energy efficiency type, acoustic characteristics and security.
Glazing systems shall be designed to avoid light leakage to adjacent
property in the form of direct glare, or reflected glare from sunlight. Glass
tinting and window frame colors should be chosen for their consistency
with the palette of materials and colors select for the facility.

F. Insets, Grills, Trim and Accents

Insets, grills, trim material and accents should be employed judiciously
and only where necessary or appropriate in achieving compatibility with
adjacent structures. Insets, grills, trim and accents shall be consistent with
the color palette chosen for the facility and should avoid bold, strong or
reflective colors.

G. Doors and Frames

Door and frame colors shall be compatible with the wall surface in which
they are located. An 8 foot wide, 10 foot high, rolling steel door shall be
provided at one end of the pump station for maintenance vehicle access.
Single doors shall be installed on opposite walls of the station for
maintenance access. The Engineer shall make an effort to locate one of
the single doors near the MCC to facilitate easy access to the main
disconnect.

H. Lighting

Lighting should satisfy functional and security needs while not creating
light pollution in the form of point sources of direct glare which are visible
from a distance. Lighting should be sensitive to the privacy of adjacent
land uses. Fixtures should be carefully selected for efficiency, cut-off,
consistent lamp coloration throughout the project, and effectiveness in
delivering only the light which is necessary to the task, while avoiding
unnecessary spill lighting beyond the site boundaries. Low level light
fixtures which light immediate areas are encouraged.


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I. Equipment and Service Areas

All mechanical and electrical equipment as well as service yards and
service areas shall be screened from public view.

J. Material Safety

Materials employed in the construction of the facility shall conform in
composition and application to all applicable regulations, including but not
limited to, those concerning Volatile Organic Content, lead, mercury,
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and asbestos.

K. Site Constraints

Finally, the Engineer shall review the predesign information for discussion
on applicable site constraints which may affect the design appearance,
character, material selection, massing, and location on the project site.
Views of the facility from areas surrounding the project site shall be
analyzed, and alternatives discussed in harmonize the appearance of the
facility with its visual context. The Engineer shall cooperate closely with
the civil engineering disciplines associated with site planning for the
facility to assure that view sheds are optimized while hydraulic elevations
and storm drainage provisions are preserved. Regardless of visual
circumstances, the facility shall in all cases be located above the 100-year
storm flood elevation.

L. Landscape Coordination

The landscape must be perceived as an extension of the directions
established for the materials and form of the building. As such, the
Engineer shall be responsible for guiding and coordinating the landscape
design for the project, either by retaining the services of a sub-consultant,
or engaging a landscape professional on his own staff.

M. Code and Standards

The codes and standards to be used in the design of pump stations shall
include as a minimum the following, but not limited to:

American Concrete Institute. (ACI)

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American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Engineers. (ASHR)
American Society of Mechanical Engineers. (ASME)
American Society for Testing and Materials. (ASTM)
Hoist Manufacturers Institute, Crane Manufacturers
Association of America.
Hydraulic Institute Standards.
Manufacturers Standardization Society, Inc.
National Electrical Code.
National Electrical Manufacturers Association.
National Fire Protection Association.
Uniform Building Code.
Uniform Mechanical Code.
Uniform Plumbing Code.

In addition, the Engineer shall observe all applicable codes and other
requirements adopted by local permitting agencies. The current version of
these documents effective at the time of receipt of notice to proceed with
design shall be used as reference for design purposes. In case of conflict
between the requirements of this document and any code adopted by local
permitting agency, the code requirements will prevail.

2.03.04 Mechanical
2.03.04.01 Station Piping

Station Piping shall be arranged in accordance with the following
requirements:

The pump station suction and discharge header shall be
designed to ensure a velocity to the pumps of not more than
ten (10) feet per second (fps) and shall eliminate turbulence
in the header that could lead to possible cavitation in the
pumps. Individual pump suction and discharge piping shall
also be designed to ensure a velocity of not more than ten
(10) fps.
Check valves shall be silent, globe style, non-slamming as
manufactured by APCO, Golden Anderson (GA)
Industries, Inc., or equivalent, with model determined by
the application. Check valves, if required, shall be installed
on horizontal piping runs. Check valves and isolation
valves shall be installed within proximity to the pump room
floor. Valves shall not be located at or near the ceiling. No
obstructions shall impair removal of check valve bonnets.

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Isolation valves shall be either a butterfly or gate valve
design with resilient rubber seats. The Engineer shall use
AWWA C509 gate valves for valves 10 inches and smaller
and AWWA C504 butterfly valves with up-graded
operators 12 inches and larger. All butterfly valves shall be
installed with the shaft in the horizontal position.
Air release valves shall be as manufactured by APCO or
GA Industries, Inc.
Air vacuum/air release combination valves shall be as
manufactured by APCO or GA Industries, Inc.
Electric valve operators shall be as manufactured by
Limitorque, EIM or Rotork.
Couplings - Sleeve couplings, bell and spigot rubber-
gasketed joints, field-weld joints, grooved and shouldered
couplings and flanges are commonly used on threaded
small steel, cast-iron, bronze, stainless etc. Patented joints
may be considered of the application fits the recommended
use and design data from the joint manufacturer.
Restrained Couplings Flanged adapters, sleeve-type
compression couplings or grooved-end couplings should be
provided with a suitable harness to provide longitudinal
restraint. For bolted flanges, make sure that flanges of
different materials are compatible.
Pump station piping shall utilize insulated flange gaskets
and fasteners as necessary in order to electronically isolate
the station piping from the yard/system piping.
In order to facilitate installation, removal, maintenance, and
accommodate slight alignment adjustments in the pump
suction and discharge piping, sleeve-type flexible steel
couplings restrained by tie-rods shall be provided at each
pump inlet and discharge connection. Couplings shall be
located between the pump inlet isolation valve and the
pump and between the pump and the discharge check
valve. Because these couplings are not intended to provide
any significant longitudinal restraint, the pumps and piping
must be anchored as necessary to prevent movement.

2.03.04.02 Pump Systems
A. System Responsibility

In general, the Engineer shall include in its project design specifications
requirements for the pump, drive motor, drive shaft, couplings, supports,
constant speed equipment and specific controls and appurtenances to be

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provided by a single manufacturer/supplier (typically that of the pump
equipment) who shall take unit responsibility for the entire system.

B. Drive Equipment

Pump stations that pump to storage tanks/reservoirs will be provided with
constant-speed motors with across-the-line, soft start/soft stop capability.

The use of variable frequency drives (VFDs) must be demonstrated to be
required for the application. Each use will require review and approval by
the COH through the DUS-NDS. VFDs, if used, shall be provided by the
pump equipment manufacturer/supplier. This ensures a unit responsibility
for a system that will pump over the required head and flow ranges. The
VFD specifications must include a complete description of the power
system including any requirements for operation from standby generators.

Specifications for VFDs shall address the following:

Power requirement as a function of pumping capacity.
Allowable supply voltage wave form distortion.
Allowable supply voltage notch area.
Minimum and maximum allowable power factor over
working speed range.
Minimum allowable efficiency at full speed and load.
Required operating ambient temperature range.
Required diagnostics provisions.
Control and monitoring signal interface.
Allowable acoustical noise level.
Adjustable ramp acceleration/deceleration time.
Characteristics (available short circuit current X/R ratio) of
power supply including alternate and standby power
supplies.
Allowable speed regulator error.
Provide VFD recommended spare parts.


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C. COH Standards

Minimum requirements (design criteria) for pump stations are as listed
below. Non-factory fabricated package pump stations will be considered
on a case by case basis. Main pumping equipment shall be specially
selected for individual application/service. At a minimum, all pump
stations shall be equipped with three (3) pumps and have the capability of
automatically alternating the pumps from lead to stand-by. Engineer shall
provide the following:

Pump Station Piping

Selection of major piping within the pump station shall be
limited to either flanged welded steel pipe or flanged
ductile iron pipe, above ground. Welded steel pipe shall be
flanged fabricated steel piping with fusion bonded epoxy
lined with primed/painted coating. Fusion bonded epoxy
lining system shall conform to the requirements of AWWA
C213. Flanged joints shall conform to the requirements of
ANSI/AWWA C207. Steel piping shall conform to the
requirements of ANSI/AWWA C200 and the design
requirements of AWWA M11. DIP shall be Class 53
cement-mortar-lined, primed/painted with flanged fittings.
DIP and fittings shall conform to the material and design
requirements set forth in AWWA M41.
Suction piping arranged to avoid high points where air may
collect. Where reducers are required in horizontal piping,
they shall be eccentric (with flat on top).
Discharge piping shall also avoid high points. Dissolved
air will have less tendency to come out of solution on the
discharge side than on the suction side, but if air pockets
are allowed to accumulate, they will restrict flow. Air
relief should be piped to drain.
During the design process the Engineer shall assess the
need for vibration isolation between the pumps and suction
and discharge headers.
Pumps shall have isolation valves located on the suction
and discharge sides of each pump. The Engineer shall use
AWWA C504 butterfly valves with up-graded operators.
Standard bourdon-style oil (glycerin)-filled pressure gages,
2-inch diameter, Type 316 Stainless Steel construction,
shall be provided on both the suction and discharge sides of
the each pump. Pressure gages shall be provided by
Ashcroft, Trerice, US Gage, and Solfront with a 4-inch
face. Pressure gages shall be specified with diaphragm

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seals and snubbers. Normal operating conditions shall be at
the middle of scale.
Provide piping supports and hold-down straps to keep all
weight off of the pumps.
Provide hatch and door openings of sufficient dimension to
facilitate the removal of both pump, motor and major
equipment.
Discharge piping shall include:

o End spools

o Spool with NPT tapped outlets or welded coupling
to accommodate a flow sensor and pressure gage
and/or pressure switch.
o Spool with NPT tapped outlets or welded coupling
to accommodate an air vacuum/air release valve (if
required by design).
o Silent check valve (cushioned) or pump flow
control valve.
o Isolation valve.
o Eccentric reducer/increaser.

Pump discharges shall be joined to a common discharge
header, which shall pass through a flow meter. The
Engineer shall pay close attention to the distance (number
of straight-run pipe diameters required by the flow meter
manufacturer) both upstream and downstream of the flow
meter to ensure accurate measurement.
A high pressure relief valve shall be provided between the
discharge header and supply line. High-pressure relief
valve piping shall be piped from the discharge line back to
the suction side of the pump.

Pump Motors

Pump motors shall be cast iron with UL, FM, CSA or NSF
International approval required.
With line shaft vertical turbine pumps, a cat walk, service
grating or some type of access/maintenance platform shall
be provided in order to allow servicing of the motors.
Prime mover: Electric motor of US, premium-efficiency
design, NEMA type, open drip-proof weather protected
Type I, squirrel cage induction type with Class F insulation
and Class B rise, designed and applied in compliance with
NEMA, IEEE, NFPA and the NEC.

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Motor space heaters are not required.
All rotation changes (phase reversal) shall be made at the
motor and not at the MCC.
Pump motors shall not be loaded to use more than 90% of
the rate horsepower. Wire to water efficiency shall be
provided.
Electric motors from 5 hp to 400 hp shall be rated at 480
Volts, 3 phase, 60 Hz. (COH reserves the right to modify
this requirement depending upon the design and operation
flexibility.)
Ratings for electrical motors larger than 400 hp shall be
reviewed by the COH through the DUS-NDS.
If smaller motors are operating in the same group as larger
motors, motors as small as 100 hp may also be rated to
match the large motors voltage, i.e.; 480 Volts, 3 phase, 60
Hz.
Line-shaft vertical turbine pumps: minimum motor/pump
speed shall be 900 rpm.
Line shaft vertical turbine pumps: maximum motor/pump
speed shall be 1,800 rpm.
COH DUS-NDS reserves the right to modify these
minimum and maximum requirements depending upon
design and operation flexibility.
Motor noise shall be less than 90 dBA at a distance of five
(5) feet from the motor.
The motor torque and locked rotor characteristics will be
outlined in the NEMA standards for Design B and shall be
selected to be non-overloading throughout the driven
pumps full speed performance curve.
The motor shall be of the solid-shaft type, steel cast and
adapted to a four (4)-piece flanged coupling assembly that
will adapt to the bowl shaft assembly.
Motors located indoors shall be specified for a 50 degree
Celsius ambient temperature.
Motors located outdoors without sun shielding shall be
specified for 60 degree Celsius.
Once the motors have been installed, the specifications
shall specify that a vibration analysis and summary report
be prepared and submitted to the COH through the QC
representative.
Where used in conjunction with adjustable speed drives,
provide electric motors fully compatible with the variable
speed controllers.
Where used with constant speed pumps 25 hp or larger,
provide power factor corrections capacitors with soft start

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and soft stop motor starters. Starters shall be designed for
the pump control algorithm.
Motor connection terminals or power distribution blocks
shall be provided for motors over 100 hp.
Aluminum motor rotor bars are not acceptable.
All motors except those for variable frequency drive
systems shall have a service factor of 1.15.
Variable frequency drive (VFD) system motors shall have a
service factor of 1.20 (or 1.15 and de-rated by 5% of
nameplate horsepower) and shall be specifically designed
for operation with selected variable-speed drive in the
specific application.

VFDs shall be:

o Toshiba G-3 w/pump control option.
o Allen Bradley: Power Flex 700 w/pump control
option.
o Cutler-Hammer: SV 9000 w/pump control option.

Motors:

o If Toshiba VFDs are specified, use Toshiba motors.
o Otherwise, use U.S. Iron Core premium efficiency
motors on all other VFDs.
o Franklin and Hitachi are acceptable motor
manufacturers.

Pumping Units

UL/NSF Approval.
The Engineer shall specify a vertical multistage turbine,
barrel-mounted, water-lubricated-type pump having
impellers of such design that the head-capacity curve is
equal to or slightly better than the designed system
requires. Pumps shall be driven by vertical, solid-shaft
electric motors.
Bowls shall be (typical) Cast-iron. Exterior and internal
surfaces of the bowl units shall be coated with 8 mils of
fusion bonded epoxy in accordance with the painting and
coating section of the technical specifications (typically
Specification Section 09900).
Impeller shall be zincless bronze statically and dynamically
balanced with Type 316 stainless steel bolting.

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Wear rings shall be aluminum bronze, hard faced
replaceable (wear ring alloy shall not gall when used with
impeller alloy).
Bowl shaft shall be stainless steel, Type 410, 416, or 316.
Suction bell shall be cast iron bell, with bottom bearing and
streamlined ribs; for lining and coating; see bowls.
Column shall be steel pipe, not less than Schedule 40,
fusion bonded epoxy-lined and coated, in maximum 10-
foot lengths, flanged with registered fit and through Type
316 stainless steel bolting.
Line shaft couplings shall be Type 316 or Type 416
Stainless Steel shaft and couplings in maximum 10-foot
lengths, sized for a critical speed of minimum 20% above
maximum operating speed.
Shaft lubrication shall be a water lubricated product.
Shaft seal shall be a mechanical seal, Chesterson 442.
Line shaft bearings shall be rubber with zincless bronze
retainers at each joint for open line shaft.
Discharge head shall be cast iron with fusion bonded epoxy
passages with flange, base plate, and minimum 1-1/4-inch,
3,000 lb forged steel half-couplings for air valve, pressure
switch, and drain connections.
Motor shaft coupling shall be a flanged Type 316 stainless
steel coupling.
Bottom bearing shall be close tolerance sleeve type with
length minimum 2-1/2 times shaft diameter, permanently
grease lubricated for suction case with non-soluble grease,
or zincless bronze sleeve with Type 316 stainless steel
grease tube and fitting, extended to base plate.
Bowl and suction case bearings shall be product lubricated
zincless bronze sleeves.
Drive on each pump shall be a vertical, solid shaft, high-
efficiency, high thrust, open drip proof, non-reverse ratchet,
480-volt, 3-phase, 60 Hz heavy duty, electric motor. Each
electric motor shall be designed to accept the total,
unbalanced thrust force imposed by the pump.
Acceptable manufacturers are listed below:

o Flowserve Model.
o Floway Model.
o Byron J ackson.
o Goulds Pumps, Inc.
o Peerless Pumps.


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Each pump shall be provided with the following spare
parts:

o One suction bell bearing assembly.
o One set of all bowls and discharge case bearings.
o One set of all wear rings.
o One set of pump shaft bearings.
o One mechanical seal per pump.
o Two sets of all gaskets and O-rings.

Pump Cans

Water velocity between the largest obstruction in the pump
assembly and the can shall not exceed five (5) fps.
Pump cans shall be of a sufficient diameter to avoid
limiting or restricting the flow of water into the pump inlet.
Steel cans shall be fusion bonded epoxy coated on the
interior and exterior surfaces conforming to AWWA C-
213-91. The powder coating product shall be National
Sanitation Foundation (NSF) Standard 61 certified
material. The can shall have bolt-on flanges to allow for
removal. The cans shall be of sufficient depth to
accommodate the pump. In order to reduce the potential
for pump cavitation, the pump impeller shall be mounted a
minimum of 1-1/2 times the diameter of the pump bowl
away from the bottom of the pump can. This distance of
clearance has been presented in various texts as a function
of the pump inlet diameter. It is recommended that the
Engineer consult with various experts in the field of
pumping to verify the minimum clearance required for the
particular design condition.
Future expansion capabilities using larger pump cans,
additional pump cans, etc. shall be discussed with the COH.

SCADA (Pumps)

Alarm I/O points shall be provided for in the design of the
projects PLC. PLC shall include I/O points for connection
to the projects SCADA system for all stations. Alarm I/O
points shall include:

o Over Load / Fail.
o Vibration sensor.
o Low suction pressure shut-off.
o High discharge pressure shut-off.

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o Motor temperature.
o Low flow.

All motor-operated equipment shall be provided with the
ability of calculation and display of Run-Time information.
This information shall be displayed on each pump motor
starter. SCADA system shall also provide run time hours
on the SCADA host screen.
Provide an automatic rotation algorithm for air compressors
only.
Provide power monitoring unit for each pump.
Provide an on-site voltage and amp reading of the pumped
system for the site.
Provide three 4-20 mA output signals voltage, kilowatt
(power) and amp monitoring for the COH of Henderson
SCADA system.
Monitoring equipment shall be a micro-processor-based
device. Device shall be a GE Multilin 269+for each pump.
Provide a Square D Power Logic Circuit Monitor, Model
Number CM 2000, on incoming power. Provide power
relay from Nevada Power Company (NPC).
Provide hard copy of settings, software, and converters that
are required.

2.03.04.03 Flow Meters

The selection of the appropriate pump station or PRV station flow meter
and its location depend on many factors. A few of these factors include
having adequate station area to allow installation of the selected meter;
providing the manufacturer-specified number of lengths of straight run
pipe before and after the meter; and having the appropriate piping
orientation and configuration for the type of meter chosen. The required
distance of straight-run pipe upstream and downstream of a flow meter
depends on the type of meter chosen. The use of flow straightening vanes
prior to the meter can significantly reduce the required straight-run
distance. Each pump station must be analyzed on an individual basis.
COH flow meter requirements are:

Flow metering shall be performed above grade where
practical to reduce the concern for confined space entry.
If confined space entry conditions can not be avoided, a
magnetic flow meter shall be provided. A flood alarm,
sump pump, lighting, and vent fan shall be provided in the
vault.

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Full circle magnetic flow meters shall be used with a
remote converter mounted in a building or a shaded area.
Acceptable manufacturers for flow meters are as follows:

o ABB, Foxboro, Sparling or Krohne Aquaflex Series
Full Circle Magnetic Flow Meter.

Provide flow meter with 4-20 mA outputs and pulse output
for totalization.

2.03.04.04 Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC)


2.37
The Engineer shall design an evaporative cooler system and an infrared
heating system for the pump station. Where applicable, local exhaust
systems shall be provided for the pump rooms, any chemical rooms, rest
rooms, janitor rooms and storage rooms. The evaporative cooler shall be
either single stage or double stage with a water conservation type water
spray control system. Evaporative cooler ductwork for the pump room
shall be directed to discharge on pump motors.

All HVAC equipment shall be designed to provide adequate space for
installation, operation and maintenance. All electrical equipment
associated with HVAC system shall be UL listed, shall conform to NEMA
standards and shall conform to the project Technical Specifications.
Provide a local disconnect switch for maintenance.

The evaporative cooler system shall be supplied by Mastercool or DUS-
NDS approved equal. The evaporative media shall a rigid cross fluted pad
or cellulose material impregnated with anti-rot salts. The media shall be
CELdek by Munters Corporation or COH DUS-NDS approved equal.
Each evaporative cooler shall be controlled by a separate thermostat
designed to operate the unit to satisfy temperature set points inside the
pump station. Multi-stage units shall have multi-stage thermostats to
control the stage separately. All controls shall have phase fail relays to
protect control circuits. A reduced-pressure principle backflow prevention
assembly (RPPA) is not required if a functioning air gap is provided.

The electric infrared heaters shall consist of a steel enclosure with and
incaloy metal sheathed heating element with a ceiling mounting bracket.
The system shall come with a multiple unit controller with contacts for
thermostat operation for each heater and power transformer. The heaters
shall be supplied by Q-Mark or COH DUS-NDS approved equal.

Applicable codes and regulations shall be followed. If different codes or
regulations exist for the same area of building, the most conservative value
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shall be used. In general, ventilation systems shall conform to the
following, unless superseded by more stringent local requirements or these
guidelines:

American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).
Associated Air Balancing Council (AABC).
Air Movement and Conditioning Association (AMCA).
Air Diffuser Council (ADC).
American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM).
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
American National Standards Institute (ANSI).
American Refrigeration Institute (ARI).
Anti-Friction Bearing Manufacturers Association
(AFBMA).
Chlorine Institute.
Clean Air Act of 1990 Guidelines.
Code of Federal Regulation OSHA (CFR).
Manufacturers Standardization Society (MSS).
National Electric Code (NEC).
National Environmental Balancing Bureau (NEBB).
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).
Other Codes and Regulations.
Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National
Association (SMACNA) Standards.
Underwriters Laboratories (UL).
Uniform Building Code.
Uniform Fire Code.
Uniform Mechanical Code.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and local codes may
have special requirements regarding equipment or materials used for the
HVAC systems. The Engineer should be cognizant of these requirements
and others which may supersede general industry codes and standards.

The Engineer should address the following during the design phase:

Building insulation requirements.
Noise and vibration control mitigation measures.
Earthquake/seismic restraints for equipment, ductwork and
piping. Redundant equipment requirements and/or
emergency electrical service.

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Any equipment and piping containing liquids which may be
subject to freezing must be provided with heat tracing
located under the insulation and controlled by a thermostat.
Design temperature and humidity in pump station
structures shall conform to ASHRAE requirements.
Equipment selection shall include high efficiency units that
minimize electrical energy usage and water consumption.

2.03.04.05 Support Systems
A. Air Systems

The Engineer shall size and evaluate the plant air demand for each
individual pump station facility. Compressed air shall be used for surge
tanks, maintenance air tools, etc. The air supply to the surge tank shall
have priority over the supply for air tools.

The plant air system shall consist of lubricated motor-driven compressors,
air or liquid-cooled aftercooler, coalescing filter, air receiver, pressure
switches, relief valves, pressure reducing valves with bypasses,
condensate removal system with traps and all associated piping systems.
Air tools may require filters, pressure regulators and lubricators. Where
plant air usage is considered critical (like surge tank makeup air), a
redundant compressor unit should be installed to operate on an automatic
alternating lead-lag mode. The compressors shall be reciprocating type,
with ASME-approved receiver.

Air piping shall be designed to provide a separate piping header to each
type of service to ensure that priority equipment will have a continuous,
uninterrupted supply of compressed air.

B. Water

The potable water supply system shall be protected by a reduced pressure
principle backflow preventor, in accordance with local code requirements.
Water systems shall be designed to avoid possible contamination. If the
backflow preventor is mounted adjacent to a wall, it shall be mounted a
minimum of 8 away to allow for maintenance.

C. Service Water

Service water (plant water or utility water) shall be obtained from a
potable water supply. A backflow preventor or air gap tank shall be

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provided. Service water will be used for general housekeeping purposes
and for chemical dilution systems.

D. Pump Room Drainage System

The drainage system shall consist of a floor drain, hub drain, floor sink,
cast iron drain pipe, holding sump and sump pumps, as necessary. The
drainage system shall be designed to handle drainage from the pump seals,
housekeeping and evaporative coolers. A floor flood switch shall be
provided and connected to SCADA. The system may be exempt from the
Uniform Plumbing Code. It is the Engineers responsibility to consult all
governing authorities to design the drainage system to meet all applicable
codes. The holding sump shall be designed with adequate volume to
prevent the pump from cycling in excess of the number of starts per hour
recommended by the motor manufacturer. The sump may be covered with
aluminum grating.

Sump pumps (if necessary) shall be duplex type submersible pumps
complete with lifting chain, discharge valve, check valve, piping, starter,
level controls and automatic alternator. High water level alarms shall be
connected to the main pump station control panel PLC.

The drainage system shall be designed to convey drainage from the pump
seals, housekeeping and the evaporative coolers offsite. Due to the wide
variety of pump station locations, the location of the offsite drainage shall
be determined on a case by case basis by the COH DUS-NDS.

E. Wastewater System

Pump stations which are located remote from other facilities will be
provided with toilet, service sink, mop sink and lavatory facilities. The
requirement of such facilities will be reviewed and determined by the
COH through the DUS-NDS. Where these facilities are provided, the
Engineer must address the handling and disposal of the wastewater
generated. The system provided must meet standards of the authorities
with jurisdiction.

F. Telephones and Communications

Pump stations shall be supplied with a telephone board and 4-2 buried
conduit for the addition of telephones and other security electrical needs.
Approved Sprint drawings shall be submitted as part of project as-builts.


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2.03.04.06 Fire Protection

Fire protection measures for pump stations and PRV stations, i.e., fire
hydrants; fire department Siamese connections, sprinklers, fire alarms, fire
extinguishers, etc. shall be in accordance with City of Henderson
Department of Developmental Services, IBC and UFC requirements. If a
fire suppression system is required, it is recommended that the sprinkler
system, along with fire and smoke alarms, be provided under a
performance specification, with the Contractor required to obtain the
necessary permits.

2.03.04.07 Chlorine Residual and Turbidity Sampling

Options for the disposal of sample water shall be submitted to the COH
through the DUS-NDS for review and approval prior to implementation.
Sampling systems shall be pressurized using either system pressure or a
system supply pump and/or a residual analyzer return pump.

2.03.04.08 Chlorination Provisions

Chlorination storage and feeding system shall be provided where required
by the design. The system shall use commercially available hypochlorite.
The system shall consist of the storage tanks, chemical metering pumps,
chlorine residual analyzers, injection diffusers, piping, valves, electrical
systems and controls. All equipment shall be constructed of materials
compatible with hypochlorite solution. Solution concentrate shall vary
from 10 to 15 percent.

A. Capacity and Points of Injection

The system shall be designed for a capacity of sufficient magnitude to
maintain a chlorine residual of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L, unless otherwise revised
through the COH DUS-NDS. Hypochlorite solution shall be injected at
the reservoir and/or at the pump station suction or discharge manifold.
Capacity shall be based on maximum discharge rate for the pump station
or that required to increase the residual of the total reservoir volume from
0.2 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L in a 24 hour period, whichever is greater.

B. Selection of Type of System


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The Engineer shall perform an evaluation to determine the most
economical, reliable, easy to operate and COH-preferred hypochlorite
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system to be used. During the evaluation, the Engineer shall receive input
from the local chemical supplier(s) to assess typical system operations and
availability..

C. Sodium Hypochlorite

Sodium hypochlorite solution shall be used for disinfection.
Commercially available sodium hypochlorite is normally delivered as a 10
to 15 percent available chlorine solution.

D. Chemical Solution Piping

Chemical solution piping shall be schedule 80 chlorinated polyvinyl
chloride (CPVC) pipe. All isolation valves shall be CPVC diaphragm
valves with either union or flanged ends. Where required by local codes,
buried underground chemical piping shall be double-wall type with leak
monitoring system. Interior piping shall be double walled where required
for safety and to prevent overhead leaks where personnel or equipment
could be impacted.

E. Storage Tanks

Chemical storage tanks shall be cross-link polyethylene designed and
manufactured in accordance with applicable ASTM Standards. Storage
tanks shall be furnished with inlet, outlet, level indicator, vent and drain
nozzles with an access manhole. Storage tanks shall be provided with a
containment basin or dike sized in accordance with the International
Building Code (IBC). The containment area shall have a liquid detector
and light to indicate that attention in needed. Tank size shall be calculated
based on usable storage volume not tank volume.

F. Chemical Metering Pump

Chemical metering pumps for sodium hypochlorite solution service shall
be hydraulically peristaltic type and suitable for metering service. The
metering pumps shall be manufactured by Watson Marlow Bredel. Each
pump shall be complete with base, drive and tubing. Piping shall include
diaphragm valves, check valves, calibration column, and all other
appurtenances for a complete and functional dosing system. An
eyewash/shower for chemical stations may be required by OSHA. Each
metering pump for reservoir disinfection shall have a manual and remote
controlled dosage control.

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Metering pumps injecting into the main pump station suction or discharge
manifold shall be controlled by flow and residual.

Each set of pumps shall be provided with a standby unit.

Sample lines shall be sized to provide fresh and representative samples to
the analyzers. Sample line sizes and the location of sample points,
metering pumps and analyzing equipment shall be coordinated by the
Engineer through the COHs DUS-NDS.

G. Residual Analyzers

Residual analyzers shall be provided to sample chlorine residual as
appropriate for controlling chlorine residual. Residual analyzers shall be
manufactured by Wallace & Tiernan, Hach or equal.

2.03.04.09 Wash Down Systems

The Engineer shall provide wash down piping with hose bibbs mounted on
the interior of each pump station. The wash down system shall be
connected to the high-pressure side of the station discharge header piping
for source water. Hose bibbs shall be inch and conveniently located for
station housekeeping service. Each hose bibb shall be provided with a
hose rack and a 50-foot, inch hose.

The Engineer shall ensure that all wash down system water connections to
the potable waterlines be protected by a backflow prevention/air break
system. The backflow prevention/air break system shall be mounted a
minimum of 8 inches from the wall to allow for maintenance. Service
water piping shall be Type K Rigid Copper pipe. All isolation valves shall
be brass body, turn, eccentric plug valves.

2.03.05 Structural Design Requirements
2.03.05.01 General Design Guidelines

This section identifies the codes, standards, and design aides that shall be
used in the design of pump stations. This is intended to serve as an
introduction to structural design requirements and should not be construed
as an all-inclusive list.


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Reference Standards and Codes - The following reference standards and
code shall be used in the design:

The latest edition of the International Building Code (IBC).
The latest edition of the ACI for Environmental
Engineering Concrete Structures (ACI 350R).
The latest requirements for reinforced concrete (ACI 318)
and the commentary (ACI 318R) as contained in the IBC.
Latest requirements for Occupational Safety and Health
Act.

2.03.05.02 General Service Design Loads

Each structure shall be designed to safely support the imposed live and
dead loads. Loading combinations and live load reductions shall be
according to the requirements/limitations set forth in the IBC. All live and
dead loads used for purpose of design shall be developed for the intended
use or occupancy of the particular structure.

The following general service design loads shall be used in the design of
pump station and vault structures. These loads include dead loads, live
loads, impact and vibration loads, wind loads, earthquake loads,
hydrostatic loads, lateral soil loads and miscellaneous loads.

A. Dead Load Unit Weights

In addition to the dead load of the basic structural elements, the following
items, at a minimum shall be used:

Piping 12 inches in diameter and smaller shall be treated as
uniformly distributed loads. Typical values are 20 pounds
per square foot (psf) for extensive piping and 10 psf for
light to moderate piping.
Piping larger than 12 inches in diameter shall be considered
as concentrated loads.
Pipeline thrust under maximum pressure conditions.
Earth: 120 pounds per cubic foot (pcf), or as recommended
by the project/developments geotechnical engineer.


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B. Live Loads

In addition to concentrated loads, the following items shall be used:

General roof live loads, walkways, platforms and stairs
shall have a minimum (unreduced live load of 100 psf.
Additional consideration shall be given for the type, size
and weight of specific equipment and maintenance of
equipment, in determining the actual design live loads and
concentrated loads. Requirements are as follows:
Mechanical/Electrical Rooms: Equipment weight +100
psf.
Stairs/Walkways: Use the greatest of 100 psf or 1,000 lbs.
Grating: Use a concentrated load of 250 lb/ft with less than
inch deflection.
Use HS20 load per AASHTO for truck loading.
Electrical and pipe space areas can be estimated by using
150 psf or more as determined by the actual equipment.

C. Hydrostatic Loads and Lateral Soil Loading

The values for lateral soil pressures and soil-bearing pressures for below
grade structures or parts of structures shall be designed in accordance with
the projects geotechnical report(s)/projects geotechnical engineer.

Buried reinforced concrete structures shall be designed for
hydrostatic forces imposed by the presence of groundwater.
The design of these structures shall include resistance to
uplift forces.
Lateral soil loadings shall include active soil pressures for
yielding walls, at-rest soil pressures for non-yielding walls
and surcharge pressures due to a soil minimum cover of 2
feet or equal to the actual depth of the soil cover above the
structure.
Seismic soil pressures.
For buried hydraulic structures use high operational water
level without backfill (33% overstress).

2.03.05.03 Seismic Design Criteria

Each structure shall be designed in accordance with the latest edition of
the IBC and per site-specific seismic design recommendations as given in
the projects geotechnical report(s). For minor isolated structures where a

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site-specific study may not be performed, the appropriate provisions of the
IBC shall be used to determine seismic forces.

A. Seismic Forces

Seismic forces resulting from dead loads shall be determined using the
appropriate ground acceleration and in accordance with IBC criteria.

2.03.05.04 Structural Design Criteria

Reinforced concrete stations and vaults shall be designed for both strength
and serviceability. The ultimate strength design method and the working
stress method (alternative design method) are acceptable for reinforced
concrete design.

Pump stations constructed of reinforced masonry block shall be designed
based upon the working stress analysis method.

A. Materials

Hollow Concrete Masonry Units shall be Grade N, Type II, load bearing
units, ASTM C90, made from normal weight aggregates (ASTM C33).
Size: 8-inch by 16-inch concrete block. Masonry Reinforcement: ASTM
A615, Grade 60.

B. Joints

Expansion and construction joints shall be provided in accordance with
ACI 350R to allow flexibility and to adequately tolerate differential
movements and shrinkage stress. Strength of design method shall employ
load factors and strength reduction factors. Load factors for each structure
shall be in accordance with ACI 318-83 Code.

C. Walls

Walls shall be designed with consideration for the following:

Wall footings shall be continuous with the floor slab.
Vertical wall construction joints shall align with the floor
joints. Construction joints shall utilize (as a minimum) 3/8-

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inch by 6-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC) flatstrip waterstop
and -inch triangular sealant grooves.
Two techniques are recommended to reduce the tendency
for vertical wall cracking that results from footing restraint.
o The wall shall be keyed into a joint at the tip of the
wall footing. In order to minimize water demand
from the footing on the fresh wall concrete, the
keyway in the footing should be kept wet until the
wall concrete is placed.
o Additional horizontal reinforcing shall be placed in
the bottom 3 feet of the wall.

D. Floor Slab

Floor slabs shall be designed with consideration for the following:

Station floor slabs shall be sloped to provide adequate
drainage to the floor drain or sump.

2.03.06 Electrical Systems
2.03.06.01 General Design Guidelines

The electrical systems for pump station designs shall comply with the
National Electric Code (NEC) with Southern Nevada Amendments,
current version adopted by the COH. The electrical equipment will be
manufactured in accordance with the standards of the Institute of
Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the National Electrical
Manufacturers Association (NEMA). Where applicable, the electrical
equipment will require a label indicating compliance with the standards
of a nationally recognized testing organization, i.e., Underwriters
Laboratory (UL), Factory Mutual System (FM), or Canadian Standards
Association (CSA).

The electrical design will include service entrance sections, switchgear
sections, motor control sections, standby and/or dual-power systems,
conduit and wiring. Motor control center (MCC) panels will be housed in
air conditioned or evaporative cooled space. Each design shall include
power demand information that will be needed in order for contractor to
apply for electrical service from the Nevada Power Company.

The electrical design shall include appropriate lightning protection devices
for power system protection.


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2.03.06.02 System Reliability

Reliability is defined as a measurement of the ability of a component or
system to perform its designated function without failure. Pump station
power distribution systems shall be designed such that no single fault or
loss of the preferred primary power source will result in the disruption of
greater than 30 minutes of electrical service to more than one MCC
associated with vital components. To satisfy this requirement, the
electrical primary power distribution system shall incorporate redundant
power sources.

Vital components serving the same function shall be divided as equally as
possible between at least two MCCs. Non-vital components will be
divided in a similar manner where practical.

2.03.06.03 Power System Protection

Pump stations will operate unattended. Power systems shall be provided
with protection against single phasing, improper phase rotation and ground
faults. A power pulse relay shall be provided from the Nevada Power
meter to the COH SCADA system.

Fault studies analyzing the available fault currents shall be prepared for
each source of power and submitted as part of the operation and
maintenance manuals.

2.03.06.04 Uninterruptible Power Supply

An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) shall be provided to power
communications, PLC and instruments only. UPS can be evaluated for
emergency exhaust systems.

Each panel furnished with a programmable logic controller (PLC) shall
have one UPS. The UPS shall be true, on-line with total harmonic
distortion of less than 2.5%. The UPS shall comply with EEEI Standard
519 and be designed to provide battery backup power for a minimum of
12 hours. UPS shall have a discreet output to the PLC indicating UPS on
battery power and UPS low battery.

2.03.06.05 Equipment Sizing and Rating


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Electrical equipment shall be sized to continuously carry all electrical
loads without overloading. Equipment and materials shall be rated to
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withstand and/or interrupt the available fault current, with at least a 20%
reserve margin for electrical load growth. Electrical power conductors
shall be sized according to the heating characteristics of conductors under
fault conditions. Temperature rise shall be limited to a maximum of 200
degree Celsius within 30 cycles, in addition to the continuous rating of the
conductors.

Electrical power conduits shall be sized for ultimate design conditions.
For conduits installed in concrete or under base slabs, etc., the Engineer
shall provide and stub-up at all major equipment and panels at least two
spare conduits for every 10 placed. The minimum size of the spare
conduits shall be 1-inch diameter or the largest size conduit used;
whichever is largest.

2.03.06.06 Motor Control Centers and Switchgear

All motor control centers (MCCs) and switchgears, shall be provided with
a solid state monitoring device as a minimum. Depending on system
requirements, a kilowatt hour meter and power factor meter will be
required. In general, MCCs and switchgear will be provided with Hand
Switches (HS) HOARs (Hand, On, Off, Auto, Remote); Supervisory
Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA); and Pilot Lights (PL)
On/Off/Fail, Alarm. All equipment lights shall be Light Emitting Diodes
(LEDs)

A. Motor Control Centers

Additional requirements for MCC units are as follows:

Low-voltage motor control assemblies should conform to
the standards for NEMA Class I, Type B assemblies.
Each assembly shall consist of vertical, free-standing
sections each approximately 90 inches high, a minimum 20
inches deep, and in multiples of 20 inches wide.
The door of each unit containing a disconnect device shall
be interlocked so the door cannot be opened unless the
device is in the OFF position, thus preventing the unit
from being energized when the door is open. All unit doors
shall be swing doors, with locks and continuous length
hinges. All MCC units shall be rodent proof.
All indicator lights mounted on the MCC shall be of the
push-to-test type, LED bulbs only.

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Each wire shall be identified with a unique number and
each terminal strip should be numbered.
Provide surge protection.
Allen Bradley or Square D, Cutler Hammer, or equal.
MCC drawings will identify all wiring numbers.

B. Switchgear

The following items shall be incorporated in the switchgear design:

The construction of the switchgear shall be of the universal
frame type using die-formed welded and bolted members;
panels should be 11-gage steel bolted in place.
Busbars shall be copper, fully insulated and silver plated at
the joints. A full-length ground bus should be provided at
the bottom of the switchgear enclosure.
Incoming and outgoing switch or circuit breaker sections
shall have ample spaces for medium voltage, 133%
shielded, jacketed single conductor stress-cone terminations
and lightning arrestors.
There shall be a clear indication of switch or circuit breaker
position, a high-impact type viewing window for
interrupter switches and status lights for circuit breakers.
Each wire shall be identified with unique number and each
terminal strip should be numbered.

C. Main Disconnect

The Engineer shall layout the pump station such that the main disconnect
on the MCC is located adjacent to an exterior door or provided in a
dedicated electrical room with exterior access. If site requirements or
other building requirements prevent this, a service disconnect shall be
located just inside an easily accessible exterior door.

A yellow sign with black lettering shall be affixed to the MCC identifying
the main disconnect. If a service disconnect is required, a similar yellow
sign shall be used to indicate its location. Finally, another yellow sign
shall be attached to the outside of the exterior door indicating that the
main and/or service disconnect are located inside the building. If there are
additional sources of power within the pump station, i.e. UPS, additional
signage will be required. It is preferred that the disconnect for UPS be
located adjacent to the MCC main disconnect.


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According to the latest Southern Nevada Amendments to the NEC, the use
of a shunt/trip device is no longer an acceptable means of disconnecting
power to the pump station.

When the main and/or service disconnect is located within the building or
dedicated electrical room, a fire department approved KNOX box shall be
installed on the exterior of the building adjacent to the main entry door to
the building.

A separate key operated main shall be provided to bring in future
temporary or permanent emergency generator power.

2.03.06.07 COH Standards

The COH has identified minimum requirements (design criteria) for pump
stations. The Engineer shall provide the following:

A. Smart Pressure and Pressure Sensing Level Transmitters

Transmitters shall have smart electronic circuitry and
shall be of the two-wire type and must support Highway
Addressable Remote Transducer (HART) protocol.
Process fluid shall be isolated form the sensing elements by
AISI Type 316 stainless steel, Hastelloy C or cobalt-
chromium-nickel alloy diaphragms and a silicone oil fluid
fill.
Transmitters shall have self-diagnostics and electronically
adjustable span, zero and damping with a turn down ratio
of at least 60-1.
Transmitters shall have integral temperature compensation
capabilities.
Transmitters shall be suitable for operation at temperatures
from 0 degrees Fahrenheit to 180 degrees Fahrenheit and
relative humidity of 5 to 100%. All parts shall be
cadmium-plated carbon steel, stainless steel or other
corrosion-resistant materials.
Transmitters shall have over-range protection to maximum
line pressure.
Accuracy of the transmitter shall be 0.10% of span and
transmitter output shall be 4-20 mA dc without the need for
external load adjustment.
Transmitters shall not be damaged by reverse polarity and
shall have a surge protection circuit.

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Transmitter shall have an elevated or suppressed zero as
required by the application.
For calibrated spans of less than 0.8 PSIG, a differential
pressure type transmitter with wide side vents shall be
utilized.
Transmitters shall be provided with AISI Type 316
stainless steel brackets for wall and pipe-stand mounting
and shall have AISI Type 316 stainless steel block and
bleed valve.
Transmitters tagged on the drawings or specified to be
indicating type shall be furnished with LCD type digital
indicators, scaled in engineering units (PSI).
Transmitter must support the following:

o Local display shall be scalable.
o Support HART protocol.
o Integral temperature compensation capabilities.
o Drift specs of not to exceed 0.125% URL for 5
years.
o Stainless steel (SST) manifold) with two (2) valves,
all SST wetted parts with a vent.
o SST mounting bracket.
o LCD Digital readout in PSI, which displays
diagnostic information.
o Transient Protection.
o 100:1 Turndown Ratio.
o 4-20 mA signal.
o Lightning protection, by CIT (805-496-7570)..

B. Pressure Switches

Pressure switches shall be field adjustable and shall have a
trip point repeatability of better than 1% of actual pressure.
Contacts shall be contact type and shall be rated 10
amperes at 120 volts ac.
Switches shall have over-range protection to maximum
process line pressure.
Switches mounted inside panels shall have NEMA Type 1
housings. All other switches shall have weatherproof
housings.
Switches shall be of the differential pressure type where
indicated on the drawings on in the device schedules.
Switches shall be snap-action switch type. No mercury
bulb types will be allowed.

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C. PLC

The Engineer shall provide PLC and operator interface
equipment in accordance with Section 2.03.07.
Boards shall not be stacked on top of one another.
20% spare wire terminal strips will be provided for future
expansion.
20% spare rack space will be provided for future
expansion.

D. Radio Telemetry Equipment

The Collection/Distribution Layer to Communication
Host radio system equipment shall be point-to-multipoint
multiple address (MAS) licensed radio equipment operating
in 928 MHz to 952 MHz bands, as manufactured by
Microwave Data Systems, model MDS 9710b. This model
is backwards compatible with the MDS 2310a radios, but is
the newer offering.
Surge suppressors shall be provided and installed on
antennae cables at each radio site to protect the radio
equipment from lightning damage.
Surge suppressors shall be bulkhead mounted on the radio
enclosures and shall be suitable for the size of cable used.
Surge suppressors shall be Polyphaser Corporation Series
IS-B50LN-C2 or equal.

E. Chlorination Controls (as required)

Provide a chlorine leak detector and related alarms and
lights.

F. SCADA Antenna

A radio path survey shall be performed by Frontier Radio
prior to setting the final location and elevation for the
antenna.
The SCADA antenna shall be mounted on a separate free
standing pole. Antenna shall be provided as follows:


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o Directional antenna shall be YAGI 10dBd with
20db from to back ratio. Directional antennas shall
be Scala Y900 or equal.
o Omni direction antennas shall be Scala 9-db gain
with mechanical tilt up and down provisions.

Antenna shall accept an Andrew N male connector,
Model #ANDREW L4NM or L4PNM-C.
Antenna Ground Kit: Andrew Type 204989 or SGPL4-
0681.
A cold shrink weatherproofing kit, Andrew Type 241548-4
shall be installed on the antenna end N connector.
If RTU is installed outdoors, use Andrew Type 241548-4
cold shrink weatherproofing kit on the RTU N connector.
SCADA Antenna shall not protrude more than 20 feet
above the station or perimeter wall unless approved by the
COH.
Maximum height of a pole mounted SCADA Antenna shall
be 50 feet above finish grade unless approved by the COH.
All antennas will be approved through the COH special use
permitting process.
Antennas shall not be mounted on storage reservoirs.

G. Radio Cable and Cable Installation

Directional antennas and feedline shall be provided.
All cabling between antennas and radio transceivers shall
utilize a splice-free un-kinked: foam dielectric coaxial
cable cut to length.
Foam dielectric coaxial cable shall consist of an inner
conductor surrounded by a foam dielectric, a solid-copper
corrugated outer conductor surrounding the dielectric, and a
polyethylene outer jacket suitable for direct bury.
Foam dielectric coaxial cable shall be Andrew Heliax LDF
per the requirements noted below. Radio cable type and
size shall be selected based on the following minimum
criteria:

o Manufacturers minimum bend radius for coaxial
cable installation in conduits shall be strictly
observed. Bend radii of 18 inches for LDF4 50A,
24 inches for LDF5P 50A and 30 inches for LDF6
50 are recommended.

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o Conduits shall be minimum 1-1/2 PVC-Coated
Galvanized Rigid Conduit (GRC).
o All antenna cable (including direct-bury) shall be
installed in PVC coated rigid-steel conduits for ease
of replacement.
o To prevent above ground portions of the cable from
being damaged, all cables (including direct-bury)
shall be run through a PVC-coated GRC conduit
extending to 10 feet above the grade.
o Installation shall use self-flaring connectors
specifically designed for use with the cable.
Table 2.2 Radio Cable Sizing Requirements


Total Feedline
Length
Feedline Type/Size
Minimum Bend
Radius
Up to 100 Feet
LDF4 50A
(1/2-inch Heliax)
5-inches
Up to 200 Feet
LDF5 - 50A
7/8-inch Heliax)
10-inches
Up to 300 Feet
LDF6-50
(1-1/4-inch Heliax)
15-inches









H. Miscellaneous Field Instruments

Liquid Level Control: Warrick Controls.
Digital Panel Indicators: Texmate DU 35CL or Precision
Digital 3.5 digit, 4-20 mA current loop panel meter, zero
& span potentiometer.
Signal Isolator: AGM Loop Powered Isolator, Model
AUX4000-24, adjustment screw to fine tune 4-20 mA
output.

I. Wiring

3 phase, 480 Volt shall be brown/orange/yellow colored
wire.
24 Volt wire for instrumentation power shall be:

o Positive (+) =blue.
o Negative (-) =brown.
o 4-20 mA loop wire shall be TP#16 white/black.

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2.03.06.08 Harmonics and Power Quality

If required harmonic suppression equipment shall be provided in
conjunction with variable frequency drive (if used). Equipment selection
and design, as well as, design calculations will be reviewed by the COH
on a case by case basis.

2.03.06.09 Trip Calibration

Motor overload protection shall be selected based on final motor
nameplate information. Size motor circuit protectors to coordinate with
motor starting characteristics and overload protection. Submit summary
of settings to the COH:

Equipment project identification number.
Nameplate information.
Overload device trip range.
Overload device setting.
Trip device rating.
Trip device setting if different from rated value.

Set trip devices and verify devices are operating within manufacturers
tolerances. Make changes to settings not complying with requirements
furnished by the Engineer in accordance with the Technical Specifications.
Device settings will be furnished for following equipment:

Medium-voltage system.
Low voltage switchgear.
Secondary unit substations.

2.03.07 Instrument and Control
2.03.07.01 General Design Guidelines


2.56
The instrumentation and control systems for pump station designs shall
comply with the National Electrical Code (NEC) and applicable local
codes. The electrical equipment shall be manufactured in accordance with
the standards of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). Where
applicable, the instrumentation and control equipment shall require a
label indicating compliance with the standards of a nationally
recognized testing organization, such as Underwriters Laboratory (UL) or
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Factory Mutual System (FM) Instrumentation and control facilities shall
be provided to measure, control and monitor pumping operations
including auxiliary equipment. Pumping operations include pump
stations, surge tanks, regulating reservoirs and turnout/rate of flow control
system. The design shall provide an integrated instrumentation and
control (I&C) system. This information shall be referenced for the
following information:

Control approach.
Future expansion capacity.
Design criteria compatible with existing water facilities and
the HEN NET systemwide control system.
Control strategies for pump stations, reservoirs and rate of
flow control stations.
Preliminary P&IDs.
Preliminary input and output point count for PLCs.
Equipment configurations and interfaces.
Data map with register numbers and transfer functions.

2.03.07.02 Control Philosophy/Logic

Typically pump stations pump from a zone reservoir to the next higher
zone reservoir. Pump stations will be operated automatically, but may be
manually overridden. Under normal conditions, the pumping system will
be remotely controlled automatically through an existing supervisory
control and data acquisition (SCADA) system located at the Henderson
Water Treatment Facility. The SCADA system will transmit and receive
signals to and from each pump station and/or reservoir to operate the
number of pumping units to match the flow demands or level.

The automatic control will be programmed in the PLC and will start and
stop the pumping units at the respective pump stations in accordance with
reservoir levels.

Each pump station will have a single master programmable logic
controller (PLC), Modicon Quantum 140 CPU 43412A with Quantum 140
CPS 114 20 power supply, Quantum 140 DDI 353 00 32-point discrete
input modules, Quantum 140 DRA 840 00 16-point relay discrete output
modules, Quantum 140 ACI 040 00 16-point analog input modules, and
Quantum 140 ACO 13000 4-point analog output modules. See Exhibit 2.1
for additional equipment.


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A. Motor Starter Controls

The following description will be typical for each of the pumps at each of
the pump stations. Each motor control starter section will have a General
Electric Multilin 269 +motor protection relay. The relay will generate
high temperature protection, ground fault protection, rotor temperature
protection, underload protection, voltage and frequency protection and
other unbalanced or over-limit functions. The Multilin relay will also
monitor the number of starts, running time, and will block starting when
too frequent attempts are requested. Other motor and machine safety
devices will include low-suction pressure switch; high-discharge pressure
switch will be hard wired to pump controls. Centralized functions such as
low suction level in the suction tank or reservoir, high level, or high-high
level in the reservoir or tank being pumped to, will be monitored by the
PLC which will provide a permissive interlock to each pump starter.

B. P&ID

Process and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) shall be developed to
indicate each instrument, monitoring and control device, and
communication device for the pump station, including components of the
subsystems of the pump station. The P&IDs shall follow the I&C
standards listed below and industry standard practices that promote
consistency, clarity and informative illustrations.

C. P&ID Support Documents

Supportable documents shall be developed to provide a completed design
that is constructible and biddable. Support documents shall be provided to
the COH electronically and include the following:

PLC input and output point summary lists.
Instrument summary list.
Control loop descriptions.
Instrumentation installation detail drawings:
Panel layout detail drawings.
SCADA system communication block diagram.
Communication interface detail drawings.
Instrument calibration sheet showing scale and output
range of instrument as set up as initially calibrated.


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D. I&C Standards

Numerous standards are applicable to the various facets of I&C work.
Listed below are major standards and recommended practices that the
Engineer shall be familiar with and follow in the design of the I&C
system.

Table 2.3 I&C Standards

Reference Title
API RP550 Manual on Installation of Refinery Instruments and
Control Systems
IEEE 100 Dictionary of Electrical and Electronic Terms
IEEE 472 Guide to Surge Withstand Capability (SWC) Tests
ISA S5.1 Instrumentation Symbols and Identification
ISA S5.3 Graphic Symbols for Distributed Control/Shared
Display Instrumentation, Logic and Computer Systems
ISA S5.4 Instrument Loop Diagrams
ISA RP7.3 Quality Standard for Instrument Air
ISA RP12.6 Installation of Intrinsically Safe Instrument Systems
in Class I Hazardous Location.
ISA S18.1 Annunciator Sequences and Specifications
ISA S20 Specification Forms for Process Measurement and
Control Instruments, Primary Element and Control
Valves
ISA 51.1 Process Instrumentation Terminology
NEMA 250 Enclosures for Industrial Controls and Systems
NEMA ICS Industrial Control
NFPA 70 National Electrical Code (NEC)
NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm Code

E. Input and Output Summary Lists


2.59
The Engineer shall compile a listing of all the required I/O points
associated with the I&C system. The tabulation will indicate all points
required to meet immediate and future process needs as separate entities.
I/O will be in a logical order of the P&ID drawings referenced. Spare
points will not be annotated. The I/O list will include tag/loop number,
process description, P&ID drawing reference, I/O type (analog, discrete,
digital link), associated number, and a remarks column to present
clarifications as needed (e.g. if a pulse input is required, future point
required). Each instrument and I/O summary will be organized by PLC
and will include the following information:

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Tag number of I/O point.
Description of I/O point.
PLC memory map.
P&ID drawing number on which the I/O point is indicated.
Associated specification section.
I/O type (analog, discrete, digital link, etc.).
Associated control panel number.
Applicable installation detail.
Applicable remarks or comments not covered elsewhere.
Total number of digital input, digital output, analog input
and analog output points associated with each PLC.
Data map with all registers and functions.

F. Instrumentation Summary

The Engineer shall compile a listing of all required instruments. The
instrument summaries will list each instruments tag and loop number,
specification number, associated instrument panel name/number, I/O list
(including tag and loop number, process description and P&ID drawing
reference), installation detail number, instrument range, instrument
setpoints, trip points, NEMA rating, material requirements and all other
data needed to precisely define the instrument requirements. These data
will be presented in hardcopy and electronic format.

G. Control Loop Description

A control strategy will be prepared for each instrument loop that controls
equipment. In addition, overall process control strategies, which interlock
numerous individual control strategies to provide an efficient operator
interface, will also be prepared. Control and process strategies will list all
applicable inputs and outputs, provide a general description of what the
strategy is supposed to do, and provide an explicit description of how each
element in the control loop functions. Each strategy will describe
monitoring, alarm and control functions associated with both local and
remote control. Each strategy will describe in detail the sequence of
operations required to start or stop a device under normal and abnormal
conditions. All process trip points, set points and timers will be quantified
in each strategy. Strategies will be annotated using the instrument and
equipment tag numbers shown on the P&IDs, and a P&ID reference will
be provided. Each strategy will describe the required functions needed in
process graphic screens used to monitor and control a specific process.
These data will be presented in hardcopy and electronic format. Each
strategy will also describe what should happen under abnormal conditions

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such as an I&C system failure, transmitter failure, abnormal process
values and loss of communication between PLCs.

H. Field Instrumentation

All field instruments shall be of the latest proven design and
manufacturing. Each instrument shall have a history of successful use in
its specified application. If the failure of any single field instrument could
jeopardize the continuous operation of the process, redundant instruments
shall be designed for a fault-tolerant configuration. Analog signals shall
be 4 to 20 mA.

I. Instruments Specifications

The Engineer shall compile instrument specifications for each type of field
and panel-mounted instrument to be provided.

J. Data Sheets

The Engineer shall require the Contractor to prepare and submit data
sheets conforming to ISA S20 for the specific equipment used.

K. Loop Diagrams

The Engineer shall require the Contractor and its instrument suppliers to
prepare and submit loop diagrams conforming to ISA 5.4. The Contractor
shall provide loop diagrams conforming to the expanded format of ISA 5.4
for all loops. The loop diagrams shall incorporate all instruments and all
loops associated with the I&C system. Loop diagrams shall be provided
in both hard copy and electronic formats.


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L. Electronic Layout Drawings

Electrical layout drawings shall show each field instrument that has
electrical connections, and all instrument panels. Particular care will be
given to ensure that adequate space is reserved for instrument panels.
Electrical signal cables and raceways will be installed by licensed
electricians and shall be shown on the electrical layout drawings. The
electronic layout drawings shall show all unique wire numbers and
terminal stop numbers. Electronic layout drawings shall be provided in
both hard copy and electronic formats.

M. Panel/Layout Detail Drawings

Panel layout detail drawings are required for control panels. Each face-
mounted device will show a reference number which is coordinated with
the instrument and input/output summary. Front-view drawings will show
maximum cabinet dimensions, but will have minimal detail dimensions
because the specific equipment dimensions and clearances are not
generally know during design. Nameplate and Annunciator schedules will
be shown on the drawings.

N. Control Panels

Control panels shall be installed in enclosures that are environmentally
suitable for the area. All control panels which require NEMA 3 or 4 rating
will be provided with window kits to preserve panel integrity and allow
operator viewing. Lens covers for indicating lights on all control panels
will be colored as determined by the Engineer.

O. Criteria


2.62
Detailed design shall promote commonality of hardware, the use of proven
and established hardware and software products and the use of current
technology to support upward compatibility with hardware and software
products.

The instrumentation and control (I&C) devices specified shall be
industrial grade. Design emphasis shall be placed on safety, process
control, reliability, maintainability and economics.

Controllers, instruments and control panels shall be designed to
accommodate all known immediate loads. The Engineer shall allocate all
required space and resources needed to support the installation of
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equipment and control panels. All instrument ranges will be scaled in
English units to the measured variable of the process. In addition to
meeting present needs, all control panels shall have a spare capacity (e.g.
I/O cards, memory, panel size, terminations, power supplies) of 20 percent
to be allocated for future needs. All control panels which are designed to
accommodate future expansion will be provided with blank plates to cover
cutouts.

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Exhibits



Exhibit 2.1 PLC Equipment

Exhibit 2.2 Loop & Tag Standardization

Exhibit 2.3 Conflicting Loop & Tag Numbers

Exhibit 2.4 Typical Hennet Pump Station Inputs Outputs

Exhibit 2.5 Instrument Loop Number Standardization




























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Exhibit 2.1

PLC Equipment

Modicon PLC
Power Supply CPS 114 20
Processor CPU 434 12A
Analog Input ACI 040 00
Discreet Input DDI 340 00 (16 inputs)
DDI 353 00 (32 inputs)
Analog Output ACO 020 00
Relay Output DRC 830 00


Data Panel
Spectrum SOI-200 Series 260AL402X


Communications
NR&D Universal Comm QUCM-OE
NR&D SPE4 Plus SPE4-2S
NR&D Media Converter DDC21
MDS Radio 9710
MDS RS232/RS422
Converter 01-2358A01, Rev 1
4-Wire Data Modem Adtran 4-wire Data Modem - DSU III AR
Part #1202011L1

UPS
APC 1000XL
Extra Battery Pack SUA24XLBP


Wiring Colors
+24VDC PS +Blue
-Brown

+24VDC I/O Blue

120VAC I/O Pink

4-20mA +White
-Black

+13.8VCD PS +Red
-Black

Exhibit 2.2

Loop & Tag Standardization

Loop 01, 11 (01A?) Reservoir level indications, and alarms
Loop 02, 12 (02A?) Remote Reservoir level indications alarms
Loop 03, 13, 23, 33 Pump suction pressure
Loop 04, 14 Compressor/Surge tank
Loop 05, 15, 25, 35 Pump discharge flow
Loop 06 Communications, radio or modem
Loop 07, 17, 27, 37 Pump discharge pressure
Loop 08, 18, 28 Intrusion, hatch intrusion
Loop 09 Commercial power
Loop 10
Loop 20
Etc.
To be used as needed (Chlorine, Etc)
Loop 90 Standby power, generators and UPS
Loop 100 Pump 1 status and alarms (or Flow control valve)
Loop 200 Pump 2 status and alarms (or Flow control valve)
Loop 300 Pump 3 status and alarms (or Flow control valve)
Loop 400 Pump 4 status and alarms (or Flow control valve)
Loop 500 Pump 5 status and alarms (or Flow control valve)
Loop 600 Pump 6 status and alarms (or Flow control valve)
Loop XX0 PLC Health status, PLC halted and PLC clock (last three digits
would be PLC number x 10, i.e.YA_81_810)



Exhibit 2.3
Conflicting Loop and Tag Numbers
Tag Description Tag Description Tag Description
LAHH_61_21S_15 PS 21S Building Flooded LAH_62_10A P22 Flood Level High LAH_63_107 PS 23 Flood Alarm
ZL_61_21S_12 PS 21S Building Intrusion XS_62_508 PS 22 Building Intrusion ZA_63_910 PS 23 Intrusion
ZSO_61_21S_4
PS 21S Bypass Pressure Relief
Open
ZL_62_550 PS 22 Bypass Pressure Relief Open
YS_61_610 PS 21S PLC Health Good YS_62_620 PS 22 PLC Health Bad YA_63_412 PS 23 PLC 63 Health Status
PAH_61_21S_5 PS 21S High Discharge PAH_62_507 PS 22 High Discharge Pressure PAH_63_100 PS 23 High Discharge Pressure
PAL_61_21S_2 PS 21S Low Suction Pressure PALL_62_503A PS 22 Pump 1 Low Suction Pressure PAL_63_110 PS 23 P1 Low Suction Pressure
PALL_62_503B PS 22 Pump 2 Low Suction Pressure PAL_63_120 PS 23 P2 Low Suction Pressure
YL_61_21S_3_1 PS 21S Pump 1 Running YL_62_510 PS 22 Pump 1 Running YL_63_110 PS 23 P1 Running
YA_61_21S_3_1 PS 21S Pump 1 Start Fail YA_62_510B PS 22 Pump 1 Start Fail YA_63_110A PS 23 P1 Start Fail
ZL_61_21S_3_1 PS 21S Pump 1 Auto ZL_62_510B PS 22 Pump 1 In Auto ZLA_63_110 PS 23 P1 Auto
QL_61_21S_3_1 PS 21S Pump 1 Disabled ZL_62_510C PS 22 Pump 1 Disabled ZLB_63_110 PS 23 P1 Disabled
QA_61_21S_3_1 PS 21S Pump 1 Trouble YL_62_512 PS 22 Pump 1 Trouble YA_63_110 PS 23 P1 Trouble
J AL_61_21S_11 PS 21S UPS Battery Low J A_62_510B PS 22 UPS Battery Low J A_63_602 PS 23 UPS Battery Low
QA_61_21S_11 PS 21S UPS On Battery J A_62_510A PS 22 UPS On Battery J A_63_601 PS 23 UPS On Battery
LAHH_61_21S_1 R-21S Reservoir HI HI Level LAHH_62_401B R-22 Reservoir HI HI Level LAHH_63_562 PS 23 R23 Reservoir High High Level
LAH_61_21S_1 R-21S Reservoir High Level LAH_62_401 R-22 Reservoir High Level LAH_63_561 PS 23 R23 Reservoir High Level
LA_61_21S_1 R-21S Reservoir Lost Level Signal LA_62_401 R-22 Reservoir Lost Level Signal LA_63_561 PS 23 R23 Reservoir Lost Signal
LAL_61_21S_1 R-21S Reservoir Low Level LAL_62_401 R-22 Reservoir Low Level LAL_63_561 PS 23 R23 Reservoir Low Level
LAHH_61_22_1_1 R-22 Reservoir HI HI Level LAHH_62_609B R-23 Reservoir HI HI Level LAHH_63_512 PS 23 R24 Reservoir High High Level
LAH_61_22_1_1 R-22 Reservoir High Level LAH_62_608 R-23 Reservoir High Level LAH_63_511 PS 23 R24 Reservoir High Level
LA_61_22_1_1 R-22 Reservoir Lost Level Signal LA_62_608 R-23 Reservoir Lost Level Signal LA_63_511 PS 23 R24 Reservoir Lost Signal
LAL_61_22_1_1 R-22 Reservoir Low Level LAL_62_608 R-23 Reservoir Low Level LAL_63_511 PS 23 R24 Reservoir Low Level
J AL_61_21S_13 PS 21S Utility Power Fail J A_62_509B PS 22 Utility Power Fail J A_63_801 PS 23 Utility Power Failure
ZA_63_519 PS 23 R24 Reservoir Intrusion
Exhibit 2.4
Typical Hennet Pump Station Inputs Outputs
Analog Inputs
Reservoir Y Level
Discharge Flow
Discharge Flow Total MSR
Discharge Flow Total 2MSR
Discharge Flow Total LSR
Discharge Pressure
Pump X Run Hours
Power Usage
Power Usage Total MSR
Power Usage Total 2MSR
Power Usage Total LSR
PLC Time Clock
AO Setpoints and AI Readbacks
Pump X On Time
Pump X Off Time
Pump X Start Level
Pump X Stop Level
Reservoir Y High Level
Reservoir Y Low Level
CTU Clock Hours
CTU Clock Minutes
CTU Clock Seconds
High Discharge Pressure
Low Discharge Pressure
Exhibit 2.4
Typical Hennet Pump Station Inputs Outputs
Digital Inputs DO Setpoints & DI Readbacks
Reservoir Y High High Level Pump X Override Start
Reservoir Y High Level Pump X Override Stop
Reservoir Y Low Level Pump X Disable
Reservoir Y Lost Signal Pump Control Reservoir Select
Pump X Auto
Pump X Running
Pump X Start Fail
Pump X Drive Fail
Pump X MCC Fail
Pump X High Temp
Pump X Trouble
Pump X Diabled
Pumps Low Suction Pressure
Pumps High Suction Pressure
Pumps Low Discharge Pressure
Pumps High Discharge Pressure
Station High/Low Discharge Pressure
Hennet Test
PLC Remote Rack Fail
Utility Power Fail
UPS on Battery Power
UPS Battery Low
Reservoir Level Power Failure
PLC I/O Power Failure
Loop Power Failure
Pump Station Intrusion
PLC Health Status
PLC Rate of Change
PLC Communications Failure (from CTU)
Pump Station Flood alarm
Surge Tank HiHi
Surge Tank LoLo
Compressor Run
Compressor Fail
Sump Pump Run
Sump Pump Fail
Bypass Releif Valve Open
Exhibit 2.5
Pump Station
Instrument Loop Number Standardization
Pump Station 30, PLC-81
Loop # Description Examples Description
01 Level LI_81_01 R-30 level indication
LI_81_01A R-30A level indication
LAHH_81_01A R-30A high high level switch
LAH_81_01A R-30A high level switch
LAL_81_01 R-30 low level switch
LALL_81_01 R-30 low low level switch
LCH_81_01 R-30 high level setpoint
02 Remote Level LA_81_02 R-31 level signal lost/failure @ P-30
LI_81_02A R-31A level signal @ P-30
03 Pump Suction Pressure PI_81_03 P-30 Pumps (all) suction pressure
PI_81_13 P-30 Pump 1 suction pressure indication
PI_81_23 P-30 Pump 2 suction pressure indication
PAL_81_03 P-30 Pumps (all) low suction pressure switch
PAL_81_33 P-30 Pump 3 low suction pressure switch
PCL_81_13 P-30 Pump 1 low suction pressure setpoint
04 Compressor/Surge tank PI_81_04 P-30 Surge tank pressure indication
PAH_81_04 P-30 Surge tank pressure high
PAL_81_04 P-30 Surge tank pressure low
YA_81_14 P-30 Air compressor trouble
PAL_81_14 P-30 Air compressor low pressure
05 Pump Discharge Flow FI_81_05 P-30 Pumps (all) flow
FI_81_15 P-30 Pump 1 flow
FQI_81_15 P-30 Pump 1 flow totalizer pulse input
Exhibit 2.5
Pump Station
Instrument Loop Number Standardization
Pump Station 30, PLC-81
Loop # Description Examples Description
06 Communications PLC81_FAIL P-30 Remote to CTU Communications Failure (hennet alarm)
YS_81_06 P-30 Communications Failure Reset
YA_81_06 P-30 Communications Failure Alarm
YA_81_36 P-30 Rate of Change
YA_81_46 P-30 Dectalk Alarm Test
07 Pump Discharge Pressure PI_81_07 P-30 Pumps (all) discharge pressure indication
PI_81_17 P-30 Pumps 1 discharge pressure indication
PAH_81_07 P-30 Pumps (all) discharge pressure switch high
08 Intrusion XS_81_08 P-30 Intrusion switch
XA_81_08 P-30 Intrusion alarm
XS_81_18 R-30 Hatch Intrusion alarm
XS_81_18A R-30 Ladder Entryway Intrusion alarm
09 Commercial Power J I_81_09 P-30 Power Company Power Transmitter
J A_81_09A P-30 Power Failure
J A_81_09B P-30 UPS on battery power
J A_81_09C P-30 UPS battery low
J QI_81_09 P-30 Power Totalizer Pulse
J QI_81_19 P-30 MCC-1 Power Totalizer Pulse (more than 1 transformer)
90 Generators XL_81_90 P-30 Generator Run
XA_81_90 P-30 Generator Fail
Exhibit 2.5
Pump Station
Instrument Loop Number Standardization
Pump Station 30, PLC-81
Loop # Description Examples Description
100 Pump 1 HS_81_100 (HS_81_100H ?) P-30 Pump 1 HOA switch in Hand position
200 Pump 2 YS_81_100 (HS_81_100A ?) P-30 Pump 1 HOA switch in Auto position
300 Pump 3 YL_81_100 P-30 Pump 1 Run
400 Pump 4 HS_81_100B P-30 Pump 1 override start
500 Pump 5 HS_81_100F (C?) P-30 Pump 1 override stop
600 Pump 6 HS_81_100D P-30 Pump 1 disable/enable
YA_81_100 P-30 Pump 1 Fail (or Start Fail)
YA_81_100A P-30 Pump 1 VFD Fail
LC_81_100B (LCH_81_100 ?) P-30 Pump 1 Start Level
LC_81_100F (LCL_81_100 ?) P-30 Pump 1 Stop Level
KC_81_100B P-30 Pump 1 Start Time
KC_81_100F (S?) P-30 Pump 1 Stop Time
TSH_81_100 P-30 Pump 1 Temperature high switch
TAH_81_100 P-30 Pump 1 Temperature high alarm
FVA_81_100 P-30 Pump 1 Valve fail
XX0 PLC Health YA_81_810 P-30 PLC Health Fail
81QI_100 P-30 PLC Health Counter
81PLCRUN_100 P-30 PLC Halted
KI_81_810 P-30 PLC Clock Time
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Chapter 3 Reservoirs
3.01 Design Concept Report
3.01.01 General

A Design Concept Report (DCR) shall be submitted to and approved by
the COH DUS-NDS. As a minimum the report shall address the
following:

Location of the reservoir (Site map, APN, etc.)
Siting Analysis
Site Description
ROWs, easements, ownership, ect.
Sizing
o Use Appendix D for sizing
o Maximum Day is 1.75 times the Average Day
Demand
o Peak Hour Demand is 1.70 times the Maximum
Demand
o Expandability
Overflow elevation
Height
Diameter
Reservoir Material:

o Steel (2 tanks required)
o Concrete

Water Quality Analysis
Service Area

The purpose of the DCR is to provide the Engineer and the COH with a
general overall perspective of purpose and need for the reservoir. Without
an approved conceptual design report, the Pre-Design Report will not be
accepted.

3.02 Pre-Design Report
3.02.01 General

The pre-design phase of the project shall be summarized and presented in
a Pre-Design Report (PDR). The report will be submitted to the COH

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DUS-NDS for review and acceptance. The PDR is the basis for the
ensuing design process and must be presented in a fashion which allows
the reader to gain a thorough and complete understanding of the necessity
of the project. Without an approved PDR, the Engineer will not receive
City of Henderson approval to proceed to the final design.

The Pre-Design Report shall include, but not be limited to:

Executive Summary
Table of Contents
The project background.
Existing conditions.
Summary of utility conflict information, including pothole
information or recommendations for utilities proposed to be
potholed.
Topographic mapping information summary
Draft Geotechnical Investigation Report
Draft Environmental Investigation Report
Draft Corrosion Control/Cathodic Protection Report
Summary/overview of the applicable drainage and traffic
study findings with references to those documents
submitted separately.
Preliminary plans and centerline profiles (30% design
drawings) illustrating the recommended pipeline alignment
and profile, facility plan views, proposed site plans and
improvements, any offsite improvements, appropriate
sections, elevations or details, existing features, property
ownership info, rights-of-way/easements, etc.
Alternatives evaluation summary.
Recommendations for future connection and tee locations.
Identifications of appurtenant facilities and spacing criteria
Opinions and recommendations for bidding packages,
scheduling, contractor staffing and impacts to public areas.
Identification of any permanent and temporary
ROW/easement constraints and acquisition needs.
Matrix summary of permits to be obtained.
List of agencies and utilities to review and sign the
drawings.
Outline of technical specification sections and list of final
design drawings.
Preliminary quantity and associated cost estimates.
Preliminary construction schedule.
Project correspondence file, including meeting minutes.
Inventory of existing facilities and improvements.

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Graphics, detail sketches, tables, and other displays to
support analyses and recommendations.
List of relevant reports, plans and maps reviewed and other
relevant project information
Work plan for how construction is to be accomplished if
connecting into existing facilities (phasing, shutdowns,
etc,).

More specifically the preliminary design effort includes determining
reservoir volume, surveying, and geotechnical work. The conceptual
reservoir design shall be provided in the Conceptual Design Report. The
Pre-Design Report shall include as a minimum the following procedures
for site selection, volume determination, surveys, and geotechnical work.

3.02.02 Site Selection

Site selection shall be based on the following criteria:

The Water System Master Plan and subsequent work by
COH staff to refine siting for a specific reservoir.
Proximity to existing and future water pump stations.
Distribution system hydraulic capacity requirements
including overflow elevations.
Access to facility including construction access.
Reservoir overflow elevation and site drainage.
Size of parcel.
Topography of the site including sufficient setback to allow
for fill, cut, or fill transition to existing contour elevations
at the property lines.
Utilities on and near the site.
Geotechnical considerations including seismic
requirements.
Zoning requirements.
Permits.
Environmental considerations.
Operation and maintenance considerations.
Impact to the public including visual impact.
Power availability.

3.3
Final selection of the site will be approved, upon review
and modification, if necessary, by the COH through the
DUS-NDS.



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3.02.02.01 Site Description

The location of the reservoir/tank site shall be described and defined by
the Engineer in sufficient enough detail to allow a contractor unfamiliar
with the Las Vegas Valley, to locate the reservoir site with reasonable
effort. As a minimum the Engineer shall:

Prepare a location map showing the regional location of the
site with an Assessors Parcel Number (APN).
Prepare a vicinity map depicting the site location relative to
streets and recognizable features.
Prepare a survey control map identifying the site by
township, range, section, basis of bearing, coordinates, and
other existing survey control features including
benchmarks.
Provide topographic mapping, locations and descriptions of
all existing easements.
Proposed site configuration including locations and
proposed easements for access, power, water/sewer, etc.

3.02.03 Volume Criteria

Determine the volume of the reservoir, if not provided. The City of
Henderson has specific criteria for determining the volume of a particular
reservoir. The Engineer shall consider operational storage, fire
suppression storage, emergency storage, and water quality requirements in
determining the volume of a proposed reservoir.

3.02.03.01 Operational Storage

Operational storage is the volume of the reservoir devoted to supplying the
water to the system under normal operating conditions. Operational
storage is equal to the peak hour flow rate minus the maximum day flow
rate for 6 hours.

3.02.03.02 Fire Suppression Storage

Fire suppression storage is the volume required to deliver fire flows in
accordance with the fire flow requirements set forth by the Uniform Fire
Code, latest edition adopted by the COH, Appendix A-III-A, and any
amendments by the COH.


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3.02.03.03 Calculations

The City of Henderson requires the calculation of two storage criteria in
determining the volume of the reservoir. The larger of the two volumes
shall be provided. Both criteria utilize operational storage, which is
expressed below.

Operational Storage =(PHD-MDD)*6 hrs
o PHD is Peak Hour Demand
o MDD is Maximum Day Demand

The first criterion states that the volume of the reservoir must equal twice
the operational storage. The second criterion states the reservoir volume
be equal to the operational storage plus the fire suppression storage. The
two criteria are presented below.

Volume = 2 x Operational Storage
Volume =Operational Storage +Fire Suppression Storage

3.02.04 Survey

Perform field location survey work consisting of, at a minimum,
the following elements:

Contact public and private utilities, field verify the location
of their installations, and identify design conflicts.
Establish a tank and building footprint and limits of other
site development work.
Prepare a record of survey map showing locations of
existing property corners which may be disturbed or
destroyed during construction, including locating of
recording information of all existing easements affecting
the site.
Survey topography including aboveground and
underground utilities, facilities.
Prepare record of survey of property boundary, set lot
corners, file with the County, and prepare legal descriptions
for warranty deeds.
Prepare a coordinate sheet of aboveground and
underground utilities and facilities including inverts, rims

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on storm drainage and/or sanitary sewer, and valve
operating nuts on water mains.
Prepare profile(s) and/or cross-section(s) as required.
Prepare legal descriptions for all proposed permanent and
temporary construction easements.
Global Positioning System (GPS) as required by the COH
DUS-NDS. .

3.02.05 Geotechnical Investigation

Geotechnical services related to design of reservoirs shall be provided by a
Geotechnical Engineer experienced in geotechnical evaluation of water
storage reservoir sites. Local experience, knowledge of local soil and
geological conditions, and familiarity with reservoir construction practices
shall be required criteria in selecting a qualified and professionally
registered Geotechnical Engineer. The Geotechnical Engineers shall be
responsible for determining the following specific design criteria and site
conditions.

3.02.05.01 Site Conditions

The Geotechnical Engineer shall be responsible for providing an
evaluation of the site to determine the minimum number and the depth of
exploratory boring required for the design of the reservoir structure. The
geotechnical investigations shall comply with ASTM standards for
conducting the Standard Penetration Test (SPT), providing soil
descriptions, and conducting laboratory tests on soils. Geologic
formations shall be described following USGS and the Geological Society
of Nevada recommendations. The Geotechnical Engineer shall be
responsible for determining the following specific design criteria and site
conditions.

The following are minimum design parameters to be addressed:

Active and passive soil pressure.
At rest soil pressure.
Total and differential settlement.
Design bearing capacity.
Minimum footing embedment.
Recommended foundation system.
Groundwater.
Corrosive soils.
Expansion soils.

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The Geotechnical Engineer shall evaluate and provide recommendations
for the following groundwater conditions:

During construction.
Dewatering.
Design groundwater elevation.
Temporary excavation slope.
Permanent fill and cut slope.
Fill and backfill materials and compaction.
Pavement design for both flexible and rigid pavement for
Traffic Index of TI =4, 5, 6, and 7.
Pavement shall support loads from cranes or other
maintenance vehicles.
Excavation slope.
Trench shoring.
Bedding material and trench backfill.

The Geotechnical Engineer shall evaluate and provide a recommendation
from two corrosivity analyses. The corrosion analysis shall be used to
determine if the sand drainage system is adequate or not. The
corrosivity analysis shall include as a minimum the following:

Chemical test and corrosivity.
pH, chloride, and sulfates.
Corrosion potential for buried pipelines.

If corrosion protection is deemed necessary by the Geotechnical Engineer,
the COH shall be notified through the DUS-NDS and will have the final
decision on whether to install a sand drainage system, see Figure 3.4 at
the end of this section. Sand shall meet the current electric resistivity
requirements of the COH DUS-NDS.

3.02.05.02 Geotechnical Data Report

Geotechnical information accumulated in the field reconnaissance, data
review, field explorations, field resistivity, and laboratory testing shall be
summarized in a data report, which will be made available to prospective
bidders.

The geotechnical report should summarizes the general site grading; sub-
grade preparation, compaction, and stabilization; excavation for buried
utilities; construction access and wet weather construction; allowable
bearing capacity of the soil including factor of safety (including whether

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allowable bearing values can be increased for wind, earthquake, or other
temporary loading); potential for liquefaction and landslide; lateral earth
pressures and seismic acceleration dampening and equivalent liquid
backfill pressures for foundation system(s) and wall design; anticipated
differential settlement; friction factors for resistance to later movement;
minimum footing widths and depths; over-excavation beneath foundations
and placement of structural fill; modulus of sub-grade reaction; base rock
thickness; groundwater considerations; and recommendations with respect
to seismic design, soil borings, water levels, test pit logs, and results of
laboratory tests.

3.02.05.03 Geotechnical Recommendations Report

The Geotechnical Recommendations Report will generally follow the
Geotechnical Data Report as a companion volume; information already
presented in the Data Report should generally not be repeated in the
Recommendations Report. The Recommendations Report is intended for
use by the Engineer; however this information may also be made available
to prospective bidders. Provide recommendations on dewatering, E
values for onsite pipe thickness design, etc.

A combined data and recommendations report (one that contains all of the
elements of both reports) may be developed for small projects as agreed
upon by the geotechnical professional and Engineer. Separation of the
factual data (background, technical data, and data interpretation) from
design recommendations provides a separation of factual and subjective
information for the construction bidders and allows the design criteria to
be modified as the project changes during the various design phases.

3.02.05.04 Seismic Requirements

The following are minimum seismicity parameters to be evaluated by the
Geotechnical Engineer:

Maximum credible earthquake for known major faults.
Probabilistic seismic curve for 50- and 100-year design
lives.
Peak ground acceleration, calculated return period for
design lives of 50 and 100 years and probabilities of
exceedance of 10 and 50 percent.
Seismic response spectra for 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 percent
damping.
Potential for liquefaction and recommendations.

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Seismically induced lateral earth pressures.

3.02.06 Schematic Design

Prepare schematic design documents consisting of, at a minimum,
the following elements (as appropriate for the particular type of
facility or portion of work being examined):

Reservoir site selection alternatives (if appropriate).
Tank configuration options including size, materials of
construction, foundation, elevations, roof, and baffles (if
required).
If necessary, building configuration options, including size
(plan view), exterior elevations, roof styles, and materials.
Site development showing existing, new, and future
planned improvements.
Piping (cross-section, plan, and elevation) including
aboveground and belowground facilities and tie-ins.
Inlet and outlet piping including water mains.
Overflow appurtenances and sizing calculations.
Electrical systems including lighting, power,
communications, security, control and instrumentation, and
SCADA.
Sequence of operations.
An approach and plan to maintain water service to the
service level during maintenance periods including
identifying the redundant reservoir and connection (i.e.,
recoating of reservoir) (if applicable).
Prepare a schematic design report including the above
items and detailing findings, conclusions and
recommendations resulting from the schematic design
process. Include plans, sketches, references and any other
resource documents, calculations, computer printouts,
meeting notes/minutes, etc.
An approach to maintain water service and operation of
adjoining facilities during construction, if appropriate.

3.02.07 Document Preparation

Perform the remaining preliminary design work and prepare documents
consisting of the following minimum elements:

Prepare preliminary construction plans;

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Prepare preliminary construction plan details;
Prepare a vicinity map;
Prepare preliminary outline of Specifications Sections.
Prepare a Pre-Design Report including the above items and
all design calculations supporting decisions and/or
recommendations. Submit all above items and other
applicable items to support the preliminary design to the
COH DUS-NDS for review and approval.
Identify and work with all permitting agencies that have
jurisdiction or authority over the work, as required to
identify the necessary review, approval, and permit
requirements. Provide a list of approvals, permits, etc.
required.

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3.03 Final Design Phase
3.03.01 General Submittal Requirements

The Engineer may proceed with the final design of the project upon
acceptance of the Pre-Design Report. After review and approval of the
preliminary documents, the Design Engineer shall produce final
construction plans and other required documents or work products
incorporating those items identified in the preliminary review; revise the
sequence of operations; and write special (technical) provisions to the City
of Henderson Standard Construction Specifications as required to provide
a description and method of payment for all items of work and to clarify
construction details.

The design shall provide for the complete construction of a water reservoir
facility including a tank(s); a building (if necessary), associated site
improvements; associated piping and appurtenances; valve vaults;
manholes and/or storm drainage; electrical power; instrumentation and
controls; complete interface package to the COHs SCADA system (HEN-
NET) including radio transmitter and tower; and other associated work
identified by the COH DUS-NDS as being necessary to make the facility
fully functional.

After COH approval of the final construction documents, the project
Engineer shall submit the prerequisite number of sets and pay all fees to
all permitting agencies which have been identified as having review,
approval, and/or permitting authority over the project. The Design
Engineer is responsible for making corrections and/or clarifications as
required by the permitting agencies to receive final plan approval and/or
required permits prior to construction.

3.03.02 General Design Requirements

The general design of the water reservoir shall include:

A minimum design service life of 50 years. The facility
shall also be capable of accommodating future components
anticipated for projected growth in the service area.
A low maintenance tank which is architecturally
compatible with the surrounding area at each and every
specific site location. All structures shall be of adequate
size with interior and exterior clearances to facilitate access
for ease of operation and maintenance of all systems.


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Site development for current and future expansion
including an access road and parking, security fencing,
access gate(s), security lighting, drainage, site signage, and
low maintenance landscaping which eliminates or
minimizes the need for automated irrigation.
A tank of a proven design with a long history of use and a
minimal cost of maintenance.
Inlet, outlet, drain, and overflow piping with all necessary
control and measurement features; altitude valves; isolation
valves; couplings; and other appurtenances required for a
complete and operable system.
Equipment.
Plumbing systems for potable water, non potable water and
drainage.
Electrical systems for lighting, power, communications,
security, control, and instrumentation.
A design that allows remote monitoring of the reservoir
through a connection with the COHs SCADA system so
staff can monitor reservoir activities from the COH
Operations facility. The reservoir shall have a SCADA
system in accordance with the COH standards. A reservoir
programmable logic controller shall be provided in
accordance with the COHs standard.

3.03.02.01 Required Design Information

The Engineer will be required to have copies (current adopted version or
most recent version and COH addendum as applicable) of the following
documents or information (at a minimum) to assist in their design and
adhere to the applicable sections:

The Water System Master Plan;
International Building Code with Nevada Amendments;
Uniform Plumbing Code with Nevada Amendments;
Uniform Mechanical Code with Nevada Amendments;
Uniform Fire Code with Nevada Amendments;
National Electrical Code with Nevada Amendments;
The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Inc.;
Instrument Society of America: Standards and
Recommended Practices for Instrumentation and Control;
National Fire Protection Association;
American Water Works Association Standards (AWWA);
AWWA D100Welded Steel Tanks for Water Storage;

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American D110 Wire and Strand-Wound, Circular
Prestressed-Concrete Water Tanks;
American Water Works Association Standards (AWWA);
American Concrete Institute International Standards (ACI)
include but are not limited to the following:

o ACI 318
o ACI 350
o ACI 372

American Society for Testing Materials;
Federal Department of Energy, Energy Policy Act of 1992;
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program
Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New
Buildings and Other Structures; and
American National Standards Institute/National Sanitation
Foundation International Standard 61 Drinking Water
System Components.

3.03.03 Design Assumptions

This section applies to both welded steel and pre-stressed concrete
reservoirs. Applicable AWWA standards include AWWA D100 for
Welded Steel Tanks and AWWA D110 and AWWA D115 for pre-stressed
concrete tanks.

3.03.03.01 Dead Loads

Dead loads shall be the weight of all permanent construction including
equipment and piping that is permanently connected to the tank. The
following unit weights shall be used:
Table 3.1 Dead Loads

Steel 490 pcf
Concrete 144 pcf
Aluminum 169 pcf

3.03.03.02 Live Loads

Roof live loads shall be designed per IBC, ANSI/AWWA D100, or local
code. The more stringent requirement shall be used. Live loads for stairs

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and platforms shall be 100 psf or use the local code, whichever is more
stringent.
3.03.03.03 Water Load

Water load shall be the weight of the water when the tank is filled to
overflowing. The unit weight of water shall be 62.4 pcf.

3.03.03.04 Wind Load

Wind pressure asserted on the tank shall be as recommended by
ANSI/AWWA D100, on the basis of a wind velocity of 100 mph or the
requirements of the local code, whichever is more stringent.

3.03.03.05 Seismic Load

The tanks shall be designed for seismic loading on the basis of the
effective mass approach in accordance with the requirements of Chapter
13, ANSI/AWWA D100. Tanks are located in seismic Zone 2B, the
COHs Building Department shall be consulted for verification of the
latest seismic zone designation. It is recommended that the zone factor
Z as shown in Table 15 of Chapter 13 of ANSI/AWWA D100 should be
modified to meet the requirements of seismic design for tanks with
Supported Bottoms in accordance with the UBC for seismic Zone 2B.
The Z factor of 0.2 is recommended for the Las Vegas Valley (Zone
2B).

The latest edition of the UBC shall govern and be used in seismic design.
In addition, site-specific seismic design recommendations, as provided in
the geotechnical report, shall be considered.

3.03.04 Site Design Guidelines
3.03.04.01 Survey Control

The Engineer shall provide survey control. Two temporary benchmarks
and two horizontal control points shall be set near the site at a location that
is not likely to be disturbed during construction.


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3.03.04.02 Flood Control

The Engineer shall prepare a Technical Drainage Study for the reservoir
site in accordance with the requirements of the latest edition of the Clark
County Regional Flood Control District (CCRFCD) Hydrologic Criteria
and Drainage Design Manual.

3.03.04.03 Grading and Drainage

The Engineer shall provide a grading plan in accordance with the
requirements of the local reviewing agency, the latest edition of Clark
County Uniform Standard Drawings (CCUSD), and the latest edition of
Clark County Regional Flood Control Districts (CCRFCD) Hydrologic
Criteria and Drainage Design Manual.

3.03.04.04 Paving, Curb, and Gutter

Paving, curbs, and gutters shall be designed in accordance with the
CCUSD. Asphaltic concrete (AC) paving shall be installed around the
entire perimeter of the tank.

3.03.04.05 Yard Piping

Mortar Lined and Coated Steel Pipe (MLCSP) or Ductile Iron Pipe (DIP)
shall be used for yard piping. Steel piping shall conform to the
requirements of ANSI/AWWA C200. Mortar coating shall be provided
for buried and submerged conditions. Cement-mortar lining and coating
shall conform to ANSI/AWWA C205. Ductile Iron shall conform to the
requirements of ANSI/AWWA C151. Unless otherwise approved all
mainline valves shall be the same diameter as the pipeline.

The Engineer shall provide a temporary distribution plan to maintain the
water distribution service during tank maintenance procedures.
Maintenance procedures include, but are not limited to, taking the tank out
of service for recoating of interior and/or exterior tank surfaces or
installation of interior liner. The Design Engineer shall include
identification of the availability of an alternate tank serving the same
service level, connection(s) to provide service, and sequence of operation.
Multiple tanks shall be piped such that each tank can operate
independently, in parallel, or in series. Yard piping shall include buried
valves in the same lines as above ground valves installed at tanks to allow
for above ground valve maintenance. Direct buried valves shall be

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installed with worm gear operators and above ground valves can be
installed with traveling nut operators.

3.03.04.06 Security

The site shall be enclosed with a design approved by the City of
Henderson Community Development Department through the DUS-NDS.
At a minimum, an eight (8) foot tall masonry perimeter wall with locked
entrance will be required. Embedded extension arms with three (3)
strands of barb wire shall be installed on the top of the entire perimeter
wall. The wall shall be compatible with the surrounding environment,
including landscaping.

At the discretion of the COH DUS-NDS, an acceptable card reader system
may be required for access to the site. At a minimum, 4-2 conduit shall
be installed up to the gate for future use. Down cast site lighting, both
wall and pole mount shall be provided with at least two photocell-operated
lights. A motion sensor shall be located at a strategic location in the
interior of the site which will activate site lighting. At locations agreed
upon by COH DUS-NDS, conduit shall be installed and stubbed up for
future site security cameras.

3.03.04.07 Pump Stations

Pump stations are typically located at reservoir sites. Design of the pump
station shall follow the requirements described in Chapter 2 Pump
Stations.

3.03.05 Concrete Reservoir Design
3.03.05.01 General

A prestressed concrete tank with cast-in-place corewall, vertical post-
tensioned tendons and circumferential prestressed strands is the COHs
concrete tank standard.

Prestressed concrete tank with cast-in-place core wall, vertically post-
tensioned tendons, and circumferential prestressed strands shall be
complete with foundation; walls; roof; seismic cables; exterior protective
coatings; roof hatches; roof vent(s); external and internal ladders; tank
handrailing; separate inlet and outlet piping; overflow drains; and all
associated appurtenances. Circumferential prestressed strands shall be

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tensioned by elongation methods with continuous electronic monitoring
and recording. Prestressing by die drawing will not be allowed.

Tanks with precast concrete wall panels with internal post-tensioned
tendons, and tanks with precast concrete wall panels with circumferential
wrapped prestressing are not acceptable for use.

3.03.05.02 Foundation and Tank Floor

For concrete tanks, a structural floor or slab-on-grade foundation are
allowable. The concrete floor shall be cast continuously, without
construction joints, when possible. Curing of the floor shall be done with
water only. A slab-on-grade type floor shall be designed to transmit loads
to the sub-base through the floor. Anchored flexible base is preferred. At
a minimum, a membrane liner on the sub-base and covered with an
aggregate sub-base; a liner sloped from the center of the tank; and
perimeter drains shall be provided.

The Design Engineer shall be responsible for the design of the foundation
and tank floor according to Code for live and dead loads and for operating
requirements and loading conditions during construction. The allowable
loads shall be listed on the contract documents.

3.03.05.03 Tank Roof

The roof pitch shall not preclude operators from walking on the roof. Fall
protection anchors shall be located where operators can attach to anchors
before stepping on the above grade roof. Roof drains shall be provided on
the entire perimeter of the tank.

A concrete tank shall have a precast/cast-in-place roof; or a flat
precast/cast-in-place, two-way reinforced concrete flat slab roof. The joint
between the roof and wall, separated by an elastomeric bearing pad is
preferred on a concrete tank. Aluminum roofs will not be allowed.

3.03.05.04 Inlet and Outlet Piping

Inlet and outlet piping shall be ductile iron (AWWA C151) or steel pipe,
mortar-lined and coated (AWWA C200 and C205).

Inlet and outlet piping shall be designed to ensure water circulation inside
the reservoir.


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Reinforced concrete piers are spaced to support the pipe, and to protect
against uplift of the pipe due to buoyancy.

The outlet pipe is placed in the outlet sump, located away from the inlet
pipe to accomplish maximum water circulation within the reservoir.

3.03.05.05 Tank Drain

A tank drain shall be provided on the tank. It shall have an isolation valve
located outside of the tank and be piped to a discharge manhole or storm
drain vault. A flap gate and air gap shall be provided at the discharge
point.

3.03.05.06 Overflow System

Piping shall enter through the floor of concrete tanks near the tank wall.
The overflow drain on the tank shall be provided on the interior of the
tank. It shall be designed for the maximum proposed fill rate expected
over the life of the tank. A flap gate and air gap shall be provided at the
discharge point of the overflow drain. It shall be piped to a manhole or
storm drain vault for manual flow monitoring. An energy dissipater may
be required to control erosion at point of discharge. Verification in
writing shall be provided to confirm that overflows will not impact
adjacent properties.

3.03.05.07 Energy Dissipater

The storage capacities of the reservoirs vary according to site constraints
and hydraulic requirements. The overflow pipe shall be designed to
discharge to an energy dissipater at a maximum flow rate to be determined
by the Engineer. The Engineer shall design the energy dissipater to ensure
that water within the reservoir is protected from cross-contamination with
surface water. The energy dissipater shall be designed by the Engineer in
accordance with the latest edition of CCRFCD Hydrologic Criteria and
Drainage Design Manual.

3.03.05.08 Reservoir Access

Tanks shall have a minimum of two hinged, leakproof, spring-loaded,
alarmed, steel, lockable hatches. Both hatches shall be a minimum 48-
inch x 96-inch opening. One hatch shall be a personnel access hatch and
located near the tank inlet pipe. The second hatch shall be located

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circumferentially (180 degrees) from the personnel access hatch or near
the center of the tank. Hatches shall have a minimum 4-inch curb and the
cover shall have a downward overlap of at least 3 inches on concrete
tanks. If the concrete tank is buried, the hatch shall be designed for H-20
loading and drainage around the hatch shall be provided. Personnel access
hatch shall be provided with a safety frame.

3.03.05.09 Roof Vent

Roof vents shall be sized to prevent excess pressure or vacuum buildup
during the maximum inflow or outflow of water. A minimum of one vent
near the center of the tank shall be supplied. Roof venting shall be
provided with two (2) stainless steel mesh screens to prohibit entry of
insects, birds, or undesirable objects. The mesh shall be located behind
the vent grille.

For security, a metal cage shall be installed over the roof vent per standard
detail. The metal roof vent security cage is shown on Figure 3.1 at the end
of this section.

3.03.05.10 Ladders

External ladders shall be hot dip galvanized and internal ladders shall be
stainless steel. The ladders shall be designed to meet all Codes and
standards. At a minimum, the ladders shall have an extension and a safety
climb rail for use with a full body harness. The external tank ladder shall
be located at the personnel access hatch.

The exterior ladder shall begin at ground level with a ladder cover
extending from 4 inches below the bottom rung to a height of 8 feet to
prevent unauthorized access to the ladder. If a safety ladder cage is
provided, the bottom of a ladder safety cage shall be fully blocked
whenever the ladder cover is in the closed position. The ladder shall
extend a minimum of 4 feet 6 inches above the roof hatch. Refer to Figure
3.2A, Figure 3.2B and Figure 3.2C for a typical ladder assembly.

All conduit shall be located behind the ladder for security.

3.03.05.11 Underdrain System

The purpose of an underdrain system is to protect against uplift that occurs
when the tank is drained and to detect excessive leakage from the tank.
An underdrain system shall be provided for partially-buried and buried

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pre-stressed concrete tanks. At a minimum the underdrain system shall
consist of a perimeter ring drain system. Water collected from beneath the
tank and around the perimeter is discharged to a storm drain manhole or
overflow/drain manhole.

The size and configuration of drain rock, polyethylene or PVC sheeting,
filter fabric and PVC perforated piping shall be determined by the
Geotechnical Engineer.

3.03.05.12 Sampling Station

A minimum of two (2) sampling stations shall be provided. The taps shall
be a stainless steel locking ball valve.

3.03.05.13 Surveillance and Security

The site shall be enclosed with a design approved by the City of
Henderson Community Development Department through the DUS-NDS.
At a minimum, an eight (8) foot tall masonry perimeter wall with locked
entrance will be required. Embedded extension arms with three (3)
strands of barb wire shall be installed on the top of the entire perimeter
wall. The wall shall be compatible with the surrounding environment,
including landscaping.

At the discretion of the COH DUS-NDS, an acceptable card reader system
may be required for access to the site. At a minimum, 4-2 conduit shall
be installed up to the gate for future use. Down cast site lighting, both
wall and pole mount shall be provided with at least two photocell-operated
lights. Hand/Off/Auto switch shall be provided for all lighting to enable
testing. A motion sensor shall be located at a strategic location in the
interior of the site which will activate site lighting. At locations agreed
upon by COH personnel, conduit shall be installed and stubbed up for
future site security cameras.

3.03.06 Steel Tank Design

This section is for the design and construction of vertical, ground-
supported, flat bottom, welded-circular-steel tanks for potable water
storage. Two steel tanks of equal size, each tank meeting the criteria
provided in Section 3.02.03, shall be provided at the site so maintenance
can be performed on either tank without interrupting service.

Standpipes and bolted steel tanks are not acceptable for use.

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3.03.06.01 Design Criteria

The following standards and codes shall govern and shall be used
for the design of steel tanks:

The latest edition of Building Code Requirements for
Minimum Design Loads in Building and Other Structures,
ASCE 7.
The latest edition of Standards for Welded Steel Tanks for
Water Storage, ANSI/AWWA D-100.
The latest edition of Building Code Requirements for
Reinforced Concrete ACI 318.
The latest edition of American Institute of Steel
Construction, Specifications of the Design, Fabrication, and
Erection of Structural Steel for Buildings, AISC-S-326.
The latest edition of the UBC of the International
Conference of Building Officials.
The latest edition of AWWA standard for Painting Steel
Water Storage Tanks, ANSI/AWWA D102 and NSF
Standard 61.

3.03.06.02 Roof Design

The tank roof shall be structural-steel-supported, steel roof having a
inch vertical to a 12 inch horizontal slope. A knuckle with a 2-foot radius
shall be provided at the roof and wall junction.

The roof shall be designed for the loading in accordance with the
requirements of the Design Assumptions section; the minimum live load
shall be 20 psf.

The roof plate that is not in contact with water shall be at least 3/16-inch
think; the roof plate submerged in water during normal operations shall be
1/4 inch minimum. Corrosion allowance is not required for the roof
plate. The roof plate construction shall be in accordance with the standard
practice of ANSI/AWWA D100, by continuous fillet weld at the topside
only. Full penetration welds shall be used to join the roof knuckle
together. The roof plate shall not be seal welded at the support members.

The roof supports shall be hot-rolled structural shapes with a minimum
thickness of 3/16 inch. Shape, bar, and plate submerged in water shall be
inch minimum. Lateral bracing of the roof rafter compression flanges

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shall be required. Figure 3.3 at the end this section, depicts a typical roof
guardrail.

Bolts inside the reservoir shall be Type 316 stainless steel.

Columns shall be fabricated from steel pipe seal that is welded at both
ends. Column base shall be fabricated from steel plate and designed for a
maximum allowable soil bearing as recommended by the project
Geotechnical Engineer. The column base shall not be welded to the
bottom plate, but must be restrained from any lateral movement.

3.03.06.03 Wall Design

The tank wall design shall be in accordance with ANSI/AWWA D100
standard. Applicable loadings as listed in the section entitled Design
Assumptions shall be considered in the design.

The design fabrication and inspection requirements specified in
ANSI/AWWA D100 will be allowed with the exception that, only steel
that complies with Category 1 material requirements shall be used. The
lowest 1-day mean ambient temperature at the tank site shall be generally
at 20 degrees Fahrenheit unless a lower ambient temperature is required
by COH-NDS.

Corrosion allowance is not required. Minimum tank wall thickness shall
be in accordance with the requirements of ANSI/AWWA D100.

The tank wall shall be designed for stability without the requirements of
intermediate girders on the inside or outside surface of the wall.

3.03.06.04 Tank Bottom

The bottom shall be lap welded continuously from the top of the plate with
a minimum thickness of 5/16 inch. The bottom plate shall be extended a
minimum of 1-inch beyond the exterior of the tank. The joint between the
tank wall and the bottom plate shall be continuously welded from inside
and outside of the tank wall.

Corrosion allowance is not required.

The width and thickness of the bottom annular ring shall conform to the
requirements of Chapter 13 of the ANSI/AWWA D100. The requirements
of the butt-welded bottom annular ring shall be in accordance with the
requirements of Appendix C of ANSI/AWWA D100.

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An underdrain system as depicted in 3.4 shall be installed.

3.03.06.05 Footings and Foundations

Reinforced concrete ring footings shall be provided. The top on the ring
footing shall be approximately 6 inches above the finished surface. The
minimum embedment of the ring footing shall be as recommended by the
geotechnical Engineer, but shall not be less than 2-6.

Ring footings shall be reinforced to resist the lateral soil pressure on the
confined earth. The width and height of the ring footing shall be sized for
the loads in Section 4.03 of this Chapter and the allowable soil bearing
pressure recommended in the geotechnical report. The minimum width
shall not be less than 1-6.

A compressive strength of 4,500 psi shall be used for the concrete; and
60,000 psi yield strength shall be required for reinforcing steel. Concrete
cover for rebar shall be in accordance with the requirements of ACI 318.
The Alternate Design method is recommended for the design
reinforcement. Corrosion protection for concrete shall be as
recommended by the project Geotechnical Engineer.

3.03.06.06 Allowable Stress

Allowable stress for steel plate and structural steel shall be in accordance
with the requirements of ANSI/AWWA D100.

Allowable stresses for tank concrete footing shall be in accordance with
the requirements of ACI 318.

3.03.06.07 Inlet and Outlet Piping

Inlet and outlet piping shall be designed to maximize water circulation
inside the tank. Both pipes shall penetrate the bottom plate or lower wall
plate (minimum of 12 inches from floor) and shall be separated as much as
is practical for circulation. In-line valves shall be the same diameter as
inlet/outlet piping.

Pipe penetration opening through the bottom plate shall be reinforced in
accordance with the requirements of ANSI/AWWA D100.


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3.03.06.08 Overflows

Overflow pipe shall be sized for the maximum fill rate expected over the
life of the tank. The overflow pipe shall be brought down the inside of the
tank and the discharged into a drainage structure with an energy-
dissipating feature, if needed. Figure 3.5 illustrates the overflow discharge
structure, which includes a flap valve. The overflow pipe shall be braced
against the tank wall. The Engineer shall design the overflow system to
ensure that water within the reservoir is protected from cross
contamination with surface water, insects, and animal intrusion, etc.
Overflow locations and drainage study must verify protection of
downstream properties.

3.03.06.09 Vent

A vent shall be installed at the center of the tank roof. The vent shall be
sized to prevent pressure buildup during the inlet and outlet operation at
the maximum hydraulic rate. The vent shall be a mushroom type roof vent
with a removable lid. Two layers of stainless steel mesh shall be provided
in the vent behind the grille, and shall be concealed from horizontal
exposure. The mesh shall be held in place by a stainless steel clamping
system. The vent is shown on Figure 3.6 at the end of this section. A
metal cage shall be supplied over the air vent for security. The cage is
shown on Figure 3.1. Four (4) eye bolts shall also be supplied for tie-offs.

3.03.06.10 Access


3.24
Two (2) 30-inch minimum diameter hinged-type manways shall be
provided at the bottom shell course. Design of the manhole and
reinforcement around the wall opening shall conform to the requirements
of ANSI/API Standard 650.

A galvanized steel ladder shall be provided at the outside of the tank and
should extend to the roof. A lockable steel cage shall be provided. A
platform with galvanized steel grating and railing shall be provided and
installed on the roof adjacent to the ladder. All conduits running up the
tank wall shall be located behind the ladder for additional security.

Two (2) rectangular 42-inch roof hatches with stainless-steel hinges shall
be provided. Each hatch shall have a hold open device, hasp lock,
intrusion alarm, and security bar. A COH standard locking hatch, shown
on Figure 3.7, shall be used. One of the roof hatches shall be located
above the overflow system and the other is to be located at the interior
ladder (generally opposite from the overflow hatch). A stainless steel
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ladder shall also be provided for access to the inside of the tank. A fall
prevention system shall be installed with each ladder. An intrusion switch
shall be provided inside the tank roof hatches.

3.03.06.11 Protective Coatings

Protective coating for welded steel reservoirs for all interior surfaces
including, but not limited to shell, roof framing, roof plates, columns,
floor, piping, manways, and ladders; and painting of all exterior surfaces
including, but not limited to shell, roof, manways, ladders (including cage
and door), hatches, vents, and exposed piping. All parts of steel shall be
painted in accordance with the requirements of ANSI/AWWA D-102 and
NSF Standard 61. Cathodic Protection is not required.

As part of the reservoir warranty requirements in the technical
specifications, the contractor shall inspect and verify that is free from leak
and other defects including defects to the interior and exterior coatings.
This warranty from defects in material and workmanship shall extend for a
period of one (1) year from the date of acceptance of the work. This first
anniversary inspection requirement shall conform to ANSI/AWWA D-102
and NSF Standard 61 is required.

A. Interior Coating Systems

Epoxy or polyurethane paint material is required for all interior surfaces
including the tank wall, roof plate, bottom plate, and roof support member.
The epoxy shall be a self-priming epoxy coating intended for potable
water contact. The epoxy formulation shall use 100% solids and zero
VOC. The polyurethane coating shall be self priming; plural-component
lining that uses 100% solids and zero VOC. Both acceptable materials
shall conform to NSF Standard 61 and shall meet state and local standards.

Surface preparation shall be near white blast cleaning that conforms to
SSPC-SP10. The surface profile shall be 2.5 3.5 mils.

B. Exterior Coating Systems

For exposed exterior metal surfaces of the tank, a coating system
composed epoxy, intermediate epoxy, and aliphatic polyurethane will be
applied. The epoxy is a polyamide or polyamine, anticorrosive converted
epoxy primer containing rust inhibitive pigments. The intermediate epoxy
is a two-component epoxy capable of 4 to 6 MDFT per coat. The aliphatic
polyurethane shall be a two-component, aliphatic or acrylic based

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polyurethane, semi-gloss finish. This paint shall only be used in areas
where reflection is not a problem.

Surface preparation, conforming to SSPC-SP10, shall be provided.

Application procedures, safety precautions, and testing of coatings shall be
in accordance with the requirements of ANSI/AWWA D-102 and NSF
Standard 61.

3.03.06.12 Drain

An approximately sized drain pipe shall be installed at the bottom of the
tank (minimum size 8). If the tank is unanchored, the location of the
penetration in the bottom plate shall conform to the requirements of
Chapter 13 of the ANSI/AWWA D100.

The drain line may be discharged to a drainage structure or facility
common with the overflow pipe.

3.03.06.13 Sampling Station

A minimum of two (2) sampling stations shall be provided. The taps shall
include a stainless steel locking ball valve.

3.03.07 Electrical Systems

The electrical system providing power to components of the reservoir shall
be designed by a qualified electrical engineer registered in the State of
Nevada. Raceways shall be installed using rigid steel conduit, flexible
liquid tight conduit, plastic-coated rigid steel conduit, and/or plastic
conduit. Boxes available for use are pull boxes, junction boxes, outlet
boxes, and terminal boxes. The wire and cable used shall be 600-volt and
single conductor. Nameplates shall be provided on each electrical panel,
motor starter, and control device. Underground, non-metallic, utility
marking tape shall also be provided. All conduit on above ground tank
exterior wall shall be located behind the tank roof access ladder for
security. Pull boxes shall be identified with COH-DUS marking.


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3.03.08 Instrument and Control
3.03.08.01 Level Monitoring

The reservoir level shall be measured, locally indicated, and transmitted to
a Level Monitoring Cabinet and Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)
using a field instrument as discussed below. Reservoir level signals shall
be transmitted to the COH HEN-NET. The level transmitter shall be an
ultrasonic-type level instrument for buried tanks. For above ground tanks,
use a 3-inch flange mounted differential pressure transducer

In instances where a pumping station takes suction from the reservoir; the
low-level switch activated from the level transmitter signal will be used to
protect the pumps from cavitation. In instances where a pumping station
pumps to a reservoir, the high- and low-level switch alarms activated from
the level transmitter signal shall be transmitted to the pumping station to
protect the reservoir from overflow. In instances where a Rate of Flow
Control Station (ROFC) feeds the reservoir or tank, the high- and low-
level switches shall be transmitted to the ROFC for shutdown of the
station. Reservoirs shall have a separate high/high level switch.

The Engineer shall, as part of the design, develop system hydraulic
profiles and include them in the Contract Documents. As part of the
hydraulic profiles the Engineer shall define levels needed for system
controls such as reservoir high-high, normal operating band, and low-low
water levels. The Engineer shall also include elevations needed for all
alarm conditions that will be programmed into the system during startup.
In the event some of the alarm conditions are to be provided by suppliers
of the equipment, those shall be clearly defined in the Contract Documents
and defined as the responsibility of the Contactor. Underground reservoirs
shall have level transmitters and junction boxes in an accessible location
for maintenance.

3.03.08.02 Pump Station Control Interface

In locations where there is a pump station located adjacent to a reservoir, a
PLC shall be located at the pumping station site. The reservoir level
signal will be transmitted directly to the PLC, so that the signal can be sent
through to the COH HEN-NET even during a power outage. The
pumping station shall also be shut down when a high-level alarm is
transmitted from the discharge reservoir or tank site. A low hydraulic
level, sensed by a pressure switch or pressure transmitter on the pump
station discharge header, shall shut down the pumping station. The switch
set point shall be set at the lowest minimum allowable hydraulic pressure
to prevent cavitation damage to the pumps and detect a possible pipeline

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failure. In addition, the pump station shall be shut-down when a low
water alarm is transmitted from a low suction pressure switch in the
suction piping.

3.03.08.03 Reliability

In order to enhance reliability of the instrumentation and control system,
the use of redundant instruments and power supplies is encouraged.
PLCs and critical instruments must be powered with uninterruptible
power supplies, preferably by DC battery supply. Critical instruments
shall be backed up with in place spares. UPS shall be APC-XL1000
NET with additional batteries and smart relay card for DI. UPS shall also
be sized to enable 12 hours of use.

3.03.08.04 Fluid Level Monitoring

Level monitoring units shall be installed on all future
storage tanks and reservoirs in an accessible location.
Output shall be 4-20 mA signal.
High-high level switch shall be Magnitrol A15-IH3A-
BAQ, 4 displacement type.

3.03.08.05 Field Instrumentation

For underground reservoirs, the level transmitter shall be a Hydro-Ranger
by Milltronics. For above ground reservoirs, the level transmitter shall be
a pressure transmitter by Endress & Hauser, model Cerebar S. The
pressure transmitter shall be 3-inch flange mounted with block and bleed
piping.

Field transmitters may be subjected to temperature in excess of the
manufacturers recommendations and may have to be protected by
locating them in the nearby PLC cabinet or by vented metal housing
painted white or a sunshade structure. No instrumentation will be allowed
in vaults.

Tanks for storing chemicals used in the disinfection system should have
ultrasonic level transmitters with level indication in the area where the
operator will connect the fill line. This level signal shall also have their
signals transmitted to the PLC. Chemical metering pumps shall be under
local manual control. However, their operating status and speed should be
input to the PLC.


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All reservoir, vault access hatches, and doors, in addition to doors at a
building on the site, shall be monitored for intrusion, with the alarm
transmitted to the PLC.

Instruments shall be protected by lightning protection units on each end of
PLC inputs. Coastal Instrumentation and Telemetry (CIT) Model LPB is
the approved model for surge protection. CITs number is (805) 497-7570

3.03.09 Landscaping

Landscaping shall be site specific and conform to local landscaping
schemes. The landscape must be perceived as an extension of the
directions established for the tank aesthetics. As such, the Engineer shall
be responsible for guiding and coordinating the landscape design for the
Project, either by retaining the services of a sub-consultant, or engaging a
landscape professional on his own staff.

Block walls shall conform to local community standards.
























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Chapter 4 Pipelines
4.01 General
4.01.01 Transmission Main Definition

A transmission main is used to convey flow from source, treatment, and/or
storage facilities to the distribution system. Pipelines designated as
transmission mains in this guideline have a minimum diameter of 16
inches and supply potable water or raw water.

4.02 Design Concept Phase
4.02.01 General

A conceptual design technical memorandum will be submitted and
approved through the Department of Utility Services New Development
Section (DUS-NDS). As a minimum the report shall address the
following:

System Overview.
Location of pipeline.
Approximate Length.
Design flow rate.
Preliminary diameter.
Identify ROW, permit needs, and all existing easements.
Preliminary material selection.
Schedule.
Proposed easements for alignment, power, water/sewer, etc.

The purpose of the Conceptual Design Report is to provide the Engineer
and the COH with a general overall perspective of purpose and need for
the pipeline. Without an approved conceptual design report, the Pre-
Design Report will not be accepted.

4.03 Pre-Design Phase

4.1
4.03.01 General

The pre-design phase of the project shall be summarized and presented in
a Pre-Design Report. The report will be submitted to the DUS-NDS for
review and approval. A Pre-Design Report is required for any water
facility considered in this document. The Pre-Design Report is the basis
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for the ensuing design process and must be presented in a fashion which
allows the reader to gain a thorough and complete understanding of the
necessity of the project. Without an accepted Pre-Design Report, the
Engineer can not receive City of Henderson acceptance for the final
design.

The Pre-Design Report shall include, but not be limited to:

Executive Summary.
Table of Contents.
Existing conditions.
Summary of utility conflict information, including pothole
information or recommendations for utilities proposed to be
potholed.
Topographic mapping information summary.
Draft Geotechnical Investigation Report.
Draft Environmental Investigation Report.
Summary/overview of the applicable drainage and traffic
study findings with references to those documents
submitted separately.
Preliminary plans and centerline profiles (30% design
drawings) illustrating the recommended pipeline alignment
and profile, facility plan views, proposed site plans and
improvements, any offsite improvements, appropriate
sections, elevations or details, existing features, property
ownership info, ROW/easements, etc.
Alternative alignments studied and recommended
alignment.
Recommendations for future connection and tee locations.
Recommendations regarding pipeline design parameters
and materials.
Identification of appurtenant facilities and spacing criteria.
Opinions and recommendations for bidding packages,
scheduling, contractor staging, and impacts to public areas.
Identification of any permanent and temporary
ROW/easement constraints and acquisition needs.
Matrix summary of permits to be obtained.
List of agencies and utilities to review and sign the
drawings.
Outline of technical specification sections and list of final
design drawings.
Preliminary quantity and associated cost estimates.
Preliminary construction schedule.
Project correspondence file, including meeting minutes.

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Inventory of existing facilities and improvements.
Graphics, detail sketches, tables, and other displays to
support analysis and recommendations.
List of relevant reports, plans and maps reviewed, and other
relevant project information.
Work plan for how construction is to be accomplished if
connecting into existing facilities (phasing, shutdowns,
etc.).

4.03.01.01 Facility Sizing

In sizing a water transmission main, the Engineer should consider a
number of factors including pumping costs, system demand, frictional
losses, flow velocities, and turnover concerns early in the planning period.
Typically, transmission facilities are sized in the Pump Station Pre-Design
Report or presented in a utility master plan. If facility sizing is left up to
the pipeline Engineer, the following procedure shall be used.
Transmission mains dedicated from the pump station to the reservoir with
no distribution connections use pump station ultimate design flow rates.
Transmission mains acting as inlet/outlet pipes for reservoirs and/or
distribution mains use maximum flows required either by the pump station
design flow or zone requirements (peak hour or max day plus fire flow),
whichever is higher. For transmission mains that are intended to function
as inlet/outlet pipelines, increased line pressure due to pump station
cycling shall be considered. If the increased pressure is detrimental to the
operation of the distribution system, a dedicated transmission main to the
storage facilities shall be planned. Maximum pressure differential in the
distribution system shall be less than 10 psi for all conditions.

4.03.02 Utility Coordination
4.03.02.01 Existing Utilities

It is the responsibility of the Engineer to coordinate with utility companies
during design to accurately identify and locate existing utilities crossing or
traversing a proposed COH pipeline.

All existing and proposed, public and private utilities shall be presented on
plan and profile drawings. See Section 4.03.02.04 for Underground
Service Alert (USA) and section 4.03.02.05 for potholing requirements.
Examples of utilities include water, irrigation, sanitary sewer, storm
sewer, gas, petroleum, power, communication, and traffic control.


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4.03.02.02 Record Drawings of Existing Utilities

It is the Engineers responsibility to obtain all available utility maps and as-
built drawings from utility companies when infrastructure crosses or
traverses a proposed COH pipeline.

The COH standard datum, North American Vertical Datum of 1988
(NAVD 88) shall be used. If the datum on the as-built drawings and
utility maps is not NAVD 88, then data adjustments shall be made to
conform to the current datum.

4.03.02.03 Field Verification of Utilities

It is necessary to perform a field reconnaissance to locate existing utilities
along the proposed pipeline alignment. Usually this is done with the field
survey or walk thru early in the project. The location of the existing
utilities shall be compared with the locations recorded on utility drawings
and utility maps. If discrepancies exist between utility drawings and field
data, the particular utility company shall be contacted to resolve the
discrepancy. Any Underground Service Alert (USA) markings or future
facility markings should be field located and included on the plans.

4.03.02.04 Underground Service Alert

Underground Service Alert (USA) shall be contacted at least 48 hours
prior to digging at 1-800-227-2600. Water soluble white paint shall be
used to mark the project area for the various USA member agencies. The
potholing or geotechnical boring companies shall be responsible for
contacting USA directly and shall provide USA with the street address,
cross streets, city, and county to identify the location of the work. In open
country, USGS coordinates shall be provided. The construction contractor
shall be responsible for contacting USA during construction of the project.

4.03.02.05 Potholing


4.4
All utility crossings or close utility interference shall be located and
exposed by digging test pits (potholing). The design survey shall record
the size, nature, and location of the potential interference by station, offset,
and elevation. The number of potholes required shall be sufficient to
determine the alignment and grade of the utility. Small diameter pipelines
may not need to be potholed if only in horizontal conflict. There are also
Soft Dig (Vactor truck) technologies available which minimize the
amount of soil disturbed during the potholing process. Many utility
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companies utilize this technology, for the risk of damaging the utility is
low. Any damage to pavement, roads, or soil during potholing work shall
be fully restored in accordance with local and prevailing standards before
leaving the site. The Engineer shall be responsible for coordinating the
potholing effort. The pothole sub-consultant shall be required to obtain all
permits related to their work.

4.03.02.06 Separation Requirements

Minimum separation distances shall be met when utilities cross COH
pipelines. The preferred minimum horizontal and vertical separation
requirements for all utilities, except sanitary sewers, reclaim lines, and
storm drains are shown in Figure 4.1. Separation for overhead utilities
shall be as required by the affected utility. Horizontal and vertical
separation of sanitary sewers, reclaimed water pipelines, and storm drains
from potable water facilities must comply with the Uniform Design and
Construction Standards for Potable Water Systems.

4.03.02.07 Utility Relocations

If the relocation of an existing utility is necessary, an evaluation of the
feasibility of moving an existing utility shall be conducted and relocation
alternatives shall be developed with the utility owner. The utility owner
shall be presented with the alternatives developed for utility relocation. If
all issues are addressed and the utility owner is agreeable to relocating the
utility, the utility owner needs to determine if they will design the
relocation or the Engineer will proceed with the relocation design. These
drawings shall be included in the contract documents for bidding, unless
the utility owner chooses to relocate its own utility.

If the lowering of existing pipelines is required, the Design Engineer shall
examine the new high or low points of the line to determine if Air/Vacs
or blowoffs are needed.

Once a decision is made to relocate an existing utility and the preferred
alternative alignment is set, provisions shall be included in the contract
documents for the continuation of service during construction, unless
otherwise allowed by the utility owner. Construction sequencing shall be
determined to ensure that the relocation is completed to eliminate or
minimize disruption of service.

If the utility owner designs the relocation, the cost to relocate the existing
utility is usually determined by the utility owner. If the Engineer designs
the relocation, then the utility owner may have some review and

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inspection fees associated with the relocation. These fees are the
responsibility of the project, not the COH. The relocated pipeline shall
have an adequate support contingency plan approved by the COH.

4.03.03 Survey

Perform field location survey work consisting of, at a minimum,
the following elements:

Contact public and private utilities, field verify the location
of their installations, and identify design conflicts.
Establish limits of other site development work.
Prepare a record of survey map showing locations of
existing property corners which may be disturbed or
destroyed during construction, including locating of
recording information of all existing easements affecting
the alignment.
Survey topography including aboveground and
underground utilities, facilities.
Prepare a coordinate sheet of aboveground and
underground utilities and facilities including inverts, rims
on storm drainage and/or sanitary sewer, and valve
operating nuts on water mains.
Prepare profile(s) and/or cross-section(s) as required.
Prepare legal descriptions for all proposed permanent and
temporary construction easements.
Global Positioning System (GPS) as required by the COH
DUS-NDS. .

4.03.04 Geotechnical Evaluation

The geotechnical investigations shall comply with ASTM standards for
conducting the Standard Penetration Test (SPT), providing soil
descriptions, and conducting laboratory tests on soils. Geologic
formations shall be described following USGS and the Geological Society
of Nevada recommendations. Trench excavation, pipe bedding, backfill,
and compaction recommendations shall refer to the "Uniform Standard
Specifications for Public Works Construction Offsite Improvements--
Clark County, Nevada".

Geotechnical evaluations and recommendations shall be conducted by
a qualified geotechnical professional who is an Engineer or Geologist

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with current professional registration in Nevada. The geotechnical
professional shall be qualified by the following:

Experience on previous pipeline projects
Previous local experience
Knowledge of local soil and geological conditions and
construction practices

The geotechnical professional shall be able to present examples of
previous reports and shall provide references for previous local work.

4.03.04.01 Reconnaissance Investigation

The purpose of a reconnaissance investigation is to identify site geology
and surface and subsurface features along the project alignment that may
affect construction of the pipeline. The investigation shall consist of a
data review and site surficial examination. Where subsurface conditions of
concern are identified during the site walk and data review, the
geotechnical professional shall coordinate with the Engineer and a limited
subsurface investigation shall be conducted. Results of the reconnaissance
investigations shall be summarized in a Geotechnical Data Report.

The data review shall consist of evaluating published geologic information
(maps, studies, articles, etc.) and other available subsurface information in
the project vicinity.

The site surface examination shall consist of visual observation along the
pipe alignment. The purpose of the examination is to identify features that
can help to characterize the subsurface materials and to identify any
features that may cause constructions problems. Engineering observation
of the following items shall be included as part of the examination:

Site relief.
Vegetation.
Existing improvements.
Adjacent structures and facilities.
Surface features (including drainageways).
Unusual conditions (landslides, subsidence, rock
outcroppings).
Nearby construction (observe slopes, excavations, exposed
soils).

Some limited explorations may be required at critical locations such as
bore-and-jack sites, bends in the pipe, manholes, or valves, structures, or

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at locations identified during the site surface examination or data review.
These preliminary explorations shall consist of test pits or soil borings.
The Geotechnical Engineer shall be required to provide all permits related
to their work,

4.03.04.02 Final Design Investigation

Geotechnical investigations are required to identify subsurface features
that will affect final design and construction of the pipeline.

Soil borings shall be drilled at intervals along the pipeline alignment as
agreed upon by the geotechnical professional, DUS-NDS, and the
Engineer. The location of boring shall be identified by project
coordinates. General practice is one boring every 500 to 1,000 feet, with
additional borings drilled at every structure, and bore-and-jack location; in
areas of bedrock, borings as close as 100 feet is common practice.
Boreholes should generally extend 5 to 10 feet below the pipe invert to
identify heaving soils or groundwater problems, and to reduce the
possibility of having to drill additional borings if the pipe elevation is later
changed during design. Geotechnical Engineer shall store soil boring
samples until construction is completed.

The minimum information to be provided on the soil boring logs is:

Boring number, location, elevation.
Drilling contractor (company name, office location),
drilling method, and equipment used.
Water level, date and time measured.
Sampling data from SPT (top and bottom of sample
interval, length of sample recovered in splitspoon, SPT
results and N-value).
Soil description (see below).
Comments (observations of drilling difficulty, drillers
observations of material changes or boulders, addition or
loss of drilling fluid, etc.).
Map identifying boring locations.

The soil descriptions shall be in accordance with ASTM D 2488, which
provides soil information for engineering purposes. Geologic formations
that are weathered to soil shall be described in accordance with their
engineering properties; the geologic description may be presented
following the engineering description. Geologic formation names should
not be provided on the boring logs but may be described in the
Interpretation of Data portion of the Geotechnical Data Report. The

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format and order for soil descriptions shall be presented in the boring logs
as follows:

Soil name (ASTM D 2488 Group Name).
Group symbol.
Color.
Moisture content.
Relative density or consistency.
Other descriptors as appropriate (soil structure, mineralogy,
particle size, shape, angularity, maximum particle size,
plasticity of fines, dilatancy, cementation, etc.).

A surface evaluation of any encountered bedrock shall be performed. The
evaluation shall describe discontinuities (type, orientation, roughness,
planarity, infilling material and thickness, surface staining, and tightness)
and lithology (rock type, color, mineralogy, hardness, and rock mass
characteristics).

Lithology descriptions must rely on professional judgment and experience,
and local practice and terminology shall be used. For engineering
purposes, general rock names are preferred over petrologically specific
names (for example, sandstone and basalt are preferable rock names to
arkose and tholeiite). Specific formation names may be provided in the
Interpretation of Data section of the data report.

Test pits shall be excavated to supplement or substitute for the soil borings
where permitted by the site features and where appropriate. Test pits are
helpful to identify relative degree of excavation difficulty, excavation
side-slope stability, depth to groundwater and its infiltration rate, presence
of cobbles and boulders, and depth to sound bedrock and its characteristics
(rippability, weathering, surface features). OSHA regulations for work in
excavations shall be followed during all test pit operations. The location
of test pits shall be identified by project coordinates.

Detailed test pit logs shall be prepared for inclusion in the data report.
The minimum information to be presented on the test pit log is:

Test pit number, location, elevation.
Excavation contractor (company and operator name, office
location).
Equipment used (kind of equipment, approximate
horsepower rating, bucket width, use of rippers).
Water level, date and time measured.
Soil description.

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Comments (observations of excavation difficulty, stability
of pit walls including the duration of observation, debris
encountered, water seepage and infiltration rate, results of
in situ tests, operator comments, etc.).
Map on location of test pits.

If cobbles (dimensions between 3 and 12 inches) and boulders (greater
than 12 inches) are encountered in a test pit, the number and size of
cobbles and boulders excavated from the test pit shall be noted; the
relative amount of cobbles/boulders per volume excavation can then be
calculated and presented in the Interpretation of Data section of the data
report. If cemented materials are encountered along the pipeline
alignment, their thickness and lateral extent should be estimated and their
difficulty of excavation evaluated and presented in the Data Report.

All exploration locations shall be vertically and horizontally surveyed,
unless otherwise approved by the Engineer or COH, by a Nevada
Registered Land Surveyor to determine location and surface elevation.
The surveyed elevations shall be presented on the final exploration logs.

4.03.04.03 Field Resistivity

Conduct a field electrical resistivity analysis using a Wenner electrode
arrangement and soil resistivity meter.

4.03.04.04 Laboratory Testing

Laboratory tests shall be relevant to the engineering analyses and
recommendations for the project, and shall be conducted on representative
soil samples. The engineering characteristics that will affect design and
construction of the pipeline shall be considered prior to selecting
laboratory tests. The tests shall be performed to determine the following:

Moisture and dry density.
Atterberg limits.
Grain size distribution.
Soil Box resistivity.
Chemical and corrosivity analysis.

The laboratory testing program should be prescribed by the geotechnical
professional and reviewed and approved by the Design Engineer.
Conducting vast numbers of classification or other tests is generally not
useful to pipeline design. All tests should be designed to either provide

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useful information to the potential bidders or provide relevant design data
for pipeline design.

4.03.04.05 Corrosion Analysis and Evaluation

A chemical analysis shall be included in the corrosivity study to determine
the pH, red-ox, sulfates, sulfides, total salts, and chlorides. It will be
necessary to provide recommendations on bonding, test stations, reference
cells, etc. in the study. It is important to properly coordinate the
geotechnical investigation and the corrosivity investigation. For further
information, see section 4.03.07.

4.03.04.06 Geotechnical Data Report

Geotechnical information accumulated in the field reconnaissance, data
review, field explorations, field resistivity testing, and laboratory testing
shall be summarized in a data report, which will be made available to
prospective bidders. Two (2) copies will be provided to the COH DUS-
NDS

4.03.04.07 Geotechnical Recommendations Report

The Geotechnical Recommendations Report will generally follow the
Geotechnical Data Report as a companion volume; information already
presented in the Data Report should generally not be repeated in the
Recommendations Report. The Recommendations Report is intended for
use by the Engineer; however this information may also be made available
to prospective bidders. Provide recommendations on dewatering, pipe
embedment, E values for pipe thickness design, etc.

A combined data and recommendations report (one that contains all of the
elements of both reports) may be developed for small projects as agreed
upon by the Geotechnical Professional and Engineer. Separation of the
factual data (background, technical data, and data interpretation) from
design recommendations provides a separation of factual and subjective
information for the construction bidders and allows the design criteria to
be modified as the project changes during the various design phases. Two
(2) copies will be provided to the DUS-NDS


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4.03.05 Hydraulic Analysis
4.03.05.01 Hydraulic Analysis

The Engineer shall refer to the project information provided by COH
through the DUS-NDS regarding system and project hydraulics. This
information can be obtained through utility master plans and appropriate
pump station Pre-Design Reports. The information will cover design
capacity, sizing criteria, system head losses, and design assumptions. The
Engineer shall review this information for completeness and accuracy.

The Engineer shall review the information provided and shall request any
additional information that may be necessary for the complete design
before beginning the final design. The Engineer shall immediately notify
the DUS-NDS of any conflicts or necessary changes that may affect the
validity or accuracy of the hydraulic information provided.

The Engineer shall prepare the final design hydraulic calculations to verify
that the final design is in conformance with information provided.

4.03.05.02 Surge Analysis

A surge analysis will normally be performed by the pump station Engineer
and will be provided to the COH by that Engineer. The initial pump
station surge analysis shall be considered preliminary because it will be
necessary to make certain assumptions in order to perform the surge
analysis. As the final design progresses, assumptions may require
modifications and it will be necessary to update and resubmit a revised
surge analysis. The pipeline Engineer shall coordinate closely with the
designers of other elements of the project and provide DUS-NDS with an
updated surge analysis, as assumptions change. Surge analysis performed
for pump stations shall be made available to the pipeline Engineer.

The pipeline Engineer shall review the information provided and maintain
coordination with the Engineers responsible for the pumping stations,
reservoirs, and rate of flow control stations. Should additional information
be necessary or it is found that certain assumptions made in performing
the surge analysis are modified by final design decisions, the Engineer will
be responsible for providing the DUS-NDS with additional information
and/or the need to update the surge analysis.

The Engineer shall verify in writing to the DUS-NDS that the final design
is consistent with the information provided with the surge analysis.


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4.04 Final Design Phase
4.04.01 Pipeline Systems
4.04.01.01 Pipe Materials

The chosen material for the pipeline is dependant on factors such as
preference of the COH, conformance with existing materials, special
design considerations, reliability, and life-cycle cost. The use of pipe
materials on COH facilities other than those listed below will need prior
written approval from the DUS-NDS.

Pipe materials approved without written approval for use on COH
Facilities include the following:

Mortar Lined and Coated Welded Steel pipe conforming to
ANSI/AWWA C200.
Ductile Iron pipe conforming to ANSI/AWWA C151.

A. Welded Steel Pipe

Welded steel pipe is produced in the diameters proposed for the COH
Transmission Facilities and is suitable for the design pressures anticipated
in the system. Application of a mortar lining and coating per AWWA
C205 is required to extend the life of the pipe. If necessary, the pipe can
be further protected from corrosion by applying cathodic protection or
external pipe wrap before external mortar coating is applied. The pipe
joints can be rubber gasketed or welded, depending on pressures and
restraint requirements. Large diameter pipe joints are typically welded.

B. Ductile Iron Pipe

Ductile iron pipe is also produced in the diameters proposed for
COH Transmission Facilities and is suitable for the design
pressures anticipated in the system. A cement-mortar lining along
with a double bagged polyethylene encasement shall be used to
extend the life of the pipe.


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4.04.01.02 Fittings and Appurtenances
A. Steel Fittings

Steel fittings shall comply with ANSI/AWWA C208. Flanges located
above ground or in valve vaults shall comply with ANSI/AWWA C207.
Flanges shall be selected in accordance with working pressure, test
pressure, surge pressure, and the drilling pattern of the adjoining flange.
In general, buried flanged applications will not be allowed.

Welded steel fittings shall be designed in accordance with standard
practice as stated in AWWA M11 and other applicable industry standards.
Bolt holes on flanges shall straddle the vertical centerline. Welded steel
pipe elbows shall be as follows: 0 to 30 degrees two piece, 30 to 45
degrees three piece; 45 to 60 degrees four piece; and 60 to 90 degrees
five piece. Outlets for blowoffs and air valves shall be as shown in the
Appurtenances and Structures section. J oints for fittings shall be
welded or flanged.

Reinforcement and wall thickness of steel fittings shall conform to
AWWA M11 and other applicable industry standards. Rating of flanges
shall comply with ANSI/AWWA C207.

B. Ductile Iron Fittings

Fittings shall be push-on or mechanical joint below grade and flanged
above grade. Where the design dictates, push-on and mechanical joints
shall be restrained. Ductile Iron fittings shall be furnished in accordance
with ANSI/AWWA C110 or ANSI/AWWA C153. Ductile Iron fittings
with pressure ratings as follows: 4-24 fittings 350 psi, 30-48 fittings
250 psi, 54-64 fittings 150 psi. Fittings shall be in accordance with
all applicable requirements of ANSI/AWWA C110/A21.10 or
ANSI/AWWA C153/A21.53 with the exception of the manufacturers
proprietary design dimensions. J oint components shall be in accordance
with the requirements for push-on joints in ANSI/AWWA C111/A21.11.
Cement lining shall be either standard thickness cement lining or double
thickness cement lining in accordance with ANSI/AWWA C104/A21.4,
Cement Mortar Lining for Ductile Iron Pipe and Fittings for Water.


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4.04.01.03 Pipe Joints
A. Steel Pipe Joints

Pipe joints for steel pipe shall be welded, flanged, grooved, or plain end,
depending on the pipe diameter, longitudinal force, flexibility
requirements, the type of adjoining end, and the need to disassemble the
joint. J oints between sections of the large diameter transmission pipe will
be welded. When the bell and spigot joints are used, the joint preparation
shall be in accordance with ANSI/AWWA C200 and the specifications
shall require that the pipe bell be shaped with an expanding press or by
moving the pipe axially over a die. Rubber gasketed joints may be used
for special design conditions.

Depending on the longitudinal force due to thrust and the effect of
temperature, the large diameter transmission pipe joints may be lap
welded or butt welded. The procedure for design of the joint to resist
longitudinal forces is discussed in Chapter 8 of AWWA M11. Butt strap
joints may be necessary on closure sections, or to connect to existing
sections of the pipeline.

Expansion joints as recommended by AWWA M11, Section 8.6, should
be included in the design of steel pipelines to minimize the effect of
contraction due to changes in temperature.

B. Ductile Iron Pipe Joints

There are two common types of joints associated with ductile-iron pipe
and fittings. Rubber-gasket joints are used in a variety of applications and
restrained joints are used mainly to resist thrust forces acting on a pipeline.
The push-on joint and mechanical joint are common types of rubber-
gasketed joints. Prevalent types of restrained joints include mechanical
joint restraint systems, push-on joint restraint systems (restrained gasket),
the ball-and-socket joint, the grooved and shouldered joint, flanged joints,
and special bolted joints used with sleeves and couplings. For direct bury
applications, COH prefers mechanical joint restrained systems.

The ANSI/AWWA C111 standard cover rubber gasketed joints for ductile
iron pipe and fittings with mechanical joints, push-on joints, or modified
mechanical or push-on joints shall be used in specifying ductile iron pipe
joints.

The ANSI/AWWA C115 standard covers flanged ductile iron pipe and
fittings.


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4.04.01.04 Trench Width


4.16
The Engineer shall determine the appropriate trench width by considering
the pipe size, depth of cover, type of material to be removed, the space
required for installation of the pipe and operation of equipment, general
construction practices, and guidelines in the following paragraphs.

The trench should be as wide as necessary for proper installation of the
pipe and backfilling, and should provide adequate room to meet safety
requirements for workers. A minimum clearance of 12 inches horizontally
on both sides of the pipe shall be provided. AWWA M41 Section 11.3
and AWWA M11 Chapter 13 cover trenching, embedment, pipe
installation, and backfilling. Laying conditions for ductile-iron pipe are
presented on Figure 11-6 of the AWWA M41.

The method and equipment used for excavating the trench will depend on
the type of material to be excavated, the depth of the trench, and space
available for trenching operations. The choice of method and equipment
is typically left up to the contractor. The contractor should only use
equipment capable of meeting trench width limitations. Provisions should
be included in the contract specifications that require corrective
measures to be used by the contractor if allowable trench widths are
exceeded, except when safety requirements dictate a wider trench.

The Engineer should ensure that trenches excavated during construction
are the same configuration and width as are called for in the design. If
trench excavations are not the same (e.g., sloped sides versus straight
sides), the contract documents shall provide for verification that pipe wall
design is adequate to meet loading requirements for the actual trench
configuration.

Excavating trenches in natural or undisturbed soil and then backfilling the
trench is referred to as open-cut construction. The pipe is subjected to a
vertical soil load resulting from two major forces. The first is produced by
the mass of the prism of soil within the trench and above the top of the
pipe. The second is the friction or shearing forces generated between the
prism of soil in the trench and the sides of a shallow or rectangular trench.
The width of the trench affects both of these forces.

Backfill will settle at a faster rate than the undisturbed soil surrounding the
trench. This downward movement of backfill induces upward shearing
forces that support a part of the weight of the backfill. The resultant load
on the horizontal plane at the top of the pipe within the trench is equal to
the weight of the backfill minus these upward shearing forces. Unusual
conditions, such as poor natural soils, may change these conditions.

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4.04.02 Steel Pipeline Design
4.04.02.01 External Loads

External loads on a pipeline include dead loads (the weight of the soil and
any improvements constructed above the pipe), live loads (caused by
construction traffic and/or vehicular traffic traveling above the pipe,
vacuum pressures, or pressures from groundwater. AWWA M11 shall be
used in the design of steel pipe for external loads.

A. Dead Loads

Dead loads attributable to the weight of the backfill shall be computed in
accordance with Section 6.1 of AWWA M11 using the compacted soil
weight determined in the geotechnical investigation. Dead loads caused
by improvements constructed near or above the pipeline shall be computed
by standard geotechnical engineering practices.

B. Live Loads

Live loads caused by standard highway loadings (HS-20) or railroad
loadings (E-80) shall be computed in accordance with Table 6-3 of
AWWA M11. Live loads from heavy construction vehicles shall be
analyzed in accordance with Section 6.4 of AWWA M11. Note that
construction loads may occur when the pipeline has no or only minimal
cover.

C. Vacuum Pressure and Groundwater

The Engineer shall compute the allowable internal vacuum pressure using
the formulas described in AWWA M11, Section 6.3 for buried pipeline.
For non-buried pipeline (e.g. above-grade crossings or pipelines in casings
without control density fill, or similar situations) use the formula in
AWWA M11, Section 4.4. The pipe shall be designed to resist internal
and external pressure, vacuum pressure and uplift from groundwater when
such situations exist.

4.04.02.02 Internal Pressure

The internal pressure is the difference in elevation between the conduit
and the hydraulic grade line (HGL). The pressure at the beginning of a
main may be generated by a pump, reservoir, or connection from another

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pipeline. Pressure losses are due to friction, bends and fittings, and
changes in elevation.

A. Working Pressure

Working pressure shall be determined from the maximum HGL the
pipeline will see in operation. Pressure calculations shall reflect the
difference in elevation between the HGL and the centerline of the pipe.
See Table 4.1 for allowable hoop stresses for cement mortar or
dielectrically coated steel pipe.
B. Field Test Pressure

Field air pressure testing of all welded pipe joints and field hydrostatic
pressure tests of the completed pipeline shall be conducted.

The hydrostatic test pressure shall be equal to the maximum working plus
surge pressure, the pump shutoff pressure (where applicable), or 1.25
times the maximum working pressure whichever is greater. The
hydrostatic test pressure shall not produce a hoop stress in the pipe wall
exceeding that noted in Table 4.1. Valves (body and seat) shall not be
subjected to test pressures greater that the manufacturers
recommendation. In some cases, this may require an increase in the valve
pressure class.



Table 4.1
Maximum Allowable Hoop Stress for Welded Steel Pipeline

Working Pressure Test Pressure Surge Pressure
Mortar Dielectric Mortar Dielectric Mortar Dielectric
Coating Coating Coating Coating Coating Coating
50% of 50% of 62.5% of 62.5% of 66.7% of 66.7% of
Yield Yield Yield Yield Yield Yield
16,500 psi
maximum
21,000 psi
maximum
20,625 psi
maximum
26,250 psi
maximum
22,000 psi
maximum
28,000 psi
maximum

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C. Surge Pressure

The surge pressure is obtained from a surge analysis. For more
information, see Section 4.02.04.

4.04.02.03 Design Procedures
A. General

The design procedure to determine wall thickness shall consider the
following conditions:

Minimum thickness for handling.
External loads.
Internal working pressure.
Internal surge pressure.
Longitudinal thrust forces caused by valves or changes in
alignment.
Longitudinal forces resulting from changes in temperature.
Combined stress (hoop and longitudinal).
Corrosion allowance.

The pipe wall thickness selected shall be the greater of the thicknesses
computed for the loading conditions listed above. The design procedure
for welds at the joints is discussed in a subsequent section.

B. Minimum Wall Thickness for Handling

The minimum thickness for handling shall be determined by the formula:

Thickness =Pipe Outside Diameter (inches) / 240

C. Design for External Loads

Two conditions for external loads shall be considered:

Live load plus dead load with full depth of cover. Note that
the effect of live loads diminishes with depth of cover.
Live load plus dead load with minimal cover. The minimal
cover used in the calculation must be coordinated with the
specifications. The specifications must state the amount of
cover required prior to operating heavy equipment above

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the pipe. The live loads must represent the heaviest
equipment anticipated for use in compaction or hauling
material above the pipe.

Minimum wall thickness for external loads shall be determined by using
the Iowa formula as presented in AWWA M11 (Formula 6-5). Deflection
for mortar-lined and -coated steel pipe shall be limited to 1.5 percent of
the diameter. Calculations of deflection for mortar-coated or shop-lined
steel pipe can take advantage of the mortar by assuming the coating and
lining acts as a three-part laminated ring which considers no bond between
the steel cylinder and the applied lining or coating (as described in Section
6.2 of AWWA M11). If field lining of the pipe is allowed, the lining
thickness shall not be included in the deflection calculation.

For dielectrically coated pipe, deflection shall be limited to 2.25 percent of
the diameter. The deflection lag factor shall be selected by the Engineer
but shall be no less than 1.15. The bedding constant shall be 0.1. The
modulus of soil reaction shall be as recommended by the Engineer in the
PDR and accepted by COH. The stiffness provided by mortar lining shall
not be included in the calculation of pipe wall stiffness.

When a cement mortar coating is applied over a dielectric coating to
protect the dielectric coating from damage (rock shielding), it need not be
considered a mortar coating for purposes of deflection requirements.

D. Design for Internal Pressure

Minimum wall thickness for internal pressure shall be determined by using
Formula 4-1 of AWWA M11 (t =pd/2s). The allowable hoop stress at
working pressure for cement mortar lined and coated steel pipe shall be
limited to that noted in Table 4.1 to minimize the potential for cracking of
the coating as the pipe expands under pressure.

E. Design for Internal Surge Pressure

Minimum wall thickness for surge pressure shall be determined by using
Formula 4-1 of AWWA M11 with an allowable steel stress noted in Table
4.1.

F. Thrust Forces

Longitudinal thrust force shall be calculated by the method described in
Chapter 13 of AWWA M11. Closed valves will create the full "P x A"

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(pressure times area) force. Note that this force may cause tension or
compression in the pipe wall depending on the location of the resisting
forces. Bends in the alignment will create forces as shown in Figure 13-14
of AWWA M11. Longitudinal thrust forces must be considered in the
combined stress analysis described in a subsequent section.

G. Longitudinal Force Due to Change in Temperature

When the pipe joints are welded, the temperature of the steel will likely be
higher than when the pipe is in service and conveying water. The stress in
the pipe wall attributable to a change in temperature can be calculated by
the procedure described in Chapter 13 of AWWA M11 (stress =[change
in temperature] x [coefficient of thermal expansion] x [modules of
elasticity]). The specifications must state the maximum allowable
temperature of the steel when the closure joints are welded. If controlled
low strength material (CLSM) is used to backfill the pipe zone, the
maximum temperature of the CLSM must also be stated in the
specifications. The minimum temperature of the steel shall be considered
50 degrees F. The force due to a drop in temperature, between the time
the joints are welded and the pipe is placed in service, will always create
tension in the pipe wall. Temperature stresses must be considered in the
combined stress analysis described in a subsequent section.

H. Longitudinal Force Due to Effect of Poisons Ratio

As the pipe expands due to internal pressure, it will tend to contract
longitudinally. If the pipe is restrained from contracting, a longitudinal
stress will develop in the pipe wall. The maximum magnitude of the stress
is given by the formula:

Longitudinal Stress =(Hoop Stress) x Poissons Ratio.

For steel, Poissons ratio may be assumed to be 0.303. The longitudinal
stress resulting from the effect of Poissons ratio should be added to the
stress caused by a change in temperature. The Engineer is advised that
situations may occur where the total longitudinal stress includes the
temperature stress, Poissons stress, and bulkhead thrust stresses.

I. Design for Combined Stress

Combined stress shall be calculated by using the Hencky-Mises theory. If
the maximum combined stress exceeds those values in Table 4.2, the steel
wall thickness will need to be increased. Redo the calculations and

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compare again. Combined stress calculations are not applicable for rubber
gasket pipe.


Table 4.2
Maximum Allowable Combined Stress for Welded Steel Pipeline

Working Pressure Test Pressure Surge Pressure
Mortar of Dielectric
Coating
Mortar of
Dielectric
Coating
Mortar of Dielectric
Coating
50% of Yield 62.5% of Yield 66.7% of Yield
(21,000 psi maximum)
(26,250 psi
maximum)
(28,000 psi maximum)

4.04.02.04 Design of Welds

J oint welds may be lap welds, butt welds, or butt strap welds. The design
procedure for each is discussed below.

A. Lap Welds

The allowable force on a lap weld shall be computed by the Engineer.
The strength of the seal weld shall not be included in the allowable force
calculation. Note that the AWWA M11 procedure assumes minimal space
between the bell and spigot surfaces. It is important that this space and the
resulting eccentricity be in accordance with the requirements of AWWA
C200.

If the actual force is greater than the allowable force, three options should
be considered:

The wall thickness could be increased.
A double lap weld (inside and outside of the pipe) could be
used instead of a single lap weld with a seal weld.
A butt weld could be used instead of a lap weld.





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B. Butt Joint Welds

Full penetration butt joint welds with appropriate inspection and
nondestructive testing are capable of resisting a longitudinal force equal to
the force resisted by the pipe wall.

C. Butt Strap Welds

The allowable force on a butt strap weld shall be computed in accordance
with the procedure used for lap welds.

4.04.03 Ductile Iron Design Criteria

The Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association (DIPRA) published the
Design of Ductile Iron Pipe in 1991 with subsequent revisions in 1996 and
2000. The publication is a thorough and comprehensive procedure in the
design of Ductile Iron pipe. It was used in the development of AWWA
M41, Ductile Iron Pipe and Fittings, particularly Chapter 4 Design.

The design of ductile iron pipe for COH facilities shall adhere to the
design procedures presented DIPRAs Design of Ductile Iron Pipe or
AWWA Manual M41. The highlighted points of the design procedure are
presented below.

4.04.03.01 Design Basis

Ductile iron pipeline design is based on the flexible conduit theory. This
theory states that ductile iron pipe, when subjected to external loads and
internal pressures, reacts like a flexible conduit and maintains its
roundness under the two types of loads. The thickness is determined by
considering external loads and internal pressures individually and then
selecting the larger thickness. The design procedure for ductile iron pipe
is presented below.

Design for external loads (earth load plus truck loads).
Design for internal pressure (static pressure plus surge
pressure allowance).
Choose larger pipe thickness value.
Add a 0.08 inch service allowance.
Add a standard casting allowance.

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The result of the design procedure is the total calculated design thickness.
The appropriate pipe pressure class can be determined with the known
design thickness. Internal pressure design of standard pressure classes is
based on rated working pressure plus a surge allowance of 100 psi. A
safety factor of 2.0 is applied to this calculation, which is based on a
minimum yield strength in tension of 42,000 psi.

4.04.03.02 External Load Design

The net wall thickness required for an external load is based on two design
considerations: limitation of ring bending stress and ring deflection. A
net thickness is computed using both the bending stress and deflection
equations in DIPRAs Design of Ductile Iron Pipe. The larger of the two
thicknesses is then selected as the net thickness required for external load
design.

4.04.03.03 Internal Pressure Design

The hoop stress formula is used to calculate net thickness required for
internal pressure. A safety factor of 2.0 is applied to the sum of maximum
working pressure and surge allowance. The standard surge allowance is
100 psi; however, the maximum anticipated surge pressure should be used
if it is higher than the standard.

4.04.03.04 Design Tables

Design tables have been published to simplify and expedite the
calculations involved in determining pipe thickness. The tables are
published in DIPRAs Ductile Iron Pipe Design and referenced in AWWA
M41. With the design tables, the designer need only know trench load and
desired laying condition to compute net thickness required for bending
stress design and deflection design.

4.04.03.05 Standard Allowances

Once the net thickness has been determined, certain allowances are added
to obtain the total calculated thickness requirement. A service allowance
(0.08 inch for all pipe sizes) is added to provide an additional safety factor
for unknowns. Then an allowance for casting tolerance is added to
provide the latitude required by the manufacturing process and to prevent

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the possibility of significant deviation from design thickness. Casting
allowance is dependent on pipe size as shown below.


Table 4.3
Allowances for Casting Tolerance
Size (inches) Casting Tolerance
(inches)
14-42 0.07
48 0.08
54 0.09

4.04.04 Protective Coatings and Linings

Protective coatings and linings are extremely effective in controlling
corrosion. When properly applied, coatings and linings extend the life of a
pipeline by deterring corrosion and pipeline deterioration. Many factors
influence the performance of coatings and linings. Through research and
years of experience, standards have been developed which aid the
Engineer in the selection of the most effective coatings and linings for a
specific pipeline. Respective AWWA standards, listed below, shall be
used in specifying coatings and linings for COH pipeline facilities. The
list of relevant standards is presented below:

For Steel Pipe:

AWWA/ANSI C203.
AWWA/ANSI C205.
AWWA/ANSI C209.
AWWA/ANSI C210.
AWWA/ANSI C213.
AWWA/ANSI C214.
AWWA/ANSI C602.

For Ductile Iron Pipe:

AWWA/ANSI C104.
AWWA/ANSI C105.


The effectiveness of a good protective pipeline coating depends on its
permanence and the degree to which it possess physical resistance to

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hazards of transportation, installation, temperature change, soil stress, and
pressure; resistance to water penetration or absorption; effective electrical
insulative properties; and chemical inertness to soil, air, water, organic
acids, alkalis, and bacterial action. (AWWA, M11)

4.04.04.01 Linings

Linings are installed on the interior surface of pipelines and protect against
corrosion while maintaining low hydraulic frictional resistance. Cement
mortar linings for steel and ductile iron pipe provide excellent corrosion
protection while maintaining a smooth surface on the interior of the pipe.
The corrosion protection is attributed to the alkaline cement environment
impregnated into the steel which prevents iron corrosion in most natural
environments. In addition, leached products from the mortar lining are
neither toxic nor corrosive.

AWWA maintains current standards which list coatings and linings for
steel water pipe. Pipe linings and other methods of corrosion protection
for pipeline interiors shall be considered using relevant AWWA standards.
Other reference material includes RP0175-75, Control of Internal
Corrosion in Steel Pipelines and Piping Systems. This document is
available from NACE International, Houston, Texas.

AWWA also maintains standards for ductile iron pipe linings.
Specifically, ANSI/AWWA C104 shall be used in specifying cement
mortar lining for ductile iron pipe.

4.04.04.02 Coatings

Many factors influence the external corrosion potential for steel pipe. The
most important factor is the soil resistivity, which is discussed in Section
5.4. Other factors include moisture content, pH, the chemical and physical
properties of the soil, and the existence of stray electrical currents.
Conditions which exist in the field that need to be considered in selecting
a coating include the existence of tree roots, expandable soils, bacteria and
fungus, soil chemicals and industrial wastes, and/or rocks or debris in the
backfill.

AWWA Standards C203, C205, C209, C210, C213, C214, C215, C216,
C217, C218, C222, C225, C602 describe coatings and linings for steel
water pipe. Pipe coatings and other methods of corrosion protection for
pipeline exteriors shall be considered using these standards.


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ANSI/AWWA C105 shall be used in specifying coatings for ductile iron
pipe.

4.04.05 Appurtenances and Structures
4.04.05.01 General

Pipeline appurtenances/structures include mainline valves, outlets, air
vacuum assemblies, drainvalve stations, access structures/assemblies,
conduit for communications cable, marking tape, pipeline markers, and
cathodic protection test stations. Each of these items is discussed in the
following sections. Buried valves 24 inches in diameter and larger shall
be placed in a vault. All joints shall be bonded. The DUS shall have final
decision on which valves shall be placed in a vault.

4.04.05.02 Mainline Valves
A. Spacing and Location

Mainline valves shall be placed every mile. The location, size, and type
shall be as recommended by the designer and accepted by DUS-NDS.
Unless otherwise approved, mainline valves shall be the same diameter as
the pipeline.

B. Layout of Valve Structure

Figure 4.2, located at the end of this section, presents a typical sketch of a
mainline valve structure and appurtenances. Where practicable, in-line
valves should be placed in a section of pipeline with little or no slope. If a
valve vault is required with the valve, the wall of the structure will not be
designed to restrain the full axial thrust force.

4.04.05.03 Outlets

An outlet (future or current) is simply a specified diameter tee or outlet
branching off the main transmission line.

Outlets for future connections will have an isolation valve in a vault, if
larger than 24 inches, followed by a short spool pipe extending outside of
the vault by at least 5 feet and a bumped head or end cap with thrust
restraint. The valve allows future branch piping to be constructed without
taking the main pipeline out of service.

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4.04.05.04 Air Valves
A. General

Properly designed air valves allow the safe release or admittance of air
into the pipeline system during filling, draining, and normal operations.
AWWA Manual M51 shall be used as a guide for selecting, sizing, and
locating air valves in COH transmission pipelines. In the design of
transmission pipelines, AWWA C512 shall be used as a standard for air
valve design. It is the Engineers responsibility to address the following
questions during the design of transmission air valves:

Where along the pipeline should the air valves be installed?
What style air valve should be used?
What size air valve should be used?

Reliability in air valves is required at critical locations and shall be
incorporated into the design by having one additional valve of each type.
Critical valves are those which, if removed or not functional, could create
adverse air buildup, negative pressures, etc. under certain operational,
filling, draining or catastrophic failure conditions; which damage the
pipeline or connected facilities.

B. Air Valve Assemblies

Three styles of air valve assemblies are listed in AWWA Standard C512;
air-release valves, air/vacuum valves, and combination air valves. These
air valves shall be used on COH transmission facilities. No PVC shall be
used on air valve piping. Special air valves deviating from the three
standards shall receive prior written approval by COH.

Air-release valves are designed to release pockets of air as they
accumulate at high points in a pressurized pipeline. The valve is
characterized by the size of the outlet orifice. Typical orifice sizes in air-
release valves are between 1/16 inch and 1 inch in diameter. Accordingly,
air-release valves are called small orifice valves. When a pipeline is
pressurized, a float in the air-release valve rises and activates a lever
which closes the outlet orifice. The orifice will remain closed until air
accumulates in the valves and the float falls, opening the orifice to allow
the air to escape. The weight of the float and operation of the leverage
mechanism can be designed to open the valve at any pressure up to the
maximum working pressure of the valve. Air-release valves will not

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provide vacuum protection nor will it vent large quantities of air quickly
during filling. Air release valves shall be installed at all high points within
a pipeline system. A typical air-release valve assembly consists of one or
more air-release valves, isolation valves, surge check valves, and stem
piping from a single outlet at the crown of the pipe. All air valves shall
have a street valve with a plastic lockable cover.

An air/vacuum valve can be described as a float operated device which
provides vacuum protection and allows large quantities of air to be
released or admitted into the pipeline during filling and draining.
Air/vacuum valves are characterized by outlet orifice size. Discharge
outlet sizes range between inch and 20 inches in diameter and shall be
equal in size to the inlet port. The size of an air/vacuum valve is a very
important consideration, for the size of the valve controls the pressure
differential in which air is exhausted during filling and the degree to which
vacuum conditions are minimized during negative internal pressures in the
pipeline. Air/vacuum valves shall be installed at high points and grade
changes along the pipeline. Air/vacuum valves will not open and vent air
as it accumulates at high points during normal operating conditions.

The combination air valve combines the operating features of the air-
release valve and the air/vacuum valve. The combination air valve shall
be installed at all high points along the pipeline where the functions of
both air-release and air/vacuum valves are needed. The combination air
valve shall be the single body configuration. The single body
configuration is often used in compact installations and sizes range from 1
inch to 6 inch. A typical combination valve assembly consists of parallel
combination air vacuum/air release valves, isolation valves, slow closing
check valves, and a parallel stem piping from a single outlet at the crown
of the pipe.

Where air release, air vacuum, or combination-valves are needed, multiple
outlets for the valves could be considered. Spacing of the outlets should
be far enough apart to not require special reinforcement of the pipe or
conflict with other valves and appurtenances.

C. Sizing of Air Valves

AWWA Manual M51 provides common methodology in sizing air-release
valves, air/vacuum valves, and combination air valves. For specific sizing
of valves, the Engineer shall refer to manufacturers charts, graphs and
formulas and the methodologies presented in AWWA M51.

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4.04.05.05 Drain Valves
A. General

Drain valves will need to be included along the pipeline to enable
dewatering of the pipeline during times of maintenance or emergency.
Drain valves will be located at all relative low elevations in the pipeline
and on the upstream side of isolation valves. The drain valve shall be
sized to drain the pipeline segment in approximately 8 hours. A drain
valve assembly consists of a bottom outlet tee (sized for the pipe volume
to be drained) with a shutoff valve on the branch leg of the tee that can be
operated to allow removal of water from the system. No PVC street
shutoff valves shall be used. A typical drain valve is shown on Figure 4.3
at the end of this section.

The Engineer shall verify that the downstream conditions in the receiving
system are suitable to convey the design flow. The Engineer shall develop
a curve showing the rate of flow from the drain valve at varying
differential head conditions with a fully open valve. The Engineer shall
consider the use of orifice plates to limit the pressure drop across the
control valve.

B. Configuration

A typical drain valve assembly connects to the pipe invert and consists of
an isolation valve with an extension of pipe to the ground surface beyond
the outside edge of the main pipeline. Tangential outlets are desired.
Drain valve assemblies also typically include a pumping chamber to
permit further withdrawal of water below the normal drain valve surface
elevation, and energy dissipaters at the discharge point. It is expected that
the major drain valve will discharge to washes or storm drains and the
minor drain valve will discharge to washes, storm drains or roadways.

4.04.05.06 Special Connection Points

The pipeline may connect to various facilities, including pumping stations
and reservoirs. Each connection is unique and requires special
consideration. The Design Engineer will be required to interface the
connection point with the DUS-NDS and the appropriate Design Engineer
responsible for the adjacent facility. Connection points as shown may
extend to the center of an angle point or fitting, coordination between
adjacent contract will be needed to assure the complete bend or fitting is
only one contract.


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4.04.05.07 Marking Tape

The drawings and specifications shall require three strips of marking tape
at two locations above the pipeline (See UDACS Plate #27). The upper
location shall be 3 feet below finish grade with one strip placed over the
centerline of the pipe and another strip 1 foot past the edge of pipe on each
side. The lower location shall be 3 feet above the crown of the pipe
located over the centerline of the pipe and at a distance of 1 foot past the
edge of pipe (each side of pipe). The tape shall be 12-inches wide and the
three strips shall be spaced as noted above. Tape in the upper location
shall be metallic marking tape, and tape in the lower location shall be non-
metallic. The tape shall be blue with repeating 1-inch high black lettering
as follows:

CITY OF HENDERSON WATER SYSTEM - WATER LINE BURIED BELOW

4.04.05.08 Pipeline Markers

Pipeline markers shall be provided to document the location of buried
transmission lines.

Pipeline markers shall be as shown on UDACS Plate #27.
Carsonite Survivor markers installed directly over the
pipeline will be used in open, unimproved areas. Brass Cap
Type markers will be used in developed areas where there
are nearby curbs or other fixed improvements and where
the Carsonite markers would be inappropriate. The
Carsonite marker shall have a decal containing the
following information:

o COH.
o Name.
o Appurtenance- [Air Valve (AV), Drainvalve (DV),
Turnout (TO), Bifurcation (BF), Lateral Centerline
(C/L)].
o Station Number.
o Distance and direction to appurtenance or lateral
centerline (C/L).

Markers or monuments shall be installed at the following
locations:

o Maximum distance between markers or monuments is
1000 feet.

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o At drain valves.
o At both sides of major road crossings.
o Where the pipeline changes direction.
o At bifurcations or turnouts.

The brass cap markers shall be a brass cap, 2.5 inches in
diameter with post (LIETZ 8134-06 or equivalent) installed
in the top of existing curb by drilling curb and marker post
set in epoxy. Marker to be stamped with the following:

o COH.
o Name.
o Appurtenance- [Air Valve (AV), Drainvalve (DV),
Turnout (TO), Bifurcation (BF), Lateral Centerline
(C/L)].
o Station Number.
o Distance and direction to appurtenance or transmission
pipeline centerline (C/L).

Contract specifications shall require that as-built pipeline
markers be located by GPS coordinates and recorded on as-
built drawings.

4.04.06 Thrust Restraint
4.04.06.01 Thrust Restraint Systems

When a water transmission or distribution pipeline is under
internal pressure, joint separation is possible. J oint separation is
caused by unbalanced hydraulic forces in unrestrained pipelines.
The unbalanced hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces are often
referred to as thrust forces. Thrust forces occur at changes in
pipeline size or direction, such as at elbows, tees, reducers,
increases, caps, plugs, closed valves, etc. The Engineer is
responsible for identifying both types of thrust forces within a
pipeline facility. Once the forces have been determined, remedial
actions can be considered for restraint. Thermal stresses and surge
or transient pressures caused by water hammer or pump shutoff
head must be considered in conjunction with hydrostatic thrust
forces. The Design Engineer can utilize a restrained joint system
to balance thrust forces.

Engineers shall completely design the thrust restraint system. A
performance specification that requires the pipe manufacturer or

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contractor to submit a thrust restraint design for review is not
acceptable.

Valve vaults will be used on all large line valves 24 inches and
larger. The wall of the structure will not be designed to restrain the
full axial thrust force. A flexible coupling will be located near the
valve to facilitate the removal of the valve for maintenance.
Flexible couplings will require a harness to restrain axial tension
forces.

4.04.06.02 Thrust Blocks

Thrust blocks will not be allowed on COH transmission lines.

4.04.06.03 Restrained Joints for Steel Pipelines

For buried pipelines, a restrained joint system is used to resist thrust forces
through the development of friction forces between the pipe and the
surrounding soil. The objective in designing a restrained joint system is to
determine the length of pipe necessary to transmit the force into the soil.
Factors affecting this length include pipe size, internal pressure, depth of
cover, and the characteristics of the surrounding soil.

The joints of valves, fittings, and reducers can be connected in the field
using a number of rigid and flexible connections. Rigid connections
include lap welded joints, butt-welded joints, butt strap joints, flanged
joints, and harness joints. These joints are restrained from tension forces
as well as compression and shear forces, except for harness joints. A
harness can transmit axial tension forces, but has little capacity to transmit
shear or compression forces. All joints are to be designed to transmit the
thrust force in either direction. Flexible connections include bell and
spigot rubber gasket joints, Carnegie shape rubber gasket joints, and
mechanical coupling joints. These joints are unrestrained and require
harnesses to protect against axial transient forces. The design procedure
for harnesses is covered in Chapter 13 of AWWA M11.

The most common type of restraining joint in steel pipelines is the welded
joint. This joint shall be used on all steel transmission pipelines unless
sufficient justification for using an alternate joint is presented for
acceptance by the COH - DUS-NDS.

4.04.06.04 Restrained Joints for Ductile Iron Pipelines


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Thrust restraint design for Ductile Iron pipe is covered in Chapter 8 of
AWWA M41 and shall be used in designing thrust restraint systems for
COH ductile iron transmission pipelines. Calculations for restrained joint
systems shall be submitted to the COH with the 100% design. COH
approves restraint joint systems by the following manufacturers:

EBAA Iron.
Star.
COH approved alternate.

4.04.07 Corrosion Control
4.04.07.01 Evaluation of Corrosion Protection Needs

Corrosion is an electrochemical process in which a current leaves a
structure at the anode site, passes through an electrolyte, and reenters the
structure at the cathode site. For example, one small section of a pipeline
may be anodic because it is in a soil with low resistivity compared to the
rest of the line. Current would leave the pipeline at that anode site, pass
through the soil, and reenter the pipeline at the cathode site. Current flows
because of a potential difference between the anode and cathode. That is,
the anode potential is more negative than the cathode potential, and this
difference is the driving force for the corrosion current. The total system
anode, cathode, electrolyte, and metallic connection between anode and
cathode is termed a corrosion cell. (Army, TM 5-811-7)

The need for corrosion control shall be determined through field
investigations and laboratory analyses to assess the corrosion potential of
the environment toward proposed pipe materials. Field investigations shall
be conducted at all proposed facility sites and coordinated with
geotechnical studies for efficiency in retrieving samples.

The corrosion potential of the soil is dependant on soil resistivity.
Generally, as the soil resistivity decreases, corrosion increases. Also, as
the soil moisture increases, resistivity decreases. Soil resistivity is
typically measured using one or both of the following methods. The
Wenner 4-pin method is a soil resistivity test that is performed onsite, and
the soil box resistivity test is performed in a laboratory with samples from
the field.

All pipe shall be tied with test lead stations. Reference cells to be used on
a case by case basis. All joints for both Steel and DIP shall be bonded.


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A. Field Tests

The Wenner 4-Pin Method measures the electrical resistivity of existing
soils. The test is performed by placing four steel pins equidistant from
each other and sending a current through the outer pins. The resistivity of
the soil can be determined by measuring the voltage across the inner pins
and applying Ohms Law (V=I*R). The test shall be performed in
accordance with ASTM G57 and made at intervals not exceeding 1,000
feet along the alignment or site. The resistivity shall be measured from
ground level to depths of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 feet. Pipes deeper than 30
feet shall have tests performed at greater depths. Should conditions exist
that make a test other than the Wenner 4-pin method more appropriate, the
Engineer shall inform the COH of that condition and recommend the
alternate method.

B. Laboratory Analysis

Soil samples shall be collection for laboratory analysis of corrosive
properties. Tests shall be conducted for the following parameters:

Electrical resistivity using the soil box method as defined in
ASTM G57 for samples with moisture contents as-received
and saturated with deionized water.
Water-soluble chloride.
Water-soluble sulfate.
pH.

The soil box method is used to measure resistivity of field soil samples in
the laboratory. The principles behind the test are similar to the Wenner 4-
pin method as there are four points of electrical contact with the soil and a
current is passed through the outer points while the voltage drop is
measured across the inner points. Resistivity is calculated using Ohms
Law.

Any samples with pH less than 6.5 shall be tested to determine total
acidity in addition to the other required tests. Additional tests may also be
warranted depending on the results of the field resistivity survey.

C. Stray Currents

The evaluation of stray current may require the use of specialty Engineers
with expertise in this area. It is the Engineers responsibility to provide the

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necessary expertise to meet these requirements and coordinate with DUS-
NDS.

Field investigations shall include interviews with knowledgeable sources
and measurements to determine the potential for stray current from DC
sources. Possible sources of DC current include cathodic protection
systems operated by other utilities or companies; electric transit systems,
if any; and industrial sources such as metal processors and welding shops.

Evaluations shall also consider the possible effects of cathodic protection
systems for the pipelines under consideration on other buried utilities in
the vicinity. It is the Engineers responsibility to contact the utility
companies to determine the extent, if any, of a cathodic protection system
in use.

It may be necessary to make field measurements of earth potential
gradient to detect the presence of current in the earth at locations along the
pipeline alignment. Tests shall be made by measuring the potential
between two identical portable reference electrodes placed a suitable
distance apart and in contact with the soil. Where appropriate, the
cathodic protection or other electrical system shall be interrupted to
observe the change in earth potential gradient associated with the system.

D. Induced Voltage

When a pipeline alignment is near high voltage electrical power
transmission lines the potential for induced voltage shall be evaluated.
Field measurements of the electromagnetic field may not be sufficient to
assess the potential for induced voltage. The Engineer shall evaluate the
need for induced voltage protection and design the pipeline system
accordingly unless the project scope specifically excludes this
requirement. In either case, the Engineer shall coordinate with COH
regarding induced voltage requirements.

E. Interpretation of Results

Results of field investigations and interviews shall be evaluated to
determine the needs for cathodic protection. The results shall be
interpreted by persons experienced with corrosion control systems. The
evaluation shall include consideration of the information in the Protective
Coatings and Linings section.


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The practices and recommendations of accepted standards and references
shall be used during the course of the work. The following references
should be considered as primary sources of information:

COH Corrosion Reports.
NACE International.
AWWA Standards and Publications.
Manufacturers Associations.




F. Conclusions and Recommendations

In general, corrosion protection should be provided for buried or
submerged metallic structures if any of the following conditions exist:

Soil resistivity is 12,000 ohm-cm or less, or when a wide
range of soil resistivity exists regardless of the absolute
values.
Soil with high chloride or sulfate concentrations.
Waters with high chloride concentrations, high TDS, or
high dissolved oxygen concentration.
Areas subject to stray electrical currents.
Support facility piping for natural gas, fuel, compressed air,
chemicals, and steel storage tanks.

The evaluation will reach one of two possible conclusions. The first
possible conclusion is that, at the time the study is conducted, cathodic
protection is necessary. This approach will result in the installation of
cathodic protection systems concurrent with construction of the pipeline.
The cathodic protection system would be designed for a minimum service
life of 20 years, after which it would require replacement for continued
service.

A major consideration for the cathodic protection alternative is that stray
current from the cathodic protection system must be controlled to prevent
damage to other facilities. The cost savings resulting from leak prevention
on the protected pipeline could be surpassed by the costs of damage to
other facilities.

The second possible conclusion of the evaluation is that cathodic
protection is not required at the time of construction. All pipelines would
then be provided with the test stations and joint bonding system necessary

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to allow corrosion monitoring of the pipeline. Corrosion monitoring
results are used to determine when, or if, cathodic protection is required.

4.04.07.02 Methods of Corrosion Control
A. Steel Pipe

There are three accepted methods of controlling corrosion of buried steel
pipe. First, protective coatings can be used to insulate the pipe material
from the surrounding environment. Second, cathodic protection systems
can be designed to protect the pipeline. And third, an inhibitive
environment can be installed around the pipeline to prevent oxidation and
reduce corrosion. These methods can be used individually or in
combination to achieve adequate corrosion protection.

Cathodic protection is a method of reducing corrosion by creating an
external circuit between the pipe and a sacrificial anode. The sacrificial
anode is a metal immersed in water or buried in the ground at a
predetermined distance from the pipeline. When enough current is
applied, the whole structure will be at one potential; thus, anode and
cathode sites will not exist. The need for cathodic protection systems shall
be determined on a case by case basis by the Engineer and the DUS-NDS.

There are two methods of cathodic protection commonly used. The first
method, a galvanic cell is created using a sacrifical-anode material such as
magnesium or zinc. This method utilizes the corrosion potential of
different metals to protect against corrosion. The system is designed so
that the pipeline becomes the cathode and a sacrificial metal becomes the
anode. Thus, the metal (anode) corrodes sacrificially in lieu of the
pipeline (cathode). This galvanic cathode protection system is called a
sacrificial anode cathodic protection system. This system is generally
used in lightly or moderately corrosion soils where it is desirable to apply
small amounts of current at a number of locations.

The second method of cathodic protection commonly used is the
impressed current system. This system operates much like the galvanic
system except that the impressed current system utilizes an external power
source to drive the current through the system. Impressed current cathodic
protection systems are generally used in heavily corrosive soils.

B. Ductile Iron Pipe

There are two common methods for protecting ductile iron pipe from
corrosive soils or stray electrical currents. The most common is

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polyethylene encasement and the other is cathodic protection. All
polyethylene encasement shall utilize double bag. All DIP pipe shall be
tied with test lead stations reference cell.












































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Appendix A Checklists

DEPARTMENT OF UTILITY SERVICES
TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION
NEW DEVELOPMENT SECTION


CITY OF HENDERSON
240 WATER STREET
HENDERSON, NEVADA 89015


UTILITY SERVICES
Pump Station Review Checklist

Design Concept Phase

1. Design Concept Report shall address the following:
System Overview
Site Location
Site Layout
Design Criteria Parameters
Pump Station Capacity
Preliminary Pump Selection
Number of Pumps (Min 3, 1 Standby)
Total Dynamic Head
System and Pump Curves
Building Design Parameters
Expandability
Standby Power
Control Parameters
Hydraulic Analysis
Preliminary Cost Estimate
Schedule
6/6/2005 A.1
Henderson Utility Guidelines

Pre-Design Phase

1. Pre-Design Report shall address the following:
Executive Summary
Table of Contents
Site Description and Existing Conditions
Existing Facility Inventory
List of Relevant Reports, Plans, and Other Project Information
Description of station operational scheme and controls
Site Layout
Pump Selection and Efficiency
Expandability
Alternatives Evaluation Summary
Preliminary Plans
Recommended Future Connections
Identification of Permanent and Temporary ROW/Easement Constraints
Permit Matrix
List of Agencies and Utilities to Review and Sign the Drawings
Technical Specification Outline and List of Final Design Drawings
Preliminary Quantity and Associated Cost Estimates
Preliminary Construction Schedule
Project Correspondence (Meeting Minutes)
Support Graphics, Detail Sketches, and Tables
Construction Work Plan (Phasing, Shutdowns, etc.)
Opinions and Recommendations for Bidding Packages, Scheduling, and
Contractor Staging
Line of Sight Study for PLC/Radio Control (as requested)
Security
Equipment Sizes
6/6/2005 A.2
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Utility Conflict Information
Topographic Mapping Information Summary
Draft Geotechnical Investigation Report
Draft Environmental Investigation Report
Draft Corrosion Control/Cathodic Protection Report
Drainage Study Reference
Hydraulic and Surge Analysis
Cost Estimate
Schedule

Design Phase (60% and 100% Submittals)

1. Title Block information shall include the following:

Project Name
Name of Drawings
Engineers name, address, and phone number
Developers/Applicants name, address, and phone number
Drawing and Sheet Number
Revision Block
Scale
Engineers Stamp

2. General Drawings shall include the following:

Cover
Vicinity and Location Map
Sheet Layout
Project and General Notes
Abbreviations and Symbols
Survey Control
6/6/2005 A.3
Henderson Utility Guidelines

3. Site Specific Drawings shall include the following:

Site Plan
Grading Plan and Sections
Yard Piping Plan and Profile
Landscaping and Irrigation (if applicable)

4. Detail Sheets shall include the following:

Footings and Foundations Details
Roof Details
Suction and Discharge Piping Details
Drain Details
Access Structures Details
Collection Vault Details

5. Electrical Sheets shall include the following:
Site Electrical Plan and Details (include legend)
P & ID Plan and Details (include legend)

6. Specifications shall include:
Outline or Table of Contents (60% Submittal)
Complete Set (100% Submittal)

Pump Station Design Elements

1. Site Civil
Yard Piping (Mortar Lined and Coated Steel or Ductile Iron)
Signage
Access Gates
6/6/2005 A.4
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Security (Wall requirements, Lighting , and Intrusion Alarms)
Nevada Power Co. Coordination
Noise Limits
Vault Standards

2. Architecture and Landscaping
Design Appearance Guidelines
Height of Structures
Exterior Walls
Roofing
Windows
Doors and Frames
Lighting
Site Constraints
Landscaping

3. Mechanical
Station Piping (Velocity limitations, Valving, Couplings)

Pump Motors
Pumping Units
Pump Cans
SCADA
Flow Meters
HVAC
Support Systems

4. Structural
Design Guidelines
6/6/2005 A.5
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Design Loads
Seismic Design Criteria
Design Criteria

5. Electrical
Design Guidelines
System Reliability
Power System Protection
Uninterruptible Power Supply
Equipment Sizing and Rating
Motor Control Centers
Switchgear
Main Disconnect
COH Standards
Harmonics and Power Quality
Trip Calibration

6. Instrument and Control
Design Guidelines
Control Philosophy
Motor Starter Controls
P&ID
Control Loop Description
Loop Diagrams
Electronic Layout Drawings
Control Panel Layout

7. Other Specific Project Requirements (Established based on Pre-Design Report)

6/6/2005 A.6
Henderson Utility Guidelines
DEPARTMENT OF UTILITY SERVICES
TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION
NEW DEVELOPMENT SECTION


CITY OF HENDERSON
240 WATER STREET
HENDERSON, NEVADA 89015


UTILITY SERVICES
Reservoir Review Checklist

Design Concept Phase

1. Design Concept Report shall address the following:
Location of Reservoir
Siting Analysis
Site Description
ROWs, Easements, Ownership
Sizing (Height, Diameter, Volume)
Overflow Elevation
Preliminary Material Selection (Steel or Concrete)
Water Quality Analysis
Applicable Appurtenances
System Schematic
Preliminary Cost Estimate
Service
Schedule

Pre-Design Phase

1. Pre-Design Report shall address the following:
Executive Summary
Table of Contents
6/6/2005 A.7
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Existing Conditions
Utility Conflict Information
Preliminary Plans and Centerline Profiles
Alternatives Evaluation Summary
Future Reservoirs
Material Selection (Steel or Concrete)
Design Standards
Identification of Onsite Piping and Valving
Identification of Permanent and Temporary ROW/Easement Constraints
Permit Matrix
List of Agencies and Utilities to Review and Sign the Drawings
Technical Specification Outline and List of Final Design Drawings
Preliminary Quantity and Associated Cost Estimates
Preliminary Construction Schedule
Project Correspondence (Meeting Minutes)
Existing Facility Inventory
Support Graphics, Detail Sketches, and Tables
List of Relevant Reports, Plans, and Other Project Information
Construction Work Plan (Phasing, Shutdowns, etc.)
Opinions and Recommendations for Bidding Packages, Scheduling, and
Contractor Staging
Security
Topographic Mapping Information Summary
Draft Geotechnical Investigation Report
Draft Environmental Investigation Report
Draft Corrosion Control/Cathodic Protection Report
Drainage Study Reference
Volume Criteria Calculations

6/6/2005 A.8
Henderson Utility Guidelines

Design Phase (60% and 100% Submittals)

1. Title Block information shall include the following:

Project Name
Name of Drawings
Engineers name, address, and phone number
Developers/Applicants name, address, and phone number
Drawing and Sheet Number
Revision Block
Scale
Engineers Stamp

2. General Drawings shall include the following:

Cover
Vicinity and Location Map
Sheet Layout
Project and General Notes
Abbreviations and Symbols
Survey Control

3. Site Specific Drawings shall include the following:

Site Plan
Grading Plan and Sections
Yard Piping Plan and Profile
Reservoir Plan and Sections
Landscaping and Irrigation (if applicable)

6/6/2005 A.9
Henderson Utility Guidelines
4. Detail Sheets shall include the following:
Footings and Foundations Details
Roof Details
Inlet and Outlet Piping Details
Drain Details
Access Structures Details
Roof Vent Details
Ladder Details
Overflow System Details
Collection Vault Details
Structural and Column Details (Pre-stressed Concrete)

5. Electrical Sheets shall include the following:
Site Electrical Plan and Details (include legend)
P & ID Plan and Details (include legend)

6. Specifications shall include the following:
Outline or Table of Contents (60% Submittal)
Complete Set (100% Submittal)

Reservoir Design Elements

1. Steel Reservoirs
Footing
Tank Footings and Uplift Calculations
Top of footing shall be at least 6 inches above the finished surface
Minimum embedment of the ring footing is not less than 2-6

Tank Bottom
Continuous lap weld with minimum thickness of 5/16 inch
6/6/2005 A.10
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Bottom shall extend a minimum 1 inch beyond exterior of tank

Wall Design
Conformance with ANSI/AWWA D100

Roof Design
Structural-steel-supported, steel roof with inch in 12 inch slope
A knuckle with 2-foot radius

Inlet/Outlet Piping
Design to maximize water circulation inside the tank
Piping to penetrate bottom or lower wall plate
Tank Outlet Assembly

Access
Two (2) 30-inch minimum diameter hinged-type manway
A 42-inch roof hatch with stainless-steel hinges

Protective Coatings

Roof Vent
Located at the center of tank
Metal security cage

Drain
Overflow System (Weir, Piping, Site Drainage, Sized for Maximum Flow
Delivered)
Underdrain System
Sampling Station
Surveillance and Security
6/6/2005 A.11
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Level Transmitters
Collection Vault
Corrosion Control System

2. Prestressed Concrete Reservoirs
Prestressed concrete tank with cast-in-place corewall, vertically post-
tensioned tendons and circumferential prestressed strands. (DYK or equal)

Foundation and Tank Floor
Structural Floor or slabon-grade

Tank Roof
Precast/Cast-in-place roof (sloped or flat)
Roof Drains
Fall Protection Anchors

Inlet/Outlet Piping
Design to maximize water circulation inside the tank
Ductile Iron or mortar-lined and coated steel pipe

Tank Drain

Overflow System (Weir, Piping, Site Drainage, Sized for Maximum Flow
Delivered)

Access
Two (2) hinged, leakproof, spring-loaded, alarmed, steel, lockable
hatches

Roof Vent
6/6/2005 A.12
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Located at the center of tank
Metal Security Cage

Sampling Station
Security and Surveillance
Level Transmitter
Approved Ladders

3. Other Specific Project Requirements (Established based on Pre-Design Report)





6/6/2005 A.13
Henderson Utility Guidelines



6/6/2005 A.14
Henderson Utility Guidelines
DEPARTMENT OF UTILITY SERVICES
TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION
NEW DEVELOPMENT SECTION


CITY OF HENDERSON
240 WATER STREET
HENDERSON, NEVADA 89015


UTILITY SERVICES
Transmission Pipeline Review Checklist


Design Concept Phase

1. Design Concept Report shall address the following:
System Overview
Location of Pipeline
Design Flow Rate
Approximate Length
Preliminary Diameter
Preliminary Material Selection
Proposed ROW, Permit Needs, and Easements
Schedule

Pre-Design Phase

1. Pre-Design Report shall address the following:
Executive Summary
Table of Contents
Existing Conditions
Utility Conflict Information
Topographic Mapping Information Summary
Draft Geotechnical Investigation Report
6/6/2005 A.15
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Draft Environmental Investigation Report
Drainage and Traffic Study Reference
Preliminary Plans and Centerline Profiles
Alternative Alignments
Recommended Future Connections and Tee Locations
Pipe Material Selection (Final Size, Thickness, Pressure Class)
Design Standards (Pipe Design Pressure, Design Flow Velocity, etc.)
Identification of Appurtenances and Spacing Criteria
Identification of Permanent and Temporary ROW/Easement Constraints
Permit Matrix
List of Agencies and Utilities to Review and Sign the Drawings
Technical Specification Outline and List of Final Design Drawings
Preliminary Quantity and Associated Cost Estimates
Preliminary Construction Schedule
Project Correspondence (Meeting Minutes)
Existing Facility Inventory
Support Graphics, Detail Sketches, and Tables
List of Relevant Reports, Plans, and Other Project Information
Construction Work Plan (Phasing, Shutdowns, etc.)
Opinions and Recommendations for Bidding Packages, Scheduling, and
Contractor Staging

2. Geotechnical Investigation shall include the following:
Soil boring location plan
Geotechnical Data Report
Geotechnical Recommendations Report
Corrosion Report

6/6/2005 A.16
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Final Design Phase (60% and 100% Submittals)

1. Title Page and General sheet shall include the following:

Title
Vicinity Map
Project Number
Engineers name, address, phone number, and contact person
Developers/Applicants name, contact persons, address, phone number
Sheet Layout and List of Drawings
Notes
Valve, Piping Material, Equipment, and Testing Schedule

2. General Notes sheet shall include the following:

Water pipe class
Pipe Thickness


3. Plan and Profile sheets shall include the following:

Scales
North Arrow with horizontal ( ) and vertical ( ) survey reference
Engineers name, address, phone number, and contact person
Developers/Applicants name, contact persons, address, phone number
Street names (identifying Private where applicable) and lot and parcel
numbers.
Property owner(s) names and addresses adjacent to the pipeline alignment
PE Stamp and Signature
Existing Facilities shall address the following:
1. Paving (Type)
2. Water (COH KIVA #, type of pipe material, size)
3. Sewer (COH KIVA #, pipe material, size)
6/6/2005 A.17
Henderson Utility Guidelines
4. Gas (pipe material, size)
5. Other Utilities (pipe material, size)
6. Show profiles of existing water to be abandoned
7. Wells, pumping or booster stations, and water storage facilities


Alignment
1. Minimum of ten (10) feet from existing or proposed sewer (outside
to outside)
2. Minimum of five (5) feet from existing or proposed storm drains,
inlets, poles, gas mains, conduits, etc.
3. Minimize specifying bends
4. Maximize joint deflection
5. Identify and locate by station all horizontal and points
6. Identify and locate by station all valves and appurtenances
7. Identify and locate all corrosion control
8. Rights of Ways, Construction Strips, and Easements

Profiles
1. Design main with a minimum four feet of cover below proposed
grade for new street
2. Minimum (3) feet vertical clearance of existing utilities
3. Pipe class and/or pipe wall thickness consistent with depth (submit
calculation)
4. Water profile proper depth
5. Stations in correct sequence
6. Compares with plan length
7. Indicate restrained pipe on profile
8. Identify and locate by station all vertical angle points
9. Identify and locate by station all valves and appurtenances
6/6/2005 A.18
Henderson Utility Guidelines

Valves
1. Shown on plan and profile
2. Details checked

Special Structures
1. Shown on plan and profile
2. Details checked
3. Calculations submitted

Pipe Protection
1. Ungrouted riprap
2. Encasement (existing and proposed)
3. Corrosion control measures
4. Test stations

Notes
1. Connect existing water pipelines
2. Abandoning existing water pipelines

Rights of Ways, Permanent Easements, and Temporary Construction
Easement

4. Detail Sheets shall address the following:
Trench Section
Valves, Appurtenances, and Access Structures
1. Material Lists
Valve Vaults
1. Plan and Sections
Pipeline Markers
6/6/2005 A.19
Henderson Utility Guidelines
J oints

5. Cathodic Protection (if needed)
Schematic Diagrams and General Notes
Miscellaneous Details
Plan and Sections

Pipeline Design Elements

1. General
Trench Width Determination

2. Steel Pipeline
External Load Calculations (Dead Loads, Live Loads, and Vacuum Pressure)
Internal Pressure Calculations (Working Pressure, Surge Pressure, and Field
Test Pressure)
Design Procedures
Wall Thickness Calculations
Thrust Force Calculations
Combined Stress Calculations
Determination of Weld

3. Ductile Iron Pipeline
Design for External Loads
Design for Internal Pressure
Applicable Casting Allowance
Protective Coatings and Linings

3. Appurtenances and Structures
Mainline Valve Spacing
6/6/2005 A.20
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Outlets
Air Valve Sizing Calculations
Drain Valve Sizing Calculations

4. Thrust Restraint
Thrust Force Calculations
Restrained J oints

5. Corrosion Control
Evaluation

6. Other Specific Project Requirements (Established based on Pre-Design Report)







6/6/2005 A.21
Henderson Utility Guidelines
Appendix B Water Demands

6/6/2005
B.1
[Sample]
WATER CALCULATION GUIDELINES

Subject to verification and approval by Utility Services Division

Quantity Type of Development Calculation Factor Total EDUs
1 Single Family (net acreage acre per lot) 1.5 per lot 1.5
Single Family (net acreage < acre per lot) 1.0 per lot
Multi-Family (Density RM16) 0.81 per unit
Multi-Family (Density RM18) 0.52 per unit
Commercial ( <500,000 s.f.) 0.29 per 1,000 s.f.
Commercial ( >500,000 s.f.) 0.13 per 1,000 s.f.
Turf/Landscape 8.14 per acre
Hotel/Motel 0.30 per room
Industrial (case by case) Attach Calculations
TOTALS 1.5

1 Equivalent Development Unit (EDU) equals 0.86 acre feet per year (AFY). Calculation
factor is based on density, not zoning.

Landscape Calculation:

Common Element # Square Footage
(43,560 s.f. =1 acre)
Acreage EDUs
(8.14 per acre)


N/A

TOTALS:


1. Square Footage:

s.f.
2.
Number of Acres =

560 , 43
age SquareFoot


acres
3. Number of EDUs =[Acres x 8.14]

EDUs