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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009


CLASSES I to II – ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
CLASSES III to X – SCIENCE

A. National Curricular Framework 2005 – Primary Stage (Classes I to V)

™ Primary science education has to be a phase of joyful learning for the child… The main
objectives at this stage are to arouse curiosity about the world (natural environment, artifacts
and people) and have the child engage in exploratory and hands-on activities that lead to the
development of basic cognitive and psychomotor skills language, observation, recording,
differentiation, classification, inference, drawing, illustrations, design and fabrication,
estimation and measurement.
™ This is the stage, ---- to emphasize language development through and for science learning.
™ The criteria for identifying the content at the primary stage are relevance, meaningfulness
and interest to the child. The content should provide opportunities to deal with the real and
concrete world of the children, rather than a formal abstract world.
™ The pedagogy should essentially be based on activities in and out of classroom, as well as
other methods such as stories, poems, plays and other kinds of group activities.
™ Concern for environment and inculcation of related values can be promoted through
activities (planting of seeds, protecting trees, not wasting water, etc.) and practices relating to
health, hygiene and social interactions are best taught by example rather than through
recitations from a text book. The atmosphere in the classroom should not stress the child to
perform, but allow learning to take place at individual pace and permit free interaction
among children and the teacher.
™ The assessment should aim at gaining greater insight into various aspects of the child’s
learning: language comprehension, reading ability, articulation, ability to work with hands
and in groups, skills of observation, classification, drawing, and the other skills which
constitute learning at this stage.
™ Every primary school must have an activity room or an area where a class can assemble for
individual or small-group activities.
™ Children should be encouraged to draw and write by converting three sides of the classroom
into a blackboard at eye-level.
™ While deciding content across grades we should steer away from the pipeline approach
whereby some concepts get introduced too early for any meaningful understanding, on the
grounds that they are required at a later stage. It must be realized that a difficult concept is
not simplified merely by presenting it briefly, without rigour. Rather, the pre-requisites in
terms of ideas, experiences and activities should be provided at the appropriate levels.
™ We should avoid steep learning gradients, as currently existing between the secondary and
higher secondary stages.

B. How Children Learn

9 “Young children are actively engaged in making sense of their worlds. Young
children exhibit a strong desire to apply themselves in intentional learning situations.
They also learn in situations where there is no external pressure to improve and no
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

feedback or reward other than pure satisfaction—sometimes called achievement or


competence motivation. One of the challenges of schools is to build on children’s
motivation to explore, succeed, understand and harness it in the service of learning.”

9 “If one believes that learning differences are determined by gradual increases in
capacity or speed of processing, one would except relatively uniform increases in
learning across most domains but if one believes that strategies and knowledge are
important one would expect different levels of learning depending on the children’s
conceptual knowledge & their control over strategies that organize that knowledge for
learning. Although children learn readily in some domains they can learn practically
anything by sheer will & effort. When required to learn about non-privileged domains
they need to develop strategies of intentional learning. In learning children need to
understand what it means to learn, who are they as learners and how to go about
planning, monitoring, revising & reflecting upon their learning & that of others.
Children lack knowledge & experience but not reasoning ability. Although young
children are inexperienced they reason facilely with the knowledge they have.” A
curriculum must reflect this.

9 “Between 5-10 years of age children’s understanding of the need to use strategic
effort in order to learn becomes increasingly sophisticated and their ability to talk
about and reflect on learning continues to grow throughout the
school years. By recognizing this dawning understanding in children one can begin to
design learning activities in the early school years that build on and strengthen
their understanding of what it means to learn and remember. The fact that
children use diverse strategies is not a mere idiosyncrasy of human cognition. Good
reasons exist for people to know and use multiple strategies. Strategies differ in their
accuracy, in the amount of time their execution requires, in their processing demands
and in the range of problems to which they apply. Strategic choices involve trade offs
among these properties. The broader the range of strategies that children know,
and can apply, the more precisely they can shape their approaches to the
demands of particular circumstances.”
C. Guiding Principles:

A. Joyful & non threatening – build a feeling of I Can


B. Content ---contextually relevant, age appropriate
By age appropriate is meant:
who is the child in that age group?
how does the child learn?
what facets of his/her learning are relevant to enhance
By contextual relevance--- things seen heard, felt, touched, tasted by the child
– in the “sensorium” of the child—directly relevant to the immediate world.
C. Evocative
D. Sensitive to gender, class, life in a pluralistic society, nature (environment)
E. Encourage Exploration
F. Experiential

Based on the above,

• We look at four outcomes—Content, Skill, Experiential & Value


• We create space for Questions & Observations
• We include generic skills--- language, thinking, reflecting
• Evaluation
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

D. Outcomes

Outcome Description Methodology Statement

Content • Classes 1, 2 Content cannot be • Text book


read independently by student. • Cards
• Reading aloud--listening,
Looking at Pictures, Discussions,
Doing activities together are the
main modalities NOW I KNOW
• In classes 3, 4 children are
independent readers. Stories,
poems, Narratives,
Descriptions are the main
modalities of content exploration

Functional 9 A skill list is provided. 9 Skills translate


9 In the younger classes functional into NOW I CAN
outcomes can also reflect methodologies in
applications ---things the child the following
can do ways—
• Read (picture
reading for classes
1, 2)
• Write (answers,
record)
• Discuss
• Narrate/ Show &
Tell
• Ask & Find out
• Think (cognitive
skill)
• Draw

Experiential ¾ Exploration using the 5 senses ¾ Observe


¾ Kinesthetic ¾ Find Out NOW I CAN
¾ Work with hands ¾ Do/ Make
(experiments,
projects)

Value • Social—building sensitivity to • Evocative


caste, class, gender—living in a quality of the NOW I WILL
pluralistic society reading
• Being with peers material
• Environmental—an ethic of care • Discussions
with animals, plants, things we • Activities
use, wastes we generate
• Self —respecting feelings,
change, caring for one’s health,
being safe
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Questions & • Children’s questions & • Discussion


Observations observations

Generic Skills • How did you? Questions for • Discussions—


understanding how one to one with HOW DID I?
understanding happens, problem teacher / peer,
solving, planning, finding errors small groups,
large group.

E. Methodology

Every activity has to be meaningful in the here & now while building for a future learning.

• Observation based
• Exploratory
• Multi sensorial
• Integrated (with all the other learning in math & language)
• Skill based (skills & content go together)

The methodology should scaffold for all the above listed outcomes
It should allow room for children’s questions, observations.

F. Evaluation Guidelines

1. Purpose of evaluation should be to help the teacher & child recognize where the conceptual/
other errors lie and how they can be strengthened.
2. Will follow the blend of experiences, skills & content that the chapter exposes the child to.
3. Will be a blend of formative & summative.
4. Will include multiple modes. ( oral. drawing, written work etc)
5. Will cover the main content areas as outlined in the outcomes.
6. A normative assessment can happen for every term.
7. Should have a blend of simple---challenging.
8. Should also include qualitative comments on the child’s involvement.
9. Can include evaluation by self, peer and teacher
10. Assessment could also comment on child’s patience, persistence, enthusiasm, ability to work
methodically,

G. List of Skills

Some relevant skills are listed below.


(This is not a comprehensive listing nor does it reflect children’s capabilities entirely)

Skill Skill Subsets

Drawing Draw from your imagination

Draw following the dotted lines

Draw following instructions


DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Learning to represent

Draw within a grid

Continue the pattern

Color

Observe & Imitate/ Tabulate/ Draw/ Record/ Match/ Pair/ Find


Observation similarities/ Read a Picture Story in the card, text.
Observe around you Observe & Find connections/ Describe/ Narrate/Group/ Name/Find the
Observe in the pictures missing objects/Classify/Differentiate
given Observe & Color/ Count/ Sequence
Identify from a description

Make observing the pictures

Make observing the sequence in the pictures


Art
Make from your imagination

Make with a theme given

Jigsaws--- Put the pieces together to make a picture

Find your way through the maze

Pre-mapping in the classroom

Spatial Skills Spotting shapes in the environment

Spot differences between

Find the similar one

Mapping the neighborhood

Cognitive Skill

Questioning Articulating a Q clearly

Sequencing a set of questions


DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Sustaining a question

Ability to frame a set of Q

Spotting key words

Spotting unknown words


Reading
Comprehension
Comprehension

Explaining a concept to another

Following Instructions Following a set of instructions

Written Work Answering a question -a small paragraph

Describing phenomenon, situation (oral+ written)

Explaining observed phenomenon, situation (oral+ written)

Investigative expression
Written/Spoken skills
Authentic noting down of data

Small summaries

Reporting observations & results systematically

Observing similarities, differences patterns , trends

Comparison Comparing outer features—abstract qualities

Spotting similarities in differences

Categorization Sorting , Pairing Grouping


DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Defining a basis for categorization

Grouping on the basis of the category

Shifting & regrouping on a fresh basis

Representing classes, subclasses

Tabulation

Selecting of appropriate measuring instrument


Measurement
Using appropriate units of measurement

Estimation Quantities, distances

Counting Fostering math skills through science

Sequencing—earlier from later, distant from near

Sequencing steps in a planned activity


Sequencing
Can make or follow a flow diagram

Making a timeline

Making links between seen & unseen

Association Drawing an inference between conclusion & prior data

Ability to go from previous knowledge to present learning

Problem Solving Can begin to problem solve

Ability to Memorize Songs, stories, rhymes, facts

Making Models Make simple models following instructions


DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

H. Contest Areas at a Glance

My Natural Biological
Plants Animal Birds Insects
Environment

My Natural Physical
Day & Night, Air and Water
Environment

My Self My Body, Keeping Healthy

Man, Matter Materials-- Natural resources 3 states of matter,


-use of the environment Properties of materials & their use
to meet needs matterÆmaterial-Æ wastes—(generation, management)

How I help
Work Push & pull
Tools & energy to help us work

Science & questions


Science in Every day Local innovations
life Kitchen science
Biography of a scientist

Travelogue Transport Travel to different environments


DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

I. Syllabus for Classes 1-5

Sl. Environmental Science Science


Topic
No.
Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5

1. Plants 1.1 The tree as a World of plants World of plants 1.1 Edible parts 1.1 Web of Life
home to many 1.1 Parts of a plant 1.1 Parts of a 1.2 Life cycle (seed to 1.2 Pollination,
birds, animals 1.2 Different kinds of plant seed) 1.3 Dispersal of
1.2 insects Trees, Shrubs, 1.2 Leaves 1.3 Germination seeds
1.3 Plants and Herbs, Grasses, 1.3 Flowers 1.4 Plants in our 1.4 Plants as
flowers Climbers and 1.4 Different society (sacred primary
around the creepers around kinds of trees, grasses, producers
child the child. fruits and flowers and 1.5 Uses of Plants-
seeds festivals, Medicine,
Vanamahotsav) food, aromatic
plants, timber
yielding plants
etc

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

2. Animals & 2.1 Animals 2.1 Birds Around the 2.1 Animals in 2.1 Special Senses of 2.1 Diminishing
Birds around the child ---Spotting different Animals spaces for
child & describing environments 2.1 Care of their animals
dogs, cats, birds -land, air, on young 2.2 Sanctuaries
cows 2.2 Nests of birds trees 2.3 Animal 2.3 Prevention of
2.2 Dog as man’s 2.3 Care of the 2.1 Morphology Communities cruelty to
friend young ones External animals
2.4 Food features
2.2 Food &
mouth parts
in relation to
the food
eaten
2.3 Herbivore,
carnivore,
and omnivore
2.4 Movement
2.5 Camouflage

3. Small 3.1 Names of the 3.1 Life of Ants 3.1 Life cycle of a
Creatures Small Creatures butterfly
Around the around the 3.2 Bee keeping
children children
3.2 Habitat water,
soil, garden, in
the home
3.3 Morphology
3.4 Food
3.5 Movement

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

4. Day and 4.1 Rhythms of 4.1 Night sky 4.1 Phases of 4.1 Sun and Shadows 4.1 Space
Night the day and observation Moon 4.2 Directions 4.2 People in
night life 4.2 About the space
around the moon
child 4.3 Full moon,
4.2 Day and Night New Moon
sky 4.4 Day and
4.3 Animals and night
people who formation
have different
rhythms
4.4 Welcoming
the day
4.5 Ending the
day peacefully

5. Water Rain 5.1 Life in and 5.1 Use of water 5.1 Too much and too 5.1 Understanding
5.1 A rainy day around water -- 5.2 Potable little rain some
5.2 Rainbow freshwater, sea water Droughts, floods properties of
etc 5.3 Prevention of 5.2 Conserving Water water
water borne 5.3 Tapping water --
diseases traditional water
5.3 Pollution and harvesting
its Prevention structures
5.4 Water scarcity
difficulties people
experience in
procuring water
6. Air 6.1 Kinds of 6.1 Air is a mixture of 6.1 Understanding
breeze and gases some
winds 6.2 Constituents of air properties of air

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

7. Food 7.1 The Milkman 7.1 Names of the 7.1 Ingredients 7.1 Raw and cooked 7.1 Preservation
7.2 The cereals, pulses, of food eaten food and spoilage
vegetable greens, millets 7.2 Sources of 7.2 Food in illness of food
market 7.2 Dairy products food 7.3 Utensils used in 7.2 Kitchen
7.3 The provision and their 7.3 Having a cooking Science
store preparation nutritious 7.4 Cooking Practices
7.3 Meat of animals, meal -- 7.5 Food hygiene
egg food groups,
7.4 Spices nutrients
7.5 Food eaten by 7.4 Food eaten in
people of different
different ages places
8 My Body 8.1 Five sense 8.1 Simple body 8.1 Skin, 8.1 Over view of the 8.1 Brain,
organs movements muscles, internal organs of 8.2 Sense organs
8.2 Exploration of running, bones, the human body
sounds skipping, playing. joints, teeth, 8.2 Digestion of food
8.3 Animal and 8.2 Parts of the body hair
Birds sounds 8.3 Right & left

9 Keeping 9.1 Daily routines 9.1 Keeping the 9.1 Good health eating 9.1 Personal safety 9.1 Spread and
Healthy for surroundings right, breathing (At home prevention of
and Clean cleanliness clean right, keeping fit, On the road a disease
9.2 Protection of classroom, keeping cheerful In school ) (example --
the sense public places 9.2 Eye Exercises for common cold )
organs 9.2 Importance of a better vision
yearly medical
check up
10 Man, 10.1 Things to 10.1 Natural 10.1 Three 10.1 Transformation 10.1 Properties of
Matter and touch and resources- states of of natural materials
Materials feel wood, stone, matter resources into 10.2 Different
10.2 Sand and sand, clay, materials for use kinds of
Mud metals, water (one example houses
10.3 A day in the 10.2 Indian toys from industry & --variation
beach using natural one from with climate
materials (link agriculture)
to people who 10.2 Generation of

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

make them) waste


10.3 Kinds of wastes
and sources
10.4 Recycling
11 Work 11.1 Helping at 11.1 Push and pull to 11.1 Tools to 11.1 Energy and work 11.1 Renewable
home work work (Relationship sources of energy
(Different between energy, 11.2 Non
kinds of tools force and renewable
and their design movement) sources of
for use ) Tools energy
used by the Uses and
various applications
professionals of energy
11.3 Conserving
energy
12 Science in 12.1 Need based 12.1 Kitchen
Everyday science local science
Life
innovations 12.2 Biography of
12.2 Questions and a scientist
Science
13 Travelogue 13.1 A Bus Journey 13.1 Along a river 13.1 To a Forest 13.1 To a farm 13.1 To a Botanical
13.2 Different modes (Animals, (Animals, (animals, plants, Sanctuary
of transport plants, people, plants, people, growing (Edible plants
activities and produce a crop) Medicinal
preservation) from plants Aromatic
forests) plants
13.2 Deforestation Seeds)
and its 13.2 Kinds of
consequences, Flowers
conservation (Fragrances,
Dyes
Flower Motifs)

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

J. A Sample Lesson Plan - Detailed Listing of Outcomes for Class I

Sl. Experiential/
Topic Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Evaluation Suggested Methodologies
No. Value Outcomes

1 Plants The tree as a home Observing plants Appreciating the Name trees, birds, Games I play under the trees
to many birds, around them trees as a home to animals, insects, Story of the girl who could hear the trees
animals insects. Naming many animals, flowers Plants around me that I know to name, see
Plants and flowers Describing birds, insects Describe them Words I use to describe the plant Leaf &
around the child Recalling Bark etchings
happiness in Flowers I like
playing under the Colors of flowers
trees.

2. Animals Animals around the Observing animals People and Name animals around Exercises ----
child---dogs , cats, around them children can them I care for my dog by--
cows Naming animals understand the Describe their features My dog looks like---
Dog as man’s friend Describing their language of & behaviour (appearance)
--- features & behaviour animals My dog likes to----( behaviour, food)
Dogs help blind Mimicking We treat animals Other animals I know or have heard of
people Learning to draw with kindness and Caring story
& policemen animals in simple steps care Mimicry
Thumbprint animals Learning to draw animals in simple steps
Thumbprint animals

3. Small
Creatures NA NA NA NA NA
Around Us

4. Day & Night 4.1 Rhythms of Awareness of the Awareness of the Draw the day & night Poem to welcome the day
the day and rhythms of the day & rhythmic nature of sky My actions in the different times of day---
night life night—mine & life the day Describe a morning -sequence
around the around me ---people, events scene in home What happens around me at different
child Observation of day & Importance of Recite the poem to times of day---vegetable vendor, milk

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Sl. Experiential/
Topic Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Evaluation Suggested Methodologies
No. Value Outcomes

4.2 Day and night sky sleeping early & welcome the day man— TV, Sounds at different times--
Night sky having enough discussion
4.3 Animals and sleep---ending the What my mother & father do—naming,,
people who day on a peaceful listing
have note Animals & people awake at night ---
different A sense of picture stories
rhythms welcome for the
4.4 Welcoming rising sun & the
the day day
4.5 Ending the
day
peacefully

5 Water Rain Observation of my Enjoyment and Draw a rainy day What I like to do when it rains
A rainy day surroundings, experience of rain Color the rainbow Sounds in the rain
Rainbow Plants, clouds etc on a Describe my What happens in my home during & after
rainy day surroundings on a rainy the rain
Observing the rainbow day My neighborhood when it rains
How plants change with the rain
Clouds--- on a sunny & rainy day—
different shapes
The Rainbow---colors of the sky at
different times

6 Air NA NA NA NA NA

7 Food The Milkman Observation of a The animals & Name some shops in Exercises based on:
The vegetable market place, Aavin plants around us the market place Where does my milk come from?
market booth give us all we need Draw and name some At the vegetable market---shops, vendors,
The provision Describing them to eat fruits & vegetables arrangement of goods
store Interaction with the Experiencing the Narrate an incident you Buying Provisions
milkman and grocer excitement of a witnessed in the market Making idli in my home
Understanding the market place place Different tastes
different tastes Name some provisions Story—one day in the life of a vendor

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Sl. Experiential/
Topic Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Evaluation Suggested Methodologies
No. Value Outcomes

Observing idli that your family bought.


preparation in my
home
Naming some
vegetables and fruits
Drawing

8 My Body Five sense organs Listening to sounds Awareness of Identifying sounds Exercises for :
Exploration of Identification of different sounds Naming the functions 1. My 5 sense organs and their
sounds sounds—human, around them of the sense organs functions
Animal and Birds animal, other Differentiating various 2. Sounds
sounds Rhythms and sounds tones and naming loud Can you recognize somebody by their
Finding words for and unpleasant sounds voice?
sounds Where is the sound coming from?---
Mimicking sounds identifying direction
Identifying unpleasant Sounds & feelings---volume of sound
sounds Unpleasant sounds
Speech & feelings –how I change the
sounds
Sounds & places---in my home, school,
classroom, public places
Objects I recognize by their sounds—eg,
sound of a spoon falling, Sound (s) of
water
Rhythms & Sound
Animal & Bird sounds that you have
heard
Sounds I like

9 Keeping Clean Daily routines for Learning and Keeping track of Name the objects that I How I keep clean
cleanliness following routines of one’s daily use to keep clean Demonstrating and practicing the teeth
Protection of the cleanliness routines of Demonstrate the and hand wash routines.
sense organs Learning how to cleanliness brushing and hand wash Naming objects used to keep clean
protect the sense routines Song

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Sl. Experiential/
Topic Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Evaluation Suggested Methodologies
No. Value Outcomes

organs---do’s and Identify do’s and don’ts Do’s and Don’ts—exercises for
don’ts to protect sense organs
Hand wash procedure
Care of the teeth

10 Man Matter Things to touch and Making things with Awareness of Make an object with 1. Things I touch & feel
and Materials feel clay textures clay 2. Sand & Mud
Sand and Mud Understanding textures Sand play Name textures and pair What can I make with
A day in the beach of objects around them Handling clay— with objects. sand?
making things 3. A day in the beach
with it 4. What can I make with wet mud?
5. Textures of objects around me—soft,
hard, rough, smooth— texture board,
feeling objects around me
6. Textures I like
7. Song
8. Story of a day in the beach

11 Work Helping at home Doing small tasks at Understanding Describe how you help Song on tasks
home how everybody at home Story
contributes to Picture story Role of different members
work at home interpretation Different types of work done by them
People working by day and night
Exercises based on a Picture story of a
working family.

12 Science in
NA NA NA NA NA
Everyday Life

13 Travelogue A Bus Journey Recognizing the Awareness of a Name a few vehicles Exercises for –
Different modes of sounds of different journey—the Describe a journey you 1. A Bus Journey-- (the number if
transport. vehicles and naming different sights, have undertaken/ sights the bus?, destination, starting
them. sounds etc. and sounds of the bus- point, people in the bus)
Understanding the stand 2. A journey undertaken by you

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Sl. Experiential/
Topic Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Evaluation Suggested Methodologies
No. Value Outcomes

purpose of travel and Sequence the process of Story of a journey


the processes involved a bus journey 3. Sounds the vehicles make
in a bus journey 4. Description of a bus stand--the
sights & sounds
5. Queuing to get into the bus
6. Different modes of transport —
Discussion & role play can also
be used

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

CLASSES VI to X
SCIENCE
Vision
– Equity without compromise
– Active learning as envisioned in the NCF 2005
– Universal [Inclusive] Design built into syllabus and Classroom Transaction
– Sensitivity to concerns
– Social
ƒ Gender
ƒ Minorities
ƒ Disadvantaged
– Child Rights
ƒ Safety – physical, psychological
ƒ Classroom engagement
ƒ Learning opportunities
ƒ Equitable processes with peers
ƒ Safe Access to teacher
To create a basis of holistic learning that can address children with a wide range of learning abilities and
motivations.
To create a syllabus definition that will allow for excitement, exploration, and creative understanding for
every learner through active engagement.
To create a syllabus that will address the need of learners with multiple intelligences.

National Curriculum Framework 2005


• Holistic approach in the treatment of learners' development and learning.
• Creating an inclusive environment in the classroom for all students.
• Learner engagement for construction of knowledge and fostering of creativity.
• Active learning through the experiential mode.
• Adequate room for voicing children's thoughts, curiosity, and questions in curricular practices.
• Connecting knowledge across disciplinary boundaries to provide a broader frame work for
insightful construction of knowledge.
• Forms of learner engagement — observing, exploring, discovering, analysing, critical reflection,
etc. — are as important as the content of knowledge itself.
• Activities for developing critical perspectives on socio-cultural realities need to find space in
curricular practices.
• Local knowledge and children's experiences are essential components of text books and pedagogic
practices.
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

• The school years are a period of rapid development, with changes and shifts in children's
capabilities, attitudes and interests that have implications for choosing and organising the content
and process of knowledge.

Who is the learner? How Children Learn?

Some relevant extracts from a meta study titled “How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience &
School” (John Bramsford, Ann Brown & Rodney Cocking)

¾ Young children are actively engaged in making sense of their worlds. One of the challenges of
schools is to build on children’s motivation to explore, succeed, understand and harness it in the
service of learning.
¾ When required to learn about non-privileged domains they need to develop strategies of intentional
learning. In learning children need to understand what it means to learn, who are they as learners
and how to go about planning, monitoring, revising & reflecting upon their learning & that of
others. Children lack knowledge & experience but not reasoning ability.
Early knowledge may impede later learning. For example, children who treat rational numbers as
they had treated whole numbers will experience trouble ahead. Awareness of these roadblocks to
learning could help teachers anticipate the difficulty.
¾ The importance of prior knowledge in determining performance is crucial to adults as well as
children. It includes knowledge about learning, about their own learning strengths and weaknesses
and the demands of the learning task at hand. Meta cognition also includes self regulation- the
ability to orchestrate ones learning to plan, monitor success, and correct errors when appropriate
¾ Between 5-10 years of age children’s understanding of the need to use strategic effort in order to
learn becomes increasingly sophisticated and their ability to talk about and reflect on learning
continues to grow throughout the school years.
¾ By recognizing this one can begin to design learning activities in the early school years that build
on and strengthen their understanding of what it means to learn and remember.
¾ The broader the range of strategies that children know, and can apply, the more precisely they can
shape their approaches to the demands of particular circumstances.
¾ Three key findings have emerged from studies.
1. Discoveries are often made not in response to impasses or failures but rather in the context of
successful performances
2. Short lived transition strategies often precede more enduring approaches.
3. Generalizations of new approaches often occur very slowly even when children can provide
compelling rationale for their usefulness.
¾ Children are said to have one of two classes of beliefs.. entity theories and incremental theories.
Children with entity theories believe that intelligence is a fixed property of individuals: children
with incremental theories believe that intelligence is malleable.
¾ Children are both problem solvers & problem generators: children attempt to solve problems
presented to them and they also seek novel challenges. They refine and improve their problem
solving strategies not only in the face of failure but also by building on prior success. They persist
because success and understanding are motivation in their own right.
¾ Structure is critical for learning and for moving toward understanding information. Development
and learning are not two parallel processes.
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

¾ Children come from culturally different backgrounds and that is important to keep in mind in a
pluralistic society like India.
¾ There are multiple intelligences & multiple learning styles. Multiple modalities of classroom
transaction are therefore useful.

The Basis of the Core Ideas

Some thoughts that form the basis of the reconceptualised syllabus frame work are as follows:

¾ Reducing stress and enhancing success in examinations necessitate a shift away from content-
based learning and testing to child-centered process and skills based learning and testing. Syllabus
must therefore reflect content, skills as well as process.
¾ Content: is both information and a context of learning – so content is an opportunity to learn and
use skills.
¾ Certain Skills are generic in nature (Generic skills) and cut across subjects and disciplines. They
are fundamental, applicable in many contexts and direct the use of other more specific skills. Three
such skills that form the core of the reconceptualisation are: Language skills, Metacognition and
Reflection.
o Language skills: speech and listening, reading and writing are fundamental to learning and
cut across school subjects and disciplines. Their foundational role in construction of
knowledge right from elementary classes through senior secondary classes needs to be
recognised.
o Metacognition: Learning to learn and learning strategies to learn are as important as
mastering the content itself.
o Reflection: Reflecting on the learning process, seeking feedback form the back bone of the
learning process.
¾ Specific skills – narrower, specific to particular tasks, to subject or context, eg data recording,
titration, dissection, form an essential part of science learning.
¾ Building a wholesome and healthy scientific temper needs to be at the heart of the learning.
¾ Content, process and the language of science teaching must be commensurate with the learner's
age-range and cognitive reach. Science teaching should engage the learners in acquiring methods
and processes that will nurture their curiosity and creativity, particularly in relation to the
environment. Science teaching should be placed in the wider context of children’s environment to
equip them with the requisite knowledge and skills to enter the world of work.
¾ The ability to think logically, formulate and handle abstractions rather than 'knowledge' of
mathematics (formal and mechanical procedures) is the main goal of teaching the mathematical
component of science. The teaching of this component therefore should enhance children's ability
to think and reason, to visualize and handle abstractions, to formulate and solve problems.
¾ Interdisciplinary approaches: promoting key national concerns such as gender, justice, human
rights, and sensitivity to marginalised groups and minorities.
¾ Specific activities: ensuring participation of all children — able and disabled — are essential
conditions for learning by all.

Statement on active learning

Active learning implies that children are actively engaged in the construction of knowledge rather than
remain as passive recipients of information. In active leaning students engage with the content , learn to
organise it, actively explore connections, make associations with prior knowledge, apply, problem solve
and think about what they have learnt and how. Discussions, presentations, room for questioning are
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

integral parts of the process. The teacher is a facilitator rather than the central figure in such learning
processes. She/he is not the only learning resource. Children learn individually, from each other & in large
groups Active learning focuses on processes. Children learn to learn while learning.

SUGGESTIONS FOR THE NEW SYLLABUS

What are the intentions - Learning outcomes in various domains?

¾ The learning context: In daily living, problem solving and learning children use generic skills
(refer above) to understand, choose the most appropriate strategy to meet task on hand and choose
the appropriate specific skill to achieve the task. Therefore providing a learning context implies

1. Meaningful choice of content,


2. Cheerful presentation – to kindle interest,
3. Providing scaffolding for understanding content,
4. Scaffolding for organising content (mind mapping, support for reading),
5. Scaffolding for skill building – both generic and specific.
6. A meaningful task that will reflect the content and skills.
7. An evaluative process that reflects understanding and skill, in an application task.

¾ Therefore a syllabus definition should not only define content but also reflect the above process. It
is therefore proposed that the outcomes be defined in three different forms – content competency
outcomes, Functional competency outcomes and Application competency outcomes.

¾ Content competency outcomes: define the essential level of knowledge and understanding of the
content that is expected. For example “Student should be able to recall three properties of ….”
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

¾ Functional competency outcomes: defines the out comes in terms of the specific skills that the
student needs to learn and show evidence of having learnt. For example “Student should be able to
make observations, take measurements, tabulate and record them and finally create a graph of ….”.
¾ Application competency outcomes: defines outcomes in terms of simple age appropriate functional
tasks that a student should be able to undertake. For example “Student should be able to plan a
survey, take permission from appropriate authority, talk to the right people and gather data on ….”.

Advantages of the above Definition

1. It promotes active learning --- a focus on process


2. It brings meaning to the here & now by its definition of application outcomes
3. The definition of functional & application outcomes allow for multiple learning skills and multiple
intelligences.

What considerations do we want to keep in mind?

¾ A Choice to be exercised:

A quick sweep of all topics in classes 6 to 8


OR
A few topics well done

¾ This proposal suggests that students sweep through all topics in classes 6 to 8 particularly in the
physical sciences and build on it in classes 9 and 10.
¾ Advantages of the quick sweep:
o Possible to build interconnections.
o Strong foundation of essentials.
o Comfortable level of details for all students.
o Allows time for building critical thinking skills.
o Space for addressing multiple intelligences and multiple learning strategies.
o An opportunity to use the corner of the eye and pick up several things.
¾ Disadvantages of the quick sweep:
o Not building adequate depth.
o Can kand up in information over load and the consequent meaninglessness if not
adequately egulatd.
o Can become rushed for time if not regulated.
¾ Suggested measures to overcome disadvantages:
o Articulate syllabus clearly in terms of width andscope.
o Intentional and thorough build up of interconnections to facilitate good knowledge
construction.

¾ Building interconnections would help construct knowledge better. A conscious choice is being
made to do this instead of building depth without interconnections. This syllabus plans for about
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

28 working weeks allowing sufficient time buffer. The buffer time could be used in several ways
such as
o Revision exercises whenever necessary
o Extend individual learning for differently enabled learners.

¾ A total of 28 units have been planned at the rate of one unit a week. A unit of the text book should
not contain more than about 2 to 2.5 pages of written matter for class 6. This would increase as the
students grow older. This would give adequate time for introduction/motivation, study of the text,
consolidation; activity/evaluation to take place. (This means that the entire text book should not
have more than 60 to 70 pages of reading matter. Content therefore needs to be organized
especially well. If colourful pictures or illustrations are added in every page, activities added, the
size of the book should not grow beyond about 100 to 110 pages.)

¾ Science learning to be

o Through active engagement


o Experiential in nature as far as possible.
o Must be hands on as far as possible. Where elaborate lab facilities are available they can
be used, if not a simple science kit in a box could be considered.
o Must relate to the world around – the child’s world.
o Move from the concrete to the abstract in stages. Eg fluid flow before current
o Build close interrelationships between the sciences and the social sciences as well.
o Learning skills of learning while learning
o Reflection on the process of learning
o Focus on actively working on data rather than rote learning of facts
o Contextually relevant, graded, interesting, meaningful content
o Building a participation in the contemporary debates of our times
o Fostering an ethic of care & an appreciation of the different life forms & their
interdependence
o Building an appreciation for the scientific process
o Thorough understanding of the building blocks of biology
o To give children a taste of good understanding — a few things done well
o Above all, Joyful Leaning

Features of the Suggested Syllabus

¾ The syllabus is organized into basic themes. The themes are reflected in all the levels from 6---10.
¾ Content is sequenced in a way that has a logical continuity.
¾ To allow for developing individual interest as well as to widen horizons a section on “technology”
has been included. To build awareness of the current state of issues in the world a section on
“debates of our times” has been included. The level of detailing is particularly important in
Biology so as to not loose the wood for the trees.
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

¾ Excessive detailing is the surest way to the loose the child’s interest.
¾ The themes have been chosen for :
¾ Useful application to the daily life of the child & for Contemporary relevance
¾ Building a sound basis in the building blocks of the life sciences
¾ Fostering an ethic of care with the environment

The Layout of the suggested syllabus: Physical Sciences

¾ Table 1: Sweep of the content spread across classes 6 to 10.


¾ Table 2 : Details of content for class 6
¾ Table 3 : Mater list of specific skills for classes 6 to 10.
¾ Table 4 : Specific skills matrix for class 6.
¾ Table 5: Sample Outcomes table for a few sample chapters in class 6
¾ Table 6: Detailed worked out teaching learning matrix for ONE sample topic in class 6
¾ Table 7: Sample questions list for kindling and developing generic skills.

The Layout of the suggested syllabus: Biological Sciences


This follows the document on the physical sciences.
Basic Themes

• Sweep of the content spread across classes 6 to 10


• Syllabus –Class 6 with time
• Outcomes table for Class 6
• Suggested Methodologies for 1 chapter in class 6.

The teacher’s role is to raise the right questions so that the student learns, over time, to raise the
questions for himself / herself

What am I sure about?


What are the three main central ideas of what I have learnt?
What is blocking my next step?
What do I need to solve the problem on hand – do I need more info, do I need a different approach, do I
need better skills?
What are some questions that I have?
What is the next step?
What are the things I have to bear in mind when I do it the next time?
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Level 6—10 Biology

Concept Note Specially relevant to Biology


The syllabus is organized into basic themes. The themes are reflected in all the levels from 6---10.

The level of detailing is particularly important in Biology so as to not loose the wood for the trees.

Excessive detailing is the surest way to the loose the child’s interest.

The themes have been chosen for:

Useful application to the daily life of the child & for Contemporary relevance
Building a sound basis in the building blocks of the life sciences
Fostering a n ethic of care with the environment

The movement in the themes is as far as possible from the whole to the part

Basic themes

Theme Comment

Focus is on the design of the human body---linking structure &


The Human Body function so the child ahs an appreciation of the beauty of the human
form

Maintaining Health A completely practical unit relevant for daily life

Divided into two modules for each year. Deals with basic ecology
Our Environment
and a component on sustainable use of resources.

A largely pictorial overview of the classification system & of life on


Classification & Biodiversity earth. Specific examples have been chosen from each broad category
to give a taste to the student

Deals with the world of plants—their physiology & form. Hs been


The World of Plants & Soil
dovetailed to suit the other ecology units as well

Biology at Work---Applications & A debate & discussion unit on the contemporary issues of our times.
Contemporary Issues Also gives a few examples of biological applications.
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Mater list of specific skills for classes VI to X

Observation

Drawing and Labelling

Raising questions

Compare/contrast
Finding patterns and relationships
Classify

Infer

Predict

Devising & planning investigations

Define

Hypothesize

Measure/calculate

Collect/Organise data

Making a time line of events

Interpret data

Communicate Orally

In writing

Answer a question

Make a presentation

Designing & Making a model

Make or interpret a graph

Generalise

Reason/conclude

Notes:
1. For each level the appropriate skill may be selected from the list.
2. Each of the skills can be modified and applied as appropriate to age group.
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

CLASS VI to X

Sl. No. STANDARD VI STANDARD VII STANDARD VIII STANDARD IX STANDARD X

1. Applied 1: Plants in 1: Animals in 1: Crop 1: Improvement in 1: Heredity and


Biology Daily Life Daily Life Protection Food Resources Evolution
1.1 Commonly used 1.1 Economic uses of and
medicinal plants animals Management 1.1 Improvement in 1.1 Variations
1.2 Commonly used 1.2 Fibres (wool and crop yields 1.2 Heredity
medicinal plants silk) 1.1 Agricultural practices 1.2 Nutrient 1.3 Evolution
1.3 Fibre yielding 1.3 Apiculture 1.2 Basic practices of management 1.4 Speciation
plants 1.4 Sericulture crop protection 1.3 Uses of fertilizers 1.5 Human evolution
1.4 Ornamental 1.5 Poultry 1.3 Preparation of soil and manures 1.6 Evolution tree
plants 1.6 Animal products and sowing 1.4 Protection from 1.7 Genetic
1.5 Timber yielding (food, clothing 1.4 Types of irrigation pests and diseases engineering
plants etc.) 1.5 Protection from 1.5 Hybridization in 1.8 Bio technology and
1.6 Spices 1.7 Economic uses of weeds Plants and animals cloning
1.7 Economic uses of animals. 1.6 Harvesting. 1.6 Animal husbandry 1.9 Stem cell-Organ
plants 1.7 Storage 1.7 Poultry farming culture
1.8 Marketing 1.8 Pisciculture 1.10 Microbial
1.9 Rotation of crops 1.9 Apiculture production.
1.10 Biotechnology in 1.10 Aquaculture 1.11 Biosensor – Bio
Agriculture chips
1.11 Biotechnology in 1.12 Science today –
food processing Gene therapy

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

2. Health and 2: Types of Food 2: Nutrition in 2: Reaching the 2: Emotional 2: Immune


Hygiene and Plants and Age of Intelligence & System
Components of Animals Adolescence Addictions
Food
2.1 Mode of nutrition 2.1 Adolescence and 2.1 Understanding 2.1 Health and its
2.1 Food variety in plants puberty emotional significance
2.2 Food materials 2.2 Autotrophic and 2.2 Secondary sexual intelligence 2.2 Diseases and causes
and sources heterotrophic characters 2.2 Addictions & how 2.3 Diseases caused by
2.3 Plant and animal nutrition 2.3 Role of hormones in they happen microbes and
products used as 2.2.1 Photosynthesis Reproduction (personal, social, prevention
food 2.2.2 Other modes of 2.4 Reproductive phase of media ) 2.4 Modes of
2.4 Nutrition nutrition in life in human 2.3 Kinds of transmission
2.5 Types of nutrition plants 2.5 Sex determination addictions—alcohol, 2.5 Immunization
2.6 Food habits of 2.6 Ductless glands smoking, substance 2.6 Treatment and
animals 2.3 Nutrition in 2.7 Reproductive Health abuse) prevention
2.7 Components of animals 2.7.1 Nutritional 2.4 Prevention & 2.7 Biotechnology in
food 2.4 Digestion in needs treatment of Medicine
2.7.1 Nutrients amoeba 2.7.2 Personal addictions
(carbohydrates, 2.5 Human digestive hygiene 2.5 Emotional
proteins, system 2.7.3 Prevention & intelligence.
vitamins, fats 2.5.1 Types of teeth Protection
and minerals) 2.6 Ruminants against sexual
2.7.2 Test for and other
starch, abuse
proteins and
fats

2.7.3 Need of
various
nutrients
2.8 Balanced diet
2.9 Deficiency and
disease
2.10 Preservation of
food
2.10.1 Methods of

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

preservation
(heating,
freezing,
drying and
adding
preservatives).
2.10.2 Fast food –
its ill effects
2.11 Science to day
– Irradiated
food

3. My Body 3: Growth & 3: Body – Form & 3: Body 3: Structure & 3: Structure & Function
Change Function Movements Function of the of the Human Body –
Human Body – Organ System
Organ System 3.1 Nervous system
3.1 Determinants of 3.1 Brief overview of 3.1 Human body and its 3.1 Skin 3.2 Endocrine system
growth human body— movements 3.2 Musculoskeletal 3.3 Cell division
3.2 Growth structure & 3.2 Joints and types of 3.3 Digestive 3.4 Heredity
monitoring- functions of all the joints 3.4 Excretory (Microscopic
Recording height Human organ 3.3 Skeleton 3.5 Cardiac structure of the
& weight systems 3.4 Movements of 3.6 Respiratory tissues involved for
Appropriate 3.2 The body & health animals (Earthworm, (Microscopic each system)
height & weight as understood in cockroach, birds, fish structure of the
for age the Indian system and snakes) tissues involved for
3.3 Body mass index of health care each system)
Calculation for
malnutrition
Importance of
monitoring
3.4 Changes in rate of
growth, body
structure &
function over the
life span.

30
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

4. World of 4: Soil 4: Plants – 4: A Pictorial 4: Structure and 4: Reproduction in


Plants and Morphology Feature on the Physiological Plants
Soil Plant Kingdom Functions of
4.1 Determinants of 4.1 Characteristics of 4.1 Fungi Plants
growth Growth living 4.2 Flowering & Non 4.1 Plant cells 4.1 Modes of
monitoring- 4.2 Habitat – various Flowering 4.2 Plant tissues reproduction -
Recording height habitats of plants 4.3 Algae 4.3 Plant Functions vegetative, asexual
& 4.3 Herbs, shrubs and 4.4 Mosses 4.4 Photosynthesis and sexual
4.2 Profile trees (creepers, 4.5 Gymnosperms 4.5 Plant Nutrition --- reproduction in
4.3 Types climbers) 4.6 Angiosperms Osmosis, diffusion, plants
4.4 Properties 4.4 Parts of plant 4.7 Monocots transpiration, 4.2 Pollination
4.5 Moisture 4.4.1 Roots, stem, 4.8 Dicots transportation 4.3 Fertilization
4.6 Absorption of leaves and flowers 4.9 Structure of root 4.6 Autotrophic & 4.4 Fruits and seeds
water by soil 4.5 Modifications of 4.10 Structure of stem saprophytic formation
4.7 Soil and crops roots, stems, 4.11 Structure of leaves. nutrition. 4.5 Seed dispersal
4.8 Soil preservation leaves. 4.12 The sensitive world of 4.7 Movements in
4.6 Kinds of stem plants---case studies. plants.
4.7 Movement of
plants
4.7 Observation of
plants & trees---
recording data
Drawing
4.8 Observation of
plants & trees in
the environment
Classification

5. World of 5: Bio Diversity 5: Basis of 5: Micro 5: Animal Kingdom 5: A Representative


Animals Classification Organisms Study of
Mammals

5.1 Need for 5.1 Virus, bacteria, algae, 5.1 Invertebrates 5.1 Morphology
5.1 Different types of classification fungi and protozoa. 5.2 Vertebrates --focus 5.2 Habitats
organisms 5.2 The 5 kingdom 5.2 Uses of on special features 5.3 Adaptations
5.2 Virus, Bacteria classification microorganisms in in addition to basic 5.4 Basic Physiological

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

and fungi 5.3 Binomial medicine, agriculture, functions. Functions.


5.3 Unicellular and Nomenclature industry and daily 5.3 Various Modes of 5.5 Circulatory system
multi cellular living reproduction in in man.
plants 5.3 Harmful animals. 5.6 Excretory system in
5.4 Unicellular and microorganisms 5.4 Reproduction in man.
multi cellular 5.4 Microbes in food human 5.7 Relationship of
animals preservation. 5.5 Fertilization structure to
5.5 Evolution 5.5 Relationship between 5.6 Development of functions
5.5.1 Charles man & microbes – embryo 5.8 Animal Behaviour
Darwin & the Balances, imbalances 5.7 Viviparous 5.8.1 Behaviour
theory of and uses. 5.8 Oviparous (social,
evolution— 5.9 Young ones to adult reproductive,
specific case parental care)
studies to 5.8.2 Some case
illustrate studies from
principles researchers
5.5.2 Tree of
evolution—
pictorial
representation
5.5.3 Importance of
variation
6. Life Process 6: Structural 6: Respiration in 6: Diversity in 6: Cells and 6: Life Processes
Organisation – Plants and Living Tissues
Cell Animals Organism

6.1 History of cell 6.1 Need for 6.1 Cell as a fundamental 6.1 Prokaryotic and 6.1 Definition
studies respiration unit of life – type of eukaryotic cells 6.2 Types of nutrition
6.2 Cell theory 6.2 Breathing – human human cells related to 6.2 Multi cellular and human
6.3 Types of cell 6.3 Breathing in other functions. organisms digestive system
6.4 The cell animals 6.2 Structure & function 6.3 Cell as a basic unit 6.3 Respiration
6.5 Plant and animal 6.4 Respiration in of all organelles in of life. 6.4 Transportation in
cell comparison plants brief. 6.3.1 Cell membrane plants and animals
6.6 The cell structure 6.3 Organisation --- cells and Cell wall 6.5 Excretion in plants
and functions – tissues – organs – 6.3.2 Cytoplasm and animals
organ system. 6.3.3 Cell organelles 6.6 Nervous system

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

6.4 Homeostasis. 6.4 Nucleus, 6.7 Coordination in


6.5 Cellular respiration. 6.4.1 Chromosomes- plants
6.6 Metabolism. DNA structure 6.8 Movement due to
6.7 Design of the body --- 6.5 Cell division and growth
the beauty of structure types 6.9 Hormones in
& function – some 6.6 Diffusion /exchange animals
examples. of substances
between cells and
their environment
6.7 Tissues
6.7.1 Types of plant
and animal
tissues
6.7.2 Structure of
plant and
animal tissues
6.7.3 Function of
plant and
animal tissues
6.8 Tissues, organs and
organ systems
7. Environment 7. My 7: Ecosystem 7: Conservation 7: Bio-Geochemical 7: Conservation of
al Science - Environment of Plants and Cycle Environment
Ecology Animals
7.1 Birds 7.1 Forest and types 7.1 Conservation of forest 7.1 Life –non-life 7.1 Bio degradable and
7.2 Animals 7.2 Ecosystem (Biotic and wild life interactions (biotic non bio degradable
7.3 Insects and abiotic factors) 7.2 Deforestation and & abiotic factors) wastes
7.4 Water bodies 7.3 Energy flow aforestation 7.2 Water cycle 7.2 Water management
7.5 Adaptations of 7.4 Food chain 7.3 Flora and fauna 7.3 Nitrogen cycle 7.3 Wild life
plants and animal 7.5 Food web 7.4 Endangered species 7.4 Carbon cycle sanctuaries
7.6 Biomes 7.5 Red data book 7.5 Oxygen cycle 7.4 Balance in
7.6.1 The different 7.6 Migration Ecosystem
biomes--- 7.7 Wildlife sanctuary 7.5 Coal and petroleum
vegetation & 7.8 National park 7.6 Green chemistry
climatic zones 7.9 Threats to 7.7 Science today –
7.6.2 Different flora biodiversity Towards a global

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

& fauna in the 7.10 Traditional village


biomes knowledge &
people’s initiatives in
biodiversity
conservation
7.11 People wildlife
conflicts & positive
initiatives
8. Environment 8: Environment 8. Water –A 8: Pollution of 8: Pollution and 8: Waste Water
al Science – Precious Air, Water and Ozone Depletion Management
Resource use Resource Soil
and Manage 8.1 Garbage 8.1 Availability of 8.1 Air pollution 8.1 Causes 8.1 Journey of water
ment 8.2 Disposal of water 8.1.1 Sources of air 8.2 Consequences 8.2 Sewage
garbage 8.2 Sources of water pollution 8.3 Prevention 8.3 Treatment
8.3 Vermi 8.3 Forms of water 8.2 Water pollution 8.4 Global warming 8.4 Domestic practices
compositing 8.4 Ground water 8.2.1 Sources of 8.4.1 Green house 8.5 Sanitation and
8.4 Recycling of 8.5 Depletion water pollution effect diseases
paper and plastics 8.6 Distribution 8.3 Water purification 8.5 Ozone layer 8.6 Alternate
8.5 Pollution 8.7 Scarcity 8.4 Land pollution depletion arrangement for
8.5.1 Types of 8.8 Water 8.5 Sources of land 8.6 Science today – Oil sewage disposal
pollution – Air, management—rain pollution spills in the seas. 8.7 Sanitation in public
water, land water harvesting 8.6 Science today – Bio places
and noise 8.9 Science today – pole – easily 8.8 Energy
pollution drinking ice berg – decomposable plastics Management
8.5.2 Causes of sweet water on 8.7.1 Energy audit
pollution earth – desalination (home, school)
8.5.3 Prevention of of sea water 8.7.2 Renewable
pollution sources (solar,
8.6 Air hydrogen, wind)
8.6.1 Composition 8.7.3 Non–renewable
of air sources—(coal,
petroleum,
natural gas)
8.7.4 Bio-fuels—
generation &
use

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

8.7.5 Energy
Conservation &
How we can
help.
9. Matter 9: Separation of 9: Nature of Matter
Substances

9.1 Separation 9.1 Particle nature of


9.1.1 Definition matter
9.2 Methods of 9.2 Characteristics of
separation (hand particles of matter
picking, crushing, 9.3 States of matter
winnowing, 9.3.1 Effect of
sieving, magnetic temperature on
separators, solids, liquids
sedimentation, and gases
decantation, 9.4 Types of pure
filtration, substances.
evaporation, (elements,
condensation and compounds)
crystallization) 9.5 Mixtures and types
9.2.1 Need of 9.6 Solutions (Solute,
Separation by solvent) Type of
more than one solutions.
method 9.7 Separating the
components of
mixture
10. Atomic 10. Atomic 10: Atoms and
Structure Structure Molecules

10.1 Smallest possible 10.1 Atoms, molecules


particle in nature and atomic theory
10.2 Dalton’s atomic (Bohr’s model)
theory 10.2 Symbols and
10.3 J.J. Thomson’s model Chemical formulae

35
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

and Rutherford. 10.3 Atomic mass,


10.4 Electron, proton and molecular mass and
neutron. Mole concept
10.5 Atomic number 10.4 Laws of chemical
10.6 Mass number combination (Law
of conservation of
mass, Law of
constant proportion.
10.5 Science today –
Nano technology
10.6 Stfucture of Atom
10.6.1 Isotopes,
isobars
(Definition)
10.6.2 Uses of
isotopes
10.6.3 Structure of
atom
10.6.4 Distribution of
electrons in
different shells
of atom –
including sub-
shells
10.6.5 Valency
10.6.6 Types of ions
and Radicals.
11. Exploring 11: Changes 11: Physical and 11: Chemical 11: Chemical
Chemical Around us Chemical Reactions Reactions,
Changes and 11.1 Classification of Changes 11.1 Elements and Equations and
Formulation changes 11.1 Physical changes compounds Bonding
11.1.1 Slow and fast (crystallisation, 11.2 Valency as combining 11.1 Chemical reactions
11.1.2 Reversible melting, ability 11.2 Types of chemical
and vaporisation, 11.3 Learning to write reactions
irreversible freezing and chemical symbols and 11.3 Factors influencing
11.1.3 Desirable and sublimation) chemical formulae by chemical reaction

36
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

undesirable 11.2 Chemical changes crisscrossing 11.4 Molecule formation


11.1.4 Periodic and (rusting of iron, valencies 11.5 Chemical equations
non periodic burning and 11.4 Introduction to write 11.6 Chemical bonding
11.1.5 Exothermic curdling, chemical chemical reactions 11.6.1 Types of
and reaction of Baking 11.5 Simple chemical chemical bond
endothermic Soda with lemon reactions 11.6.2 Properties of
juice) 11.6 Balancing chemical ionic and
11.3 Acids, Bases and equations covalent bond
Salts
11.3.1 Acids, Bases
and salts
(used in our
daily life)
11.3.2 Neutralisation
(in everyday
life)
11.3.3 Natural
indicators (No
Equations)

12. Exploring 12: Classification of 12: Periodic


Chemical Elements Classification
Families of Elements
12.1 History of periodic 12.1 Modern periodic
Table. law
12.2 Classification of 12.2 Modern periodic
elements table
12.3 Mendeleef’s table 12.3 Characteristics of
12.4 Metals and Non- modern periodic
Metals table
12.4.11 Physical 12.4 Metals and Non-
properties Metals
12.4.2 Chemical 12.4.1 Physical and
properties chemical
12.4.3 Uses properties
12.4.4 Alloys 12.4.2 Reactions of

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

12.4.5 Uses of Alloys metals and


12.4.6 Science today non-metals
– polymetallic 12.4.3 Occurrence of
molecules – metals
metals from 12.4.4 Mettalurgy of
deep seas. Al, Cu and Fe
12.4.5 Corrosion and
prevention of
corrosion
12.4.6 Alloys and
their uses
12.4.7 Nano metals
and
application
12.5 Carbon and ITS
Compounds
12.5.1 Bonding in
carbon and its
compounds
12.5.2 Physical
nature of
carbon and its
compounds
12.5.3 Chemical
properties of
carbon
compounds
Homologous
series,
functional
groups,
nomenclature
of carbon
compounds
12.5.4 Ethanol and
Ethanoic acid

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

12.6 Acids, Bases and


Salts
12.6.1 Properties of
acids and
bases
12.6.2 Types of acids
and bases
12.6.3 pH value
12.6.4 Uses of acids
and bases
12.6.5 Salts
12.6.6 Types of salts
12.6.7 Uses of salts

13. Exploring the 13: Applied 13: Combustion 13: Coal and
World Chemistry and Flame Petroleum

13.1 Synthetic fibers 13.1 Combustion and its 13.1 Coal


13.1.1 Types and type 13.2 Occurrence
uses 13.2 Fire control 13.3 Petroleum
13.2 Plastics 13.3 Flame and its 13.4 Occurrence and
13.2.1 Types and structure Refining
uses 13.4 Efficiency of fuels 13.5 Natural gas
13.2.2 Plastics and 13.5 Fuels and 13.5.1 Natural Project and Practical Project and Practical
environment environment Resources -
13.3 Glass and uses limitation
13.4 Cement and uses 13.6 Science today –
13.5 Soaps, detergents Alternate fuel –
- Preparation and hydrogen
uses. 13.6.1 Cold fusion
13.6.2 Methane
from sewage
waste

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

14. Matter and 14: Matter around 14: Measurement


Measurement us and
Measurement
14.1 Matter 14.1 Idea of derived
14.1.1 Definition of quantities Area,
matter Volume of solid
14.2 Objects around and Density
us 14.2 Concept of indirect
14.3 Properties of measurement or
materials estimation-
(appearance, Example (Time-
hardness, Simple pendulum)
solubility, float or 14.3 Measuring
sink, transparency astronomical
and translucent, distances
heat and electrical
conductivity,
magnetism)
14.4 States of matter
(solids, liquids,
gases and
properties)
14.5 Classification of
matter
14.6 Uses of materials
14.7 Standard unit of
measurement
(Length, time and
mass )
14.8 SI unit
14.9 Multiples and sub
Multiples of units.

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

15. Forces and 15: Motion 15: Motion 15: Force and 15: Motion 15: Force and Laws
Movement Pressure and Motion
15.1 Moving things 15.1 Speed 15.1 Definition 15.1 Uniform and non 15.1 Balanced and
around us 15.2 Measuring speed 15.1.1 State of uniform motion imbalanced forces
15.2 Types of Motion 15.3 Units of speed motion 15.2 Measuring the rate 15.2 First law of
15.2.1 Linear and 15.4 Distance- time 15.2 Action of force & its of motion motion
Circular graph effects 15.3 Rate of change of 15.3 Inertia and mass
15.2.2 Uniform and 15.5 Science today – 15.3 Contact forces velocity 15.4 Second law of
Non uniform adventures in 15.4 Non contact forces 15.4 Graphical motion
15.3 Science today - sports – like a bird 15.5 Electrostatic force. representation of 15.5 Momentum
Robot flies Velocity 15.6 Volume and Density motion 15.6 Third law of
Acceleration Force of liquid. 15.5 Equation of motion
Effects of force 15.7 Pressure motion by 15.7 Conservation of
15.8 Pressure exerted by graphical methods momentum
liquids and gases 15.6 Uniform circular 15.8 Gravitation
15.9 Pascal’s law motion 15.8.1 Newton’s law
15.10 Atmospheric 15.7 Liquids of gravitation
pressure. 15.7.1 up thrust & 15.8.2 Mass
15.11 Friction buoyancy 15.8.3 Weight
15.11.1 Force of 15.7.2 Archimedes’s 1.5.8.4 Acceleration
friction principle due to gravity
15.11.2 Factors 15.7.3 Relative 15.8.5 Mass of Earth
affecting density
friction 15.7.4 Explanation for
15.11.3 Friction - bodies wholly
necessary or partially
evil immersed in a
15.11.4 Increasing liquid
and
reducing
friction
15.11.5 Wheels and
friction
15.11.6 Fluid
friction.

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

16. Exploring 16: Electricity 16: Electricity 16: Electricity 16: Work, Energy 16: Electricity
Energy and Power
16.1 Electric cell 16.1 Symbols of 16.1 Three kinds of 16.1 Work 16.1 Electric current
16.2 An electric electric circuit- Simple, 16.2 Energy and circuit
circuit components series and parallel. 16.2.1 Potential 16.2 Electric potential
16.3 Electric switch 16.2 Heating effect of 16.2 Conduction of energy and potential
16.4 Conductors and electric current electricity in liquids 16.2.2 Kinetic energy difference
insulators 16.3 Magnetic effect of 16.3 Chemical effects of 16.3 Law of 16.3 Circuit diagram
16.5 Different Types electric current electric current conservation of 16.4 Ohm’s law
of Energy 16.4 Electro magnet 16.4 Electroplating energy 16.5 Resistance of a
16.5.1 Sources of 16.4.1 Electric bell 16.5 Electric charges at 16.4 Rate of doing work conductor
energy 16.5 Heat rest 16.5 Unit of power 16.6 System of
16.5.2 Heat, 16.5.1 Sources of 16.5.1 Charging by 16.6 Heat resistors
electricity, heat (sun, rubbing 16.6.1 Effects of Heat 16.7 Heating effect of
chemical, combustion 16.5.2 Types of - change of electric current
mechanical (or) burning, charges and temperature, 16.8 Joules law of
and solar friction, their interaction size, initiate heating
energy mechanical 16.5.3 Transfer of or speed up 16.9 Role of fuse.
stress, charges chemical 16.10 Domestic electric
chemical (exo/ 16.5.4 Story of reaction. circuits.
endo), lightening and 16.6.2 Change of 16.11 Electric power
electrical). thunder State happens 16.12 Chemical effect of
16.5.2 Hot and 16.5.5 Lightening – at a particular electric current
cold objects safety temperature – 16.13 Electrolysis -
16.5.3 Heat and melting and electro chemical
temperature boiling point. cells
16.5.4 Measuring 16.6.3 Heat and 16.14 Primary and
temperature Temperature Secondary cells
16.5.5 Transfer of 16.6.4 Kelvin’s scale 16.15 Sources of Energy
heat – of Temperature 16.15.1 Conventional
conduction, 16.6.5 Gas laws sources of
convection 16.6.6 Gas equation energy
and radiation 16.6.7 Thermometer– 16.15.2 Non-
clinical and conventional
laboratory source of
energy

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

16.15.3 Nuclear
energy
16.15.4 Radioactivity
16.15.5 Nuclear
fission and
nuclear
fusion
16.15.6 Nuclear
reactivity
advantages
16.15.7 Hazards of
nuclear
energy
16.15.8 Chandrayan
16.15.9 Cryogenic
techniques
16.15.10 Science
today – Energy
from seas.
17. Exploring 17: Magnetism 17: Light 17: Light 17: Sound 17: Magnetic
Phenomena Effect of
17.1 Laws of reflection
17.1 Discovery of 17.1 Light travels 17.1 Production of Electric Current
17.2 Regular and
magnets along a straight sound
different reflection
17.2 Magnetic and line 17.2 Propagation of 17.1 Magnetic field and
17.3 Multiple reflections
non magnetic 17.2 Reflection sound magnetic lines of
17.4 Multiple images
materials 17.3 Plane Mirror 17.3 Longitudinal force
17.5 Total internal
17.3 Magnetic poles (Right or left) waves and 17.2 Magnetic field due
reflection
17.4 Making magnets 17.4 Images of Transverse waves to current carrying
17.6 Dispersion – using
17.5 Science today – spherical mirrors 17.4 Reflection of conductor
prism.
Flying trains and lens sound 17.2.1 Magnetic field
17.7 Refraction at plane
17.6 Light 17.5 Sunlight – seven 17.4.1 Echo due to current
surfaces (Snell’s law
17.6.1 Sources of colors – 17.4.2 Reverberation carrying
not included).
light dispersion & 17.5 Range of hearing Straight
17.8 Human eye
17.6.2 Shadows synthesis of 17.6 Application of conductor
17.9 Care of the eyes
17.6.3 Path of light. colors – Newton’s ultra sound (Sonar, 17.2.2 Magnetic field
17.10 Braille system
17.6.4 Pinhole Disc. Doppler effect) due to current

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

camera 17.11 Science today – carrying


17.6.5 Plane mirrors Fiber optics – Circular loop
and reflection sending message by 17.3 Force on a current
light carrying conductor
17.12 Sound in a magnetic field
17.12.1 Vibrating body 17.3.1 Fleming left
17.12.2 Sound hand rule
produced by 17.4 Electric motor
human 17.5 Electromagnetic
17.12.3 Sound needs a induction
medium for 17.5.1 Faraday’s
propagation experiments
17.12.4 Structure of 17.6 Electric generator
human ear 17.7 Light
17.12.5 Amplitude, 17.7.1 Reflection of
Time period light
and frequency 17.7.2 Spherical
of vibration mirror
17.12.6 Loudness 1.7.2.1 Image
and pitch formation by
17.12.7 Audible and spherical
Inaudible mirrors
sounds. 17.7.3 Refraction –
17.12.8 Noise Laws of
17.12.9 Noise pollution refraction.
17.7.4 Refractive
index
17.7.5 Refraction by
spherical
lenses
17.7.6 Image
formation by
lenses
17.7.7 Lens formula
and
magnification

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

17.7.8 Power of lens


17.7.9 Refraction of
light through a
prism
17.7.10 Dispersion-
By a glass
prism
17.7.11 Atmospheric
refraction
17.7.12 Human eye
17.7.13 Defects and
rectification
17.7.14 Science
today –
Hubble
space
telescope
17.7.14.1 Manned
space
station
18. “Unakku – Theriyuma?”
Technology “Naan Paarthen” “Naan Purindukonden” Practical and Projects Practical and Projects

45
DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcomes & Evaluation Class VI

Topic Questions Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Application Outcomes Evaluation

Growth & What determines how Importance of Growth Learning to measure height Record height & weight Why is it important to
Changes tall I grow? Determinants of growth & weight of a few friends and see if monitor growth
Is it important to Measurement of growth Calculate malnutrition from they are appropriate for Record height & weight
monitor growth & why? Growth Monitoring— height & weight age f two of your friends
How do I measure Appropriate weight & height Learn how to record height Interpret the graph given
growth? –ht, wt for age & weight
What are the causes of Causes for inappropriate Plot graphs based on height
inappropriate growth growth & how to remedy the & weight
for age & how can they situation Understand how body
be remedied? Changes in body Structure & proportions change over a
How do I grow & Function over the life span lifespan
change over my
lifetime?

Maintaining How do we plan for a A Balanced Diet Putting together the food Planning menus for Writing out a menu
Health balanced diet? Food Groups groups, nutrient breakfast , lunch & dinner Matching deficiency
What happens if the diet Nutrients requirements and known based on principles leant diseases with lack of
is not balanced? A Balanced Diet foods to make a balanced Costing the menus nutrients.
Are there foods that do Deficiency Diseases meal for a day Planning a campaign Checking a menu to see
not contribute to good Foods to avoid against “junk” food if it is balanced. Picking
health? If so, why? Some good recipes out the unhealthy
Are there ways in which elements in it.
I can combine foods I
eat to give me taste,
nutrition at minimum
cost?

Our Environment How well informed am My Environment— Making a physical features, Draw any three birds in
I about the environment Weather (Rainfall, maximum weather map of my locality In your region correlate your locality
in which I live? & minimum temperatures) Drawing & naming trees, biodiversity, agriculture What crops are grown in

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

From where do I get Crops Grown---cereals, pulses, insects, birds in it with weather your locality/ district &
my basic necessities?— fruits & vegetables Understanding interactions Link natural resource why?
(food, water, fuel, Trees observed in the ecosystem flows with man’s A scrap book of the
energy source) Birds observed Drawing crops grown & activities. information collected on
Where do my wastes Insects-- observed making a seasons your region.
go? Water Bodies & sources of tabulation of crops , fruits,
water vegetables
How does water reach me? Mapping inflows of
Where does my sewage go? amenities—water, energy
Where does my garbage go? Mapping outflows-sewage,
What are the scarcities in my wastes
environment? Listing areas of maximum
Is there air pollution in my air pollution
environment? Correlating with data on
What are the sources? prevalence of respiratory
What is the soil type? diseases in my locality
What was the environment 10 Sourcing information
years ago? Talking to people

Our Environment How do climate & Biomes Drawing link maps of Given a new biome be Given a biome map
weather create the Adaptations in plants & climate with vegetation & able to describe its comment on climate,
different landscapes? Animals to the environment anima forms & their physical features, animals, animals, adaptations
What are the major Climatic adaptation interactions plants & interactions
landscapes and what are Habitat Drawing & coloring the Be able to describe the
the life forms they Predator biomes adaptations of its animals
sustain? The biome of the region can be & plants
taken as an example + 2 others

World of Plants & What is soil? Soil Identify the different soil Given a soil profile it Given a soil, profile it
Soil What are the life forms Soil—Teeming with life types in the campus & using parameters mention using parameters
in soil? Soil—profile neighborhood properties & predict the mention properties &
How does soil support Soil—types Understand about the kinds of crops that can predict the kinds of
life? Properties of soil properties of the soil grow on crops that can grow on
Moisture in soil through observation & Match soil types with
Absorption of water by soil experiments (porosity, crops
Soil & crops absorption of water etc)

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Link soil properties to


kinds of crops grown
Comment on
appropriateness of crops
grown based on criteria
Draw life forms seen in the
soil
If the school campus is
small, pot different plants
in the different sol types
and observe what grows
best in what type
Tabulate & draw inferences

Classification & What is theory of Evolution How do correlations lead to In the given descriptions Give a brief description
Biodiversity evolution? Charles Darwin a hypothesis? find out if the steps in the of the theory of
What phenomenon does & the theory of evolution in Give examples from daily scientific process have evolution
it link? brief with examples to life. been followed. What are the arguments
How did Darwin come illustrate the basic principles How are theories verified? for & against the
on this theory? From the verifications theories? What is your
How was it verified? given, list what might be stand?
Does everybody agree the hypothesis Is the scientific process
upon this theory? Differences between useful –Why/
opinions & facts.
Listing elements of a
scientific process

Biology at work— What are food Food Additives Finding food additives in Making posters to Listing food additives
Applications, additives? Understanding the kinds of and common foods used & educate the rest of school from food cover packets
Contemporary I what foods are they their harmful effects listing them. on additives & tabulating them
Issues found? Coloring, preservative, Tabulating them with their Given a menu, find out
How are they helpful? flavoring agents, anti functions how healthy it is in
How are they harmful? oxidants— In combinations of foods, terms of additives.
What are bio—identical understanding permissible
flavors? limits
Nutritional fortification

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

How much is permissible


Why are they added?
Role of advertising in food
additives

Table 5: Suggested Methodologies for 1 topic

The teaching methodologies should follow the functional & application outcomes listed

Topic Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Application Outcomes Suggested Methodologies

Growth & Changes Importance of Growth Learning to measure Record height & weight of 1. Evocation---speaking about
Determinants of growth height & weight a few friends and see if how I have grown in the last
Measurement of growth Calculate malnutrition they are appropriate for year-physically & otherwise
Growth Monitoring— from height & weight age 2. A brief introduction to the
Appropriate weight & height Learn how to record height chapter Sharing learning
for age & weight outcomes.
Causes for inappropriate Plot graphs based on 3. Reading about the Importance
growth & how to remedy the height & weight & determinants of growth.
situation Understand how body 4. Learning to measure growth
Changes in body Structure & proportions change over a with the weighing machine &
Function over the life span lifespan inch tape-by measuring the
weight & height of a few
classmates.
5. Recording height & weight
measured.
6. Learning the calculation for
malnutrition Applying the
calculation on the data
gathered Identifying people

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

whose growth is
inappropriate for age
7. Plotting data on a bar graph
8. Seeing pictures of changes in
body shape over a lifespan
9. Writing the parts that grow at
different times Steps 4,5,6,7
can be in small groups
10. Large group discussion
consolidating the learning
Presentation by individuals/
small groups on learning
11. Evaluation

Detailed (worked out) teaching learning matrix for ONE sample topic in class VI

Topic Questions Content Outcomes Functional Outcomes Application Outcomes Sample method

Growth & Changes Why is it important to Importance of Growth Learning to measure Record height & weight of a Refer section on
monitor growth? Measurement of height & weight few friends and see if they Biology
How do I measure growth Calculate malnutrition are above & below average
growth? –ht, wt Growth Monitoring— Learn how to record
What are the causes of Causes for stunted height & weight
stunted growth & how growth & how to Plot graphs
can they be remedied remedy the situation Understand how body
How do I grow & Changes in body proportions change
change over my Structure & Function
lifetime? over the life span

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Sample Outcomes table for a few chapters in class VI

Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes Functional outcomes Application outcomes

Matter • Be able to separate • Able to choose the


• Why do we need to • Methods of
Separation of substances of different correct method of
separate different separation
substances mixtures, at least three out separation
components of
• Hand picking of several examples given
mixture?
in the text book.
• What are the different • Crushing
methods of
• Winnowing
separation?
• Can all substances be • Sieving
separated by simple
• magnetic
method?
separation’
Can we separate
mixtures whose • sedimentation
properties we do nkot
know? • filtration
• condensation
• evaporation
• crystallization

CHANGES • Have you noticed any • Different kinds of • Describe the Identifying and • Be alert to changes
Around Us changes around you? changes difference between differentiating the changes in the surroundings
• Do things keep physical and such as water
changing? chemical changes supply, traffic,
• What are the different • Identify different weather etc.
kinds of changes? types of changes • Be able to observe
• Can I categories and describe the
changes in any way, changes in
what will be the basis functional term.
or criteria for Organize the

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

categorization? information and


present.

Applied chemistry • What kinds of things • Types of usage of • to understand the • Observing and • Able to recognize
do we see around us? the following usages of plastics. understanding the types of the synthetic &
• Do all the things are • Synthetic fibers Glass. Cement soap. materials natural things used
made by the same • Plastics in day today life/
materials? • Glass
• Do some of our • Cement
clothes come from • soap
plant/animal sources?
• What kinds of clothes
help us to keep
warm/cold

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application
Themes Content Outcomes Suggested Activities
Questions Content Outcomes Outcomes

• What is the • Be able to make


world and what a List of objects
Matter &
is it made of? Defn. of matter, present in the
Measurement
immediate
surroundings.
• Can we group • Be able to
objects in the understand
• Experiment to
external world how the
• Evolve criteria show that
in some way? materials
and be able to objects allow
used for
categorise current, light to
different
things. flow and other
purposes
do not
based on their
properties
• On what basis Objects around us, Properties • Differentiate
can objects be of materials (appearance, materials based on
grouped? hardness, solubility, float or specific properties
sink, transparency and such as electrical
translucent, heat and electrical conductivity or heat
conductivity, magnetism) conduction etc

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application
Themes Content Outcomes Suggested Activities
Questions Content Outcomes Outcomes

Why do we group
things?
• Do all materials
allow electricity
and heat to flow
through them?
• Can we see
through all
objects?
• Can we bend or
break all objects
easily?
• Name the three states
of matter
States of matter and its
• One basis of properties, classification of • Must know the
classifying things matter, uses of materials properties of the three
- solids, liquids,
states of matter.
gasses.

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application
Themes Content Outcomes Suggested Activities
Questions Content Outcomes Outcomes

• Differentiate
• List the uses of
different states of
materials based on
matter based on
their properties.
their properties
• Be able to
measure the
dimensions of a
given objects
Measuring Length of
using the
Standard unit of measurement • Be able to objects in the room
• Why do we need appropriate
(Length, time and mass), SI measure the and immediate
to measure units. Measure
Unit, multiples and length of a given surroundings as well
things? the dimensions
submultiples of units object. as Distances between
of a large object
places
such as a room
etc. using the
appropriate
units.

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application
Content Outcomes Suggested Activities
Themes Questions Content Outcomes Outcomes

• Must know the SI


• Measurement of unit for Length,
• Be able to make
three quantities - Mass & Time as
measurements.
length, mass and well as the
time. submultiples and
multiples
• Why do we need
standard units for
measurement?
Why do we need
many units for.
measuring the same
thing? Why should
they be multiples or
submultiples of basic
units?

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes Activities

FORCES AND
MOTION
MOVEMENT
• Be aware of
movements
taking place in
the
neighbourhood.
Map the path
• Observing the
Moving things around us, • Be able to Identify taken by people • Identification and
Path and time
• What is Types of motion, Linear & different kinds of while going discrimination of
taken by a body
movement? Circular, Uniform & Non motion and give from one place various types of
while it is in
Uniform examples to another. motion
motion
Compare the
time taken
using different
routes to the
same
destination.

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes Activities

Plan a small
visit to a
neighbouring
• How do we know
place including ● field
that something is
journey time, observation.
moving?
rest and
recreation time
etc.
• Be able to • Demonstrating
are there different differentiate between objects having
kinds of movements? Uniform & Non more than one
Uniform Motion type of movement.
EXPLORING DIFFERENT TYPES OF
ENERGY ENERGY
Source of energy, Heat,
• What is Energy? Electricity, Chemical,
Mechanical, Solar Energy

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes Activities

• Plan and
interview three
different
people to find • Lists the source
• Are various energy out where the of energy and
• Be able to name and
forms inter energy for the discuss in small
identify different
convertible? neighbourhoo groups how
forms of energy and
d comes if the certain sources
their sources
energy is of energy are due
being used to the sun?
well,
• Is nature the source
of all energy?
• make
• Is there one source
recommendatio
of energy that is • Be able to identify
ns to reduce
behind all other energy transformation
wastage of
forms of energy?
energy

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested Activities


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes

ELECTRICY
• Be able to
identify the
• What is electric switches and
circuit? conducting
wires in a • Experiment to
building. show that some
• must be able to materials allow
keep safe in an current to flow
electrical while others do
• How does a bulb environment not
glow? and inform a
responsible
Electric Cell, An electric adult in case of
circuit, Electric switch, an emergency
• What is the use of Conductor and Insulators • Know the role of • should be able to
a cell in the electric switches and cells in connect wires and
circuit? a circuit. make a bulb glow.
• Must know the
• must know the
requirements for
safety rules for
current to flow in a
using electricity.
circuit.

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes Activities

• What is the use of


switch in the
electric circuit?
• Do all materials
allow current to
flow through
them?
●Be able to identify
EXPLORING
MAGNETISM magnetic and Non
PHENOMENA
Magnetic substances
●Be able to identify
magnetic substances
• What is a Magnet? Discovery of magnets, that are used in
Magnetic and Non Magnetic objects around the
materials, Magnetic poles, school or home.
• Do all materials get making magnets
attracted by
magnets?

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested Activities


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes

• Be able to
understand the • Demonstrating
• Must know the uses of how things are
properties of magnets. magnetic attracted by a
substances in magnet?
day to day life
• Must know the parts
of a magnet.
• Classification of
• Which part of a
objects into
magnet do these
magnetic and non
things stick to?
magnetic materials
• How do we make a
magnet?
• Activity to locate
• How do two poles of a magnet
magnets behave? (using bar magnet,
iron fillings etc.,)

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes Activities

when brought close


to each other?

LIGHT
• Be able to list the
• Can we see things
various sources of
without light?
Light
• Making a pinhole
Darkness and light, Sources of camera and
light,. Shadows, Path of Light, observe the images
Pinhole Camera, Plane Mirrors • Shadow
and reflection • Be able to understand
• How do we see game(playing and
the path taken by a
things? forming shadows
light
with the hands
• How are shadow
formed?

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DTERT - DRAFT COMMON SYLLABUS 2009 – SCIENCE

Outcome Tables for Class VI

Functional Application Suggested


Themes Questions Content Content Outcomes
Outcomes Outcomes Activities

• Do you get a
shadow at night?
• Is there a way of
seeing ourselves?
On what kinds of
surfaces
• can we see
ourselves?

• can we throw
sunlight on a wall?

64