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Forward

The following material is a brief and selected portion of my


interpretation of what my instructors have given me. It is in no way
a complete representation of the Jun Fan Method or the Jeet
Kune Do Way. Deeper explanations should be sought from Dan
Inosanto, who was instrumental in organizing the .Jun Fan
Method with Bruce Lee and in developing it further since Lee's
death in 1973.


Don Garon

























ACKNOWLEDGMENT



I would like to thank and give respect to all my instructors and seniors in the Jun
Fan Method and the Jeet Kune Do Way.
First, to Dan Inosanto whose wisdom and guidance goes far beyond physical
technique and training. His example serves as an inspiration for all to strive to become
better martial artists and stronger, yet more gentle human beings.
Second, to all the instructors who spent time with me, and whose books, tapes
and notes form a major portion of this manual. In alphabetical order: Larry Hartsell,
Paula Inosanto, Chris Kent, Cass Magda, Tim Tackett, and Alfonzo Tamez.
Third, to all my fellow martial artists at the P.K.A. who help organize and teach
our curriculum. Your input and support is invaluable to our continued growth. A special
thanks to Tom Burke, my co-organizer in writing this manual.
Finally, to all the martial artists in the J.K.D. family. May the spirit of being
dedicated to improving on what already exists be the bond that keeps us together and
growing.


Don Garon



















FOLLOW YOUR HEART

(by: Dan Inosanto)

As Bruce often said, "Jeet Kune Do can become intelligible only in the process of
self discovery." I t must be remembered that for Bruce Lee, Jeet Kune Do was not an
end unto itself, but merely a by product. Jeet Kune Do was to serve as a means of self
discovery. In other words, Jeet Kune Do was to serve as a prescription for personal
growth. It was to research freedom, to act naturally and effectively, not only in mortal
combat, but in life itself. Bruce Lee realized that art lives where there is absolute
freedom. He also realized that like other arts, training in the martial arts demands self
knowledge. Character can be shaped in any way or form to make it more beautiful and
symmetrical.
Bruce spent his lifetime in the development of an all encompassing martial art
philosophy. He knew that mere technical knowledge of the martial arts was not enough
to make a man a master." He knew that one in the martial arts must penetrate deeply
into its inner spirit. Training and discipline in his many years convinced him that the real
purpose of studying the martial arts was self -improvement. "In researching for the
ultimate "truths" on combat he discovered certain "truths" about the meaning of life, but
he refused to set them into "set" rules and "set" laws.
He often told me, "Remember Dan, my truth will not be your truth." It was
Bruce's idea not just to instruct me, but to inspire me to think along with him. He wanted
me to develop what he might have termed a "discerning" mind. He impressed upon me
that "the truth is only the whole truth, insofar as it is experienced and lived in the
present." He said to me that unless I could join him in problem solving, I could never
understand what he was trying to convey to me. It was up to me to research and
research, to experiment and experience his concepts and to actively participate in the
quest. Only by doing this would I truly understand his concepts in the martial arts.
He explained, "A teacher serves only as a pointer to the truth, not as a giver of
the truth." Before I met Bruce I sincerely believed that learning was the process of
accumulation of knowledge. Bruce Lee used the analogy of a sculptor, who instead of
adding clay to his piece of work, kept chiseling away until the "essence" was revealed.
Bruce Lee stated that Jeet Kune Do is a daily decreasing, rather than a daily increasing.
As he often said, "Truth can only be realized when, you have discarded the
untruths and the non-essentials. I agree with him, but I still believe that learning is a
process of the accumulation of knowledge. But more important is the accumulation of
repeated experiences.
I also believe in never discarding any knowledge. What may be useful for you
may not be useful for your student, and what may be useful for your student may not be
useful for you; for, knowledge is relative to the user and practitioner.
Bruce's "key" thing, and it has been said many times, is that he hoped to "free"
his students from the "bondage" of styles, patterns, and systems. He did not want his
word to be law. He wanted no one to take his advice as "gospel." He knew that a man in
the martial arts is first and foremost a man. And as a living creature and creative
individual, the man was always more important than any created" system
or style.
Truth is always universal, and to an extent almost every life style or system is
self-limited. It is important to remember that Bruce Lee was a "pointer" to the truth and
not the truth itself.
With the forming of the Jeet Kune Do Society, there has been much controversy
over whether Bruce would have gone along these lines. I can only say that those who

have descended from the "Bruce Lee Clan," will bring up the art in many different ways
and follow many different paths. They will develop and go in many different directions,
both in their techniques and their philosophical outlook in trying to preserve the
teachings of Bruce Lee. I feel this is good, as long as they do not insist or preach that
their way is the way that Bruce would have wanted the art to develop. For no one truly
knows, had Bruce lived, how he himself would have progressed, changed, developed or
continued in his concepts of his art of Jeet Kune Do.

In closing, I would like to leave you with this poem that I wrote in 1979.

We are all climbing different paths through the mountain of life. And we all have
experienced much hardship and strife. There are many paths through the
mountain of life. And some climbs can be f e l t like the point of a knife. Some
paths are short and others are long. Who can say which path is right or wrong?
The beauty of truth is that each path has its own song. And if you listen closely
you will find where you belong. So climb your own path true and strong but
respect all other truths, for your way for them could be wrong.

- Dan Inosanto


































ABSORB WHAT IS USEFUL
(by: Dan Inosanto)


Learning or absorbing knowledge in the Martial Arts is not contained within
the four walls of a dojo, dojang, gwoon, studio, academy, school, a workshop or
seminar. Learning and absorbing useable knowledge is not located within the structure
of your style or system whether it is Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Indonesian,
Okinawan, Burmese, Filipino, French or whatever. Learning comes from all your
contacts, experiences, and all facets of your life. The assimilation of learning is called
knowledge and the proper use of knowledge is called wisdom.
Knowledge in the Martial Arts can come from fields outside the Martial Arts.
Knowledge can come from your peers, your elders, your juniors, your teachers, your
students, and even from your mistakes. Sometimes in a light conversation outside of a
classroom, you can become aware of a concept that a two hour class room session
didn't reveal to you.
Your different friends in different Martial Arts as Aikido, JuJitsu, Bando, Pentjak
Silat, Savate, street fighting, boxing or wrestling can help your growth if you empty your
cup and taste their tea rather than trying to convince them that your tea is better than
their tea. Sip each others tea and let it permeate your mind, body and soul. Both of your
cups will be richer for the experience.
In the early 50's and 60's, most Martial Artists were prejudiced against other
methods or were too proud to learn another style. It is a pity because I feel you can
learn from every contact you make. I believe you owe your allegiance to truth,
knowledge, and personal growth. Some people give their allegiance to their style or to
their Instructor. I feel this is a noble gesture, as long as it doesn't restrict your quest for
total knowledge. I believe you owe your allegiance to personal growth, rather than to a
particular style, system or person.
I personally encourage my students to study and to look into other systems and
other Instructors as long as they are respectful to all parties concerned. No art, person,
culture, or thing is intrinsically better than any other. A Porsche 911 S with all the
trimmings is no better than a hollowed out canoe in the jungles of the Amazon. I try to
bring Instructors from many different styles into my classes as guest Instructors to help
my students grow. No system has it all and each system has something to offer and
together they yield a better, well-rounded Martial Artist.
I think it is important for an Instructor to always remain a student at heart -- to
constantly seek better ways of training and execution. It is important to be creative and
to experiment and to seek help in areas where you lack expertise. Even a teacher with a
doctors degree in U.S. History needs to seek help when he needs information in South
East Asian History.
I consider myself very fortunate to have so many wonderful guides to help me
grow in this life. My Father, my Mother, my Martial Art instructors, my school teachers,
and my many friends have all helped in my growth, self improvement and development.
The goal of the Martial Arts is not for the destruction of an opponent,
but to be used as a tool for self-growth and self-perfection. The practice of a Martial Art
should be based on the practice of love. The love for the preservation of life, the love for
the preservation of your body in combat, and the love for the preservation of your family
and friends.




JEET KUNE DO -- IT'S ONLY A NAME
(by: Dan Inosanto)

People are still trying to define JKD in terms of a distinct style, i.e. Bruce Lees
Gung-Fu, Bruce Lee ' s Karate, Bruce Lee's Kick Boxing, or Bruce Lees Street Fighting.
To label JKD as Bruce Lee's martial art is to miss completely its meaning; its concepts
simply cannot be confined within a system. To understand this, a martial artist must
transcend the duality of the "for and "against and reach one unity which is without
distinction. The understanding of JKD is a direct intuition of this unity. Truth cannot be
perceived until we have come to full understanding of ourselves and our potential.
According to Lee, knowledge in the martial arts ultimately means self-knowledge.
Jeet Kune Do is not a new style of karate or Kung-Fu. Bruce Lee did not invent a
new style, or composite, or modify any style to set it apart from any existing method. His
main concept was to free his followers from clinging to style, pattern or mold.
It must be emphasized that Jeet Kune Do is merely a name -- a mirror in
which we see ourselves. There is some sort of progressive approach to its training, but
as Lee said, "To create a method of fighting is pretty much like putting a pound of water
into wrapping paper and shaping it." Structurally, many people tend to mistake JKD for a
composite style because of its efficiency. At any given time, JKD can resemble Thai
boxing, or Wing Chun, or wrestling or Karate. Its weaponry resembles Filipino Escrima
and Kali and, at long range, it might resemble Northern Chinese Gung-Fu or Tae Kwon
Do.
According to Lee, the efficiency of style depends upon circumstances and range
of distance. The important factor is not technique, but the range of its effectiveness. Just
as a grenade is used at 50 yards, a dagger is used in close. A staff, for example, would
be the wrong weapon to bring into a telephone booth to fight, whereas a knife would be
appropriate.
Jeet Kune Do is neither opposed to style nor is it not opposed to style. We can
say it is outside as well as inside of all particular structures. Because JKD makes no
claim to being a style, some people conclude that perhaps it is being neutral or simply
indifferent. Again, this is not the case, for JKD is at once "this" and "not this."
A good JKD practitioner rests in direct intuition. According to Lee, a style should
never be like a Bible with principles and laws which can never be violated. There will
always be a difference with regard to quality of training, physical make-up, level of
understanding, environmental conditioning and likes and dislikes. According to Bruce,
truth is a "pathless road"; thus JKD is not an organization or an institution of which one
can be a member. "Either you understand or you don't, and that is that," he said.
Martial Arts, like life itself, are a constant unrythmic movement, as well as
constant change. Flowing with this change is very important. Finally, a Jeet Kune Do
man who says JKD is exclusively JKD is simply "not with it." He is still "hung up" on his
own self-closing resistance, anchored down to reactionary pattern and, naturally, is still
bound by another modified pattern and can move only within its limits. He has not
digested the simple fact that the truth exists outside of all molds and patterns. An
awareness is never exclusive. To quote Bruce, "Jeet Kune Do is just a name, a boat to
get one across the river. Once across it is to be discarded and not to be carried on
one's back."
I feel that students should be taught experiences rather than technique. In other
words, a Karate practitioner who has never boxed before needs to experience sparring
with a boxer. What he learns from this experience is strictly up to him. According to
Bruce, a teacher is not a giver of truth; merely a guide to the truth and the student must
discover this truth for himself.
The total picture Lee wanted to present to his pupil was that above everything
else he must find his own way. He always said "Your truth is not my truth, and my truth
is not yours." Bruce did not have a blueprint, but rather a series of guidelines to lead you
to proficiency. Using equipment, there was a systematic approach in which you could
develop speed, distance, power, timing, coordination, endurance and footwork.
Jeet Kune Do, for Bruce, was not an end in itself nor was it merely a by-product;
it was a means of self-discovery. In other words, it was a prescription for personal
growth; it was an investigation of freedom freedom to act naturally and effectively not
only in combat but in life. In life, it means to absorb what is useful, to reject what is
useless, and to add specifically what is your own. To fully understand JKD you must
experience Judo, Jujutsu, Aikido, Western boxing, some kicking styles, Chinese
systems of sensitivity such as Wing Chun, the elements of Kali, Escrima and Arnis, with
the elements of Penjak Silat, Thai boxing, French Savate, and understand all the
strengths and weaknesses of each. It is not necessary to study all of these arts, only to
understand the high and low points of each, as well as the range, distance, and
effectiveness of each. It would be impossible to study every style in detail, but if you can
get the essence you can capture the style. Or, as Bruce used to say: "I hope martial
artists are more interested in the root of martial arts and not the different decorative
branches, flowers or leaves. It is futile to argue as to which single leaf, which design of
branches, or which attractive flower you like; when you understand the root, you
understand all its blossoming."
In other words, there is a distance in which Western boxing is superior to any
kicking style, whether it be Korean Karate or Northern Chinese styles of kicking. There
is a distance and a time whereby Wing Chun can be superior to Western boxing; like
wise where Western boxing is superior to Wing Chun; like-wise where Tai-Chu Chuan
can be superior to Wing Chun; and like wise where wrestling can offset Tai-Chi Chuan.
Neither art is inferior/superior to any other. This is the object of Jeet Kune Do; to
be bound by no style and in combat to use no style as style, to use no way as way, to
use no system as system, to have no l - imitation as your limit in achieving your goal.
Neither be for a particular style or against one. In other words, it just "is", as in the Zen
maxim: "In the landscape of spring there is neither better nor worse. The flowering
branches grow, some short, some long." Draw from everything with no boundaries to
limit you.
The principles of Jeet Kune Do can relate to any interest or vocation in one's life.
Martial arts was the field that Bruce Lee was most interested in. However, his technique
could be applied to any aspect of life. In addition, the knowledge derived from any one
field can help the individual in every other field. In other words, the principles of Jeet
Kune Do involve using certain ideas, techniques and approaches to life whenever
appropriate.
The principles of JKD reach far beyond martial arts. Other men in pursuit of
knowledge and truth have made use of this philosophy.

"I continue to work on the development of my technique. I was determined not to
be hampered by any of the restrictions of the past -- to learn from the past but not
be shackled by it. My aim was to achieve the best possible effects on the cello. I
have always regarded technique as a means, not an end in itself. One must, of
course, master techniques; at the same time, one must not become enslaved by
it -- one must understand that the purpose of technique is to transmit the inner
meaning, the message, of the music. The most perfect technique is that which is
not noticed at all. I constantly asked myself, 'What is the most natural way of
doing this?' I taught the importance of relaxation -- playing demands such
tension in the hand that one must constantly exercise it to maintain flexibility. I
showed my pupils how, at certain times, it was possible to relax the hand and the
arm -- if only for a fraction of a second while performing. There is, of course, no
substitute for work. I myself practiced constantly, as I have all my life . I have
been told I play the cello with the ease of a bird flying. I do not know with how
much effort a bird learns to fly, but I do know what effort has gone into it. What
seems ease of performance comes from the greatest labor."

Pablo Casals











































SUGAR RAY LEONARD INTERVIEW


Boxing World champion Sugar Ray Leonard once told a Playboy magazine
interviewer how he had studied Bruce Lee's movies and made use of what he learned.
Leonard told Playboy:

"One of the guys who influenced me the most wasn't a boxer. I
always loved the catlike reflexes and the artistry of Bruce Lee, and I
wanted to do in boxing what he was able to do in Karate. I started
watching his movies way before he became really popular in ENTER THE
DRAGON, and I patterned myself after him in a lot of ways...
"To start with, I liked the fact that Lee was always in control and
very confident. He'd lay back and be a gentleman, and he wasn't really
outspoken, but all along he knew that whenever he wanted to, he could
kick any guy's butt. He had lightening reflexes and he could move and
think and just pick his opponents apart. In a sense, my left jab comes from
him. My hands are still not as strong as I want them to be, and after
watching Lee, I became much more precise about landing my jabs on an
opponent's nose or between his eyes. I also got some moves -- both
offensive and defensive -- from him. For instance, he'd let a punch come
within a fraction of an inch of his face and then he'd slip it and pop a guy.
Lee was an artist and, like him, I try to go beyond the fundamentals of my
sport. I want the public to actually see a knockout in the making, starting
from the moment I begin setting up an opponent, start picking my shots
and then -- POW! -- finish him off. I want my fights to be seen as plays that
have a beginning, a middle and an end."

The notion of change is essential to Jeet Kune Do. The concept advocates
learning, experiencing and evolving above all things. Jeet Kune Do will continue to grow
as long as any one person is using its approach toward discovery. Ultimately, the vitality
of JKD existed long before Bruce Lee and will continue long after Bruce Lee. Bruce Lee
himself is not important. What his presence, as a symbol, may lead others to aspire to is
what counts. If his influence as a figure who "followed his own path" can help another to
discover his own path, Lee's purpose has been achieved. Perhaps this is Bruce Lee's
greatest gift to our world -- the gift of freshness and an open-minded approach to
knowledge which will never stop. Jeet Kune Do is not to hurt, but is one of the avenues
through which life opens its secrets to us. We can see through others only when we can
see through ourselves and J.K.D. is a step towards knowing oneself.

Bruce Lee











THE PATH TO TRUTH

1. Seeking the truth.
2. Awareness of truth.
3. Perception of truth.
4. Understanding of truth.
5. Experiencing of truth.
6. Mastering of truth.
7. Forgetting truth.
8. Forgetting the carrier of truth.
9. Return to the primal source where truth has its roots.
10. Repose in the nothing.

Bruce Lee

The ultimate achievement in J.K.D. is not the destruction of one's foes but rather
the annihilation of things that stand in the way of peace, justice, and humanity. The art
thus becomes the embodiment of life not death.

Dan Inosanto

Don't be overconfident, thinking that no one but you has this knowledge. What
one man has achieved, another can certainly exceed, whether it is in wisdom, wealth, or
strength. Every person we meet is superior to us in some way.

James Lee

Before we can overcome the strength of others we must first overcome our own
weaknesses.

Unknown
































MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING GOAL DEVELOPMENT


Character Development - positive attitudes, good habits, self-discipline
Conditioning - speed, power, stamina
Technique and Coordination training - economical and optimum use of
physical movements.
Tactical Training - optimum use of physical and psychological abilities
to adapt to opponent.

Mental Training - development of intellectual facilities through improvement
of training knowledge and the creative application of knowledge.



Spirit







Mind Body

With the training of the mind (intellectual) and the body (physical), the spiritual
(character) will grow stronger.













CONCEPTS AND THEORIES


I. Jeet Kune Do vs. Jun Fan

A. Jeet Kune Do - a conceptual process
1. Philosophical aspect - a vehicle for self-discovery
and self -improvement
2. Physical aspect - discover what works best for you /
accumulate then strip away

B. Jun Fan - a methodology
1. No 'best" style theory
2. Combat is a matter of ranges
a. Four ranges
b. Victory by superiority within a range
c. Victory by changing range to counter opponent's
superiority within a range
3. Pre 1973 vs. post 1973

II. The Three Stages of Jun Fan

A. Sticking to the Nucleus - know the rule
B. Liberation from the Nucleus - follow the rule
C. Return to the Original Freedom - dissolve the rule
III. Range Theory

A. Kicking
1. Power kicking 4. Shin range
2. Speed kicking 5. Knee range
3. Close range kicking

B. Punching
1. Western boxing 3. Forearm range
2. Long Hands 4. Elbow range

C. Trapping
1. Foot immobilization
2. Hand immobilization
3. Wing Chun punching
4. Close knee and elbow

D. Grappling
1. Standing
a. Takedowns/throws
b. Locks/holds/tie-ups
c. Chokes/strangles
2. Ground fighting
a. Locks/holds/tie-ups
b. Choke/strangles

CONCEPTS AND THEORIES (cond.)

IV. Distance Principles
A. Attack
1. Use the longest to hit the closest
2. Economical initiation
3. Correct on-guard position
4. Constant shifting of footwork
5. Catching opponent at weak moment
6. Correct measure for explosive penetration
7. Quick recovery or effective follow-up
8. Courage and commitment to decision

B. Defense
1. Sensitive aura with coordinated footwork
2. Good judgment of opponent's length of penetration
3. Correct on-guard position
4. Controlled balance in motion

V. Principles of Power
A. Speed - performance speed
B. Strength - sustained muscle contraction
C. Timing - hitting in coordination with opponent's movement
D. Weight Distribution - lean/follow thru
E. Torque - hip rotation/shoulder rotation
F. Line of Force/Line of Attack - aim
G. Synchronization of Parts - coordinated action
H. Energy - focused attitude

VI. Types of Speed
A. Physical speed - m/p/h performance speed of a chosen physical
motion
B. Perceptual speed - visual speed to see openings and incoming
attacks

C. Mental speed - quickness of the mind to select the appropriate
opening, attack, or counterattack

D. Initiation speed - economical starting in response to a stimulus
E. Alteration speed - ability to change direction quickly.
F. Combination speed - quickness in delivering a series of moves
in combination





CONCEPTS AND THEORIES (con'd.)

G. Tactile Sensitivity Speed - Contact Reflex - ability
to react to tactile response to touch

H. Footwork speed - ability to quickly move support base and
maintain balance


VII. Centerline Theory

A. Control centerline by occupying centerline

B. Control centerline by giving centerline and redefining it

VIII. Bamboo Theory - be pliable like the bamboo, give when necessary
but always snap back

IX. Zoning Theory

A. Move to zero pressure

B. Gain superior position
1. Inside
2. 1 45
o
front
3. 2 - beside
4. 2 - 45
o
rear
5. 3 behind

X. Economy of Motion

A. Economical structure

B. Economical flow

XI. Broken Rhythm
A. 1 beat
B. P.I.A.
C. Fakes and feints
XII. Bridging the Gap

A. Def: Safely closing the distance between you and your opponent
to within striking range
B. Using footwork
C. Using a technique
D. Faking or feinting
E. Drawing

CONCEPTS AND THEORIES (con'd)

XIII. Methods of Attack

A. Single direct attack (S.D.A.)
1. Straight (S.S.A.)
2. Angular (S.A.A.)
B. Attack by combination (A.B.C.)
C. Progressive indirect attack (P.I.A.)
D. Hand/Foot immobilization attack (H.I.A.)
E. Attack by draw (A.B.D.)
XIV. Method of Defense

A. Distance - use distance to be out of contact range
B. Block and Hit
1. Before - Hit and Cover
2. During -
a. Slide and Hit
b. Parry and Hit
c. Evade and Hit
3. After - Trap and Hit
C. Evade and Hit
1. During
2. After
D. Intercepting Hit stop" hit

XV. Tool Development

A. Whole/Part/Whole Theory

B. Periodization Training
1. General conditioning/development of individual
performance factors
2. Development of combinations and complex performance
factors
3. Corrections of weaknesses/stabilization of skills/
engagement in sparring
C. Use of Drills and Equipment










CONCEPTS AND THEORIES (cond.)

XVI. Application of Tools in Sparring

A. Isolation Sparring
1. Technique isolation
a. Same
b. Different
2. Appendage isolation
a. Same
b. Different

B. Controlled Sparring
1. Limit within range
2. Limit within combination of ranges

C. All out sparring
1. All ranges combined

XVII. Types of Fighters and Counter Methods
A. Blitzer
1. Stop-Hit
2. Angle and counter
3. Use continuous movement

B. Stalker
1. Fake
2. Angle
3. A.B.D.
4. Offset with lead weapons
5. Use continuous movement

C. Stop Hitter
1. Probe with long range techniques
2. Fake/check and hit

D. Counter Attacker
1. Broken rhythm attacks
2. P.I.A.
3. Fake/check and hit

E. Dancer
1. Angle step to cut off
2. Initiate on opponent's body set
3. Slow down with leg kicks
4. Tire with body shots

F. Runner
1. Stalk patiently - don't overextend
2. Use long rang; attack combination (A.B.C.)
3. H./F.I.A.

CONCEPTS AND THEORIES (con'd.)


XVIII. Attributes

A. Visual Awareness - seeing the opponent's intentions
B. Sensitivity - feeling the opponent's intentions
C. Proper Mental Attitude - a combination of calmness, self-
confidence, and aggressiveness
D. Skill - economical motion in body mechanics
E. Strength - sustained muscle contraction
F. Speed - time taken from inception to completion of movement
G. Power - combination of speed and strength
H. Timing - the ability to move at the right moment
I. Coordination - the ability to perform a movement with efficiency,
ease, and balance
J. Balance - control of body alignment during movement
K. Spatial Relationship - control of distance range between you
and opponent
L. Agility - light, quick, well-balanced movement
M. Stamina - combination of muscular and cardiovascular endurance
N. Conditioning - the ability to take punishment
0. Flexibility - the ability to move through large ranges of
motion
P. Rhythm - ability to feel tempo and cadence
Q. Precision - accuracy in protection of force
R. Explosiveness - quick initiation of movement
S. Flow - the ability to adapt movement quickly to a changing
environment
T. Mental Focus - the concentration of mental faculties on a
specific action
U. Physical Focus - creating a transference of energy by changing
from a relaxed state of quick motion to a tensed state of
applied force on contact
V. Synchronization - movement in unison





POSTURES / GUARDS / BODY MOVEMENTS / STEPPING

I. Postures V. Footwork

Neutral Stance Step-Slide (forward, back, side,
Horse Stance angular)
Fighting Stance (small phasic bent-knee) Shuffle-Step
- sideways Cross Step (front and rear)
- 3/4 Step-thru
- front Circle-Step
Crouching Stance Quick Advance
Cat Stance Drop Shift
Muay Thai Stance Replacement Step (forward/back)

II. Guards VI. Footwork Drill

Boxing Guard (Vertical) Box Drill
(Horizontal) Command Directional Drill
Jun Fan Guard (front fist, rear open) Mirror Drill
Rear Hand Up Guard
Muay Thai Guard
Peek-A-Boo Guard
Wing Chun Centerline Guard
(Chun-Jiaong)

III. Body Movements

Slip
Bob (Duck)
Weave
Bob and Weave
Snap Back
Shoulder Roll
Jam - Shoulder
- hip
- palm
Rolling

IV. Body Movement Training Drills

Extended Arm - Bob and Weave Drill
Against Wall
In Comer
Free Movement: / Attacker
/ Defender







KICKING

I. Kicks v. Exchange Drills
(Matching and Un-matching Leads)
1. Front
2. Side 1. Shuffle Round Kick to calf
3. Rear 2. Shuffle Round Kick to thigh
4. Round (Snap/Thai) 3. Shuffle Round Kick to calf,
bounce, Round to thigh
5. Hook 4. Shuffle Front Foot Jab to thigh
6. Crescent (In, Out) 5. Shuffle Round to body
7. Oblique 6. Shuffle Side to knee, thigh, body
8. Knee (Straight, Round) 7. Shuffle Hook to head
8. Rear Round to thigh (leg check)
II. Kick Variables

1. Snap VI. Kicks Should be Practiced:
2. Thrust
3. Front Leg 1. In the air
4. Rear Leg a. Repetition of Technique
5. Shuffle (plant forward b. Shadow Boxing
pendulum out) 2. On Focus Mitt
6. Push 3. Kicking Shield
7. Stomp 4. Thai Pads
8. Spin 5. Heavy Bag
9. Drop- 6. On a Partner
10. Jumping a. In drill form (exchange
drills)
11. Flying b. Free Sparring

III. Striking Shield Leg Drills
(Selected Combinations)

1. Shuffle Front (calf, thigh, hip, body)
2. Shuffle Side (calf, thigh, hip, body)
3. Shuffle Round (calf, thigh, body, head)
4. Shuffle Round, Shuffle Side
5. Shuffle Round, Rear Leg Round
6. Shuffle Side, Shuffle Round
7. Shuffle Side, Rear Leg Round
8. Shuffle Front, Rear Leg Round
9. Rear Leg Round, Shuffle Round
10. Rear Leg Round, Rear Leg Round

IV. Pendulum Drill (Focus Glove or Shield)

1. Front
2. Round
3. Side
4. Hook

PUNCHING


I. Hand Technique II. Deflections

1. Vertical Punch 1. Inward
2. Horizontal Punch 2. Outward
3. Jab - Finger 3. Upward
- Speed 4. Downward
- Power 5. Angular
- Whipping
4. Cross Straight Types of Deflections
- Loose
5. Hook - Tight and Loose 1. Scoop
- Vertical and 2. Parry
Horizontal Fist 3. Windmill
- Shovel Hook 4. Sliding Energy Block (cutting
6. Uppercut the tool)
7. Overhand 5. Catch
8. Backfist - Snapping Action 6. Palm Stop (bicep, shoulder)
9. Back Knuckle - Follow Thru 7. Elbow Cover Hi/Low
10. Corkscrew
11. Palm III. Hand Combination
12. Spearhand
13. Half Fist Entries
14. Ridgehand 1. Jab
15. Knifehand 2. Front Hook
16. Hammerfist 3. Front Uppercut
17. Claw 4. Front Overhand

Other Strikes & Misc. Tech. Follow-Ups
1. Cross
1. Elbow 2. Rear Uppercut
2. Forearm 3. Rear Overhand
3. Head Butt 4. Rear Hook
4. Shoulder Butt
5. Hip Butt Entry Combinations
6. Bicep Hit
7. Hair/Ear/Groin Grab 1. Jab, Jab
8. Pinching. & Muscle Grabbing 2. Jab, Cross
9. Thumb Gouge 3. Jab, Hook
10. Biting 4. Jab, Uppercut

Follow-Up Combinations
1. Cross, Hook, Cross
2. Hook, Cross, Hook
3. Uppercut, Overhand, Uppercut*
4. Overhand, Uppercut, Overhand*
5. Uppercut, Uppercut, Hook*
6. Hook, Hook, Uppercut*
*Front & Rear Hand Initiation

PUNCHING (cond.)

IV. Boxing Combinations

Jab, Jab Series
1. J/J - C/H/C
2. J/J - H/C/H
3. J/J O/U/O
4. J/J - U/O/U
5. Fake J/J - C/U/U
6. J/Fake J - F-H/U/H

Jab, Cross Series
1. J/C - H/C/H
2. J/C O/U/O
3. J/C U/O/U
4. J/C J/L-C/H

Jab, Hook Series
1. J/H - C/H/C
2. J/H U/O/U
3. J/H O/U/O
4. J/H H/U/C

Jab, Uppercut Series
1. J/U - C/O/C
2. J/U U/H/C
3. J/U O/H/U

Additional Combinations
1. H/J - C/H/O
2. Drop Shift L-F-H/H-F-H - O/H/U

V. Partner Exchange Drill

2-Count Panatukan Drill*

Partner A Partner B
H-Jab Catch & Return H-Jab
H-Jab Catch & Return L-Jab
H-Jab Catch & Return H-Backfist
H-Jab Catch & Return H-Hook

* Can be done as a three-count drill with Partner A repeating initial
attack after Partner B'S response.
Can also be done with almost any technique.
Ex: Cross/shoulder roll and counter cross
Hook/forearm cover and counter hook





PUNCHING (cond)

VI. Basic Focus Glove Feeds

1. Attack: Response:
Jab Catch, Parry, Slip
Cross Parry, Bob & Weave, Shoulder Roll, Palm Stop
Finish


2. Attack: Response:
Jab Catch, Parry, Slip
Hook Parry, Cover, Bob & Weave
Finish

3. Attack: Response:
Hook Cover, Bob & Weave
Cross Cover, Parry, Palm Stop, Shoulder Roll,
Bob & Weave
Finish


4. Attack: Response:
High Hook Bob & Weave
High Hook Bob & Weave,
Uppercut


5. Attack: Response:
Low Hook Cover
Low Hook Cover,
Uppercut



















JUN FAN TRAPPING


TRAPPING: The momentary immobilization of hands or feet to facilitate
hitting.

I. TYPES OF TRAPPING DRILLS

A. Reference Point Trapping
B. Combination Trapping
C. Counter Trapping
D. H./F.I.A. to Various Follow-Up Modes
E. Energy Drills
F. Mook Jong Training
II. SIX POSITIONS OF TWO ARM CONTACT

A. Two Outside - XOOX
B. Two Inside - OXXO
C. Two Outside Left - XXOO
D. Two Outside Right - OOXX
E. One In One Out Left - XOXO
F. One In One Out Right - OXOX
III. BASIC WING CHUN TRAPS
A. Pak-Sao - Slapping
B. Lop-Sao - Grabbing
C. Tan-Sao - Palm-Up
D. Bong-Sao - Elbow-Up - Hand Down
E. Fook-Sao - Hooking
F. Gong-Sao - Palm-Down
G. Jut-Sao - Jerking
H. Huen-Sao - Small Disengagement
I. Jao-Sao - Large Disengagement
J. Gum-Sao Pinning



BASIC WING CHUN TRAPS (cond)

K. Cup-Sao - Downward Scoop
L. Biu-Sao Finger
M. Quan-Sao - Goang-Sao/Tan-Sao Combination
N. Doan-Sao - Downward Pressing
I V. BASIC WING CHUN STRIKES

A. Chung Chuie - Vertical Punch
B. Choap Chuie - Half-Fist
C. Ping Chuie - Horizonal Fist
D. Sut-Sao - Backward Chop
E. Jik Chung Chuie - Straight Blast
F. Chai-Lum-Chuie - Rolling Punches

V. BASIC WING CHUN COMBINATIONS

A. Pak-Sao/Da/Pak-Sao/Da ( Inside & Out )
B. Pak-Sao/Da/Lop-Sao/Da
1. Lop-Sao/Da - Inside
2. Lop-Sao/Da Outside
C. Pak-Sao/Da/Jut-Sao/Da
D. Pak-Sao/Cup-Sao
1. Da High
2. Da Low
E. Pak-Sao/Tan-Sao
1. Tan-Sao/Da - Lead Hand & Rear Hand
F. Li-Sao/Da - Lead Hand & Rear Hand
G. Pak-Sao/Jao-Sao - Jao Sao (1) High & (2) Low
H. Pak-Sao/Biu-Sao ( Inside & Outside )
I. Pak-Sao/Wedge Punch
J. Pak-Sao/Sat-Sao or Fax-Sao - Lead Hand & Rear Hand
K. Pak-Sao/Huen-Sao
L. Pak-Sao/Bong-Sao
M. Pak-Sao/Goang-Sao
N. Pak-Sao/Gum-Sao - Lead Arm


BASIC WING CHUN COMBINATIONS (con'd)

0. Lop-Sao/Da/Pak-Sao/Da
P. Lop-Sao/Lop-Sao
Q. Tan-Sao/Pak-Sao
R. Tan-Sao/Gum-Sao
S. Jao-Sao/Jut-Sao
T. Jut-Sao/Bong-Sao - Same Hand -Defensive/Offensive
U. Jut-Sao/Biu-Gee - Same Hand
V. Jut-Sao/TanSao - Same Hand -Defensive/Offensive
W. Low Jab/Pak-Sao/Gua-Chuie
X. Low Jab/Lop-Sao/Gua-Chuie
Y. Pak-Sao/Chung-Chuie
Z. Pak-Sao/Lop-Sao/Jao-Sao - Not Logical -
AA. Pak-Sao/Lop-Sao/Gum-Sao
BB. Pak-Sao/Bong-Sao/Lop-Sao
CC. Pak-Sao/Li-Sao/Pak-Sao

DD. Fake Pak-Sao & Chung-Chuie on Contact/Pak-Sao/Sat-Sao

EE. Pak-Sao/Sat-Sao/Inside Pak-Sao Pak-Sao to Sat-Sao with Loy-Pak

FF. Lop-Sao/Huen-Sao/Sat-Sao/Lop-Sao/Da

GG. Pak-Sao/Outside Wedge Punch/Gum-Sao/Da

HH. Pak-Sao/Da/Jao-Sao/Jut-Sao/Da/Lop-Sao/Da

II. Pak-Sao/Biu-Sao/Pak-Sao/Da/Lop-Sao/Da

JJ. Pak-Sao/Jao-Sao/Huen-Sao/Lop-Sao

KK. Pak-Sao/Lop-Sao/Huen-Sao/Sut-Sao

LL. High Jao-Sao/Huen-Sao/Jut-Sao/Neck Grab with Punch/Elbow

MM. Front Lop-Sao/Rear Punch/Rear Huen-Sao/Rear Sut-Sao

NN. Pak-Sao/Biu-Sao/Pak-Sao/Lop-Sao/Pak-Sao

00. Pak-Sao/Biu-Sao/Lop-Sao/Pak-Sao/Lop-Sao

PP. Pak-Sao/Lop-Sao/Chung-Chuie/Jao-Sao/Jut-Sao/Pak-Sao

QQ. Trap &: Kick/Punch/Lock/Choke/Sweep/Reap/Throw

VI. COUNTERS TO PAK-SAO

A. Pak-Sao

B. Lop-Sao

C. Bil-Gee ( Inside & Outside )

D. Jao-Sao ( Low & High )

E. Huen-Sao

F. Drop Punch to Floating ( Ping-Chuie ) to Floating Ribs

G. Palm Hand to Groin ( Ha Jao-Sao )

H. Rear Hand Sliding Energy Punch

I. Stiff Arm Energy
a. Lead ( Chung-Chuie )
b. Lead ( Tan-Sao )
C. Lead ( Lop-Sao )
J. All Kicks

K. Sut ( Knee )

VII. COUNTERS TO LOP-SAO

A. Wong-Pak/Bil-Sao/Chung-Chuie

B. Bong-Sao/Bil-Sao/Chung-Chuie

C. Wong-Pak/Qua-Chuie

VIII. COUNTER TO GRAB OF PUNCH

A. Hit
B. Tan & Hit
C. Lock & Takedown

IX. SENSITIVITY DRILLS

A. Basic Front Hand Energy Drill
1. Select Variables - Ex: Tan-Sao, Bong-Sao, Hinge,
Doan-Sao

B. Harmonious Spring Drill - One or Two Hands
1. Chung-Chuie
2. Bil-Gee
3. Bong-Sao
4. Tan-Sao

C. Ball & Socket Drill

D. Pak-Sao Cycle Drill

E. Bong-Sao/Lop-Sao Cycle Drill
1. High Lop-Sao
2. Low Lop-Sao
3. Inside Pak-Sao & Punch/Bong-Sao
4. Inside Pak-Sao & Punch/Wedge Punch
5. Outside Pak-Sao
6. Tan-Sao
7. Bil-Gee Under Lop-Sao
8. Jao-Sao instead of Punch/Gong-Sao & Punch/Bil-Gee/
Lop-Sao to Continue Cycle

F. Dan Chi-Sao

G. Chi-Sao
1. Basic Energy Drills
a. Rolling Drill (Light Energy)
b. Push-Pull Energy
c. Take Hand Away (Absence of Energy)
d. Switch Sides with Huen-Sao
2. Basic Trap & Hit Techniques
a. Tan-Sao Position
(1) Palm to Chest
(2) Inverted Finger Jab to Throat
(3) Punch
b. Bong-Sao Position
(1) Lop-Sao Under Bridge
(2) Lop-Sao Over Bridge
(3) Lop-Sao in Front of Bridge
(4) Low Grab/Pin with Elbow & Punch
c. Fook-Sao Position
(1) Finger Jab
(2) Straight Punch to Body
(3) Lop-Sao
(4) Bil-Gee
(5) Tan-Sao



















TAKEDOWNS

1. Single-Leg Takedown
2. Single-Leg Pick-Up
a. Forward Pressure
b. Draw Step
3. Double-Leg Pick-Up
4. Double-Leg Tackle
5. Hair Takedown
6. Single Arm Wrap Takedown
7. Double Arm Wrap Takedown
8. Arm Drag
9. Knee-Lock Takedown
10. Soft-Bow Takedown
11. Front Scissors Takedown
12. Rear Scissors Takedown
13. Sinking Elbow Takedown
14. Face Takedown
15. Cobra Takedown - 2 Variations
16. Bent Wrist and Elbow Takedown
17. Front Figure 4 Arm Lock Throw
18. Bent-Arm Lever Throw

THROWS

7. Hip Throw
8. Shoulder Throw
9. Neck Throw
10. Reverse Neck Throw
11. Rear Reverse Neck Break Throw






THROWS (con'd.)

12. Thigh Block (under-arm hook - either leg forward)
13. Reap - to the front and rear
14. Sweep
15. Stomach Throw
16. Firemen's Carry

OFFENSIVE GRAPPLING COMBINATIONS

1. Finger Jab/Huen-Sao/Side-Strangle and Throw
2. Front Single-Leg Takedown on the Inside with Rear Leg Trip/Ankle
Lock with Leg Spread Control or Step-Over Ankle Lock
3. Rear Single-Leg Takedown/Kneeling Leg Lock or Sitting Leg Lock
4. Jab/Pak-Sao - Forearm Strike/Slide to Front Figure 4 Head Lock
5. Pak-Sao/Chop/Inside Pak-Sao/Punch/Head Butt/Outer Reap
6. Pak-Sao/Chop/Forearm Drag Takedown
7. Fake Low/Jao-Sao Palm to Ear/ Head Butt/Rear Strangle Throw
8. Fake Low/Jao-Sao High/Huen-Sao/Neck Grab/Side Strangle Throw
9. Jab/Pak-Sao & Punch/Hair Grab & Forearm Smash to Face/Reap
Takedown
10. Jab/Front Lop-Sao & Punch/Arm Bar with Front Sweep Takedown/
Knee to Triceps Pin
11. Jab/Front Lop-Sao & Punch/Forearm to Throat & Kicking Sweep to
Back of Leg
12. Jab/Pak-Sao & Punch/Front Lop-Sao & Backfist/Step-In & Rear
Cradle Throw (turning the comer)
13. Pak-Sao/Pak-Sao/Neck-Crank Strangle










JOINT LOCKS

I. FINGER LOCKS

A. Straight Finger
1. Hyperextension
2. Lateral Pressure

B. Bent Finger
1. Twisting
2. Compression

II. THUMB LOCKS

A. Straight Thumb
1. Hyperextension
2. Lateral Pressure

B. Bent Thumb
1. Twisting
2. Compression

III. WRIST LOCKS

A. Bent Wrist - Hyperflexion
1. Wrist lock
2. Reverse wrist lock
3. Cross wrist lock
4. Cross reverse wrist lock
5. Goose neck
6. Wrist press (against floor and between knees)
7. Wrist compression

B. Bent Wrist - Twisting
1. Wrist in hyperextended position
2. Wrist in hyperflexed position


IV. ELBOW/SHOULDER LOCKS

A. Straight Arm/Arm-Bars (1-6 down; 7 forward; 8-9 up)
1. Step-over Arm-Bar
2. Down Arm-Bar
3. Down Arm-Bar @ Stomach
4. Cradle
5. Down Figure 4 Arm-Bar
6. Down Arm-Bar over Shoulder (hug to body)
7. Forward Arm-Bar (with hand, elbow, shoulder, chest, neck)
8. Up Arm-Bar (with hand, arm, shoulder, back of neck)
9. Up Figure 4 Arm-Bar (with press to shoulder, face or throat)
IV. ELBOW/SHOULDER LOCKS (Con 'd.)

B. Bent Arm/Arm Locks
1. Front Figure 4
2. Front Figure 4 wrap - right handed
3. Front Figure 4 wrap - left handed
4. Side Figure 4
5. Rear Figure 4 (non-corr.)
6. Rear Reverse Figure 4 (corr.)
7. Under Arm Figure 4
8. Inverted Figure 4

V. HEAD LOCKS

A. Forward Pressure
1. Head Lock
2. Full-Nelson
3. Head Crank

B. Backward Pressure
1. Side Head Lock
2. Rear Neck Bridge

C. Side Pressure
1. Guillotine

D. Twisting Pressure (from side, front, rear)

VI. FACE LOCKS

A. Pressure to face (nose, teeth, superior and inferior maxillary)

B. Pressure to side of head (ear, sphenoid, cheek bone, jaw)

VII. BODY LOCKS

A. Front Bear Hug
1. One Arm Pinned
2. Two Arms Pinned
3. No Arms Pinned

B. Rear Bear Hug
1. One Arm Pinned
2. Two Arms Pinned
3. No Arms Pinned

C. Half-Nelson

D. Surfboard

E. Front Scissors
F. Rear Scissors


V III. LEG LOCKS

A. Single Leg Lock Variations:
1. S.L.L. using arm - standing (pin opponents leg with your leg)
- lying opponent face up
- squatting opponent face down
2. S.L.L. using leg
3. S.L.L. using opponent's other leg

B. Double Leg Lock - Variations:
1. Standing
2. Lying with body scissors
3. Squatting opponent face down (Boston Crab)

IX. ANKLE LOCKS

A. Figure 4 Ankle Lock - Variations:
1. Standing
2. Lying with leg spread (opponent face up)
3. Squatting (opponent face down)

B. Twisting Ankle Lock
1. Standing
2. Lying with leg spread (opponent face up)
3. Squatting (opponent face down)

X. TOE LOCKS

A. Forward Pressure

B. Backward Pressure

C. Side Pressure

D. Bend and Twist

















CHOKES

1. Front Two Hand Choke
2. Rear Two Hand Choke
3. Front Forearm Choke
4. Rear Forearm Choke
5. Sliding Collar Choke
6. Fist Choke

STRANGLES

1. Front Strangle
2. Rear Strangle
3. Side Strangle
4. Front Head Lock
5. Side Head Lock
6. Cobra Holds (4 variations)

THREE PRINCIPLES OF JOINT LOCK ESCAPE

1. Change the Angle
2. Distraction
3. Release the Pressure

FLOW DRILLS

1. Counter for Counter Lock Flow
2. Lite Flow Grappling







TIE UP POSITION

1. Arm Lift to Side Standing Choke
2. Shoulder Push to Single-Leg Takedown
3. Shoulder Push & Arm Lift Combination to Rear Single-Leg Takedown
to Step-Over Leg Lock & Foot Crank
4. Step on Foot/Knee Push
5. Under Arm Hook & Hip Throw
6. Reverse Nelson Throw

COUNTERS TO STRIKES

1. Jab: Inward Parry/Palm to Ear/Standing Side Strangle or Drop-Knee
Strangle
2. Jab: Inward Parry/Inward Forearm to Bicep/Wrist Lock Forearm Drag
Takedown
3. Jab/Cross: Catch/Boang-Sao/Arm-Bar Takedown
4. Jab/Cross: Catch/Boang-Sao/Double-Leg Pick-Up/Step-Over Double-Leg
Lock (Boston Crab)
5. Hook: Parry & Palm to Bicep/Step Under Arm Break on Back of Neck/
Rear Choke
6. Hook: Parry & Palm to Bicep/Brachial Stun/Forearm to Radial Nerve/
Scoop to Shoulder Lock & Hair Grab Takedown
7. Hook: Parry & Shoulder Stop/Palm to Jaw/ Nelson & Arm Drag Throw/
Cross Arm Neck Control
8. Hook: Parry & Shoulder Stop/Arm Blast/Rear Choke
9. Hook: Shoulder Stop/Groin Lever
10. Shuffle Round Kick: Quan Sao to Shelf & Hair Grab with Foot Pin
Throw
11. Hook Kick: Shelf & Shuffle Step in Calf to Shin Sweep/Step Over
Sitting Leg Ride with Leg Insertion








COUNTERS TO HOLDS

COUNTERS TO SINGLE-ARM WRAP AROUND

1. Small Disengagement, to Single-Arm Wrap Around, to Arm-Throw with
Shoulder Push, to Elbow Crank

2. Small Disengagement, to Neck-Grasp-&Throw to Neck Crank

3. Small Disengagement, to Wrap-Right-Arm, Trap Left Arm & Hit

4. Small Disengagement, to Wrap-Left-Arm, Trap Right Arm & Hit

COUNTERS TO THE DOUBLE-ARM WRAP-AROUND

1. Double Small Disengagement, to Double-Arm Wrap-Around

2. Double Small Disengagement, to Two-Hand Neck-Grasp & Shoulder Shove
to Face

3. Double Small Disengagement with Finger Jab to Eye, to Head Butt,
to Kali Forearm Drop Throw & Double-Hand Wrist Lock

4. Head Butt, to Step-Under-The-Arm, to Wrist Lock

5. Head Butt, to Figure 4 Arm Lock Takedown

JKD TRAPPING-HAND COUNTERS TO THE WRESTLING TIE UP
1. Shoulder Shove, to Pak-Sao & Double Hit
2. Tan-Sao, to Vertical punch, to Pak-Sao & Punch
3. Small Disengagement, to Finger Jab to Eyes, to Pak-Sao & Hit
4. Large Disengagement to the Outside, to Tan & Punch
5. Scoop & Punch
BOXING & STRIKING COUNTERS TO WRESTLING TIE UPS

1. Counter Wrestling Tie Up using the Following Techniques:

Uppercuts, Hooks, Bicep Hit, Ear Slap, Eye Gouge, Brachial Stun

DEFENSE FOR BASIC POP-UPS

1. Pop-Up to Side-Standing Strangle
2. Pop-Up to Half-Nelson, to Neck Throw
3. Lift-Arm-Behind-the-Neck Arm Lever, to Rear-Leg Pick-Up, to
Leg-Wrap-Around Throw
4. Shoulder Shove to Single-Leg Takedown, to Reverse Leg Lock
- Thumb
- Palm
- Inner Forearm


COUNTERS TO HOLDS (con'd.)

COUNTERS TO THE TIGHT TIE UP

1. Elbow-Down Release to Standing Head Lock
2. Muay Thai Inside-Arm-Snake, to Tight Tie Up, to Knee
3. Shove-Elbow, to Kali Twisting-Neck-Throw, to Standing Arm Lock

COUNTERS TO LEG ATTACKS

COUNTERS TO THE TACKLE

1. Sprawl with Front Head Lock
2. Front Head Lock & Throw
3. Sidestep to the Side with Straight Arm Throw
4. Sidestep to the Side with Lifting Arm Throw
5. Head Push to Hair Grab, with Face Smash to Surfboard
6. Face Shove-Back
COUNTERS TO SINGLE-LEG TAKEDOWN FROM TIE UP POSITION

1. Neck Crank with Wrench, to Underarm Control, to Leg Step-Over, to
Head Scissors with Reverse Full-Nelson, to Pile Driver
2. Down-Elbow, to Forearm-Lift-Hit, to Neck Crank
3. Up-Knee
COUNTERS TO THE SINGLE REAR LEG PICK-UP FROM THE TIE UP POSITION

1. Adjust Position, to Leg-Buckle-Throw, to Head Lock
2. Adjust Position to Head Lock
3. Chin Throw to Forward Neck Crank
4. Adjust Position to Arm-Bar Throw
5. Circle to Sitting-Leg-Lift-Throw, to Toe Hold Leg Lock
COUNTERS TO KALI STEP-ON-FOOT, PUSH-KNEE-THROW

1. Replace Step-to-Step on Foot-Push-Knee-Throw
2. Single-Leg Takedown
3. Elbow-and-Thigh Shove with Forearm

COUNTERS TO LEG ATTACKS (con'd.)

COUNTERS TO CIRCLE-WRIST LOCK

1. Cut-Down & Shove to Straight Arm-Bar
2. Angle & Wrist his Wrist to a Bent-Wrist Lock
3. Angle & Twist-Wrist to a Bent-Wrist Lock
COUNTER FOR REVERSE CIRCLE-WRIST LOCK

1. Step-Up, to Lift Elbow, to Arm Lock

COUNTERS TO STRAIGHT-THROUGH WRIST LOCK WITH FINGERS UP

1. Push on your Fingers to a Bent-Wrist Lock

COUNTERS TO STRAIGHT-THROUGH WRIST LOCK WITH FINGERS DOWN

1. Push on Wrist to Bent-Wrist Lock, to Finger-Squeeze

COUNTERS TO FINGER GRASP WITH UP-ARM-BAR

1. Wipe-Brace to Wrap-Around Arm Lock

COUNTERS TO REVERSE WRIST-TWIST

1. Thumb-Grasp to Thumb Lock
2. Wipe to Finger Jab

COUNTERS TO UNDER ARM-BAR

1. Shove-Elbow to Figure 4 Arm-Bar

COUNTERS TO DOWN ARM-BAR WITH HANDLE

1. Wipe to Down Arm-Bar

COUNTERS TO DOWN ARM-BAR WITHOUT HANDLE

1. Wipe & Backfist to Forearm Takedown

COUNTERS TO FIGURE 4 WRIST LOCK

1. Elbow Lift to Down Arm-Bar to Figure 4, Wrist Lock Takedown to
Bent-Wrist Lock Control

COUNTERS TO FRONT BENT-ELBOW WRIST LOCK

1. Shove Arm to Hammerlock



COUNTER TO LEG ATTACKS (con'd.)


COUNTERS TO UNDERARM COME-ALONG

1. Punch-Shoulder to Shoulder Arm-Bar

COUNTERS TO STOMACH ARM-BAR

1. Ankle Pick Up t o Leg & Chin Lock

COUNTERS TO NECK LOCKS & STRANGLES

COUNTERS TO SIDE HEAD LOCK

1. Nose-Lift to Neck Crank
2. Nose-Lift to Leg-Lift Takedown
3. Leg-Buckle
COUNTERS TO FRONT NECK CRANK

1. Groin-Hit to Arm Lock

COUNTERS TO SIDE STRANGLE

1. Arm Drag Throw
2. Neck Crank
3. Head Throw
COUNTERS TO REAR STRANGLE

1. Elbow t o Arm-Bar Takedown
2. Shoulder-Throw to Figure 4 Arm-Bar

COUNTERS TO COMMON THROWS

COUNTERS TO THE REAPING THROW

1. Keep a Superior Position to the Reaping Throw (during)
2. Cradle Throw (during)
3. Arm Drag Throw to Side-Strangle (after)
COUNTERS TO THE REAR-SWEEP THROW

1. Bong Sao to Arm-Bar Takedown

COUNTERS TO COMMON THROWS (cond)


COUNTERS TO THE FRONT-REAPING THROW

1. Leg-Lift to Front-Reaping Throw
2. Tackle, to Leg-Buckle, to Leg Lock with Chin Lift


COUNTERS TO SHOULDER THROW

1. Hip-Push to Rear Strangle
2. Step-Over to Rear Hip Throw
COUNTERS TO HIP THROW

1. Arm-Across-Throat to Cradle Throw
2. Chin Twist, to Leg-Buckle, to Leg Lock