Sie sind auf Seite 1von 24

TABLE OF C ONTENTS

National Team of Artists

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2

Site-Specific Dance as an Art Form

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 3

Our Specific Site: The Entire River

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

4

History of

this Local Site

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 5

Local Site Team

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 6

This Evening’s Program

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

6-9

• Music and Dance Unique to Your

 

7

• All-Site Medley

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

8

• All-Site Dancing to Original Music

 

8

• The Chord

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 9

Site

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

10

Poem by P. Trainor .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

11

Call to Action

&

Stewardship.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

12-13

Local Environmental Organizations

Local Thanks.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

 

14-15

Environmental River Issues

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

16-17

Itasca Site Performers

Poem - Untitled

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

19-20

21

22

. About the Local Team

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

23

Acknowledgements: One River Mississippi

 

24

Donor Recognition

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 25

O N E

R IVER

M ISSISSIPPI

N ATIONAL

T EAM

OF

A RTISTS

Artistic Director Marylee Hardenbergh has been creating large outdoor site-specific perform- ances for twenty-five years, in such sites as wastewater treatment plants, aerial lift bridges, library windows, and a clock tower on the Volga in Russia. She has been named Artist of the Year twice and received numerous grants and fellowship awards, including the National Endowment for the Arts, the McKnight and Soros Foundations. She has been creating site- specific dances on the Mississippi River at Minneapolis’ historic milling district for over 20 years.

Project Director Jana Larson is an artist, filmmaker and independent producer who loves to dance. She assisted Marylee in carrying out the vision of this project. Look for her documen- tary about the One River Mississippi project this fall.

Composer Lee Blaske is in continual demand as an arranger and composer for television/radio commercials, industrial shows, and for recording projects of all kinds. He composed the music that is heard at all the sites.

Environmental Consultant Tracy Fredin is the Director of Hamline University’s Center for Global Environmental Education.

Web Designer Nicky Hardenbergh also designed the newsletters.

Sound Consultant Don Schraufnagel, at UMD’s Weber Music Hall, advised on The Chord.

Graphic Designer Corey Sevett designed the postcard and program.

S ITE

S PECIFIC

D ANCE

AS

AN

A R T

F ORM

Site-specific dance is created for one site only. The music, the costumes, and the moves flow together for a particular setting on the Earth. The dance cannot be put on stage, and it cannot be performed at other places. When performed at the outdoor site, the dance offers the audi- ence a deeper connection with the place. The dance makes the site come alive and look new in the viewers’ eyes. In its purest form, local artists and community members perform it free, open to the public.

History: The concept extends back to the origins of religion, when early humans performed dances outdoors at specific sites associated with specific deities. In this century, using specific sites to inform the dance itself has grown slowly. Rudolf Laban, in his writing and thinking on space harmony, suggested that aligned harmonious sequences of movement might have meta- physical effects, physically and energetically shaping the space around it.

During the 1970s, well before the concept of site-specific dance came into the mind of Marylee Hardenbergh, the artistic director of One River Mississippi, she studied with Irmgard Bartenieff (a pupil of Laban), and learned about Space Harmony. Bartenieff created Movement Choirs in which Marylee danced. These sparked her thought of 5000 people dancing together, a thought realized in One River Mississippi.

The creation: Marylee describes how she choreographs a dance, first taking in the site. She will sit at that point on the Earth and allow the site to unfold itself to her. For thirty days straight, she visits at different times of the day, in all weathers, sitting and looking. The ele- ments she notes become the elements of the dance. For example, if roller-bladers come by, the dance includes roller-bladers. If Marylee sees kayakers, she will employ kayakers.

T H E

E NTIRE

M ISSISSIPPI

R IVER

H OSTS

O U R

S ITE - S PECIFIC

P ERFORMANCE

R IVER H OSTS O U R S ITE - S PECIFIC P ERFORMANCE A tent

A tent city set up on the levee after the 1927 flood. Courtesy U. S. Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division

The Mississippi River is the arterial flow of this continent. It runs for over 2,300 miles. Its width ranges from 20 feet at the beginning to 4 miles at its widest expansion. Its depth varies from three feet to 200 feet. Sixty percent of all North American birds (326 species) use this basin as their flyway; 60 percent of all grain exported from the U.S. is shipped from its ports. The river carries an average of 436,000 tons of sediment per day. A raindrop from Lake Itasca takes about 90 days to arrive at the Gulf of Mexico. The area of land that drains in to the river covers more than 35 states and two provinces. Dating back thousands of years to the first American Indians in

the area, humans have always used the Mississippi River and its tributaries as major transportation routes. From the Mississippi River a boat can access over half of the United States. Today, one river tow pulling fifteen barges of a commodity has the same carrying capacity as two and a quarter freight trains or 900 trucks.

I am a living river. I am both the flowing current and the silent riverbed. I am ancient, yet always new. I deliver the endless force of water. I move barges for your commerce; you harness me to drive your machines. I am willing to work for you and with you, yet I am powerless against your chemicals. I need friends to help me, to cherish me, to take good care of me.

4

THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

H ISTORY

OF

THE

M ISSISSIPPI

H EADWATERS

L OCAL

S ITE :

I TASCA

S TATE

PARK

A trickle of clear and pristine water sparkles in the sunshine of the northern Minnesota woods. This trickle that cascades over a single layer of rocks separating it from the Lake beyond, is the beginning of the Mighty Mississippi. Located in the tall pine trees of Itasca State Park, the river finds its source in Lake Itasca. For hundreds of years travelers were curious about the source of this huge river that divides a continent. Several early explorers claimed to have found the source, but the search finally concluded with Henry Schoolcraft’s discovery in 1832, led by a Native American named Ozawindib. Schoolcraft created the name Itasca by link- ing the Latin words for truth and head—the true head of the river.

Visitors often remove their shoes and walk from one side to the other, or walk across the single log foot bridge that connects the two sides. From here the river flows north and down- stream. A twig or leaf dropped in the water here will reach New Orleans in about 90 days.

Today a Visitor Center at the site celebrates Mary Gibbs, who in 1903 was the first female park commissioner in Minnesota. Gibbs was a gutsy woman, now famous for standing up against guns and threats from loggers in order to protect the parks growing trees.

P ERFORMANCE

O N E

R IVER

M ISSISSIPPI

I TASCA

Choreographer: Elaine Hanson

Project Manager: Denise Gulbranson

Music: “Minnesota The Land” by Peter Ostroushko; Lee Blaske; “World Centering” from Gathering of Shaman flute music

Dance Therapist: Tracy Moroney

Reiki Practitioner: Jeanne Troge

T HIS

E VENING S

P ROGRAM

6:00

Visit the tables and learn about local environmental issues and how you can help. Melissa Hallaway Children’s Dance Leader

6:30

Bicycle Dance: Visitor Center Parking Lot

6:45

Art Contest Winners: Awards

6:55

Parade to the Headwaters Site led by the Spiral Peace Drummers

7:05

Earth Blessings

7:10

The Chord of Harmony: Audience Chorus led by Tracy Moroney

7:17 P M

I.

I TASCA

D ANCES

In this section, each site dances to music from its own heritage.

Music and Dance are the right art forms to express our connection to the Mississippi and to other communities of people who live along this mighty river. Our moving bodies connect with all the other moving, living things—the waters, the air, the animals and growing plants. Through the power of the intention of our thoughts and actions, we affirm our desire to acknowledge our connections and honor the Earth which gives us life. Our dance is about cele- brating and nourishing life.

Earth Dances: During the poem Earth Dances local children will wade across the Headwaters, as children and adults from around the world have been doing here for countless years.

Heavenly Blessing: In this opening piece we dance as stars at the beginning of creation. Looking down at planet Earth, on what we now know as northern Minnesota, we send out the divine and creative energy needed to create life, raw and beautiful in the Lake Itasca region. Life is formed and it is holy.

Glaciers: In imitation of that mighty ice flow, we dance and slowly help carve out the earth. We shape the hills and valleys that will support a mighty river when the frozen waters melt.

Work and Play: In this dance we celebrate early European settlers who both worked the land and played here, as they lived out their lives in this pristine wilderness.

Dancin’ in the Mississippi Mud: Our youth dancers celebrate life and the joy that water brings to all our lives. Water sustains us physically and renews our spirits. The metaphor of ‘living waters’ that we hear so frequently in religious language is a reality here, played out and danced out in the Mississippi mud! Choreography: Denise Gulbranson

7

Paddle Dance: This dance celebrates the movement of human beings in boats on the water. Two men from our flotilla, in imaginative imitation of early Voyageurs, will disembark from their canoes and dance a joyful celebration of this hardy life.

Untitled Poem: Here we segue back into a remembrance of the blessing that waters give to us all. Based on Itasca Park’s recently acquired sculpture of Women of the Water, our women dancers will pose as caretakers of the waters as we listen to an Untitled Poem that speaks to our need to be fluid and yielding in our interactions with one another.

7:37 P M

II:

O N E

R IVER

M ISSISSIPPI

The Medley: Red is the color at the top of the rainbow, and the Itasca Mississippi Headwaters Dance Site represents the top of the rainbow in relationship to the other six dance sites along the river. Each of our sister cities/communities has their own color to flesh out that rainbow. Here, all of the sites hear the same medley, comprised of music from the seven sites. Our music is first.

The red circle is passed along from dancer to dancer with a sampling of the music being used at each site.

One River Mississippi: Next we move into our dance to the original composition created for this unique One River Mississippi performance. In this section, all of the seven sites are hearing the same music at the same moment. This dance is a celebration of color, sound and movements the river inspires in us. We end this piece with our simultaneous unison dance movement with the dancers at all the other sites. Please join us at the end when we all dance

the final repetitious movement together. Choreography: Marylee Hardenbergh and all of the seven site choreographers.

The Chord: We all harmonize live along the river.

8:00 P M

W HITE

E ARTH

D RUM

AND

D ANCE

Performers from White Earth will share with us their indigenous song and dance. Through this performance we celebrate with them the ancient and honorable relationship humans have had with Mother Earth, specifically here in the region of northern Minnesota and the Mississippi River.

8:15 P M

– PARADE

Parade back to the Visitor Center for music, food, speakers and more.

Mississippi River Headwaters Note that the Mississippi River flows north from where you are standing.
Mississippi River
Headwaters
Note that the Mississippi River flows north
from where you are standing.
10
Map courtesy of Itasca State Park

EARTH

DANCES

Earth Dances, Barefoot, to feel the life warming up into us spiritual, sensual as we recognize we are born of the earth irrevocably linked in a woven bracelet of mutual beginning. Creation, a faucet of texture and time

by Peter Trainor

pouring out its riches with abundant abandon in a total reliance on the users wisdom and subject to the abusers ignorance. Barefoot we, Grounded in God yet stretching out, fingers spread, to touch every corner of the universe with the message we care. Earth Dances.

H O W

C ALL

T O

B E

TO

A

A CTION :

G OOD

S TEWARD

PERSONAL: Taking care of Mother Earth is up to each and every one of us. As individuals we can make a commitment to maintaining clean water by not littering when we visit lakes and being very careful about what we allow in the water or on the land where we live or visit. Dispose of all motor oils, machinery, appliances, computers and other recyclable items in the proper locations.

COMMUNITY: In the community you can help clean up and keep clean a portion of stream, river, ditch, lake or wetland. Groups can contact Adopt-A-River and receive free info, kits, clean-up bags, gloves and help with promotion by contacting dnrstate.mn.us/adoptriver.

NATIONAL: Katrina sent us a wake-up call about the issues facing coastal Louisiana and the necessity to restore its vital but endangered ecosystem. The Coastal wetlands of Louisiana act as a barrier protecting the coast from hurricanes and

flooding. In addition, a quarter of the nation’s gas and oil and a third of domestic seafood is produced here, requiring the protection afforded by the coastal wetlands. Here’s what you can do:

• Stop using pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers on your lawn. Buy organic.

• Urge your legislators to support the WRDA bill and the LCA program within it

• Sign the postcard to Senators Dominici and Bingham on the House Energy Committee

and urge them to support the revenue sharing bill that would fund the restoration of the

coastal wetlands through reallocation of off-shore oil royalties.

L OCAL

I NFORMATION

A BOUT

S TEWARDSHIP

Be river friendly! Keep new construction away from the river. Keep a natural buffer of plants between the shoreline and your house. Keep your landscape natural: don’t fill wetlands, remove ice ridges, or change to topography. Contact your soil and water conservation district for information and assistance.

Learn how people have used the river over time. Contact the Institute for Minnesota Archaeology, Minnesota DNR state parks, Minnesota Historical Society of your county histori- cal society

Learn what fish, animals, birds, reptiles and amphibians live within your river. Contact DNR’s Natural Heritage Program, read Janine Benyus’ Northwoods Wildlife, or other guides to wildlife.

Start a monitoring project on your river.

Get involved! Join local organizations who are working for a clean and healthy environ- ment. During the spring and summer the Headwaters Canoe Club conducts stewardship activities along the first 83 miles of the Mississippi River for river clean up and environmental advocacy. Contact Harvey Tjader: 218-444-5477.

L OCAL

E NVIRONMENTAL

O RGANIZATIONS

The Hubbard County Coalition of Lake Associations (COLA) is actively involved in edu- cation, water quality improvement and lakeshore ordinance compliance initiatives. The spread of exotic, non-native species of plants and animals threatens the area lakes. Public education, state laws, and prevention/eradication techniques are being used to control the spread. Another issue lakes face is the loss of habitat and water quality due to increased develop- ment of lakeshore property. Water quality is muddied by loss of in-water vegetation, removal of shore land vegetation buffer zones, and clearing of trees from shore land property. Public awareness and individual actions on good shore land management practices is the key to pre- serving the regions water resource heritage. Don’t use poisons on your shore land or water veg- etation and try to leave shore land as natural as possible to allow for animal habitat. COLA, may be contacted at PO Box 746, Park Rapids, MN 56470.

The Park Rapids League of Women Voters meets monthly and frequently addresses issues concerning the environment, land use and water quality. They believe that natural resources should be managed as interrelated parts of life-supporting ecosystems. They support a state role in preservation and management of Minnesota’s water resources through protection, allo- cation, conservation, pricing, and inter-basin transfer policies protective of Minnesota’s cur- rent and future needs. The League has supported state participation in interstate commissions to provide comprehensive planning for the boundary waters since 1956. In recent years the League actively participated with the Wetlands Coalition to monitor changes in the Wetlands Protection Act. Contact Trudy Overmyer at 218-732-9226.

The Itasca Moraine Chapter of the North Country Trail Association is responsible for the construction and maintenance of the North County National Scenic Trail from the western

edge of the Chippewa National Forest to Lake Itasca State Park and west into Clearwater County to the Old Headquarters Site. They are working with the National Trails System to complete a hiking trail that will be over 4600 miles in length and used for hiking, snowshoeing, hunting, and cross-country skiing. For more information about how to join in activities and help build a trail contact Jerry Trout at 218-675-5448 or on the web see northcountrytrail.org.

The Hubbard County Woodland Council is dedicated to environmentally sound and sus- tainable management of private non-industrial forest lands. They conduct field days and spon- sor tours and workshops regarding the wise use of our natural resources. It gathers and dis- seminates information on relevant topics such as tree planning, seedling care, thinning, harvesting, regeneration, wildlife habitat, wetland regulation and biodiversity. HCWC plays an important role in helping private woodland owners exercise conscientious stewardship of a critical resource now and into the future. In August ’06 the group will sponsor a GPS course in Park Rapids and in September a mushrooming hike. Contact Carter Hedeen at 703 First Street W, Park Rapids.

Other groups represented at One River Mississippi today also welcome your participation. You are invited to check out the tables for Minnesota Trailways, The Hubbard County Soil and Water Conservation District, the University of Minnesota Extension Office, and others, to learn more. Please visit these tables before and after the performance to find out how you can become involved and be a better steward of our environment.

M ISSISSIPPI

R IVER

E NVIRONMENTAL

I SSUES

A FFECTING

THE

L OUISIANA

C OASTAL

W ETLANDS

What can be done to help our watershed? The Mighty Mississippi River is a great resource for all Americans. It provides a means of transportation, habitat for abundant wildlife, and it is a primary source of fresh drinking water for millions. The health and dynamics of this great system are valuable. As citizens, we ask you to stay informed about the vitality of this dynamic watershed. The Mississippi River has also been the crafter of Louisiana wetlands. Unfortunately, cur- rently Louisiana is a state in great peril—losing on average a football field of coastal land every 40 minutes of each day. But the sediments trapped in the Mississippi River can once again be harvested to create new coastal wetland, a great barrier to the devastating effect of hurricane storm surge. Technology such as pipeline sediment delivery can now provide us with tech- niques to harvest the rich sediment of the Mississippi River to rebuild fragile marsh habitat. For more information on these issues, visit the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program Web site at www.BTNEP.org We also encourage you to contact our congressional representatives and senators asking them to allow the Army Corps of Engineers to be able to spend money to help increase the sedi- mentation build-up by using what they dredge out of the channel of the Mississippi beneficially.

D RINKING

WATER AND

THE

M ISSISSIPPI

R IVER

Along the Mississippi River, residents are able to purchase clean water from the municipalities, who work hard to make the water as pure as possible, and to sell it at an affordable rate. Of the 7 sites where performances will occur, 6 of them use the river as the main source for their tap water.

Making clean water available for public consumption has become an important world-wide issue. On other continents, a handful of private companies have public water supplies, and then sell the water at rates that are exorbitant. This is especially a hardship for the local poor people who often cannot afford to buy water at these increased rates. The Mississippi River used to be a favorite place to go swimming. Now the river is consid- ered unfit to swim in, and there are warnings not to eat the fish. Why is this so? Our river water has been polluted by chemical run-off and also by companies discharging their industrial wastes into the river – for free! (Check out http://www.scorecard.org/ and see who is responsi- ble for the dumping.)

R U N - OFF

P OLLUTION

Residential yards, construction sites, and parking lots — these everyday things may seem harmless but in fact might be causing problems for our water. When land is converted from natural areas to developed urban areas, pavement and rooftops replace grass and trees. Water flows over driveways, streets and parking lots, taking with it everything that is in its path. This “runoff” is deposited, via storm sewers, into nearby lakes, creeks and rivers. This non-point source pollution can contain sediment, debris, fertilizers, pesticides, leaves, grass clippings, motor oil or pet waste. Small amounts of these materials entering a lake or river are not gener- ally considered harmful. But when these small amounts are multiplied by thousands or tens of thousands they can cause serious water quality problems.

H ERE S

• Use permeable pavers

• Clean up after pets

WHAT

YOU

CAN

DO :

• Wash your car on the lawn

• Build rain gardens

O N E

R IVER

M ISSISSIPPI

H EADWATERS

O N E R IVER M ISSISSIPPI H EADWATERS 18
O N E R IVER M ISSISSIPPI H EADWATERS 18

I TASCA

P ERFOMERS

Core Dancers:

Kelly Grossman, Denise Gulbranson, Elaine Hanson, Shelly James, Tanya Miller, Renee Wickman, Mara Howes.

Youth Dancers:

Hannah Fischer, Abigale Grossman, Noah Grossman, Melissa Hallaway,

Northland Studio

Abby Hanson, Mara Howes, Hailey Lundin, Amanda Meyer, Hilary

of Dance

Morgan, Dara Nikolova, Kyja Penning, Lisa Pickett, Jesseca Pritchett, Mandy Schirmers, Shaylah Stomberg, Katie Zaczkowski

Children Wading:

Emily Kjenaas, Krista Carpenter, Alyssa Day, Tori Campbell, Sam Grossman, Drew & Tori Hilmanowski, Paige Hill, Cielo & Farren Mooney, Samantha Sabin, Kailee Ellenson, Kylie Higgins, Joelle Nagel, Kayla Branstrom, Skyler Kennelly, Hailey Craig, Amanda Girtz, Hope Johnson, Emily Eystad, Lydia Peterson, Heidi Lageson

Bicycle Dancers:

Rod Helm, Neil King, Mike Perez, Sandy Perez, Thom Peterson, Phil Sailer, Arlette Van Whyte, Irene Weis

Paddle Dancers:

Terry Larson, Harvey Tjader

Canoeists:

Mary Adams, Richard and Margaret Dutch, Flo and Carter Hedeen, Del & Alice Holz, Terry Larson, Harvey and Tyler Tjader, Jerry Trout

Spiral Peace

Val Burkman, Karen Chabot, Robin Cunningham, Sherry Ellefson, Sonja

Drummers:

Kosler, Ann MacGregor, Melissa Star, Jeanne Troge

Blessings:

Spiral Peace Drummers, Mike Dahl, White Earth, Pastor Bill Meyer, Calvary Lutheran

Native Americans:

The WE Boys Drummers Singers and Dancers from White Earth Tribe.

Musicians:

Hickory Wind: Bill & Julie Kaiser, Rick Paulin

Speakers:

Connie Cox: Itasca Park Naturalist; Terry Larson: Northern Adventure Mississippi Canoe Trips and Rentals; Brita Sailer, Minnesota House of Representatives, District 1-B.

Stage Manager:

Jodi Hodgson

Dance Therapist:

Tracy Moroney

Environmental &

Early Childhood Initiative; Boy Scouts; Loon Lake Woodcarvers;

Community

Park Rapids Rotary Club; Hubbard County Woodland Council;

Partners:

Itasca Moraine Chapter North Country Trail Association; Minnesota Trailways, Park Rapids League of Women Voters, COLA: Coalition of Lakes Association, Hubbard County Soil and Water Conservation; U of M Extension Office, Itascatur Ski Bike & Run Club; Headwaters Canoe Club/Adopt-A-River; PRLAAC-Park Rapids Lakes Area Arts Council

A

B I G

T HANK

YOU

TO

THE

F OLLOWING

P EOPLE

AND

O RGANIZATIONS :

Region 2 Arts Council:Teri Widman, Beverlee Olson Itasca Park Personnel: Mike Kovacovich; Connie Cox; Jim Keller; Tim Anderson Park Rapids Rotary Club Coborns Coldwell-Banker Clack and Dennis Real Estate Wells’ Blue Bunny Tim Metz, Princess Harshman: First Responders Mike Kaufenberg: Kaufenberg Signs Northland Studio of Dance: Jennifer Gytrie Cattail Creek Framing Neil King-Photographer Northern Adventures: Terry Larson Brian Bedford: Mississippi River Songs Collection Kelly’s Cottage Garden PRLAAC: Park Rapids Lakes Area Arts Council Minnesota Power Jeanne Troge

ALL OUR WONDERFUL VOLUNTEERS!

U NTITLED

P OEM

Be As water is Without friction Flow around the edges of those within your path Surround within your ever-moving depths those who come to rest there- enfold them while never for a moment holding on Accept whatever distance others are moved within your flow Be with them gently as far as they allow your strength to take them and fill your own being with the remaining space when they are left behind

–Source unknown

B IOGRAPHIES

Elaine Hanson, choreographer for One River Mississippi, holds a BFA in Dance and an Education degree from the U of Arizona. She performed and choreographed in Tucson, in Virginia with The Moving Company: Dance Now!, and in Minnesota with a University Dance Repertory Company, musical theater groups, and light opera. She has taught dance to children and adults of all ages, and worked as an artist in residence in public schools for several years. She is presently involved with liturgical dance and available for performances and dance or creative/play workshops.

Denise Gulbranson, project manager and choreographer, is the director and dance instruc- tor at the Northland Studio of Dance. She has lived in Park Rapids since 1989. She was born in Chicago, Illinois where she received her training in dance and musical theatre and performed locally with United Artists Dance Co., and taught classes. She is active in various community organizations and was enticed by the opportunity of using the performing arts as a catalyst to promote awareness of our environment through One River Mississippi.

Tracy Moroney is a dance therapist from California.

Jeanne Troge is a Reiki Master at Brigid’s House in Park Rapids. www.BrigidsHouse.com.

218-732-5347.

W E

W ISH

TO

A CKNOWLEDGE

O U R

N ATIONAL

S UPPORTERS

To the Center for Global Environmental Education (CGEE) at Hamline University where Marylee Hardenbergh is the artist-in-residence in a program developed by CGEE to foster artistic work that engages the examination of environmental issues. CGEE envisions environmental literacy and stewardship in people of all ages: Thank You! Jenny Moore, Lucy DuBose, Michael Loden, Sage Cowles, Caroline Leibman, Kay Radlauer, Gretchen Bonfert, Cheryl Kartes, Kathleen Fluegel, Dan McGuiness, John Shepard, Minneapolis Mayor RT Rybak, Pam Margules, Rosehawk, Larry Schmidt and the Trust for Public Land, Andy Grund, The Hardenbergh Family, Susan Testroet Bergeron, Kerry St. Pé, John McLachlan, Doug Meffert, Doug Daigle, all governors of the 10 states along the river, all mayors of our sites, Angela Anderson, James Falvey, Brenda Erickson, Camille LeFevre, Ellen Hufschmidt, Deanne Ekholm, Steve Lenhart, Rebecca Soileau, Laressa Dickey, Drew Flack, Sarah Bell Haberman, Katinka Galanos, Patrick Pierson, Mark Huelsbeck, Katrinka Somdahl, Carol Ryan, Cathy Mosher, Randy Hines, Paul Rhode, Catherine McCalvin, Diane Benjamin, Gretchen Benjamin, Christopher Reyes, Aaron C. Walker, James Fields, Corey Sevett, Don Schraufnagel, Holly Lau, James Baker, Jean Watts, Dinah Maygarden, Audrey Emmons, Karen Swenson, The Fireheart Women, Tracy Fredin, Dan McGuinness, John Shepard, Elaine Hanson, Denise Gulbranson, Bernadette Knaeble, Jason Clusman, Joedy Cook, Johanne Jakhelln, Beckah Voigt, Sarah Anne Patz, Loryl Breitenbach, Kimberly Baker, Amy Salerno-Hale, Barbara Hayley, Monique Moss, Janet Spencer & Lyn Caliva, Donna Duhé, Angela Hammerli, Blue Bunny Ice Cream/Wells Dairy, Lesley Bartholomew, and to the scores of others who helped anonymously. Our national radio partners: KZY-FM Northern Minnesota, KBEM Minneapolis, WVIK Quad Cities, KDHX St. Louis, WKNO Memphis, WWNO New Orleans, WRBH Plaquemines Parish.