You are on page 1of 21

Karrole McFarland

Box 963
Joliet, Illinois
ISy 91960
(10)
Tokyo Christian
"Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature" Mark 1615
Vol. 59 Kimberlin Hgts, Tennessee
^
English Bible class at Camp Oji, Tokyo which Stanley Buttray teaches on Tuesday
at 5 PM. It is more convenient at that lime because they finish work then. This is
the Christmas party of December 1959. Only one peruon is a Christian.
Sunday Morning Bible Class
On Sunday morning February 7th I be
gan an English Bible class for adults in my
former garage with an attendance of five
persons. Since then the attendance has aver
aged six. Though we had hopes for a better
attendance to begin with, yet it is a start to
wards what I hope will become a church in
this place.
Since there was a church, kindergarten.
Shiraishi, one of Japan's own woman corres
pondents writing in the March 5th issue of
the Japan Times Newspaper. "A little boy in
the kindergarten in my neighhood said that
Emichan's family had bought a TV set and
that Emichan was given the foremost seat in
the room and the other boys were making a
fuss over her. Since then she has become the
"princess" in the kindergarten, the boys al
ways waiting upon her.
In thi'5 materialistic world a man's worth
irid pahjOiragfi" here IK EhlS place before the1s--apr"to beTneasnred Tjy""v9lraT"he-l)os5esses
War, it may be an advantage for the beginning
of another church. At least that is our present
reasoning, and goal toward which we are
working.
At this present time, there are many
problems and difficulties in starting a church
here in Tokyo as well as almost anywhere
else in Japan. First, there is the enormou'3
language and FOREIGNER barrier. Second,
there are No consecrated Japanese Christian
workers among Christian (or Churches of
Christ) to help or who are willing to help!
Third, the present Churches of Christ in and
around Tokyo and their Pastors are spiritually
dead! Fourth, the whole nation is bound in
slavery to false religions and customs which
are Satan originated. Fifth, the growing vacum
of freedom, brought about by post-war de
mocracy has rapidly been filled, not by
Christianity (the Western religion), but by
New Native Cults and mixtures of various
kinds of religion. Sixth, and not the least, is
the insatiable lust for material things. For
example, permit me to quote from Tsugi
and not by what he is and what he has
achieved. This kind of thinking influences
small children . . .
Adults sa.y that children of postwar Japan
are mercenary, but the country and people
have become materialirtic and value material
gain more highly th n spiritual gain. It is
natural for children brought up in a family
where spiritual value is not recognized to
become materialistic. Adults are not qualified
to criticize children."
But in spite of the above mentioned ex
ceeding great obstacles, there can be no al
ternative, but to follow the M.sters example
and command . . . preach the Gospel to all
people. Knowing the fear of God and the
constraining love of Christ we cannot but teach
and preach the all-sufficient reconciling mer-
sage of the Cross.
Whether here in Japan or with you good
people at home, may such a consuming
passion for lost souls as Jesus Christ's, ever
pervade each of our lives.
Stanley Buttray
Spring, 1960 Number 2
NEWS AND VIEWS
Miss Velma Held, a teacher for the Air
Force schools, is now teaching at Grant
Heights in Tokyo. Miss Held is known for her
friendship with the missionaries and as a
valuable helper in their work.
In September Sharon Lee Patton started
attending a kindergarten at the U.S. Air Force
school at Grant Heights. However, in October
she had to be absent from school for several
days because of a severe case of impetigo
which she perhaps contracted at school. The
tuition at the Air Force kindergartens is
$90.00 a year.
The Fattens are buying a 1956 Japanese
Toyopet car for $835.00 from a missionary
who is returning for furlough to the U.S.A.
Funds are needed to pay for the car. Send to:
Andrew Patton, C/o Ray Armstrong, R. 3,
Box 310, Piqua, Ohio.
Andrew Patton observed his 42nd birth
day on October 4th. Velma Held, the Buttrays,
and Edd Hodge of Akron Ohio, a visiting Air
man, were present for the birthday supper.
Stephen lijima, minister of the Minato
Church, has started an English class to sup
plement his salary. Andrew Patton helps him
teach English conversation an hour once a
week.
The Minato Church has invited the
Pattons to go on a Church picnic with them
on November 3rd, Cultural Day in Japan.
Recently the EMAJ missionary organiza
tion held in Tokyo a two-day meeting which
they called a Strategy Conference. Such
practical subjects as the use of radio and the
printed page in evangelism, the economical
-buHdtng xft Church tfuildtngs tor thFVapsnese
Churches, and methods of evangelism were
discussed. Mark Maxey, our fellow missionary
from Kyushu, was present and spoke on how
to build Church buildings economically. Those
of us who attended derived much practical
profit from the discussions. We enjoyed Mark's
visit in our home and the good fellowship with
him.
Recently Harold Sims received one of the
quonset huts which the Armed Services has
been donating to the missionaries in Japan.
Harold being on furlough, Stanley Buttray
received it for him and he and Andrew Patton
dismantled the building and had it hauled
from Yokohama to Tokyo. The tax and the
hauling bill cost about $25.00. This gives
Harold a fairly good building at a very low
cost.
In the latter part of September Miss Ruth
Smith, passing through Tokyo on her way
to her mission work in the Philippines, spent
a day with the missionaries in Tokyo.
Andrew Patton
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
niE TOKYO CHRISTIAN
Published quarterly by the Missionaries of
the Church of Christ Cunningham Mission.
Tokyo, Japan, for the information and inspira
tion of every Christian whose heart is open to
the call of Christ, and who is willing to help
in the supreme task of carrying out the Great
Commission of Christ: Matthew 28:19, 20.
Entered as second class matter in the Knox-
viile, Tenn., Post office under the act of March
3, 1879.
Two-Year Subscription 50 cents
Subscription and "Flaming Torch" $1.00
MISSION STAFF
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Buttray, 575 2-Chome,
Kamiochiai, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. For
warding agent: Mrs. Homer Anderson, R. D. 1,
Mcadville, Pa.
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Patton, 27 Sakura-
yama, Nakano-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. Forwarding
agent: Mr. or Mrs. Ray Armstrong, Rt. 3,
Box 310, Piqua, Ohio.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Sims (Furlough
address for the winter: 790 15th Ave., South,
St. Petersburg, Fla.) Forwarding Agent: First
Christian Church, Tokyo Mission, Box 262,
Charlottesville, Virginia.
Packages for Japan should be sent direct by
parcel post to one of the missionaries whose
addresses are shown above. Consult your local
post office concerning mailing rules and limit
ations of size and weights.
If you change your address please notify
H. L. Hamilton, Kimberlin Heights, Tennessee,
giving both your old and your new address.
If you make an offering of $1.00 or more you
arc entitled to receive this paper if you so
request. Churches or groups making an offer
ing of $10.00 or more may request a bundle
of 10 copies for distribution.
Korean Visit
This Report Is Continued from Previous
Issues of the TOKYO CHRISTIAN
By Harold Sims
9. The Seminary Students
The 15 boys and 2 girls in the school
were very friendly and receptive to the teach
ing, and many of them knew their Bibles quite
well, although their general educational back
ground was inferior to the Japanese young
people. They were of all typos, but general-
'y they seemed to like argument and asked me
a lot of speculative questions. For instance,
one of them advanced the theory that there
must be toilets in heaven because Jesus ate
fish after His resurrection etc. That was a
nc.v one, and it occured to me that perhaps
people who never get quite enough to eat
in this vale imagine heaven as a place with
plenty of steaming delicious food perhaps
even some well-fed Americans have the same
idea. We had many happy hours together
in the study of Personal Evangelism and
Chi'istology (6 hours per week in each sub
ject). The night before I left the students
gave me a farewell party and many kind ex
pressions of their esteem and appreciation. As
a parting Scripture verse they gave me II Tim.
4:9, so I hastily referred them to I Tim. 4:13
as my reply. I have much confidence and
Page 2
New Agent for Sims
Effective from May 1, 1960 the Chris
tian Church of Charlottesville, Vir
ginia will act as our sponsor and for
warding agent. Someone appointed
by the church will receive, record,
receipt and report all offerings-both
living-link salary and general gifts
for the work being done in Tokyo by
the Harold Sims family. The design
ated salary for the Sims family will
be sent to Japan regularly, a fur
lough fund of $500 per year will be
set aside, and funds for the expenses
of carrying on the work in Japan,
children's school tuition etc. will be
sent as requested by Mr. and Mrs.
Sims who will be fully informed at
all times of the amount available in
the current account.
This change is made because: (1)
we feel it is more suitable and ex
pedient for one of our living-link
churches to act as our "board" than
any other system of missionary sup
port and supervision. There is a trend
toward responsible cooperation be
tween local congregations and their
directly-supported missionaries in our
brotherhood which we like. (2) Char
lottesville has a larger share than any
of the other churches in our regular
support, although we appreciate the
others just as much. (3) This church
has been very co-operative with us
and interested in the work for many
years, and offered to help in this
additional way. (4) For those in
dividuals who wish to deduct the
sum of their contributions for income-
tax purposes, checks may be made
payable to the church, which is in
corporated.
We are NOT changing because of
any dissatisfaction on either my
father's part or mine. Rather we
cannot find adequate words to ex
press our appreciation for his deep
interest in us and the work in Japan
hope in some of the young men I met in the
class-room there.
10. The Interpreters
One of my regrets on the trip was inability
to use Japanese. The language of their form-
eer conquerors has been taboo in Korea for
15 years now, so only middle-aged people can
understand it, and many of them have forgot
ten a lot or don't like to use it because it re
calls bad memories. So I experienced once
again the language barrier.
In the Seminary I was assigned 2 inter
preters. One was an old man called "grand
father" by all the students and a real person
ality. Ho had a small nosewidth mustache
which he constantly pulled when in thought,
and wore an old pair of women's shoes for
house-slippers and a well-patched black coat.
His wife has been bed-fast for years and there
and his sacrificial labors as our for
warding agent for 7 years, editor of
the Tokyo Christian and trustee of
the Cunningham Mission. Through
most of this time he has contributed
not only his time in writing many
letters and articles, but also much
of the postage and stationery.
At the time he became fonvarding
agent for us he was the minister of
one of our living-link churches in
Turtle Creek, Penna. Now he is semi-
retired. On March 23 he celebrated
his 70th birthday in good health,
and we are looking fonvard to many
more years of his faithful service to
Christ. Although the book-keeping
burden will be eased for him by
this change, we know that the bur
den of prayer for the missionaries,
the lost souls and the young churches
over in Japan will remain in his
great heart, and we are thankful
From May 1, 1960 all offerings
that are sent to cither Harold Sims
or A. E. Sims will be forwarded to
Charlottesville. Checks may be made
payable to Harold Sims or First
Christian Church, Tokyo Mission.
ADDRESS:
Box 262, Charlottesville, Virginia.
Since my father is so well-inform
ed about all aspects of the work in
Japan he will still be in general
charge of publicity and information
concerning our work, particularly
after we return to Japan. He will
have copies of the Flaming Torch
(biography of W. C. Cunningham)
for sale, and extra copies of the
Tokyo Christian and display materials
for missionary fairs etc. may be
obtained by writing to him. AD
DRESS; A. E. Sims, 1312 Forest Ave.
High Point, N. C.
Yours,
HAROLD AND LOIS SIMS
are 10 assorted grand-children, in-laws eti
who live in with him and depend somewh
on him. Yet he carried his burdens lightl;;
and had a wonderful Christian disposition a
well as a large store of common-sense and di:
ceinment. When the students would ask som
foolish question or be a little slow to undei
stand he would scold them severely in wha
sounded like pretty eloquent and forcefu
Korean.
The other interpreter was a young ma
engaged in graduate study at a university an
fluent in several languages. He was very polit
and cultured and one of the most lively an
helpful interpreters I have ever used.
11. The Preachers
Of our more than 70 churches of Chrb
in Korea I was able to visit only 9, althoug
I met several other preachers when they visite
the Seminary on various business and for
chapel talks. So I saw only a cross-section of
the ministers, and because of the language
difficulty I was unable to visit intimately with
many of these. One difference from Japan is
that there are quite a few older men with
many years of experience, and that makes for
a more stable work Most of the men, both
old and young, are preaching heroically and
sacrifically without any Mission salary; and in
my view that is the best way and the true in
dicator of an established church in Korea.
Some of the preachers made a very favorable
impression to me, although vei'y frankly some
of them did not. God, of course, is the judge
and will prove each man's work.
One day while we were wailing in the car
to go somewhere a young Presbyterian preach
er who had been studying several months came
to the window and announced he had decided
to be immersed. He had been befriended and
laughrby one of~"tlie "ybuhg' preachers who
graduated from the Seminary last year and
also by Mr. Taylor. He was immersed at 5:30
the following morning in the chill Han river.
(There are no baptisteries in the churches
they seem to think them unscriptural) The
possibilities in this land are open and good, and
I am thankful for those who are there pro
claiming the ancient gospel.
IZ. The Missionaries
There are now 5 families in Korea, and I
was able to visit a little with all of them. Un
fortunately, while I was there some problems
in the Christian Radio Mission in Pusan, with
which 3 families were associated, came to a
head and 2 of the families on the field as well
as the executive committee resigned. The only
distressing thing about my whole visit to Korea
was the disunity among the missionaries, and
while I don't know the solutions to their prob
lems and have no desire to meddle or criticize,
I do pray that there may be exemplary unity
among the missionaries on the field so that
the work may prosper.
There are many other things that should
be mentioned. Something should surely be
said about the Korean food, but because of
the over-abundance of red-hot pepper and gar
lic used it is a subject just about too hot to
-handle: And there are -alwayssome-things-
hard to describe, such as the sensation of being
wakened about midnight to the tune of "Near
er My God to Thee" being rendered loudly by
some fellow walking along the street, wheth
er drunk or not I cannot tell. Such a thing
would perhaps not happen in any other nation
under the sun.
One late afternoon as we were returning
from town I noticed a middle-aged farmer
leading his ox down one of Seoul's sidewalks.
His chest was thrown out, his shoulders were
high, wide and handsome and his face was
lighted with a huge, healthy smile. I imagine
he had just purchased his bovine companion
and was rejoicing in the privilege of private
ownership. To me ho was a typical Korean
choosing for the moment, perhaps, to ignore
some of the bitter facts of life he was happy
to be a free man and able to overcome his
difficulties many times by a cheerful disposi
tion.
I believe Korea is both worth defending
from Communist and evangelizing for Christ
and His church.
Places Visited By Sims
Up until Feb. 1, 1960 the following places
had been visited by Harold Sims who is now
in the United States on furlough. Those mark
ed with an asterisk were visited by the whole
family. We wish to thank each one of you
for the gracious hospitality which we have
enjoyed and your interest in the work of
preaching the gospel in Japan.
CALIFORNIA
'^Tnglewood, First Christian Church
"Tnglewood, Grenshaw Christian Church
FLORIDA
-Cleai-water, First Christian Church
Eau Gallic, First Christian Church
*Eustis, First Church of Christ
''Kissimmee, First Christian Church
*Lakeland, First Christian Church
Lake Wales, First Christian Church
*Largo, First Christian Church
*Leesburg, First, Christian Church,
Miami, Hialeah Christian Church
''Orlando, First Christian Church
""St. Cloud, First Christian Church
*St. Petersburg, Central Christian Church
Tampa, Palma Ceia Christian Church
"'Wauchula, First Christian Church
GEORGIA
Atlanta Christian College
''Carrollton, First Christian Church
Forest Park, Christian Church
INDIANA
Columbus, Garden City Church of Christ
Columbus, Jonesville Christian Church
Columbus, New Hope Christian Church
Crothersville, Jackson County Youth Rally
Heltonville, Mundell Christian Church
Greenwood, First Christian Church
Indianapolis, University Heights Christian
Lawrenceburg, First Christian Church
Lpwrenceburg, Bright Christian Church
''Markle, Church of Christ
Mishawaka, Milburn Blvd. Church
Springville, Christian Church
ILLINOIS
Bridgeport, First Christian Church
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
Wood River, First Church of Christ
KENTUCKY
'^Alexandria, First Chrisldan Church
''Leesburg, Christian Church
Louisville, College of the Scriptures
MICHIGAN
Buchanan, First Christian Church
Lansing, Great Lakes Bible College
MISSOURI
"i'Garuthersville, First Christian Church
*East Prairie, First Christian Church
St. Louis Christian Old People's Home
NEW MEXICO
^Albuquerque, First Ctoistian Church
OHIO
"Cincinnati, Chase Ave. Church of Christ
^Cincinnati, Montgomery Road, Church of
Christ
Canton, Moreland Christian Church
"Findlay, Parkview Church of Christ
Hamersville, Church of Christ
Malvern, Church of Christ
-Pandora, Chux'ch of-Christ
PENNSYLVANIA
Central City, Church of Christ
Confluence, Christian Church
^'Monroeville, Christian Church
"Turtle Creek, First Christian Church
Pittsburg, Alleghany County Miss. Assn.
Waynesburg, First Christian Church
TENNESSEE
Englewood, First Christian Church
Knoxville, Forest Ave. Christian Church
VIRGINIA
''Charlotlesville, First Christian Church
Newport News, 24th St. Church of Christ
Norfolk, S. Norfolk Church of Christ
Salem, W. Main St. Church of Christ
WEST VIRGINIA
Wheeling, Warwood Christian Church
Sick Coll
Jonnie and Bobby Sims had tonsillectomies
in St. Petersburg, Florida on Feb. 12. Both
of them recovered completely and quickly.
Lois Sims was bed-fast for 2 weeks with
flu in late February and early March,
This is the Yochomachi Church of Christ as it looked on the first Sunday of the
New Year 1960. This Church is located in Shinjuku, Tokyo. It is where Mr. and Mrs.
Buttray first worked on arriving in Japan in 1950. Because the Church at present
is rather small and weak we still help them occasionally.
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
fit
^jf^X iVS
Harold and Lois Sims in the Japan Booth at the Missionary Fair in Eiistis, Florida,
March 21, 1960 (their 13th wedding anniversary.)
Background was paintwl by a high schoolmate of Harold's, who is a member
of the local congregation.
Dear Friencls,
I am now located briefly in Char-
lottesville, Va. for a 2 week evange
listic meeting which has been in the
date-book for more than a year. Loi:
and the children will join me here
for Easter Sunday and the Southern
Christian Convention in Richmond
the following week. I am very grate
ful for this fellowship with the
brethren in the Old Dominion, and
for the chance to attempt to preach
gospel messages to an American
audience.
Since the first of the year my
travels have been long, varied and
enjoyable. I was privileged to speak
at missionary rallies in Flora, 111.,
East Palestine and Danville, Ohio and
Eustis, Florida. It was encouraging
to see the large attendance and the
interest in and understanding of the
mission fields expressed in the well-
designed booths and other thing. Also
it was good to visit for a few days the
campuses of several Bible Colleges
and participate in the various Mis
sions Programs which, in each case,
had been well-prepared. It was thrill
ing to hear dedicated young people
sing and to talk with those who were
thinking seriously about service for
Christ on the Mission Fields. In
January I was at Atlanta Christian
College, in February at Great Lakes
Bible College and Cincinnati Bible
Seminary, in March at Lincoln Bible
Institute and Kentucky Christian Col
lege. Not least of the blessings on
these occasions was fellowship with
missionary co-laborers from other
lands. Of course interspersed with all
of these meetings there were a num
ber of visits to local churches in the
different areas.
Lois became sick with a cold about
Feb. 20, and it developed into a bad
case of the flu. Since I was away on
a trip at the time, Lois' mother (Mrs.
W. C. Lutton) very kindly came over
to the house before noon every day
to take care of Lois and fix supper
for the whole family. Finally they
called me home from Illinois, and
for this reason I had to cancel some
speaking appointments. During this
"emergency" the children had to get
up every morning and dress, fix
breakfast, pack lunch and leave on
time for school all by themselves.
Hope Joyce rose to the need and
occasion and assumed these re
sponsibilities like a real nimse. We
are all real proud of her, and it seems
that overnight she has grown into
a Jr. housekeeper and young lady
as tall as her mother. We celebrated
her twelfth birthday on March 28.
Lois has completely recovered, by the
way.
On March 25 Lois, helped by a
committee of ladies, prepared a Jap
anese sukiyake supper for about 60
members of the Christian Crusaders
Class of the Central Christians Church
in St. Pete. Some of the ingredients
were imported from Japan, and the
food was cooked at the tables in
9 electric skillets (that is, before
fuses started blowing). Most of the
folks seemed to enjoy it. A picture
post-card of some scene in Japan was
given to each person as a souvenir.
Earlier we did the same thing for the
ladies missionary meeting in Eustis,
Fla.
Page 4
Simses Announce Sailing Date
On Jan. 25, 1960 the Harold Sims family
sent a down-payment to confirm reservations
on the Pacific and Orient Line (British owned)
pa-'senger ship "S.S. ORSOVA" which will
sail from San Francisco on August 21 this
year for Honolulu and Yokoh;ma. They ex
pect to attend the North .A.merican Christian
Convention in Columbus, Ohio July 12-15; and
following that to the West Coast.
Explanaf-fon
We ere very sorry for the delay in this
i-sue of the Tokyo Christian. This was caused
by the lack material, and that was caused
by much traveling around on the part of
Harold Sims at least.
To Go To BrazH
Mitani San a former member of the Yocht
machi Church of Christ where I preache
when I first came to Japan, told me recentl
that he is making plans to go to Sao Pauh
Brazil to help in one of the local Japanes
churches.
Stanley Buttray
Mrs. John Muto, wife of one of our minis
ters in Tokyo, returned in October from :
six-month stay in a tubercular hospital. Thi,
was the second attack she has had by th<
disease. She now seems to be making goo(
progress toward complete recovery. Also Titu;
Kikuchi, minister of the Nakano Church, ha;
been suffering for the past few weeks witl
what seems to be nervous exhaustion.
Letters From Japonese Friend;
One of the real pleasures of our furloug
has been receiving letters from the folks lei
behind in Japan. They are not in the habit c
expressing themselves in written English whe
we are there, so some of the expressions wi
sound a little queer. Of course these letter
are all personal correspondence, so I will nc
reveal any names, but I am sure the writer
would not object to publishing some selecte
lines from a few of them in order to give yo
a glimpse into the soul and personalities c
some of the Japanese brethren.
Harold Sims
"I am very happy to hoar that you all had
arrived dear old sweet home ... I am going
to tell you some church news. On the 30th day
of August three people are going to be bap
tized. Of course you know them well, Mr.
Amagi, an old G-man, Mr. Akada, and Miss
Ushiyama, an organist. Among them Miss Ushi-
yama has engaged Mr. Minagawa . . . their
marriage shall be in this fall, so we are going
to add one more Christian family in this con
gregation."
' ^it, (^,,^y\/LvvvuX^ ./^^f tJt ^.M.UJt
m" .// /^ / ^
aJjty^ ^
' I
p/Frl^ni
a
Deari
April 11, 1960
{/^py> f r/am'^iiS^loca^lie'^'Se'lefly in (jharlottesville, Va. for a2roaak evange-
fistic meeting which has been in the date-book for more than a yoajr, Lois
and the children will Join me here for Easter Sunday and the Southorn Christian
Convention in Richmond the following week, I am very grateful for this fellow
ship with the brethren in the Old Dominion, and for the chance to attempt to
preach gospel moasages to an American audience*
Since the first of the year my travels have been long, varied and
enjoyable. I was privileged to speak at missionary rallies in Flora, 111,,
East Palestine and Danville, Ohio and Eustis, Florida, it was encouraging
to see the large attendance and the interest in and understanding of the
mission fields expressed in the well-designed booths and other things. Also
it was good to visit for a few days the campuses of several Bible Colleges
anJ participate in the various Missions Programs which, in each case, had been
well-'prepared. It was thrilling to hear dedicated young people sing and to
talk with those who were thinking seriously about service for Christ on the
Mission Fields. In January I was at Atlanta Christian College, in February at
Great Lakes Bible College and Cincinnati Bible Seminary, in March at Lincola
Bible Institute and Kentucky Christian College, Not least of the blessings on
these occasions was fellowship with missionary co-laborers from other lands.
Of course interspersed with all of these meetings there were a number of
visits to local churches in the different areas.
We had some sickness in the family during the winter^ almost everyone
else did too. On Feb. 12 Jonnie and Bobby had tonsillectomies in the hospital
in St. Pete. That makes our family unanimous in that experience. They came
home the same afternoon of the operations and recovered rapidly. Lois became
sick with a cold about Feb. 20, and it developed Into a bad case of the flu.
Since I was away on a trip at the time, Lois' mother (I'irs. ;J.C. Lutton) very
kindly came over to the house before noon every day to take care of Lois and
fix supper for the whole family. Finally they called me home from Illinois,
and for this reason I had to cancel some speaking appointments. During this
^ juiergency" the children had to get up every morning and dress, fix breakfast,
pack lunch and leave on time for school all by themselves. Hope Joyce rose
to the need and occasion and assumed these responsibilities like a real nurse.
We are all real proud of her, and it seems that overnight she has grown into
a Jr. housekeeper tind young lady as tall as her mother. We celebrated her
twelfth birthday on March 28, Lois has completely recovered, by the way.
On March 25 Lois, helped by a committee of ladies, prepared a Japanese
stikiyaki supper for about 60 members of the Christian Crusaders Olass of the
Coj-trcJ. Christian Church in St, Pete, Some of the ingredie.a';s were f.iT
fyo?.} Japan, and the food was cooked at the tables in 9 electric skillets, (that
is, before fuses started blowing), Most of the folks seemed to enjoy it, A
pL(.s,;ure post-cEird of some scene in Japan was given to each person as a souvenir,
Sarlier wq did the same thing for the ladies missionary meeting in Eustis, Fla,
r/e have our visas for re-entry to Japcin in hand, and reservations have
been made for us to sail from San Francisco on Aug. 21 on the "ORSOVA" of the
::.c and Orient Steamship Line. This late date will allow us to attend
th? Eorth American Convention In Columbus, Ohio in mid-July. The whole family
77:.:i be there, and we hope to greet and say farewell to many of our friends
at that time.
As may of you know already, fiy father and mother recently closed the
ministry to the new church in Alexandria, Kentucky; and they have moved to
the West Side Church of Christ in High Point, North Carolina. At this time
we are announcing a change in address and forwarding agents which has been
contemplated for several months.
Effective from May 1. I960 the Ejget Christian Church of Charlottesville.
Virginia wiii act as our sponsor and forwarding agent. Someone appointed by
the church will receive, record, receipt and report all offerings-*both
living-lihk salary and general gifts^<*f6r the work being done in Tokyo by
the Harold Sims family. The designated salary for the Sims family will be
sent to Japan regularly, a furlough fund of $500 per yeer will be set aside,
and funds for the expenses of carrying on the work in Japan^ Children's
school tuition etc. will be sent as reqdested by Mr. and Mrs. Siihs who will
be fully informed at all times of the amount available in the current account.
This change is made becauses (l) fe feel it is more suitable and
expedient for one of our living-link chuhches to act as our "board" than any
other system of missionary support and Supervision. There is a trend toward
responsible cooperation between local Congregations and their directly-supported
missionaries in our brotherhood which we like. (2) Charlottesville has a
larger share than any of the other churChes in our regular support, although
we appreciate the others just as much, [i) This church has been very co
operative with us and interested in the wohk for many years, and offered to
help in this additional way. (4) For those individuals who wish to deduct
the sum of their contributions for incoise-thx purposes, checks may be made
payable to the church, which is incorporhted.
We are NOT changing because of any dissatisfaction on either my father's
part or mine. Rather we cannot find adeqiMtte words to e^qiress our appreciation
for his deep interest in ud and the wox'k ih Japan and his sacrificial labors
as our forwarding agent for 7 years^ editoh of the Tokyo Christian: and trustee
of the Cunningham Mission. Through most of this time he has contribuied not
only his time in writing many letters and articles, but also much of the
postage and stationery.
At the time he became forwarding agent for us he was the minister of
one of our living-link churches in Turtle Creek, Penna. Now he is semi-retired.
On March 23 he celebrated his 70th birthday in good health, and we are looking
forward to many more years of his faithful service to Christ. Although the
book-keeping burden will be eased for him by this change, we know that the
burden of prayer for the missionaries, the lost souls and the young churches
over in Japan will remain in his great heart, and we are thankful.
From May 1, i960 all offerings that are sent to either Harold Sims or
A.E. Sims will be forwarded to Charlottesville. Checks may be m^.de payable
to Harold Sims or First Christian Church, Tokyo Mission. ADDRE^
Box 262 Charlottesville, Virginia.
Since my father is so well-informed about all aspects of the work in
Japan he will still be in general charge of publicity and information concerning
cur work, particularly after we return to Japan. He will have copies of the
Flaming Torch (biography of W.C. Cunningham) for sale, and extra copies of the
Tohyo Christian and display materials for missionary fairs etc. may be obtained
by writing to him. ADDRESS; A.E, Sims 1312 Forest Ave. High Point, N.C.
yours, EgROLD AM) LOIS SIMS
Harrole I^cFarland (10)
Box 9>3
Joliet, Illinois
Christian
'Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature" Mark 16:15
^ol. 59 Kimberlin Hgts. Tennessee
Key To Map Of Tokyo
* indicates land owned by the Mission before
World War II
'^l^-WokubQ-ehci Chureh-tmd parsonage (stucco
building erected 1948). Minister, Itsuro Haru-
yama (Graduated T.B.S. '53). Membership
est. 50. Also missionary house where Mrs. W.
D. Cunningham lived and died. (2 story stucco
erected 1948).
*2. Yocho-machi Church and parsonage (quon-
set building erected 1948). Minister, Atsumi
Matarai (Graduated T.B.S. '53). Membership
est. 20.
*3. Missionary house occupied by Stanley
Buttray family (frame bungalow erected 1948).
Site of pre-war church and kindergarden. S. S.
and various Bible Classes held in the home.
*4. Tokyo Bible Seminary (2 story stucco
building erected 1949). Caretaker, John Y.
Muto (Graduated T.B.S. '54). Also missionary
house occupied by Andrew Patton family
(frame, erected 1953). Site of pre-war Chase
and Still home. Various night classes etc.
fOKyO BAr
*5. Nakano Church and parsonage (stucco
building erected 1952). Minister, Titus S.
Kikuchi (Graduated T.B.S. '52). Membership
est. 40. Also missionary house occupied by
Harold Sims family (2 story stucco erected
1950).
6. Mabashi Church (stucco building erected
1950). Minister, Hideo Aoki (American born
Japanese missionary). Membership est. 50.
7. Nishi-ogikubo Church, kindergarden and
parsonage (stucco building erected 1950).
Minister, Philip S. Oba (4 years study at
T.B.S.). Membership est. 40.
8. Minato Church and parsonage (frame
building erected 1950). Minister, Stephen M.
lijima (Graduated T.B.S. 1951). Membership
est. 40.
*9. Setagaya Church, kindergarden and par
sonage (only building to survive the war).
(Extensively remodeled and enlarged in 1951).
Minister, Shin Hanyu (2 years in this church).
Membership est. 100.
10. Kamiuma Church and parsonage (resid
ence, purchased in 1948, remodeled 1951).
Summer, 1960 No. 3
Minister, Sahara & likins. Membership est. 35.
11. House owned by Likins Mission (2 story
frame).
*12. Mikawashima Church and parsonage
(stucco buildings erected 1949 and 1954).
Minister, Mr. Cho (Korean congregation).
Membership est^ 30.
*13. Arakawa Church and parsonage (stucco
building erected 1951). Minister, Akira Nagano
(Graduated T.B.S. '54). Membership est. 20.
14. Shimo-ochiai Church and parsonagte
(quonset building erected 1953). Minister,
Julius Fleenor. Membership est. 30. Also home
of Julius Fleenor family (frame building
erected 1951).
15. Nishi-arai preaching point (meets in
rented house). Minister, Aono. Membership
est. 10.
16. Kashiwa preaching point (meets in com
munity kindergarden building). Minister,
Yukio Itagaki (Graduated T.B.S. '56). Mem
bership est. 3.
17. Abiko Church, kindergarden and parson
age (frame buildings erected 1953). Minister,
Keiji Inoue (Graduated T.B.S. '52).Member-
ship est. 25.
18. Yoko'suka Church and parsonage (frame
building erected 1953). Minister, Koji Sugiura
(Graduated T.B.S. '58). Membership est. 5.
19. Minami-Shinagawa preaching point
(meets in rented community hall). Minister,
Rhee Sun Won. Membership-12-- -
20. Christian AcademySchool for mission
ary children.
21. Nogata preaching point (meets in rented
hall). Minister, Hideo Fukuda (Graduated
T.B.S. '58). Membership 2.
It should be understood that this map is
very imperfect and leaves out many heavily
traveled streets, privately owned railroads,
subways, street-car lines and a complicated
network of canals near the waterfront.
All missionaries living and working in
the Tokyo area are included, and not just
those associated with the Cunningham Mission.
The information on membership of these
churches was not at hand and these are all
my private estimates, but we like to give you
a summary picture of the whole work in an
understandable form from time to time.
^Harold Sims
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
THE TOKYO CHRISTIAN
Published quarterly by the Missionaries of
the Church of Christ Cunningham Mission.
Tokyo, Japan, for the information and inspira
tion of every Christian whose heart is open to
the call of Christ, and who is willing to help
in the supreme task of carrying out the Great
Commission of Christ: Matthew 28:19, 20.
Entered as second class matter in the Knox-
ville, Tenn., Post office under the act of March
3. 1879.
Two-Year Subscription 50 cents
Subscription and "Flaming Torch" $1.00
MISSION STAFF
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Buttray, 575 2-Chome,
Kamiochiai, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. For
warding agent: Mrs. Homer Anderson, R. D. 1,
Meadville, Pa.
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Patton, 27 Sakura-
yama, NakanOfKu, Tokyo, Japan. Forwarding
agent: Mr. or Mrs. Ray Armstrong, Rt. 3,
Box 310, Piqua, Ohio.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Sims (Furlough
address for the winter: 790 15th Ave., South,
St. Petersburg, Fla.) Forwarding Agent: First
Christian Church, Tokyo Mission, Box 262,
Charlottesville, Virginia.
Packages for Japan should be sent direct by
p::rcel post to one of the missionaries whose
addresses are shown above. Consult your local
post office concerning mailing rules and limit
ations of size and weights.
If you change your address please notify
H. L. Hamilton, Kimberlin Heights, Tennessee,
giving both your old and your new address.
If you make an offering of $1.00 or more you
are entitled to receive this paper if you so
request. Churches or groups making an offer
ing of $10.00 or more may request a bundle
of 10 copies for distribution.
Shiro San from my Bible class at Camp
Oji -.ame to me a few weeks ago asking if he
could be baptized. Of course this was the
moment for which I had been waiting for,
and praying for. Mr. Shiro had been attend
ing my Bible class for about a year, except
for a period of about three months. And since
I started the Sunday morning Bible class
here at my home, he has also been attending
it. From the first time that he came to the
Bible class, I felt that he was one who
would go all the way (and eventually) be
come a Christian. Because his personality and
character seemed to me, to radiate true
humility. The person with at least a degree
of humility, is easier reached by the
Gospel. And as I have said before, this quality
is of absolute necessity in bowing before
the Lord Jesus Christ, and making HIM'
King of cur lives. This is definitely a quality
lacking among most of us, and more so
among the Japanese people because of theiv
"superior Race" attitude, which is inherently
natural.
Please pray with me for this young man
that his faith will not falter, but that he
shall grow stronger day by day in the Spirit
of Christ and His T^th.
Mrs. Stanley Buttray
Page 2
Saturday Bible Class ..
Mrs. Stanley Buttrays' Saturday afternoon English Bible class for high school
students.
Soon after we put up the sign announcing
the beginning of the Bible School for children
last year, I found a note in the mail box from
a neighborhood girl asking if there could not
be a class for high school students. When
she came, she brought her friends and since
then the average attendance has grown to
ten or twelve. Several of these young people
are Christians and a number of them attend
nearby churches.
They love to sing and the past few weeks
we have been learning choruses in Japanese
and English. Even after thirty minutes of
singing they want to continue and ask for
their favorite ones. They are also memorizing
scripture each week which they seem to enjoy
also. Pray for these young people as they
study and read the Word of God, that their
hearts maybe opened to the truth and that
they may have the courage to accept it.
Mrs. Stanley Buttray
TO PRAY FOR A SUNDAY BIBLE CLASS
A missionary himself recently made a
list of suggestions as to how he would like
his friends to pray for him.
1. It is not so essential that you ask
God to give us good health. The important
thing is that He give us only the measure
of health that will best glorify Him that
we have a God who can keep us in perfect
peace and joy, even in the midst of pain.
2. Do not pray so much that God will
answer our prayers, as that God will keep
us from being too busy to pray.
3. We are not so anxious that you pray
God will remove the obstacles as that He
might give us an unconquerable determination
to go all the way with Him.
4. Not so much that God should bless our
activities as that God will censor our activi
ties, for how easy it is for a missionary's
time and energy to be spend on second best
things.
5. Please do not pray for us as though
we were saints. We need your prayer that
God will give us grace and strength to resist
temptation.
During the time Stanley is having Sunday
School for the small children I have an
English Bible Class primarily for girls, al
though lately several young men have been
attending also. Several weeks ago one of the
young women asked to stay and talk after
the others had gctne. She said, "When I first
came to your class, I knew nothing of the
Bible or of Christ and I read the Bible with
out thinking. Now when I read, I think and
I want to know what some of these things
mean." Truly the Word is a powerful two-
edged sword and how wonderful and humbling
it is to see it working in the hearts of those
whom we teach.
Mrs. Stanley Buttray
6. Please remember that missionaries can
become lonely; we can become discouraged:
we can become irritable, sharp, impatient. So
we covet all your prayers for us that we may
ever live with our hearts aflame with the
glory and love of Christ.
Ann Williams
in "The Christian Challenger"
Page 3
Is The Trouble With
Mrs. Cunningham's Daughter
, Something like the above question has
oeen asked me by numerous people these past
cew months. It is to briefly answer these
sincere inquiries on the part of folks who
have invested financial support and payer-
backing in the Tokyo work and are rightly
concerned that I am writing this, and not to
stir up old things that might best lie buried.
We are sorry to have failed to keep you
folks fully informed. Perhaps our reticence
has been reassuring to a few that "everything
must be O.K.," but I can see that most people
want more definite information. The work
in Tokyo has indeed been through a lot of
trouble since the death of Mrs. Cunningham,
and because the ownership of the Mission
properties and control of the remaining funds
seemed~tO"be~in question for-ar~i:ime- many -
supporters of the work across the brotherhood
have been doubtful, uncertain and worried.
We will attempt here only a brief sum
mary of the way the situation looks to us at
|the present time. The possibility of a change
in the picture is admitted, but we neither
'expect the destruction of the work begun by
jtV.e Cunninghams nor fear that it will fall into
the hands of those who do not share their
faith.
j 1. PROPERTIES.
j Eleven building lots and eighteen build
ings erected on them in Tokyo are registered
'in the name of the Yotsuya Mission Church
Iof Christ Holding Corporation. This includes
all of the missionary houses and some of the
churches. It does not include the buildings
ibelonging to 2 of the congregations who have
already completed all of the legal require
ments and been incorporated as independent,
local churches of Christ by the Educa.ion
(Ministry of Japan. These properties have been
Ideeded over to the local churches by the
Mission. Four or five other congregations there
are in various stages toward achieving this
independent status, which is a somewhat com-
' plicated process.
Mr. and Mrs. Buttray, Patton and Sims
are all trustees of this Corporation, and these
six have control over the properties of the
(Mission. AH American lawyeirhrToksm-whonr-
we have consulted about various matters has
assured us that the property is completely
safe and the deeds are in order,
i Mr. Cunningham bought 4 lots and buUt
4 cabins on a wooded hill in the mountain
resort area of Karuizawa (about 100 miles
from Tokyo) about 40 or more years ago.
These were left in his own name. In his will he
'specified that one of them should be given
to his wife and the other three to the Mission
organization that was to be set up after his
death. Mrs. Cunningham received all of this
Iproperty, and to this date it has remained as
her personal property. She once explained this
by the fact that it was difficult to register
them as belonging to a Tokyo corporation
since they were located in another prefecture.
While Mrs. Cunningham lived we mission
ary families used these cabins for a short sum
mer vacation each year, and some years for
young people's camps also. Mrs. Cunningham
loved the spot, and always insisted that we
take some time off up there away from the
summer heat in Tokyo. When her will was
made public we noticed that she gave her
own cabin to her daughter Eloise, but said
not a word about the other three. To us this
would imply that she considered them as
Mission property. However, Eloise, as the
executrix of her mother's estate, has taken
over these properties for her use. We noticed
in the Japanese newspapers that the Music
for Youth organization (which sdie heads)
would be sponsoring music camps, presumably
at this place. Perhaps we could build up a
legal case and go to court in an effort to
get these properties, but we have not done
so.
2. FUNDS
Our plan, as announced in the June 1953
Tokyo Christian, was that the remaining Am
erican funds of the Mission should be used
by the Corporation in Japan to maintain the
present buildings and erect new ones. Eloise
_Ciinningham made frantic, repeated and well-
organized moves to get control of these funds.
But in spite of tape-recordings, flying trips to
America^ slander sheets against us and other
things this failed, and the board of trustees
in Atlanta decided to dissolve and turn the
several thousrnd dollars in their control over
to the legi 1 corporation in Japan. These funds
have remained intact except for a little which
has been withdrawn for taxes and repairs. The
present Mission funds are held in 3 Federal
Savings Banks in the U. S. in the name of the
Yotuya Mission Church of Christ Zaidan
(Corporation). They will be used only in con
nection with real estate.
At one Mission trustees meeting in
Atlanta in 1954 we heard that there was a
fund of about $6000 in a Canadian bank. Judge
T. 0. Hathcock reported that he had made
efforts to have that withdrawn and included
in the regular Mission accounts in the U. S.
but the b nk had said they would only re-
linqui:h the funds to Mrs. Cunningham in
person. Mrs. Cunningham's executrix may
have obtained this moneywe do not know.
\lso Eloise has continu^ to seek for funds
in her mother's name ever since Mrs. Cun
ningham's death in 1953, and we hear there
is a committee of about 10 preachers on the
West Coast who have organized to help her
with advice, publicity and financial support.
3. CHURCH SPLIT
In some __
Eloise G. several years ago she claimed nine
of the churches in Tokyo were against us and
supporting her in an effort to "restore the
Cunningham Mission." At the present time
this 9 (an exaggeration) has dwindled to only
four. One of the preachers she included was
serving 2 small churches. Both churches have
now died and he has moved to another part
of Japan. Three other preachers left her "Pas
tor's Association" organization and published
a manifesto declaring their reason for with
drawal"domination by Miss Cunningham"
which was circulated throughout Tokyo. The
members of these churches repoiced, for they
never had been sympathetic to the "move in
and take-over" by an outsider. Of the remain
ing 4 preachers who support her, at least one
is doing so without the support of the con
gregation he serves. We were present at the
meeting when the congregation voted to leave
him free to do as he wished, but they did not
want to become involved with Eloise.
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
It is true that these 4 preachers are very
uncooperative with us, to put it very mildly.
There has been created a deep and hurtful
cleavage in the work which has discouraged
many of the Christians.
We do not seek to build up any human
loyalty to "our side", and the majority of
those who do not go along with Eloise would
not want to be counted as "Sims boys" or any
thing similar. We want both Christians and
preachers to be slaves only to Christ and free
of human bondage.
We do not know what is the solution to
this stalemated and cancerous split in the work
in Tokyo, and we ask your prayers for us all.
This will, I hope, provide fair answers to
the main questions that are bothering some
of our friends. Many have also why Eloise
Cunningham has departed from her mother's
faith and done all of these things. I cannot
and would not answer this. She will answer
to the judge of all the earth some day, and so
jffiiR L_
Harold Sims
TIME MARCHES ON
Talk of the town in Toba, Mie prefecture,
is not some new development in the pearl
culture industry of which the island city is
a major center but of a brothelkeeper who's
just turned Shinto priest. The brand-new
chief priest of Toba's OOyamagi Shrine hadn't
come under an "Onward Shinto Soldiers"
revival movement. The "march of time" is
his explanation of his transformation.
You know the Anti-prostitution Law Is
going to take full effect from April 1. Late
last year the proprietor of the brothel made
up his mind to close his business. He dismiss
ed the girls in his employ after making plans
for the future of each of them. It happened
that the shrine was without a chief priest. Its
parish unanimously asked him to fill the
vacancy. He was prevailed upon.
A graduate of the Jingu Kogakkan Uni
versity, class of 1911, he was qualified for
Shinto priesthood. Kiku Miyase, 61, hadn't
been the propreitor of the old-established
brothel long. When his father died in 1921,
it came to his wife's turn to run the business.
About 1944 circumstances made it necessary
for him to be the proprietor. Seme people call
trflngfnrmflfiATi HAfifK
ing an inhabitant of Mie, the prefectural site
of the Grand Shrines of Ise."
0
Japan...
"My dear Great Traveler: Thank you very
much for the nice letter. I am glad to hear
that you could visit your uncle's farm. I am
trying to imagine that scene out of those A-
merican movies I have seen. In Tokyo, your
town, it is in the top of heat in the year. Un
usually a typhoon attacked the Kanto area
e:rly. What a weak land this! we sighed. It
was rather a small one. but left a big damage
to every prefecture in Kanto district. They
are used to suffer so easily, and recover so
soon, and forget about them soon. They like
to be healed the wound lightly, saying. Peace.
Peace . . . Thank God we are all well and in
His service with bright hope.
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
The Annual Convention of all Churches
of Christ was held this year at Tanabe, Osaka. Primarily because it is planning on to Japan in 1895, and after about twenty-five
Wakayama-Ken from March 29, to April 2nd. having its new Bible College building finished years settled in the Osaka area, establishing
This includes both the Japanese and Mission- by that time. It will be named, "The M. B. the Osaka Christian Mission,
ary Conventions. The Japanese Christians al- Madden Memorial" in honor of Mr. Madden
ways have theirs the first two days and a
half and the missionaries the last two days,
with a joint service on the middle day. There
were Japanese Christians and missionaries
from as far away as Tokyo and Kyushu in
Japan, and some from Okinawa and Korea.
Everyone considered the Convention a
succe-s and some said it was the best ever. - -- n u i. .
Others said, it had the best spirit, although College in Lansing, Michigan on Feb. 2, 1960 ^pecially because of the "independent-
the attendance fell far below the last two as a part of their Missions Emphasis program) direct supportfaith system of missionary
yggj-s . work which is popularly known and used
Harold Sims among us these days we must give serious
At the close of the Japanese sessions qj yg agree I am sure that thought to questions of whether to establish
there were four persons who made confes- niethods and institutions' are not the main
sions. One person was the mother of Taniyama, thine<? in missionarv work Npvprlhlpcc thp cnh should be emphasized. To those ot
the Convention host minister. There were a us who are unaccustomed to the backing of
numoer of people with tears in their eyes Jgm of institutfo^ ^ endowed, nation-wide mission board,
as the minister son asked his mother the most of its own that merits our careful eonsidera- dependent on rather sporadic free-will
offerings from individuals and churches the
original investment required for the buildings
I take "institution" to mean some organiz- alone seems way out of reach financially; and
la Japan, children are supposed to follow ed adjunct to the churchsuch as a Bible when we go on to consider the daily drain on
very care.ully the parents in all things. And College, Christian Service Camp, orphanage, finances necessary to maintain these establish-
especially in the family religion is it very hospital, Christian Day School etc. . - _ .
difficult for parents to accept the faith of
an erring child. Therefore, such a decision as C
Taniyama Ban's mother made did not come not think that institulions, as such, are un- among our "independent" people speaks well
easy, nor was it made hastily. This, of course scriptural and wrong. In fact, in recent years for the faith and vision and hard work of our
was the real climax of the whole convention, our people have been much strengthened and pioneers and fellow-laborers, and also for
and the^missionaries session that followed revived and have grown numerically through their supporting churches.
Of necessity I must speak mainly from
Page 4
Annual
Convention
Church of Christ (Christian)
missionaries who attended the
Annual Convention at Tanabe,
Japan. Included in the group
are missionaries also from
Okinawa and Korea.
The Convention next year will be held in a Church of Christ missionary who first came
on
Stanley Buttray
ssion Field
(A synopsis of a talk delivered to the dispassionate about the whole idea,
students and faculty of Great Lakes Bible
All of us will agree, I am sure, that
methods and institutions are not the main
things in missionary work. Neverthless the sub-
important question, "Do you believe that Jesus j^on.
is the Christ, the Son of the Living God?"
was anticlimax.
The Fattens, Likins, and Buttray families
traveled to and from the Convention on the
same trains. "We returned to Tokyo just in
time for cur regular Sunday morning services, precedent Scripture.
Miss Grace Farnham who has been a mis
sionary here in Tokyo for about thirty-five On the other hand
years wa? especially honored at the Conven- not and should not d
J.l n -11 11. ...... " * Ai/x OH O\..UUV/10, OliU LilUV aiSU
tion by receiving a pearl necklace and photo institutions as sacrosanct and absolute essen- have a high number of well-qualified doctors
album. AF missionaries were to bring family tials. Since we are not "Organization-minded," and suitable hospitals This would be a much
pictures to be placed in the album along with and are proud to be free of various denomina- different situation from that prevailing in the
a few comments. Miss Farnham gave a brief tional concepts of "brotherhood societies" and Congo jungles,
history of her life and work in Japan during the pride of great and old brick-walled insti-
one of the afternoon sessions. tutions, we can afford to be obiective and (Continued next time)
ments it truly gives us pause. In this light I
believe the fact that various institutions have
Generally speaking our brotherhood does been established and maintained to this day
the contribution made by the increasing num- Of necessity I must speak mainly from
ber of young people's camps and Bible Colleges the background of my experiences and im-
across the land. Yet it will be acknowledged pre-sions in Japan. I recognize that the situa-
that these 2 effective means of Christian tion on other fields might be entirely different
training have neither express command nor and that all I say might not be applicable to
_ j._i. every other field. For example, the Japanese '
have a very well-developed public-school
album. AF missionaries were to bring family tials. Since we are not "Organization-minded,^
tutions, we can afford to be objective and (Continued next time)
CherlottesvUley Virginia
June 20, I960
Dour BVlendss
We last wrote from Charlottesville, Virginia announcing the change of
forwarding agent, etc# After two weeks of very fine fellowship with the church at
Charlottesville in an evangelistic meeting which ended with a great Resurrection
Sunday, we went on to the Southern Christian Convention in Richmond# After the
school Easter vacation had begun on April lA, Lois and the children came up to
Virginia, and during some of the free time between meetings we went sight seeing to
Monticello, Natural Bridge, Jamestown, Wllliamsburg, and roofed over the rolling hills
of Uncle Mort*s and T,0. Scott*s nice farms# On the way back to Florida after the
convention we spent an enjoyable week-end in Savannah, Georgia#
On May 1 Harold spoke in Atlanta, Ga, and the following week went along
with 9ome of the men In the College Park church to the Kiamichi Men*s Clinic in
Oklahoma. This "tentlng-out" trip was an interesting change in the normal shaving,
dressing, speaking routine, and the fellowship, messages, peppy and old-fashioned
singing were very inspirational* After returning to Atlanta he went oil to Pennsylva
nia for about a week of speaking engagements.
Since about May 20 we have been busy with various preparations for the
return trip to Japan# Harold built and packed two big boxes of books, and one of
househoLl effects# Now we are haVing a con^any here crate our washing machine and
refrigerator which we had bou^ for taking back with us and have been using these
past months partly in order to save some customs tax#- These five crates will be
shipped by ocean freight direct from Tan^ja to Yokohama, which will be cheaper than
rail freight across the U.S.
Vve also bought a cheap luggage trailer so we could pull our trunks and
suitcases behind the car and save the cross-country shipping e35>ense on those. The
next problem was that the automatic transmission on the car went bad# We talked the
problem over with a number of people here, including mechanics, and all of them
advised us to trade cars, so we did# Through a dealer in the Central Christian Church
in St# Pete we were able to get a very good price on a 1959 Ford Ranch Wagon, which
should provide ua with comfortable and reliable transportation for the 5,000 mile
trip ahead# We didn't get much out of the old Chevrolet, but we can't complain
because it certainly gave us excellent service for over 18,000 miles of hard use#
Here is e':fichedule of our travel plans for the summer:
June 21 Leave St# Petersburg for the North#
June 23-30 Visit Mr & Mrs A.E, Sims in High Point, NX,
July 1-4 24th Street Church of Christ, Newport News, Va.
July 5 Other friends and relatives in Virginia#
July 6-11 Visit Lois' sisters and First Christian Church, Turtle
Creek, Fa;
July 12-15 North American Christian Convention, Columbus, Ohio
(Lois has a Wednesday morning workshop on "Introducing
Missions to Children.")
July 16-22 ...Chase AvebueXhurch of Christ, Cincinnati, Ohio, and
visit Harold's brother Ralph and Earl and families#
July 23-24 Church of Christ, Markle, Indiana.
July 24-25 Churches in Potomac and Camp Point, Illinois*
July 26 Stringtown Christian Church, Unionville, Missouri,
July 27 Island City Christian Church, Stanberry, Missouri,
July 31 Fifth Sunday Rally, Colorado Springs, Colo,
August 1-6 Colorado Christian Service Camp, Sedalia (?re-Hi Week)
Ai^gust 7,8 Denver Area, Visit Harold's sister, Margaret
August 9-12 To the West Coast.
August 12-21 San Fraricr'sco Area
August 21 Sail oat a:ic^ ch5 Golden Gate
August 29 One day stop in Hawaii
September 6 Arrive in Yokohama
We are now almost ready to leave this pleasant place that we have called home
for the past 10 months, and start the long journey back to the place we have called
home for the past 10 years* Of course the packing is a chore that all of us dread,
and I guess human beings are the only species in the creation that are condemned to
do it. Always there are times when one begins to wonder whether he will make it,
but we us^oi-uiy do. It has been a wonderful year in every way, and we thank the Lord
for His leading us to St. Petersburg, and for the safety of the many journeys we have
madso We also trust Him to keep us along the way now.
On June 7 the Central Christian Church in St, Petersburg where the family has
been worshipping this year, decided to join in our support with some additional
li\ingitnk. We are tery thankful for this unselfish move by a young congregation
faring a big building program^ The decision was made with the understanding that
this help would enable us to keep the house where we have been living, so now we will
not be forced to sell and will have some place to call home when we return next time.
It has been good for all of us to have the fellowship with this great and friendly
and growing congregation and its minister this year, and we rejoice in the continuing
fellowship. The people have givah us.so very many expressions of love helpful
concern in things great and small, and we appreciate it.
We do not look forward with delight to the farewells, or to leaving this
beloved coutry where we have enjoyed so many happy hours of visiting with friends,
shopping in super-markets, sigh-seeing, etc. But at the end of every pleasant visit
there comes a time to say, "We really must be getting back."
In recent days many friends have expressed concern about the anti-American
demonstrations in Japan. Actually, we es^ject things to have cooled off tremendously
by the time we arrive in Japan, but even now we would like to assure our friends of
two things. First, there are many Japanese people - even University students - of our
acquaintance whom we are sure deplore the whole plan, sentiment, method and violence
of these demonstrations. We have known some that possibly would be in the mobs, but
the majcrlty seem to be basically friendly to us and our country. Secondly, this is
just another illustration of the need of the principle upon which we have been
workings that is, stay in the background and let the Japanese take the leadership in
the local church. While we are not ashamed of America, we want to overcome the
mistaken notion that Christianity equals Americanism, and that it is an American
religion. We also do not want to disrupt the work every time the tide of political
fe9?^:ng changes. There have been other times that the anti-American sentiment has
been strong while we have resided in Japan, and we came through that all right. So
we are making no change in our plans to return, and committing our lives and our
work and our nation* s affairs and all to the will of God, who does all things well
and neither slumbers nor sleeps.
Yours in His Service,
Harold and Lois Sims
IfeUG 1'i
August 20, i960
Dear Friends,
Tomorrow we sail for Japan again after a long and interesting farewell trip
across the country* God has been our protector and companion all along the way,
and we thank Him. We have visited all of our living-link churches and our immediate
relatives during the past 2 months as well as a great number of other deer brethren
in Christ. Saying "good-bye" so many times and for so long is one of the trials of
the missionary calling, but it is also a real spiritual boost to receive the many
sincere and loving good wishes from such wonderful friends of all ages in so many
places. So this sorrow of parting has been sweetened by pleasant memories this
summer.
Some of these werei
*Sitting in the shade of the moss-draped trees in Eustis, Fla, and visiting with
old friends in the church where Harold was ordained. Eating our fill of plsza pie
and watermelon and playing "Sorry"and other games with family and friends.
* Portioipatihgiln the large D.7.3.S. at Central Christie Ghurbh Ih^St'. Fete ,
our last week in Florida. Bobby received a neck crown (too large for bis head)
for bringing the most new students to Bible School one day, and being a TV fan,
called himself Queen for a Day.
-N- In the midst of All the thih on tbe:iast day of packing and closing the house,
pausing to celebrate Bobby's fifth birthday with a picnic in the back yard.
* At 9 AM June 21 slowly pulling out of the driveway at 790 15th Ave. The car
was fully packed with several suitcases, a big lunch, a pile of last-minute things
and 6 souls. On top was a full luggage carrier, and behind us was a trailer loaded
with 3 steamer trunks, 4 foot-lockers and the remaining suiteases, including 2 new
ones bought in a hurry the day before.
* On the patio in back of A. E Sims home in High Point, North Carolina watching
the stars come out. Eating "home-cooking" after a swim in the big city park pool.
Visits with the First and West Side church in High Point and at Capella Wed. evening,
* Taking a walk along the shore of Hampton Roads after supper at Mrs. Gilliam's in
Newport News. Harold showing the children where he used to live and go to school.
Big Sunday at 24th St, church.
* Sitting in C. S. Wilson's yard in Hampton talking with 2 Japanese brides from
Langley Air Force Base who are in Mabel Farmer's Bible Class.
* A brief visit with the young people in Albemarle can^ near Charlottesville, while
stopping over-night at the T. 0. Scott home.
* Playing foot-ball etc, in the back yard at Lois' sister's house in Monreevllle, Pa.,
and family singing around the old player piano in Norma end Ray's basement.
* Sunday morning service tn Turtle Greek church where we were married, with the 3
Button sisters bringing a special message in music. A nice crowd on a rainy Sunday
evening at the missionary meeting in Shadeland church in Pittsbur^.
w Ma\fing "parting word" tape recordings and watching the Democratic Convention open
during a visit with Dorothy (Lois' other sister) and family in Irwln, Pa,
* The bustle of activity, trying to remember names, the fun of visiting booths,
seeing many missionary acquaintances and the great singing and messages at the
North American Christian Convention,
* Hope shyly shaking hands with the folks at Chase Ave.hep living-link church-
in Clnoinnati. Listening to Hi-fi at the Grant Shafer home.
* Taking pictures around the Seminary and from the top of Carew tower. Back yard
banquets with brothers Ralph end Earl and families.
* Riding in a truck across Eldon Caley's nice farm to see oats being combined near
Markle, Ind, After church Sunday AM they gave us a very nice check which they had
been saving 6 years for "furlough fund."
* Arriving at Potomac, HI. just in time fop supper and then telliag-about our work
to a nice crowd on a hot Sunday evening.
* After speaking to the folks at Camp Point, 111, we met a couple who had sponsored
one of our Japanese preachers through Bible Seminary,
* Watching hay^-baling on the Webber farm near Unionvllle, Mo, and then cleaning up
in a galvanized tub in the smoke-^house for the evangelistic meeting at Stringtown
church. Afterward we showed slides of Japan for about an hour,
* Also good to meet the folks at Island City Christiana white church on a shady
hill-sidenear Stanberry, Mo,, who had been supporting us "unseen" for a long time.
After a supper together we remained until almost 10 PM answering questions,
* Crossing for the first time into Kansas state via the pony e3q>resg terminal of
St, Joseph, Stopping briefly at mid-day while passing through Horton to look up
Miss Lawrence,
* Sylvia giving most of my regular missionary talk from memory after oft hearing.
They were playing church in the car to pass travel hours away,
* The welcome sight of Denver cifter the hot tedious plains
* A great fifth-Sunday ral3:y at Central Church in Colorado Springs, and the
hospitality of a Christian couple who own Sleepy Hollow Motel,
* By limousine up to the top of Pike's Peak and down by the cog railway. Playing
with snow-balls on the way up and tremendous, breath-taking grandeur,
* Hiking in the rocky mountains, riding horses, eating from a real chuck wagon,
Bible dramas, prayer circles under a clear, cool, full moon and other activities
dui'ing Pre-hi week in Colorado Christian Service camp.
* Visits with Cherry Creek (Denver) and Longmont churches,
* Jennie had a cake with space-men and rockets on it for his eighth birthday at
Harold's sister's home in Arvada, Colo, We spent the day riding things and looking
in funny mirrors in Elitch's gardens in Denver, Also we went out ot visit East Tin
Cup which is a very authentic reconstruction of a western town of 90 years ago,
" Driving west across the hot straight black line that cuts the Salt Lake Desert
with most of the family asleep,
* Disgust with the slot machines in every place in Nevada,
* Coming down from the Sierra range into Sacramento and a gorgeous sunset,
* The fine hospitality of the church in Najba, California during our last busy week
in the states. We slept at the Wayne Wells home every night, and between trips to
Oa-'land on business and packing we had meals at 13 of the homes in this congregation.
This ;as typical of the Christian hospitality which we have enjoyed in every place.
Out of 62 nights on the journey we paid for only 8 nights lodging. We are grateful
for each one of those who had a part in this unforgetable gesture of good-will aiad
God-speed toward us. You have sent us on our way with thankfulness that is hard to
express. Opening one's home to a family of our siae we realize is a burden, but
you have carried it lightly and to the second mile. Our children think America is
the greatest place on earth and everybody's house and yard is their home. May God
bless you all.
Many of the men especially will want some word about the Ford Ranch Wagon
/y4hich. we purchased for this trip. V/e went 5714- miles with 3 changes of oil, and
//added one quart of oil between each changer Considering the heat, load, speed and
r ^ altitude much of the way we are completely satisfied with the performance. There
/ was no noticeable strain on the car from pulling the heavy trailer all the way,
t After selling the trailer here we suffered a total loss of only $15, in bringing
all of our baggage from St, Pete to the pier in San Francisco,
Vife ran an add in the neTOpapers here and made an honest effort to sell the car,
A good number of people looked at it, but for one reason and another we could never
work out a suitable deal. So we gradually began to conclude that in answer to our
prayers for guidance perhaps God was indicating that we should take to over with us.
Today we called Charlottesville, Va. and after talking it over reached a
decision to take the Ford with us to use in Japan,, We expect to get much good
service from it this term/ It will be sent to Japan on a freighter in 2 weeks or
80 after we leave.
Farewell, and nay God watch between us while we are absent one from the
other. It has beon a wonderful yeai' and we are ready to begin another rouiid in Japanc
Until we meet again, Harold & Lois Sims
lOV
z
Harrole McFarLand
Box 963
Joliat, Illinois
(10)
Tokyo
Christian
'Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature" Mark 16:15
Vol. 59 Kimberlin Hgts. Tennessee
DVBS - Japanese Style
Daily Vacation Bible School was held at
the Sakurayama Church on July 25-29 with an
average attendance of 16. The students were
divided into two classes and Mr. Sahara, minis
ter of Kamiuma Church and Miss Shimizu of
the Shimoochiai Church, who has been train
ed for that kind of work, served as teachers.
Thp s<'hnnl was well pl'^uned by teachers
News Notes
September 6th was a very unusual and
exciting da> because it marked the first time
(at least in this post-war period) that three
Church of Christ missionary families returned
to Japan on the same ship.
The Harold Sims family returning for
third term and the Bill Walker and A1 Ham
mond families coming back for their second
term, might be called "One for the book."
For there does seem to be a slight trend to
ward not returning for the second term. How
ever, Japan is still open and definitely in need
of many more to help reap the harvest.
* *
Eugene Morse and family stopped here in
Tokyo for about six days for adjustment and
rest before going on to the States for their
furlough. The warm fellowship and the mess
age which Eugene brought at the missionary
prayer meeting were appreciated by all.
Stanley Buttray
and the classroom work was well done. Since
Sharon Lee's birthday and that of another
student fell during that week, Betty baked
a cake and all of the students attended the
iparty at recess time on the final day of the
school. The children learned much concern
ing the Lord during the meeting and enjoyed
it immensely.. Andrew Patton
Youth Meeting
The missionaries located in the Tokyo
area have several Bible classes in English
every week. Using English as a drawing card,
missionaries in Japan are able to reach many
Japanese youth with the Gospel who would
perhaps not be reached otherwise. Besides the
many other activities in which she is engaged
for the Lord here. Miss Velma Held, an Air
Force school teacher, has started a joint meet
ing for those various English Bible classes.
At these meetings youth can get acquainted
with each other as well as hear a gospel
message. The meetings are held on the first
Saturday night of each month and they are
fairly well attended in spite of the fact that
many must travel a great distance to the meet
ings. Since the whole program is in English
the missionaries serve as speakers. We pray
that these meetings will be effective in lead
ing many souls to the Lord.
Andrew Patton
Fall. 1960 - No. 4
Simses Return To Tokyo
The Harold Sims family returned to Japan
from their furlough on Sept. 6, and were met
at the pier in Yokohama by the Buttrays and
Fattens and a dozen or so Japanese and
Korean friends. Most of the day was spent
in visiting and catching up on the news^first
yelling back and forth from ship to pier, and
then more when we were able to sit down
togetherand getting through customs. That
night a big welcome supper meeting was held
at the Julius Fleenor home in Tokyo.
The 2 weeks crossing was made in the
middle of the typhoon season, but the weather
was perfect all the way and we spent most
of each day on dock and in the pool. Therefore
all of i-he passengers looked fat and tanned
compared to the welcomers. On the way we
had a nice sight-seeing stop in Vancouver for
a day and then enjoyed a wonderful fellow
ship for another day with the missionaries in
Hawaii, among whom are some of our dearest
friends. Of course Christian worship services
were held on the Lord's Day, and after a large
group of Japanese embarked in Hawaii they
even had a service in Japanese language on
the second Sunday out.
Mr. and Mrs. A1 Hammond and family
and Mr. and Mrs. William Walker and family
(our co-workers in the Tokyo area) were our
congenial travel companions, and we had the
Lord's supper in our cabin on Sunday after
noon as well as many other times of good
fellowship together. Among the other pas
sengers on the large and comfortable S. S.
Orsova-were-Inure than 20 missionary-fanaUt a
representing many denominations, and some
of them were old acquaintances.
Some of the Nakano church folks had
spent 3 days cleaning up our house and yard
which had been unoccupied for 2 months, and
the missionaries had helped them and even
put sheets on the beds for us. So we spent the
first night in Japan in our old familiar home.
Thus ended the "God be with ye" (real mean
ing of good-bye) journey that began on June
21 in St. Petersburg, Florida. God had brought
us safely and joyfully half way around the
world again.
Dale Marsh, former assistant chaplain at
Camp Oji here in Tokyo, who is now a second
year student in the Great Lakes Bible College,
and Ruth Yamashita former organist at the
Chapel and also Sunday school teacher for
Stanley Buttray, were united in marriage in
the Northside Church of Christ, Grand Rapids,
Michigan on Saturday September 27th. A
daughter Michele Denise was born to Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Buttray on July 8, 1960.
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
THE TOKYO CHRISTIAN
Published -quarterly, by the Missionaries o
the Chutrh of Christ Cunningham Mission.
Tokyo, Japan, for the information and inspira
tion of every Christian whose heart is open to
the call of Christ, and who is willing to help
in the supreme task of carrying out the Great
Commission of Christ: Matthew 28:19, 20.
Entered as second class matter in the Knox-
ville, Tcnn., Post office under the act of March
3, 1879.
Two-Year Subscripton 50 cents
Subscription and "Flaming Torch" $1X0
MISSION STAFF
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Buttray, 575 2-Chome,
Kamiochiai, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. For
warding agent: Mrs. Homer Anderson, R. D. 1,
Meadville. Pa, _ .
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Patton, 27 Sakura-
yama, Nakano-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. Forwarding
agent: Mr. or Mrs. Ray Armstrong, Rt. 3,
Box 310, Piqua, Ohio.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Sims, 1-52 Arai Machi,
Nakano-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. Forwarding agent:
First Christian Church, Tokyo Mission, Box
262, Charlottesville, Va.
Packages for Japan should be sent direct by
parcel post to one of the missionaries whose
addresses are shown above. Consult your local
post office concerning mailing rules and limit
ations of size and weights.
If you change your address please notify
H. L. Hamilton, Kimberlin Heights, Tennessee,
giving both your old and your new address.
If you make an offering of $1.00 or more you
are entitled to receive this paper if you so
request. Churches or groups making an offer
ing of $10.00 or more may request a bundle
of 10 copies for distribution.
Sakuroyama Church
On March 6, 1960 we held the first serv
ices of the Sakurayama Church which meets
in the building which formerly housed Tokyo
Bible Seminary. Actually, one of the churches
which wo reestablished after the war met in
this building but it finally died out. After
our return from furlough last year we made
plans to establish a church here. A Sunday
evening Bible class was begun in November
and Sunday morning services in March. Since
then the Lord has blessed the work wonder
fully. The attendance at the morning service
now averages around 15 and that for the Bible
class about 10. A Sunday School for children
taught by a widow from the Nakano Church,
a "seekers meeting," and a prayer meeting
are also now being held at the church, and
although the attendance is fairly small at these
meetings the interest shown by those who
attend is great. Two young ladies have been
baptized recently and a few earnest souls,
now seeking the will of the Lord, will perhaps
do likewise in a short time. Souls are being
saved and for that we praise the Lord and
take courage. We pray that a like spirit of
revival can be started among the other
churches affiliated with the Cunningham Mis
sion. Your prayers for this would help
tremendously.
Andrew Patton
"V.
V'.v'
W'
Velina Held and three of the missionary
children. A surprise birthday party was given
to Miss Held at the close of one of our mission
ary prayer meetings.
Off The Press
After much patience and perseverance
the book, "On The Rock" came from the
printers on Saturday noon October 1, and a
few minutes later the first of a thousand
copies was sold to a Korean Christian who re
cently lias been attending Mrs. Buttray's Satur
day afternoon Bible class. Needless to say we
are rejoicing over this new publication, and
hope and pray that it will find a ready market.
This book was written by D. R. Dungan about
eighty-five years ago and is still popular
among Christian and Churches of Christ. If
you haven't read this book, I recommend that
you do sc. For it will surely be a blessing
and joy, and a me.ins of strengthening your
faith.
This book has gone through thirty-three
English editions and is now beginning it's
second publication in a foreign language.
Unknown to each other, both Ralph Harter a
missionary to India and myself started transla
tion work on this book about the same time.
Both of us considered it as invaluable in the
field of Christian literature, especially in mak
ing known Christ's teaching concerning what
we must do to be saved.
Pray that God will bless and use this
book here among the Japanese as well as
there in India as it goes forth into the hands
of the public. If only one soul is converted
and brought into the narrow way through this
book, it will be well worth the effort and
eight hundred dollars It cost.
Since returning to Japan in 1956 this is
the third book which the Lord has led me to
publish. Also another book, "The Christian
System" by Alexander Campbell is in the
process of checking the translation. I am
hoping that this fourth book will be published
by the time of our next furlough, which (if
it's the Lord's Will) might be in the summer
of 1961. Stanley Buttray
Page 2
Sims Address Changed
The Sims family is living at the same
location, but the streets have been zoned and
renumbered. Their new address is 1-52 Arai
Machi Nakano-ku Tokyo.
Furlough Reminiscences
Like presidents and prisoners, missionaries
work and live by "terms"; and these are
separated, in the case of missionaries, by
intervals of time called "furloughs." As you
will imagine, each term and furlough is a
new and different experience. We have now
returned for our third 5-year period of service
in Japan, and because the house, neighbor
hood, work and people around us are all fami
liar we have found it easier than ever before
to settle down and adjust. Already the year in
America seems like a pleasant dream or
memory, and we are back in the harness as
before. We would like to pause for a moment
of retrospect while the furlough is still fresh
in our minds and attempt an answer to come
of the questions that were often asked of us as
we traveled over the United States.
1. How much have you traveled.?
As close as we can count the miles from
memory, the whole family traveled about
14,000 miles on ocean liners and 13,000 miles
by Station Wagon. In addition Harold traveled
about 10,000 miles by auto, 10,000 miles by
bus, 11,500 miles by airplane and 1500 miles
by train. Any way you look at it this was a
lot of riding and a great expenditure of
money. We enjoyed the trips, and are very
thankful for the opportunity to get around
and see so many friends and the wonderful
scenery and the work of the kingdom in
different areas. Of course we hope that the
inspiration we received and the contribution
we were able to make by various missionary
messages in the various programs will bear
fruit so that this travel will not be considered
a waste of time, energy and money.
2. Did you get any rest?
Yes, thank you, we consider the whole
year a very refreshing vacationspiritually
and physically. Although Harold was on the
go a lot, it was relaxing to be away from the
pressures and tensions that are special to the
work in Japan; and he still managed to be
at home about 140 days during the 13 months.
For us the most complete and enjoyable rest
of the furlough is always the 2 weeks on the
calm, spacious and beautiful sea.
3. Do you feel like you accomplished your
purpose?
Yes. We did not arrive in America with
the intention of raising a certain sum of
money. Our desire was simply to visit loved
ones and brethren, be encouraged and revived,
report on our work, and try to give people
better understanding and concern for the task
of evangelizing Japan.
4. Are you anxious to get back?
Frankly, if it were just a choice of a place
to live we much prefer the United States
(won't say which state) to any other place in
the world. There was nothing about the fellow
ship in the churches, the visits with the fam
ily, the relaxing and familiar life of friend
liness, frankness and abundance that made us
want to leave. Like any other person, we
dreaded the time to say good-bye.
}
Page 3
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
On the other hand, though, there is the
realization that a job waits to be done over
here and the conviction that God would have
us here sharing in it. As we begin another
term of service we already know some of the
problems and discouragements we must face,
but these are the very things that draw us
back into the line-up for another scimmage
after a welcome time out.
The soldier is not asked whether he
would like to go overseashe is commanded
and he goes in simple loyal obedience. In
the last analysis, that is the reason we are
going back to Japan. To be where He wants
us to be, to make the most of the opportuni
ties He gives us, to serve The One who emptied
Himself that we might have forgiveness of
our sins and eternal lifethis is true freedom
joy and life. Harold Sims
Evangelistic Meeting
In Japan, as in America, "revival" meet
ings can be effective instruments in leading
many souls to lay hold on the salvation of the
Lord. The methods may differ a little but the
aims and effects are similar. Sakurayama
Church has had two such meetings this year
one in May and the other one on September
18-25. The results from both meetings have
been very gratifying. The latter meeting was
a sort of international affair as far as leaders
were concerned. Mr. Oho, minister of the
Korean Church at Mikawashima, served as
evangelist, Harold Sims spoke on the final
night, Mr. Sahara, minister of the Kamiuma
Church (Japanese), was song leader and
presider, and Velma Held was organist. Three
persons indicated that the meetings had help
ed them 10 have faith in Christ and they are
almost ready to be baptized. Others were stir
red to thinking about their relation to the
living God. A Christian movie was shown
almost every night and this proved to be a
good means of drawing the people to the
meetings. We cannot boast of great crowds,
the largest attendance being about 30, but
those who did attend showed much interest
in the Gospel. Such meetings held frequently
help a church to have a steady growth.
^Andrew Patton
institutions on the Mission
Field
Continued from last issue
Let us turn, then, to consider a few of the
ADVANTAGES to be sought and derived from
establishing institutions on the mission fields.
1. The bringing into existence of an in
stitution usually gives to all concernedboth
missionary personell and native workersa
sense of permanency to the work. "Now that
this school is built we feel that we are here
to stay." The work does not depend on just one
individual who might leave at any time, but
rather the cooperation of many is needed and
usually given. Employment and security is
given to the nationals who work there, and
the neighborhood knows you are settled re-
sidents. This stability is good for the work any
where.
2. Generally speaking institutions have a
good influence on society and are respected
.
David Buttray and some of his Japanese playmates in the background. In the
foreground is Noel Ray and Philip Patton.
for it. The tendency is to create a tolerance,
respect, and favorable climate for the propaga
tion of the gospelto make the initial contact
with the heathen society that will soften and
warm their hearts. This is an important job,
and I believe that the many Mission Schools,
kindergardens and few hospitals founded by
Christian groups in Japan a generation or two
ago certainly had this beneficial effect there.
Just one example is the Seventh-day Adventist
hospital where all of our children were bom.
Every day this fine institution with its clean
rooms, smiling nurses, excellent doctors and
chapel services makes a favorable impression
on hundreds of non-Christian Japanese people
who in the meantime are paying for the privi
lege of receiving its services.
Such large and strong old institutions as
the -31ue MountainSchooL (Methodist) in
Tokyo, with classes for students from kinder-
garden through University, and the new In
ternational Christian University, are highly
regarded by Japanese in all walks of life.
This reaches up to the highest level in
government. Prime Minister Kishi paid high
compliments to the contribution of Christian
institutions to the progress of society and
culture in Japan in an address to the World
Sunday School Convention meeting in Tokyo
recently. So sometimes we can see the pos
sibility that institutions might help the whole
cause of the church by giving a favorable
impression to governing authorities and mak
ing the obtaining of visas and other contacts
with the powers that be more pleasant and
cooperation more fruitful.
where. Many missionaries never return to
Japan for a second term of service precisely
because of tiiis discouraging aspect of general
evangelism. One of my relaxations and enjoy
ments is painting^walls and floors, that is
because the privilege of starting over here
and finishing over there and being able to see
how much you have covered is a rewarding
experience for a change.
The missionary who works in an institu
tion escapes most of this; because he works
regular hours, has a niche in the organization
into which he fits, and he can see results in
the statistics. Often we almost envy the con
tentment and security of the young person
who has come over to Japan specifically to
teach English in a certain High School, or the
man who has come just to be book-keeper
and trAfltnirpr for a...large denominational
board. They have nothing like the worries
of the green-horn who was sent over with the
simple task of winning 90,000,000 people to
Christ Fortunately it is not a straight (ened?)
salary basis instead of commission.
3. A further advantage of institutions
accrues to the missionary personally. I refer
to something difficult to define, but it could
perhaps be expressed as "a feeling of accom
plishment." Evangelism is a frustrating work
in any land, and particularly in Japan where
responses to the gospel are so long and slow in
coming we often feel we are not getting any-
4. We might also mention the financial
advantage afforded by institutions. Everybody
is in favor of healing bodies, helping un
fortunate children, and education; and finan
cial appeals for these are answered more
readily and liberally than for simple preach
ing. Also there is responsibility about the
handling of the funds and auditing etc. that
is usually required by the local governments
and this very properly impresses the donors
as more business-like and trustworthy than
undesignated offerings sent to an individual.
More things could be said about the ad
vantages of institutions, but before time runs
out let us look at a few things that might
be considered DISADVANTAGES. Perhaps it
would be well to begin with the opposite side
of the very same things which we have listed
as advantages.
(Continued next time)
TOKYO CHRISTIAN
Sharon Lee Patten's Sixth Birthday
First Grader
August 29 is a day to be remembered
by Sharon Lee Patton. That was the first day
of school and she was in the first grade. She
attends the Narimasu Elementary School at
Grant Heights, Tokyo which is operated by the
U. S. Air Force. The bus runs near our house
and she must meet it at 7:30 in the morning.
What Would You Like?
If God should speak to you just now and
say, name what you like, and It shall be given
you. What would you ask for? I'm sure the
answers would be as varied and interesting
as those given by the Sunday School children
a few weeks ago here at Kamiochiai, Tokyo.
Before actually starting the lesson about
King Solomon, Miss Sugaware asked, the
children v/hat they would like to have if they
were given the opportunity to choose. Keeping
in mind the background of these children, that
their ages run from six to eleven and their
attendance in Sunday School would average
only about eight months, their answers were
all the more interesting and revealing.
Here are a few of the answers. One girl
said she would like to have a French doll.
Two girls said they wanted a Bible. Another
said a pair of shoes. One girl said Yesu Sama
(Jesusi, and two sisters said they wanted
eternal life. These last two mentioned are
six and eleven years old and have been at
tending since a year and a half ago when the
Sunday School was first started.
I think it would be safe to conclude from
these answers that Japanese children are no
different than American children when given
opportunity to hear God's Word from a faithful
witness. Can it be that in our zeal to see grown
adults and young people born again that we
have been partially blinded to an even richer
and more fertile field among children?
Stanley Buttray
Her teacher is a Christian who spends her
spare time in doing missionary work. The
method of teaching, teaching materials, and
the course taught at the school seem to be
excellent. Sharon's tuition is $1.80 a day plus
25 cents a day for lunch. Such excellent school
ing opportunities for our children are a
wonderful blessing.
Andrew Patton
Sakurayama Sunday School
Every Sunday afternoon the missionary
children in Tokyo are gathered by automobile
to the Sakurayama Church for Sunday School.
Most of them are not proficient enough in
Japanese to comprehend what is taught in a
Japanese Sunday School. Miss Velma Held
saw the need of a Sunday School for the mis
sionary children and started the one at Sakura
yama Church. She furnishes all of the mater
ials herself and serves as teacher. Miss Held
is a native of Hampton, Iowa and is a member
of the Church of Christ there. She is employ
ed as a teacher in the Air Force Elementary
School at Grant Heights in Tokyo. She has
taught school for the Armed Services in
several foreign countries and wherever she
goes her greatest joy comes from being able
to help the missionaries in her spare time.
Conducting this Sunday School is just one
of the many ways in which she renders in
valuable assistance to the Tokyo missionaries.
Thus our children have the opportunity of
studying the Scriptures taught in a Sunday
School in their own language.
Andrew Patton
David, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley But
tray entered the first grade at the Narimasu
Elementary School (Air Force). He travels to
and from school by bus which stops in front
of the house (fortunate), but his tuition and
lunch for the year is $350.00 dollars, (unfor
tunate).
First impressions
Our first impression on arriving in Japan
again was the traffic congestion which has
become a major problem with the increased
production of all kinds of vehicles in Japan.
The second thing was that we noticed no
difference in the attitude of the people toward
us in spite of the demonstrations and riots in
this city just 3 months ago. The people are
just as polite and accomodating as ever. The
riots are often discussed, and they bring up
the subject and speak with frankness and salm.
A couple of examples:
Early in the morning of the day we
arrived, when the ship was still in the mouth
of the bay, a launch came out full of customs
officials and other functionaries. Among those
climbing up the gangway we were very sur
prised to notice a man that looked like (and
actually was) one of our former students who
had graduated from University last spring. He
had taken a day off from his place of employ
ment and left home at daybreak in order to
come and meet us. He went out of his way to
assure us we were welcome and that the riots
meant nothing as far as our welcome to Japan
was concerned.
When we arrived at the pier there were
others saying the same thing. One student
came and lielped us all one day when we were
first getting settled. When I first went to
the meat store, the whole staff stopped work
and gave me a deep-bow greeting. Then when
I asked how much he told me that prices had
gone up during our absence. "That's no good,"
I said. He and all the others laughed and said,
"It has been pretty quiet and lonesome around
here with Mr. Sims gone."
Harold Sims
Christ'ian Service Camp
August 22-27 was the date Christian Serv
ice Camp was held under the sponsorship of
the Kamiuma Church. The camp grounds are
located at beautiful Lake Motosu at the foot
of Mount Fuji. This is one of the most scenic
spots of Japan and is separated from civiliza
tion and back in nature enough to make an
ideal camp site. The camp grounds were rent
ed from the Yoyogi Hachiman Church (non-
instrument) in Tokyo for a reasonable fee.
Those participating in the camp were the
Kamiuma Church where Mr. Sohara ministers
and the Sakurayama Church. The campers
numbered about twenty five, seven of which
went from the Sakurayama Church. Mr.
Sahara, IFdeo Aaki, and Andrew Patton ser-
ed as teachers in the camp. The spiritual at
mosphere of the camp was truly inspiring and
the fellowship among the campers was close
and effective. Everyone seemed to agree that
this was one of the best camps we have had.
One happy result of the camp was the deci
sion of two young ladies and one young man
to obey the Lord Christ and become His
servants. One of the young ladies who made
this decision and a young man who had com
mitted his life to the Lord earlier were bap-
tied on the final morning of the camp. We
know that several more campers were led to
think seriously about doing likewise and per
haps only a short time will pass when they too
will become obedient to the faith. The good
results from this camp will live on into the
future. Andrew Patton
November 22, I960
Dear Friends:
Here we sit in the same house (but new number 1**52, instead of old 450)
in Aral Maohi, 3ji fVcnt cf the old fam5JLiar typewriter, marveling over the fact that
a mere tm mcnths ago wo were just leaving the mainland of the U,So The distance
covered and the rush since we arrived in Yokohama on Sept. 6 has been so ^eat that
the furlough seems very long ago and far awaye But we do want to take time about every
two months to let you know how we are getting along and some things about the work here
We had the best crossing of the Pacific this fifth time that we have
e3q)erienced so far The ship was large, comfortable and fast, and the food was good.
The sea was a smooth as a lake, and the beautiful weather every day left nothing to be
desired - and this was appreciated all the more because it was typhoon season. Also we
had as travel companions the A1 Hammond and Bill Walker families from our churches as
well as many other congenial missionary families. The stopovers were also delightful.
We enjoyed a day of sightseeing in Vancouver, B.C#, whidh is filled with beautiful
homes and fabulous gardens* Then in Honolulu we had a full day of fellowship with
most of the missionaries in the islands, many of them friends from years ago.
Quite a number of friends were down at Yokohama to meet us, and we learn
ed that they had cleaned up our house and yard so we could move into our house that
night. Most of every day for the newt two weeks or more was spent in trips to Yokohama
to see our things through customs inspection, unpacking, cleaning, painting and
settling down. The children enrolled in Christian Academy the next day after we
arrived and are doing okey, Hope is studying piano and Sylvia is beginning Violin this
year.
During this time when the house was such a mess we didn't have many
j^isitoi^a-axcept those -who oame to help eome with the^ork. Since that time^werhave ^
had a number of friends drop in fcr long "catch-up"on-the-news" visits. Also we have
had brief visits with the Eugene and Russell Morse families as they stopped by on the
way home from Burma on furlough, and Ray Woodward, a UiS, Navy man from Markle, Ind,
As far as we have been able to notice^ the June demonstrations against
the treaty revision and the visit of President Eisenhower have not adversely affected
the work of the churches in any way, and the people's attitude toward us seems unchanged.
Quite a few people, among them university students, have talked about the problem in
an enlightened and discerning manner, and we are just sorry that there are so few
people in this teeming and tumultous nation who have a gospel^oriented and God-fearing
-attitude. The other day after the funeral for the Socialist leader Asfinuma who Was
assisinated by a rightist youth the labor unions and socialist party had called for a
demonstration of 100,000 people. We spent the day quietly working with the preacher's
wife here straightening up the Nakano church office in order to find out what we had
on hand in Sunday School materials, tracts and books for the Christians to read. In
the evening I went to a downtown auditorium to hear Oswald Smith preach to an audience
of about 2,000 Japanese, On the way I overheard someone on the train mention the plan
ned demonstration, and his companion replied, "0 yes;, that was today" in a disinterest
ed sort of way, I had forgotten about it until that moment. Perhaps it was because the
demonstration was not as large as planned, but everything in town seemed perfectly
ncrmal. The streets were full of cars and the sidewalks swarmed with people hurrying
along on their own business. Afterward it occured to me that if even 90,000 people
were to gather it would be only 1 out of 100 of the population of Tokyo,
The first Sunday in Japan we attended Nakano church. We found about the
same people there as 15 months before. During the year we were absent there had been
three baptisms. There had been no great problems, attendance for the morning service . .
had consisteltly held between fifteen and twenty-five, but very little progress and
growth was evident.
We were especially distressed to see that the Sunday School attendance had fallen
until only 5 children were there. The preacher^'s wife has 2 lib tie babies ages 16
aDd^2 months^ so she had not been aU.e to take her' normal leadirtg part for many
months and the whole responsibility had fallen on a fine, devoted young girl who was
doing her best. Lois began ftom the next Sunday to help with flannel-graph and other
things and the attendance has already grown to 15 regulars# We are hoping that it
will grow large enough by Christmas to separate into 2 or 3 classes for different
ages after the first of next year. At the welcome meeting for us on Sept. 25 Harold
suggested that evening services be started again. Since the preacher works almost
full-time at his father-in-law's company he said he didn't have time to prepare 2
sermons a sunday, so Harold began preaching every Sunday night here from the first
Sunday in October. So far our lowest attendance has been 5 and the highest 11.
We have also preached at the Mikawashima church, which has shown a marked improvement
during the past year. There were about 70 present the Sunday we were there.
The day we arrived in Japan a letter from Vivian Lemmon, the Missionary in
Tanabe, Wakayama prefecture (450 miles south of Tokyo) was h^ded to me. It was in
j^gent plea for help because the preacher had just resigned and the church seemed to
be in great trouble with feelings running high. She thought a week of meetings with
the main emphasis on rallying the Christians would be the best thing. We were unable
to go^during the first several weeks, hut went for a week from Oct. 10-16, The
results were not spectacular, but we averaged about 15 in attendance every night,
and some who had quit came back and most of the folks seemed encouraged. On Saturday
night Oct. 15 we didn't have a meeting at the church building in town but went to
one of the villages in the nearby mountains where there is a Christian family and
held a special evangelistic meeting in their hoine. Seven of the neighboring people
came in and we had a good time. The road out from the city was one of the most
ii^y and-narrow that-I-have-ever seen-atterapt^ed-by a 6-wheel vefiicler FoF^t of
the way it ran along the top of a dike beside the river. The buses are scheduled so
they don t meet ^ther one, but when occasionally they meet a truck one of them must
back up a long distance. On both sides of the road the fields were full of golden
rice and the people were out there cutting it by hand, It is then Wrapped in hand-
lUil sized shocks and hung upside down on bamboo poles which are strung across the
center ^i2.ds where it dries for a week or two before threshing which is also r'
done in the field witha small machine. As we climbed up the hill and looked back down
valley I thought the patchwork of paddy-fields filled with grain and the
neatly terraced mo^tain'-sides dotted with orange and persimmon trees was typically
Japanesequaint, traditional, peachful, the beauty of nature being used and appreciated.
anb.4,r ^enunon and I were invited by one of the Christians to a special
sukiy^i dinner at the town's newest and best hotel. In such cases you dine in a
private second-floor room with a choice view of the bay, and the view of that calm
simset on the sea with the fishing boats returning home and the loaded ferry plowing
resort area, the green mountains in the backgi-ound and the islands in
the distance was a picture for the tourist books and a meiifry good for the soul. It
made me feel a deep jo^' in being back in Japan and pri~ileged to preach the gospel
to these people so blessed with natural beauty and alco so often the victims of
disasters like volcanoes, typhoons, earthquakes-worshipping the creation and
not the Creator who alone is also able to save.
Yours in His service,
Harold and Lois Sims
Christmas 1960
Dear Friends,
w. lu.."ifiir
and all the new year of our Lord , r I
As another year closes we will
city helping carry the CaWor Smce we returned to a place and
seeking to serve the world s only Savior, bince we difficulty in the
work fo which we have become J
adjustment to living here. The d y J , ^ Christian
This ysss's /v;
on our evangelistic work. It ^ fdikawashima church during the
increase in attendance and Nakano during the past 3months,
past year, and on a smaller the Pattons in the
Pt^itrlard a^d in an evangelistic meeting in Tanabe, about
dSO miles south of Tokyo during October
Thank you, everyone, once more, for ,raveled across the home-
iJr ":i77:;(,7: ^ t"
We remember that Christ's '""""f ''^highesl 'pe!ice'on earth,
chain of blessings in motion so glory to God in ttie nig
and good tidings to all people.
Yours in Him,
Harold and Lois Sini.<
152 Arai Machi,
Nakano-k u Tokyo.