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With Inmarsat and Iridium having either begun or will soon
begin launching their next-generation constellations, and
Globalstar and Thuraya Communications finding success in
the consumer-driven handheld market, the worlds leading
MSS players all expressed optimism for their growth pros-
pects at Tuesdays opening General Session.
During their initial remarks of business highlights from
2013, panel moderator Tim Farrar of TMF Associates play-
fully reminded Iridium CEO Matt Desch of last years bet
with Jay Monroe of Globalstar, who bet Desch $1,000 that
Iridium Next would not make its scheduled launch of March
2015. Iridium recently announced that it would be delayed
by a few months to accommodate additional software vali-
dation on the network.
Im glad to pay my bets, quipped Densch, adding, Ill
pay it in Iridium stock it will be worth far more than the
money.
Desch conceded that 2013 wasnt the best business year
in terms of bottom-line results, reporting equipment shortfalls
that he indicated would be turned around this year with the
launch of several new products. Were in a capital cycle right
now were about half way through a $3 billion program,
and are testing our satellites that will start to be launched next
year, he said.
Desch highlighted two successes in 2013: securing the
satellite industrys first fixed-price contract with the U.S.
Department of Defense (DoD), and shoring up the compa-
nys hosted payload strategy for Aireon, which will leverage
Iridiums new constellation to provide better tracking of
aircraft across the Atlantic. We brought all the money and
partners together so Aireon is guaranteed to be a successful
product company, he addedsaid.
Rupert Pearce, Inmarsats CEO, said his company is poised
for double-digit growth with the coming of Global Xpress. The
company anticipates growth in wholesale revenues of 8 to 12
percent over the next two years. Thats a dramatic jump from
2013, when Inmarsat only grew by 3.3 percent in what Pearce
called a difficult market environment.
We spent most our time last year on our new wave [of] in-
novation and we continue to spend roughly $300 million a year
on innovation, he added.
The first of three Inmarsat 5 satellites forming the Glob-
al Xpress network launched in December, and Pearce
said the next two satellites are on course to launch later
this year to deliver full worldwide coverage by years end.
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Launch Smart:
Continuous Innovation
Ariane 5 ES
20 MT to LEO
Ariane 5 ECA
9.5 MT to GTO
Ariane 4
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Ariane 3
2.7 MT to GTO
Ariane 2
2.3 MT to GTO
Ariane 1
1.8 MT to GTO
MSS Market Poised for
Faster Growth as
Next-Gen Constellations
Prepare to Launch
BY ANNE WAINSCOTT-SARGENT
DAY 4

THURSDAY

03. 13. 14
ad667_2.5x2.75:Layout 1 2/7/14 1:27 PM P
Congratulations
Ar i a ne s pa c e s a l ut e s Kha l i d Ba l k he y o ur,
Presi dent & CEO of Arabsat, for bei ng named
Via Satellites 2013 Satellite Executive of the
Year. He recei ved thi s presti gi ous award for
expandi ng Arabsats presence i n the Mi ddl e
Eas t and Eur ope. We hav e been a pr oud
par t ner wi t h Ar absat si nce t he l aunch of
Ar absat -1A i n 1985 and have successf ul l y
or bi t ed 8 sat el l i t es f or t he or gani z at i on.
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MSS Market Poised for
Faster Growth as
Next-Gen Constellations
Prepare to Launch
With Inmarsat and Iridium having either begun or will soon
begin launching their next-generation constellations, and
Globalstar and Thuraya Communications finding success in
the consumer-driven handheld market, the worlds leading
MSS players all expressed optimism for their growth pros-
pects at Wednesdays opening general session.
During their initial remarks of business highlights from
2013, panel moderator Tim Farrar of TMF Associates play-
fully reminded Iridium CEO Matt Desch of last years bet
with Jay Monroe of Globalstar, who bet Desch $1,000 that
Iridium Next would not make its scheduled launch of March
2015. Iridium recently announced that it would be delayed
by a few months to accommodate additional software vali-
dation on the network.
Im glad to pay my bets, quipped Desch, adding, Ill pay it
in Iridium stock it will be worth far more than the money.
Desch conceded that 2013 wasnt the best business year
in terms of bottom-line results, reporting equipment shortfalls
that he indicated would be turned around this year with the
launch of several new products. Were in a capital cycle right
now were about half way through a $3 billion program,
and are testing our satellites that will start to be launched next
year, he said.
Desch highlight-
ed two successes in 2013: securing the satellite industrys
first fixed-price contract with the U.S. Department of De-
fense (DoD), and shoring up the companys hosted payload
strategy with Aireon, which will leverage Iridiums new con-
stellation to provide better tracking of aircraft across the
Atlantic. We brought all the money and partners together
so Aireon is guaranteed to be a successful product compa-
ny, he said.
Rupert Pearce, Inmarsats CEO, said his company is poised
for double-digit growth with the coming of Global Xpress. The
company anticipates growth in wholesale revenues of 8 to 12
percent over the next two years. Thats a dramatic jump from
2013, when Inmarsat only grew by 3.3 percent in what Pearce
called a difficult market environment.
We spent most our time last year on our new wave [of] in-
novation and we continue to spend roughly $300 million a year
on innovation, he added.
The first of three Inmarsat 5 satellites forming the Glob-
al Xpress network launched in December, and Pearce
said the next two satellites are on course to launch later
this year to deliver full worldwide coverage by years end.
ad667_2.5x2.75:Layout 1 2/7/14 1:27 PM P
BY ANNE WAINSCOTT-SARGENT
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DAY 4

THURSDAY

03. 13. 14
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The MSS market has some interesting
dynamics right now. While a lot of focus
in the overall industry has centered on
SpaceX and O3b Networks, the MSS
sector has seen a hive of activity in
recent months and some key events.
With Thuraya seeing great traction
with its SatSleeve product, Inmarsat
launching Global Xpress, and Iridium
getting ready to launch its Iridium Next
constellation, it is also a market that is
on the verge of a new era.
The question is how these companies
will find success with their respective
business plans. It is interesting how
both Gl obal star and Thuraya are
looking to play in the consumer market,
and how it has reinvigorated it. The
question is whether these companies
can come up with enough new products
and services to justify the costs of some
very expensive constellations.
What has been interesting at this
show, more than the other years, is
the constant talk of disruption and
innovation. The key to the industrys
future success it seems is a quicker pace
of change towards new technologies
and solutions.
We are now approaching the end
of SATELITE and today we end with
two great panels. First, we have the
Next Big Four panel where a number
of regional FSS operators around the
world talk about their views on the
changing satellite world. Given that
the last two Satellite Executive of the
Years have come from Asia and the
Middle East, the perspectives on this
panel will be of much interest. Finally,
we close the event today with a new
panel Satellite Executive of the Year
Winners Circle where past winners of
the award analyze the road ahead.
What we do know is, despite the
usual upbeat message the industry
gives about its future, more innovation
is quite clearly needed. The bar has
been raised for next year, and we
look forward to seeing what will
develop and what will be the talking
points of SATELLITE 2015. As we
know from 2013 with so many news
and announcements coming from the
industry, a year is a long time in the
satellite world. Lets hope it is a good
year ahead.
Editorial
MARK HOLMES, Editorial Director
VERONICA MAGAN, Managing Editor
CALEB HENRY, Junior Editor
KATIE KRIZ, Media Associate
Contributing Writers
ANNE WAINSCOTT-SARGENT
SAM SILVERSTEIN
Advertising & Business
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tdrake@accessintel.com
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Conference Services
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The Drive for More
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Schedule of Events At-A-Glance
Thursday, March 13, 2014
Start Time End Time Room Session
7:30 AM 8:30 PM 145 Via Satellites Excellence Awards Winners Breakfast
8:00 AM 9:00 AM Foyer Rise-n-Shine Coffee Service
9:00 AM 1:00 PM Exhibit Hall Exhibit Hall Opens
9:00 AM 10:30 AM 202 The Next Big Four: Driving the Future of Space-Based Communications
9:30 AM 4:30 AM 209AB Interference Prevention Summit: Presented by GVF
10:30 AM 11:00 AM Foyer Coffee Break
11:00 AM 12:30 PM 202 SEOTY Winners Circle: Past Winners Assess the Road Ahead
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Hosted payloads and small satellites have become increasingly important for many
organizations, including the military and government, to ensure success by offering
cost-effective solutions for access to space. Join the satellite community at the 2014
Hosted Payload and Smallsat Summit to discuss the trade-offs and attributes of hosted
payloads and smallsats, and how they t into mission conguration.
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The whole program remains on track and on budget includ-
ing the modems, terminals, the distribution channels as noted
by our new announcements this week, said Pearce. Im confi-
dent we will launch and deliver services through a very power-
ful distribution channel.
He added that the Inmarsats core Maritime L-band business
is growing, where $1 in new inno-
vation is delivering $10 value more
into the enterprise. Pearce sees the
L-band market continuing to evolve
with more broadband capabilities in
smaller form factors for small vessels
at sea. I see us pushing the envelope
on higher speeds, he said.
Pearce added that Inmarsats fast-
est-growing segment this year will
be aviation, which is growing 25 to
30 percent a year in areas such as
cockpit services, safety service and
passenger connectivity.
Monroe was decidedly upbeat not-
ing, Its finally fun to be Globalstar
again. He successfully reworked
loan provisions to give Globalstar ad-
ditional liquidity. We are fully funded
and we are starting to grow rapidly.
Last August, Globalstars second-
generation satellites were in full
commercial service, supporting
voice, duplex and simplex data prod-
ucts and services. The company also
is preparing for a new ground system
that will deploy a few years after the
constellation. The target timing for
the whole system to be up and run-
ning is early 2016. It will allow us
to deliver very inexpensive chip sets
and technology at faster speeds,
Monroe said.
This year, he expects voice and
duplex services to grow rapidly,
with revenues in that area up more
than 100 percent from this year,
with increasing contribution from
M2M applications.
Samer Halawi, CEO of Dubai-
based Thuraya Telecommunications, said his firms revenues
were up 15 percent with equipment sales up by more than
50 percent. Thuraya also restructured its debt, which Halawi
said now is the lowest average in the industry.
Additionally, the company also entered into the maritime
broadband market. Were offering a value proposition to
customers that make sense, Halawi said, explaining that for
launching
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some customers, L-band may be the only solution. We designed
packages that our partners can take and bundle with bands so
we can offer a managed solution.
The panelists see a lot of momentum for the Machine-to-Ma-
chine (M2M) market. Inmarsat signed a partnership with Orb-
comm in December that will allow Orbcomms modem to run
over Inmarsats network.
It cascades into terrestrial and satellite, fixed and mobile
its a big wave of the future, said Pearce, calling the M2M
market a big driver of growth for Inmarsat.
Desch said that Iridium sees continued opportunities in the
market, adding that M2M is expected to grow fastest in the
coming year. Iridium currently provides satellite M2M servic-
es to Caterpillar, the largest heavy-equipment provider in the
world and an early adopter of M2M.
Its clear that Caterpillar is going to telematics on all their de-
vices because they recognize the value of knowing where their
assets are. Its a growth segment. We are investing in this area in
terms of cost, size, throughput and latency, said Desch, noting
that when Iridium Next launches, the company will be able to
offer additional innovation in this growth area.
Differing Views
Both Thuraya and Globalstar were positive about the mar-
ket for their consumer satellite handhelds, with Thuraya
just announcing the launch of two more SatSleeve prod-
ucts. The SatSleeve is currently outselling other products
two to one, Halawi said.
Many of the panelists disagreed on whether their handhelds
could achieve the price points to reach a mass market, how-
ever. Globalstars Monroe was most bullish, saying, Its our ob-
jective to create what is now SatFi into something that can be a
$100 product, he said.
Globalstar hopes to eventually offer 5 to 10 million units in a
market where two billion people today live, work or play out-
side terrestrial coverage. I appreciate Jays optimism, but when
we start talking millions we have to be very careful, said Halawi,
observing that reaching a mass market is hindered by the indus-
trys current lack of standardization.
Desch, on his part, is focused on working through
channels to sell the Iridium GO! which creates a satellite-
backed Wi-Fi hotspot to users. Desch said that from his
experience in the consumer market, going direct to con-
sumers is expensive and inevitably market players have to
raise prices to make any money. Its not just about com-
ing up with a low-cost product; its about distribution and
branding, he said. Weve stayed away from that because
if you go down that path and youre not successful, its
spectacularly unsuccessful.
Spectrum
As the satellite industry con-
tinues to rally together to
fight off spectrum attacks
by the wireless terrestrial
market, many of the pan-
elists were not in favor of
Globalstars move to expand
into Wi-Fi. The FCC placed
Globalstars request for ter-
restrial use of spectrum on
public notice, which Mon-
roe says if the process goes as expected a commission order
would be expected in late summer or early fall.
We can make no apology for exploiting all the assets inside
Globalstar Inmarsat has leased their spectrum for similar
reasons. We all are trying to make sure that the terrestrial wire-
less guys dont impinge on satellite spectrum that we need to
operate our networks, Monroe said, adding that Globalstar
worked hard with FCC to get a technical solution that would
reduce harmful interference.
Its dangerous to start to flirt with different business mod-
els, said Pearce, noting it could cause further loss of spectrum
to the Wi-Fi industry, which already has occurred in the United
States with spectrum being repurposed for firms like Light-
Squared. He noted two big threats facing the satellite industry:
the trend of national regulators instituting local spectrum policy
to the highest bidder, and the direct threat of the International
Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) industry, which has created
a crisis mindset. Were beginning to mobilize, he said, not-
ing that IMT technology efficiencies are already addressing
the capacity problem. VS
Tim Farrar, MSUA, TMF Associates; Rupert Pearce, Inmarsat; Jay Monroe,
Globalstar; Samer Halawi, Thuraya Telecommunications; Matt Desch, Iridium
Communications, during the MSS CEOs: Routes to Success with New Satellites,
Services and Spectrum panel.
www.amos-spacecom.com
Int. Tel: +972.3.755.1000, U.S. Tel: 1.212.920.8868 Connect with us
Your Satellites Across North America, the Middle East, Europe, Africa,
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Spacecom operates the AMOS satellite constellation, consisting of the AMOS-2
and AMOS-3 satellites co-located at 4W, AMOS-5 located at 17E, and the new
AMOS-4 launched in 2013 to 65E. The AMOS satellites provide high-quality
broadcast and communications services in North America, the Middle East, Europe,
Africa, Russia and Asia.
With the launch of AMOS-6 to 4W in 2015, Spacecom will enhance coverage over
Europe and the Middle East with its new Pan-European beam, and further strengthen
its position as a global satellite operator.
Let Spacecom answer your call for high-quality satellite coverage. Contact us today.
Answering the Call for Greater Coverage
Come visit us at Satellite 2014
March 11 - 13
Booth 6053
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A Closer Look at the Off the Shelf Lineup
BY TAI NICHOLS
Senior executives of Airbus Defence and Space, Astrium Satel-
lites, Space Systems Loral (SSL), Thales Alenia Space, Lockheed
Martin Space Systems, Orbital Sciences and Boeing Satellite
Systems International gathered to discuss customizable off-the-
shelf options that allow the use of most current and anticipated
services as well as specialized spacecraft for evolving applica-
tions, on Tuesdays Satellite Manufacturing: In-Orbit technolo-
gies Define On-Ground Capabilities panel.
Thales Alenia Space announced it will have an all-electric
product starting in 2016. Lockheed Martin Space Systems has
its own all-electric design, which offers quick delivery to geosta-
tionary orbit, but uses a heavier electric propulsion system. Or-
bital Sciences GEOStar 3 commercial communications satellite
platform, which will offer a 60 percent growth in power and a
one-third growth in payload mass compared to the GeoStar 2,
will use electric power for in-orbit station keeping but not for
orbit-raising. Also, the successful completion of on-orbit test-
ing for the first Boeing-built Inmarsat 5 satellite, and Airbus De-
fense and Spaces launch of AuroraGlobal, its new high through-
put satcom services for the maritime market, were announced.
With these announcements, the panelists discussed the pos-
sibility of additional sales of all-electric satellites. Orbital Sci-
ences CEO David W. Thompson said satellite operators have
shown little demand for these solutions because it would take
months, as opposed to a week, to reach final geostationary
operating position.
Game Changers
For Eric Branger, senior vice president of space systems and
programs, Airbus Defense and Space, Astrium Satellites, what
has happened is a combination of three game changers. First,
the cost to launch is lower than launching the traditional
way. Next on his list was the idea to stack two small satel-
lites. Finally, he shared that customers are now accepting to
do the electric orbit rising from the start. We think there will
be some future satellites using electric orbit raising. Not the
majority, but significant enough to offer it and make sure its
embedded from the start in the next generation, he said.
The use of High Throughput Satellite (HTS) systems was also
a major factor in many of the announcements made by panel-
ists, leading to a discussion of predictions for its impact on the
industry. There is no question that HTS, that provide at least
twice the total throughput of a traditional fixed satellite ser-
vice (FSS) for the same amount of allocated orbital spectrum,
are on the rise. According to a recent report by Euroconsult, 33
HTS will be launched between this year and 2016. Compared to
the total 31 HTS that were launched over the last decade, this
is a record high. Although the topic of HTS may bring opposing
views throughout the conference, panelists agreed the demand
for these systems would not slow down any time soon.
Clearly, with some of the operators, HTS systems are already
changing the business models. Theres been focus on flexible
payloads and other technologies that drive HTS to be more pro-
ductive for operators. Were investing a lot in technology right
now. I dont see it slowing down for a few years, said Mike Lar-
kin, executive vice president, Orbital Sciences.
Larkins thoughts were echoed by other panelists, such as
Paul Estey, senior vice president engineering, manufacturing,
and test operations, SSL. Its a growing part of the space seg-
ment. We see this as a growing marketplace, whether open or
closed, Estey said.
Hosted Payloads
Before closing, hosted payloads were also brought to the ta-
ble, as panelists discussed its status in the industry. While opti-
mistic for the future, Lieutenant General Michael Hamel shared
realistic reflections from the past. It is hard, he said. Once
upon a time when talking to customers about hosted payloads,
they would say no. However, and almost unanimously, the pan-
elists agreed hosted payloads are more than just a flash in the
pan, but instead a part of the business.
We have 20 hosted payloads. This is something signifi-
cant for us, Branger said. With our experience and with
all we see in the market, I think we will continue to see some
hosted payloads.
Adding to Brangers remarks, Larkin shared his prediction
for the future of hosted payloads. While the government has
had certain hosted payload champions in the past, it hasnt been
as widespread as it is now. Were seeing more formal infrastruc-
ture. I think well see more of this in the future than were seeing
now, Larkin said.
While much debate may surround these in-orbit technologies
throughout the conference, panelists predicted that one of the
current trends will be the ability to offer greater options to their
customers. If these predictions are true, the future of these tech-
nologies is a bright one. VS
As we celebrate our 20th Anniversary Year, wed like to
extend our appreciation to our iDirect partners around
the world.
We look forward to continuing our successful partnership,
working together to expand the market and prosper in an
exciting new era of opportunity.
Please stop by Booth #7001 to see the latest and receive
your invitation to our 20th Anniversary Party exclusively
for iDirect partners on Tuesday, March 11, 5:00 pm.
Thank you, partners.
20
A
N
NIVERSARY
Two Decades of Partnership and Innovation
2
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E X H I B I T O R L I S T ( A S O F 0 3 . 0 6 . 1 4 )
A.G. Franz Associates, LLC 5120
A1 Microwave 4132
AAI Corporation 3117
Accelerated Media Technologies, Inc. 9103
Access Intelligence, LLC 1134
ACORDE 7094
Actox Corporation 9067
Adtec Digital 5123
Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. 7119
Advanced Microwave Components 2092
Advantech Wireless 6017
AEi Systems, LLC 3080
Aerojet 9097
Aerospace Corporation (The) 7097
Agilent Technologies, Inc. 3034
Agilis 8009
Airbus Defense & Space 5023
AIS Engineering, Inc. 9133
AKD ICT Co., Ltd. 8081
Alga/Mitec VSAT 6074
Allot Communications 4123
All Pro Solutions, Inc. 1118
Ameripack Inc. 9063
Amos - Spacecom 6053
Amphenol Fiber Systems International 3121
AnaCom Inc. 9085
Analytical Graphics, Inc. 8134
ANRITSU COMPANY 2091
Apollo Microwaves Ltd. 4099
Applied Instruments Inc. 8111
AQYR 9090
ARA - Seavey Division 5127
Arianespace 7019
Arqiva 5067
ARTEL, LLC 5041
ASC Signal Corporation 5057
Astro Haven Enterprises, Inc. 3139
ATCI 9007
ATK 3087
AVCOM of Virginia, Inc. 3024
AvL Technologies 8037
Ayecka Communication Systems 2112
Azure Shine Technology Co., Ltd. 9052
BAE Systems Australia 6136
Baird Mounting Systems 5081
Bliley Technologies Inc. 9058
Boeing Company 6009
Brandywine Communications 8107
BRASTRADING 1097
BSC Filters 7116
Busek Co. Inc. 8122
By Light Professional IT Services, Inc. 9054
C4ISR & Networks 2114
Calspan Aerospace 1075
Carlisle Interconnect Technologies 2132
C-Com Satellite Systems 6041
China Huaxin Antenna 1098
Civolution 2076
Cobham 7025
COGENT TECHNOLOGIES 3134
COM DEV International 9055
Communications & Power Industries (CPI) 4016
ComSpOC 8133
Comtech EF Data 7009
Comtech Telecommunications Corp. 7009
Comtech Xicom Technology, Inc. 7009
ConcealFab Corporation 9001
Cone Drive Gearing Solutions 1105
Crane Aerospace & Electronics 4138
Cross Technologies, Inc. 9039
Crystal Solutions 8064
Datum Systems Inc. 7127
DBA Distribution by Air, A Radiant Logistics Company 2110
dBm 5083
Design Interface Inc. 4115
DH Antenna 4097
Diamond Antenna & Microwave Corp. 7123
DiTom Microwave, Inc. 3129
Dow - Key Microwave 7112
DTA SA 5121
EchoStar 6001
Electrorack 1102
Elite Antennas Ltd. 7129
EMCORE / Ortel 6089
EMC Technology/Florida RF Labs, Inc. 8095
Emerging Markets Communications 3075
EM Research, Inc 8109
EM Solutions 6126
Encompass Digital Media, Inc. 8017
Ericsson 6075
Esterline Power Systems 1117
ETL Systems 3093
Eutelsat America Corp. 6061
Evertz Microsystems Ltd. 3008
Exelis 1092
Expedition Communications 9092
FEI - Zyfer, Inc. 9043
Ferrite Microwave Technologies 7108
Finisar Corporation 7138
FOR-A Corporation 3113
Foxcom 8059
Fraunhofer IIS 3127
Frontline Communications 9126
GATR Technologies 4135
GE Aviation 7135
General Dynamics SATCOM Technologies 3031
Geosync Microwave, Inc. 9056
Gigasat 3061
Gilat Satellite Networks 5030
Glenair 4122
Global Invacom 3044
Global VSAT Forum (GVF) 1116
Globecomm 5061
Glowlink Communications Technology Inc. 4055
GMV 5087
GRUS 1096
Haigh-Farr, Inc. 3119
Harmonic Drive LLC 8126
Harris CapRock 4000
Harris Corporation 4000
High Gain Antenna Co, Ltd. 5097
Hispasat 6083
Honeywell 2127
Hughes 6001
Hunter Communications Canada 5135
IAI - Israel Aerospace Industries 8127
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COMPANY BOOTH COMPANY BOOTH
iDirect 7001
Infinite Technologies, Inc. 5133
Inmarsat 3047
Integrasys, S.A. 9127
Intellian 8068
Intelsat 3000
Intelsat General 3000
International Launch Services (ILS) 3009
Intrasky 7057
Iridium Communications 3053
IRT Technologies Inc. 6128
ITC Global 1106
ITS Electronics, Inc. 5090
Jersey Microwave, LLC 4113
JFW Industries, Inc. 3141
K&L Microwave, Inc. 7114
Kamatics RWG Specialty Bearings 1094
KenCast, Inc. 5075
Klas Telecom Inc. 4098
KMIC Technology, Inc. 2107
KNS, Inc. 9074
Kratos 3025
Kratos ISI 3025
Kratos Networks 3025
KYMETA CORPORATION 4127
L - 3 Communications 6030
LBiSat, LLC 6095
Leader Tech Inc 1109
LightSquared 3039
Linearizer Technology, Inc. 5103
Linear Photonics, LLC 5103
Link Communications, Inc. 9081
LinQuest Corporation 9117
Lockheed Martin 7043
Logus Microwave 6078
LPKF Laser & Electronics 8120
LP Technologies, Inc. 1107
M2 Global Technology Ltd. 7095
MDA 4039
MEDIA BROADCAST 3118
MegaPhase, LLC 5118
Metamagnetics 8119
Mician GmbH 3126
Micro - Ant LLC 8091
Microsemi 6092
Microwave Development Labs 3131
Microwave Photonic Systems, Inc. 4110
MIL-SAT Global Communications 8118
Mini-Circuits 6133
MITEQ, INC. 5017
MM Microwave LTD 6134
Moscow Institute of Physics & Technology (State University) 8138
MOST SOTM 2104
MTN Government 7075
NAL Research Corporation 3135
National Reconnaissance Office 9116
NEC 2108
Network Innovations/GMPCS 5115
New Japan Radio Co./Sojitz America 9047
Newtec 3019
Noisecom/Wireless Telecom Group/Boonton 3106
Norsat International Inc. 3090
Northrop Grumman 7111
Novella USA, Inc. 5110
NovelSat 9025
Novotronik GmbH 4116
NYNEX satellite OHG - professional satellite services 2077
O3b Networks Ltd. 3067
OAG Aviation 6109
OHB System AG 1104
OPTICAL ZONU CORP. 8128
Optimal Satcom 6080
Orbital Research Ltd. 8115
Orbital Sciences Corporation 7103
Orbital Systems, Ltd. 7133
Peak Communications, Ltd. 9027
Peregrine Semiconductor 1114
Phasor Solutions Ltd. 3105
PhilTech Co., Ltd. 1093
Polarity, Inc. 3082
PolarSat 9021
Precision Devices, Inc. (PDI) 6107
Pro Brand International Inc. 6139
Procera Networks 3128
Quintech Electronics 8053
Radome Services 5137
Red Rapids 9083
Research Concepts, Inc. 4111
RESHETNEV COMPANY 1121
RKF Engineering 7106
Romantis Inc. 5114
Rotating Precision Mechanisms, Inc. 3111
RT Logic 3025
Russian Satellite Communications Company 2097
Saft 6094
Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corp. 2074
San Francisco Circuits 2116
San Francisco International Gateway 6127
Santander Teleport 3099
SAT Corporation 3025
Sat-Lite Technologies 7140
Satmex 6121
SatPath Systems, Inc. 2093
SATPRO MEASUREMENT & CONTROL TECHNOLOGY CO, LTD 1081
SBG SYSTEMS 2133
SCAN Antenna A/S 6132
SCS Networks 1113
Sector Microwave Industries 4091
SED Systems 7088
SEG, a Division WESCO Distribution 5101
SES 4009
Shaanxi Tianyi Antenna Co., Ltd. 9087
Siemens Convergence Creators 6114
Skyline Communications NV 9065
Skylink Technology 3116
SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation 7081
Skyware Global 4085
Skyware Technologies 4085
Sojitz America/New Japan Radio Co. 9047
Spaceflight Inc. 9118
Space Machine & Engineering Corp. 6129
SpaceNews 9106
SpaceX 9003
Spinner Group 3101
Squire Tech Solutions, LLC 9062
STAR SOLUTIONS 1077
State of Maryland 5122
Surface Heating Systems (Kirkaldy) Ltd. 4093
Surrey Satellite Technology 6115
TACO Antenna 8057
Tampa Microwave LLC 9011
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TDK Lambda Americas 2094
TeamCast 4121
TECOM - Smiths Microwave 8094
TeleCommunication Systems, Inc. 8045
Teledyne Coax Switches 7033
Teledyne Microelectronics 7033
Teledyne Microwave Solutions 7033
Teledyne Paradise Datacom 7033
Teledyne Relays 7033
Teledyne Technologies 7033
Telenor Satellite Broadcasting AS 2081
Telesat 6047
Telespazio 4051
Temwell Corporation 1095
Terrasat Communications, Inc. 5093
TestEquity LLC 9114
Thales Alenia Space 5049
Thales Components Corp. 6067
ThinKom Solutions, Inc. 6100
Thuraya Telecommunications Company 7087
Times Microwave Systems 3123
TRAK Microwave - Smiths Microwave 8099
Triquint Semiconductor, Inc. 1111
TrustComm, Inc. 4140
TTI 3132
Turkish Aerospace Industries, Inc. 4117
UltiSat 2111
Universal Switching Corporation 3081
Uplogix 9023
VASTech (Pty), Ltd. 8117
Vectron International 7110
ViaLite Communications 9029
ViaSat Inc. 4075
Viking SATCOM 6120
Virgin Technologies Inc. 4118
Vislink 9108
ViviSat 3087
Vocality 3028
Volga-Dnepr Unique Air Cargo 2117
W.B. Walton Enterprises, Inc. 7051
Washington Laboratories, Ltd. 7139
WaveLab Limited 3107
Wideband Systems, Inc. 3103
Winegard Company 4061
WISTEK, Co., Ltd. 9121
WORK Microwave GmbH 6101
XipLink, Inc. 7126
XTAR LLC 5096
Zarges Cases 6111
ZODIAC DATA SYSTEMS 4102
Zoho WebNMS 7121
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During Wednesdays Latin America: An Emerging Region
Emerges panel, executives from eight different companies en-
gaged the audience in a conversation about High Throughput
Satellites (HTS) and altering value chains.
Moderator David Hartshorn, secretary general of Global
VSAT Forum (GVF) mentioned Euroconsults recent report on
High Throughput Satellites (HTS) that stated there are currently
31 satellites in orbit around the globe that carry high throughput
capability, and by the end of 2016, according to the report, 33
more satellites with this capability will be coming into the mar-
ketplace. This is equal to approximately 450 traditional satellites,
a good portion of which will be prominent in Latin America.
This is an exciting time for Latin America, agreed Javier Re-
cio, VP of sales and marketing, Eutelsat Americas. Were bring-
ing new satellites and capacity to the markets through satellites
themselves, frequency reuse
and Ka-band.
But according to Russell
Ribeiro, regional vice presi-
dent, Latin America, Gilat
Satellite Networks, these new
technologies will also impact
the companies value chain.
The new value chain, Ribeiro
said, will come with the need
to provide new full solutions
and lower price levels to the
market. In the last 10 years, the Latin American market has
been trying to customize solutions for its customers. But with
the new value chain of HTS, Gilat expects a sharp drop in the
prices of capacity, which will instead bring new standard solu-
tions to the market.
We are now living in the beginnings of a new era, Ribeiro
said. In the last few years, the value chain didnt change too
much, but its about to change now and of course, together
with this, we will have to be prepared for a new market.
In this new value chain, customers are beginning to tell ser-
vice providers and manufacturers exactly what they need. How-
ever, in some cases, this can be challenging.
Were getting pressure from our end users, our customers,
as well, said Sergio Murillo, director general, Red 52. They
have perhaps a similar budget, but they want more sites, they
want more bandwidth, they want more services. Were see-
ing a lot of turnkey type projects a lot of governments and
companies we work with dont have capex budgets, so we
have to work through opex, which puts more pressure on us,
hence more pressure on them.
We are always pressured by customers to reduce price, Ri-
beiro added. Which is not bad, but we also look to provide a full
solution, more value to the customer, but at the end of the day,
we feel pressure to reduce the price even more.
Carmen Gonzalez-Sanfeliu, regional vice president of Latin
America and Caribbean sales, Intelsat said that this increase
in capacity demand is one of the reasons HTS are such a hot
topic in the market. However, the definition behind these satel-
lites is not simply black and white.
High Throughput Satellites cover an incredible gamma, said
Gonzalez-Sanfeliu. They are classified in three areas: the broad-
band area, B2B and residential so, clearly, what were doing is
positioning ourselves in these markets most of us are going
to be in the B2B market where we see a tremendous amount of
growth. Whats interesting is how the satellites now are really
being designed first with the applications.
According to Gonzalez-Sanfeliu, the thirst for bandwidth
is incredible, which is why HTS is becoming more promi-
nent in regions like Latin America. HTS platforms would
help improve markets such as: broadband; retention; track-
ing and telemedicine.
Murillo agreed that telemedicine is one of the regions top
markets, along with government and social services. Were
Latin America Emerges as
Major Satellite Market
BY KATIE KRIZ
David Hartshorn, GVF; Hugo Frega, EchoStar Company; Jos Antonio Gonzalez,
Star One; Carmen Gonzalez-Sanfeliu, Intelsat; Russell Ribeiro, Gilat Satellite Net-
works during the Latin America-dedicated session at SATELLITE 2014.
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seeing some interesting new technologies, new equipment [in
telemedicine], he said. Theres not a lot of huge numbers right
now, but were just starting to see big dots. Maritime is also
growing, but, by definition, its a limited field.
Murillo expanded on how maritime is a market where the
platforms are constantly moving, never staying in one place for
very long. Since maritime is limited to ships at sea, he explained,
telemedicine and government are larger in the region. However,
in order to expand these markets, operators continually have to
look for new opportunities.
There will be some competition between HTS and tradi-
tional satellites, said Ricardo Pellicciari, senior sales direc-
tor at SES. But HTS will open up new markets in the area. A
large amount of underserved or even unserved
regions will have service through new products
that dont exist today.
Although Ka-band and HTS are both be-
coming much more prominent in the region,
this does not mean the end of C- and Ku-band
applications. According to Recio, the integra-
tion of Ka-band to the region will follow the
same pattern that was set forth when Ku-band
was introduced.
C- and Ku-band will not be less relevant,
said Recio. We didnt have Ku 15 years ago,
and the fact that we were struggling was the first sign to
have Ku-band. Now that its penetrated the market, we use
it. The same thing will happen with Ka-band, we just have
to give it time for the equipment to catch up. Its a matter of
volume and time. VS
Javier Recio, Eutelsat Americas; Ricardo Pellicciari, SES; Sergio
Murillo, Red 52; Ignacio Sanchs, Hispasat, part of the Latin Ameri-
ca-dedicated panel at SATELLITE 2014.
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As the satellite industry prepares for WRC-15 in Geneva in
November 2015, industry and regulatory leaders gathered at
SATELLITE 2014 to examine how far the satellite industry
has come to bring a united voice to the issue of spectrum
sharing. The topic continues to be a hot issue for the industry,
as noted by the lengthy discussion at the Opening General
Session by the Big Four FSS operators on Tuesday, who
observed that this issue isnt just a C-band concern that
the hunger for spectrum by wireless broadband providers
could easily spill over into other bands such as Ku and Ka.
The interest in this topic also was evident by the sizeable
turnout for the afternoon panel on WRC-15. Moderator
Cecily Holiday, foreign affairs officer, U.S. Department of
State, cut to the chase, noting that the question of WRC-15
on frequency access to accommodate wireless broadband
mobile traffic will not be resolved next year, but will feed
into the agenda for WRC-18.
The panels sole ITU representative, Yvon Henri, chief of
the space services department of ITUs Radiocommunication
Bureau, said that the satellite sector has until the end of
July or early August to provide input on the report for the
conference since preparation of the report begins more than
a year out.
Wireless broadband providers have come out aggressively
lobbying for the opportunity to spend billions to buy C-band
spectrum, which satellite companies have shown repeatedly
cause interference with Fixed Satellite Services (FSS).
Many panelists are alarmed by how the models used by the
wireless sector are based on maximum peak demand, which
is disconnected from what you would need going forward,
stated Ethan Levan, Eutelsats director of in-orbit resources.
This model assumes, for instance, that high mobility, high-
speed data services would need to support as many as 50,000
users in some places who would be traveling 50 kilometers
an hour at a time.
Satellite industry studies examined the premise of such
a model, including looking at transportation infrastructure,
and found those numbers were grossly exaggerated.
An analogy is trying to design highways
capable of taking a large flush of people to a
huge sporting event and have those highways
available all the time, Levan said.
Satellite providers are no strangers to
battling the wireless terrestrial industry. In
2007, mobile providers first sought a global
identification for C-band.
One thing thats changed from 2007
to today is the proliferation of wireless,
said Phillip Spector, counsel with Milbank,
Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, who noted that at
the time iPhones werent yet invented, but
now wireless ubiquity is evident everywhere.
Panelists representing the satellite companies all agree that
their industry is much better prepared this time around.
Weve a good job of mobilizing customers and challenging
the demand for spectrum [made by the wireless broadband
industry], said Spector.
Additionally, national industry associations werent
involved in 2007 but are very active this time, said David
Hartshorn, secretary general, Global VSAT Forum (GVF).
The Satellite Industry Association (SIA) has also embraced
this issue, as well as industry associations in Brazil,
Indonesia, Mexico and Turkey, he added.
Involving End Users
Gonzalo de Dios, associate general counsel for Intelsat,
explained that one of the big changes from 2007 was the
involvement of real users who use the satellite spectrum
on a daily basis. Theyre pressing the satellite industrys
Industry Galvanizes Around Issue of
Spectrum Sharing Heading toward WRC-15
BY ANNE WAINSCOTT-SARGENT
Yvon Henri, ITU Radiocommunication Bureau; Phillip Spector, Milbank, Tweed,
Hadley & McCloy; Gonzalo de Dios, Intelsat; Gerry Oberst, SES; Ethan Lavan,
Eutelsat; David Hartshorn, GVF; and Alexander Roytblat, FCC, revisiting the role
of satellite in preparation for WRC-15.
Photo courtesy of Kenny Bordelon
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PAGE 17
case directly with government and regulatory leaders in
their countries.
Users make the best cases since theyve seen interference
first hand. Thats because back in 2007, the ITU compromised
on the satellite-wireless argument, letting countries opt
in if they wanted to deploy in C-band, said de Dios. Some
80 countries signed that provision, and GVF began to hear
reports of interference in places like Tunisia, Hartshorn
reported. Tunisias broadband
license top-use C-band was
pulled when no technical solution
was possible. The same situation
occurred as recently as a year ago
in Bangladesh, he added.
Back in 2007, WiMAX,
commonly known as last-mile
wireless broadband access, was
the key technology providers
wanted to use on C-band. It has
since lost ground to fiber, small
cells and other technologies.
Another key difference, panelists
said, was that the issue now
concerns both the uplink and
downlink, whereas in 2007 it was
only about the downlink.
Telling Satellites
Story Better
A key job facing the satellite
industry is doing a better job
of telling the story of C-band to
the world. Gerry Oberst, senior
VP of global regulatory and
governmental strategy at SES,
expressed frustration at how
little the industry has been able to
communicate the coolness factor
of satellite and C-band externally.
My company provides 6,000
broadcast channels around the
world many on C-band
because broadcasters demand
reliability, said Oberst, noting
that BBC provides C-band
services across Africa.
C-band proved critical for
emergency services following Typhoon Haiyan that struck
the Philippines in November 2013. The UN High Commission
for Refugees remains a dedicated user of the spectrum.
Another message that satellite industry needs to tell is
the fact that industry isnt opposed to partnering when it is
technologically feasible and that the industry is committed to
innovation finding ways to make efficiency improvements
and to innovate within existing bands. VS
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Panelists at the CFO Roundtable: The Burden of Success were
confident that despite benefiting from lower interest rates and
an increase in lending options, the satellite industry should not
be concerned about an impending market bubble. The current
low interest rate environment was praised as a good thing for
many companies and also as something they have benefited from
with few negative repercussions. Panelists responded favorably,
as well, to the significant role satellite is playing for the Export-
Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im), Compagnie Franaise
dAssurance pour le Commerce Extrieur (COFACE) and to new
export financing options such as the Export Insurance Agency
of Russia (EXIAR). However, they warned that favorable cash
options do not always lead directly to new investments.
Overall, the low interest rate environment has ben a good
thing for a number of companies, said Michael McDonnell,
CFO of Intelsat. One region seeing effects is Africa.
McDonnell sees Intelsat as optimistic toward the African
market in the long run, but wants to see a clearing up of sup-
ply and demand issues that previously stalled out new invest-
ments on the continent. Five years ago there were a number
of investments made by both satellite and terrestrial providers,
drastically changing the market dynamics in the region. Surging
fiber networks, the transition away from point-to-point and the
introduction of a large amount of capacity in a short period of
time made it difficult for satellite operators to turn a profit from
new services.
The stars all aligned in a somewhat negative way, said
McDonnell. Pricing was opportunistic and I would say un-
disciplined [but] that region will absorb what today is
excess capacity.
Padraig McCarthy, CFO of SES, said that SES preferred not
to allocate a large amount of new capital, but rather to focus on
filling existing resources. By taking this approach, the company
was able to address needs as they arose, rather than trying to
anticipate them.
Eutelsat CFO Antione Castarde pointed out that many of the
investments that led to the oversupply were focused primarily
on data. This is perhaps what led SES to have more success in
acquiring broadcasting opportunities.
[Africa is] not an area where we have made a lot of invest-
ments, said McCarthy. We have, in the last few years, ad-
dressed specifically DTH, and have been quite pleased with the
fill-rates of these satellites.
According to McCarthy, Africa has been weighted more to-
ward network services, whereas America leans toward media.
Thomas Fitzpatrick, CFO of Iridium Telecommunications, high-
lighted Brazil as a top market for satellite M2M services, but the
majority of panelists agreed that broadcast opportunities are the
most prevalent. Stating that in some regions the penetration of
HD is less than 5 percent, McCarthy pointed to investments in
the Latin American region as valuable long-term commitments.
When you are addressing video and you are building neigh-
borhoods, there is a lot of stickiness to that, he said. As you
build up new markets, its building a lot of value for the future,
irrespective of supply and demand.
Shifting to investment opportunities in mobile services,
Investment Opportunities Abound but No
Market Bubble on the Horizon for Satellite
BY CALEB HENRY
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PAGE 19
panelists were hesitant to say that the opportunities were as
fast as the vehicles they connect. The cost of retrofitting a
plane was described as not insignificant, and the overall ex-
pectation was that satellite-based mobile services would be
implemented gradually. The demand, based on the extensive
growth of IP services, is expected to stem from early adopter
airlines, which will put pressure on other airlines to provide
the same level of connectivity.
Grant Barber, EVP and CFO of Hughes, called out some tech-
nical obstacles that remain. Hughes does ground infrastructure
work for Row 44 and Global Eagle and is involved in address-
ing some of the hurdles facing in-flight connectivity. He warned
that focusing on investments in capacity over investment in ef-
ficiency might not be the right way to proceed.
Today, the issue we have is congestion: people are all dialing
in at the same time, he said. Better data on how they access
those will allow us to do more than just throw more bandwidth
at them.
Over-the-top (OTT) content was pointed to as a way for satel-
lite to play a strong role in content delivery. Notably, McCarthy is
confident that OTT and Ultra-HD will become key pathways for
satellite to grab a larger stake in the evolving digital landscape.
We see OTT as an opportunity and something that is compat-
ible with video OTT becomes very integral when you break
down the barrier between the digital IP world and the DVD, he
said. Bandwidth is not for free. As you get into the world of HD
and Ultra-HD, I think there is a very nice fit between satellite
and OTT and hybrid terrestrial devices.
Other investment triggers discussed include the launch flexi-
bility introduced by all-electric satellites, which are smaller than
their hybrid or non-electric counterparts. Panelists weighed the
pros and cons, noting that while electric propulsion has the im-
mediate benefits of lower launch costs, the reduced thrust can
add up costs over the lifetime of the satellite.
When you have a large fleet, from time to time you think of
moving satellites around, said McDonnell. You can do it with
electric propulsion, its just going to take a lot longer. Speed is
something you have to include in the overall mix.
We estimate that what would normally take a six-day mis-
sion becomes a six-month mission [with electric propulsion],
added McCarthy.
Government investment opportunities also remain an inter-
est as companies wait to see if changes promoted by the Na-
tional Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2014 will lead to
a lengthening of DoD buying cycles. McDonnell described his
state as cautiously optimistic that legislative changes will lead
to stability in the government market.
Weve worked very hard to convince the government that the
key to minimize cost is to contract on the long term, he said.
We are becoming more hopeful that because of sequestration
they will begin to contract for a longer period of time and will
allow companies to invest in that direction. VS

Bandwidth is not for free. As


you get into the world of HD
and Ultra-HD, I think there
is a very nice fit between
satellite and OTT and hybrid
terrestrial devices.
- Padraig McCarthy, CFO, SES
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While the United States lags behind in the global commercial
drone boom, experts on the UAVs and Commercial Communi-
cations Satellites panel were more than ever focused on mili-
tary and civil Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) use. When asked
if the U.S. commercial development lag was not only caused
by slow legislation, but also a technology stall, Rick Lober, vice
president and general manager of defense and intelligence sys-
tems at Hughes Network Systems, was quick to disagree.
I think the technical will be solved, its probably the regu-
lation [were waiting on], he said. Stuart Daughtridge, VP of
advanced technology and business development at Integral
Systems Kratos Company, however, said not only technology,
but also culture and regulation mean the lag will continue for
some time. I think youll see driverless cars before you see
the FAA allow UAVs in commercial airspace, he said.
Meanwhile, military demand soars. Sensor and backhaul
demand are on the rise as UAV capabilities have grown from
covering only one kilometer on the battlefield, to covering
several 10- to 12-kilometer areas simul-
taneously, requiring 2.2 megapixels per
spot and bandwidth of 4 to 8 megabits
per second per coverage area, accord-
ing to ViaSats Vice President and Chief
Strategy Officer Howard Pace.
When asked if these military advances
will lead to potential commercial applica-
tions, Pace said future developments will
be determined by the customer. Every-
one on this panel will say that demand
will continue to exponentially increase
we have the highest throughput satel-
lite holders in the world, that has great
promise but at the same time we are out
to meet the customers demand and what-
ever the customers demand is what were
going to do to our network, he added.
Daughtridge cited developments that
are happening currently, however, de-
scribing test drones operating in Sac-
ramento, Calif., that fly at supersonic
speeds, perform turns at 12 Gs, cost be-
tween $500,000 and $1 million per piece,
and can be reused.
Thats what youre going to see; UAVs that are going to oper-
ate in conflicted airspace. We now assume youre going to see
UAVs that operate in non-conflicted airspace. Thats going to cre-
ate a lot of problems: frequency hopping, signal spreading, they
dont fit well into the current FSS [Fixed Satellite Service]. Its
very expensive to do the frequency hopping, said Daughtridge.
In order to make such future UAVs possible for commercial
and military use, Daughtridge said Kratos is developing low-
cost ways to use bandwidth efficiently to enable communica-
tions needed for supersonic UAVs and other future UAS tech.
If youre going to have UAVs operating in commercial air-
space, youve got to figure the FAA is not thrilled if you cant
keep positive link control to that UAV, said Daughtridge. Its
going to be a key area not only to the military but to the whole
market going forward.
Kenneth Turner, deputy director of the Department of De-
fense Chief Information Office, sided with Pace, and claimed
that emerging technologies and satellites start off slowly and
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Regulation Issues Hinder UAV Progress
BY CHELSEA BRYAN
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operate by meeting challenges as they come rather than an-
ticipating them. Between the government and industry, you
tackle the problem, address the problem, solve the problem.
I think, not pre-defining what the commercial market is
for UAVs, whether its delivery systems or something else that
people are looking at, that is actually determined by what you
are trying to do, he said.
While the slow regulatory pace of the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration (FAA) to regulate commercial UAV use stalls U.S.
development, Turner took a tone of patience. The regulations,
the framework will grow with whatever comes along, [ensuring
its] safe, secure, affordable. One company, like Kratos, how-
ever, is eager for development and not content to wait.
Northrop Grummans Enterprise Director of Business and
Strategy Development John VanBrabant is also eager to for
regulations to move forward. Im waiting to slap on a spec-
tral sensor and start flying wheat fields in the United States.,
said VanBrabant. He doesnt feel there are so many barriers to
going into commercial airspace. Operating UAVs in the civil
airspace, if you ask me its easy, but its really an issue of fly-
ing unmanned aircraft theyre among manned aircraft with
passengers. Ours spiral up to above commercial or military
airplanes, thats part of the way we view it is that we can stay
out of harms way, but you have to come down through that
controlled airspace, said VanBrabant.
Away from commercial demand, Turner said new military
UAV capability needs and shifting world conflicts will drive
future needs. We have to go other places not as concentrated,
more dispersed, he said, adding that budgets are also mean-
while decreasing. Pace agreed, and said unserved demand is
everywhere from the need for affordable bandwidth to line
of sight. Unserved demand is in the eye of the beholder, if
youre that platoon soldier and you dont have beyond line
of sight capability and it limits you tactically, you would say
thats a real problem, he added.
The Satellite Perspective
Rick Lober, vice president and general manager of defense
and intelligence systems at Hughes Network Systems, said the
companys first priority is protecting the link communications
needed to navigate all the frequencies UAVs will use in mixed,
commercial and civil airspace. We take certification very seri-
ously the safety of flight issue as we go into civil airspaces,
protected communications as we go into an air-to-ground mar-
ket, those are the challenges we can see, said Lober.
Lober added that many of the currently operating UAVs work
on bandwidth efficiency two generations behind, and employ
old coding techniques. We see a lot of opportunity for improve-
ment, whether managed FCPC [Flight Control Primary Comput-
er], something besides just locking up bandwidth 24/7, even go-
ing toward managed networks. Weve talked to customers about
letting industry manage it. Interface we see as a key, he said.
Eutelsat Americas CEO David Bair said the withdrawal from
Afghanistan means changes, and he anticipates an increase in
multi-spectral needs. It does drive demand and drive some
changes, youre not necessarily flying over the same area
troops on the grounds use these things even more tactically then
they do strategically, said Bair. VS
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Arianespace signed 18 new launch contracts in 2013 worth nearly $2 bn making it an exceptional year
for new orders. Our record backlog of orders totaling over $6 bn equals more than three years of launches
including 20 Ariane 5, 9 Soyuz and 6 Vega launches.
The constant pursuit of greater lift and volume continues as Arianespace adapts its family of launchers to
changing market requirements. Improvements include increasing the Ariane 5s payload volume without
penalizing performance and providing more flexibility to satellite operators and manufacturers designing
the next generation of communications satellites. We are also driving to reduce the time between launch
campaigns seeking greater efficiencies and constructing a new filling hall for Soyuz to streamline operations.
Ariane 5 has now logged an impressive 11 years of uninterrupted success with 58 consecutive successful
flights -- a track record unmatched in the commercial market. All told, our workhorse launcher has flawlessly
delivered 117 spacecraft to orbit for 46 customers including 12 maiden flights for fledgling operators.
Because we focus on doing one thing right, satellite operators the world over choose to Launch Smart.
Launch Smart
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